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Woods improves in final round at Masters, welcomes break

By Mark Long, Associated Press AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — Tiger Woods nearly aced a hole and made his lone eagle of the week. The four-time Masters champion somewhat returned to form at Augusta National. It was just a few days too late to be more than an afterthought at golf's first major. .@TigerWoods records his first eagle of the Tournament on No. 15 in the final round of #themasters. pic.twitter.com/ykAqxyNo7F — Masters Tournament (@TheMasters) April 8, 2018 Woods closed with a flurry, recording a 3-under 69 in the final round at the Masters. He finished 1 over for the tournament and left the hallowed grounds feeling a little better about his game. Woods last played the event in 2015. He returned the last two years for the champions' dinner, but didn't get on the course. The hiatus left him feeling nostalgic during his walk to the 18th green. "This is one of the greatest walks in all of golf," Woods said afterward. "And I had missed it for the last couple of years. I hadn't been able to play in it, so now I'm glad I'm competing in this tournament. And to face the challenges out there, I missed it. I really did. I missed playing out here. I missed competing against these guys. Such a great event. Best (event) in all of our sport." Woods started the weekend more than a dozen shots out of the lead and knew he would need something special to happen to get back in contention. It never happened. Never even came close, either. But there were some glimpses Sunday in his traditional red shirt. Woods had two birdies and an eagle on the back and looked like he would get to even par for the event. He lamented his iron play for the fourth straight day and loathed two three-putts, including one for bogey on No. 18. "Another loose day with the irons," he said. "And I putted awful. It was possibly the highest score I could have shot today. All in all, a bittersweet ending." He still drew one of the round's largest galleries, giving spectators a reason to get to the course long before the leaders arrived at the practice range. They simply wanted to catch a glimpse of one of golf's greatest players. Woods is assured of moving back into the top 100 in the world, notable only because he was at No. 1,199 just over four months ago when he returned from yet another long layoff following a fourth back surgery. "I think things are progressing," he said. "It was a little bit disappointing I didn't hit my irons as well as I needed to for this particular week. You miss it just a touch here it gets magnified. And I just didn't do a good enough job this week in that regard. But overall I'm five or six tournaments into it, to be able to compete out here and to score like I did, it feels good." Woods plans to take some time off in April, maybe even putting the clubs in the closet for a few weeks to "kind of get away for a while." "The run up to this event is pretty hard and pretty grueling," said Woods, who finished 12th, tied for second and tied for fifth in three tournaments on the Florida Swing. "I pushed myself pretty hard to get ready. And I peaked at it four times over the course of my career, and it's tiring." He can take some solace in making six birdies or better in the final round — nearly as many as he made in the first three rounds combined. The best one came early Sunday. Woods nearly aced the 240-yard, par-3 fourth. His tee shot landed a few feet short of the flag, bounced a couple of times and then skirted by the left edge of the hole. He was left with a left-to-right-breaking 10-footer that he dropped in the left side of the cup. His eagle putt at the par-5 15th was even better. He drained a sweeping 30-footer after reaching the green in two. Those shots provided a brief snippet of what might have been at Augusta National had Woods had better control with his irons. Woods missed greens right and left, never really getting approach shots in the precise spots on treacherous greens. His errant ways left him starting a lot sooner than expected Sunday and finishing shortly after the leaders teed off. "My swing is slightly off," he said. "I was pleased with the way I was able to drive it, but I just could not convert with my irons. I struggled with obviously controlling the shape. Can't control the shape. Can't control the distance. And it was one of those weeks in that regard.".....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnApr 9th, 2018

Woods improves in final round at Masters, welcomes break

By Mark Long, Associated Press AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — Tiger Woods nearly aced a hole and made his lone eagle of the week. The four-time Masters champion somewhat returned to form at Augusta National. It was just a few days too late to be more than an afterthought at golf's first major. .@TigerWoods records his first eagle of the Tournament on No. 15 in the final round of #themasters. pic.twitter.com/ykAqxyNo7F — Masters Tournament (@TheMasters) April 8, 2018 Woods closed with a flurry, recording a 3-under 69 in the final round at the Masters. He finished 1 over for the tournament and left the hallowed grounds feeling a little better about his game. Woods last played the event in 2015. He returned the last two years for the champions' dinner, but didn't get on the course. The hiatus left him feeling nostalgic during his walk to the 18th green. "This is one of the greatest walks in all of golf," Woods said afterward. "And I had missed it for the last couple of years. I hadn't been able to play in it, so now I'm glad I'm competing in this tournament. And to face the challenges out there, I missed it. I really did. I missed playing out here. I missed competing against these guys. Such a great event. Best (event) in all of our sport." Woods started the weekend more than a dozen shots out of the lead and knew he would need something special to happen to get back in contention. It never happened. Never even came close, either. But there were some glimpses Sunday in his traditional red shirt. Woods had two birdies and an eagle on the back and looked like he would get to even par for the event. He lamented his iron play for the fourth straight day and loathed two three-putts, including one for bogey on No. 18. "Another loose day with the irons," he said. "And I putted awful. It was possibly the highest score I could have shot today. All in all, a bittersweet ending." He still drew one of the round's largest galleries, giving spectators a reason to get to the course long before the leaders arrived at the practice range. They simply wanted to catch a glimpse of one of golf's greatest players. Woods is assured of moving back into the top 100 in the world, notable only because he was at No. 1,199 just over four months ago when he returned from yet another long layoff following a fourth back surgery. "I think things are progressing," he said. "It was a little bit disappointing I didn't hit my irons as well as I needed to for this particular week. You miss it just a touch here it gets magnified. And I just didn't do a good enough job this week in that regard. But overall I'm five or six tournaments into it, to be able to compete out here and to score like I did, it feels good." Woods plans to take some time off in April, maybe even putting the clubs in the closet for a few weeks to "kind of get away for a while." "The run up to this event is pretty hard and pretty grueling," said Woods, who finished 12th, tied for second and tied for fifth in three tournaments on the Florida Swing. "I pushed myself pretty hard to get ready. And I peaked at it four times over the course of my career, and it's tiring." He can take some solace in making six birdies or better in the final round — nearly as many as he made in the first three rounds combined. The best one came early Sunday. Woods nearly aced the 240-yard, par-3 fourth. His tee shot landed a few feet short of the flag, bounced a couple of times and then skirted by the left edge of the hole. He was left with a left-to-right-breaking 10-footer that he dropped in the left side of the cup. His eagle putt at the par-5 15th was even better. He drained a sweeping 30-footer after reaching the green in two. Those shots provided a brief snippet of what might have been at Augusta National had Woods had better control with his irons. Woods missed greens right and left, never really getting approach shots in the precise spots on treacherous greens. His errant ways left him starting a lot sooner than expected Sunday and finishing shortly after the leaders teed off. "My swing is slightly off," he said. "I was pleased with the way I was able to drive it, but I just could not convert with my irons. I struggled with obviously controlling the shape. Can't control the shape. Can't control the distance. And it was one of those weeks in that regard.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 9th, 2018

Woodland sets PGA record but leads by only a stroke at PGA

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press ST. LOUIS (AP) — Sirens blared across Bellerive, putting the second round of the PGA Championship on hold and ending a day of scoring rarely seen in a major. Gary Woodland set the 36-hole record — for now, anyway — after a round where his driver wasn't as reliable, he didn't see many putts drop and he didn't hit the ball quite as well as the day before. "I can live with that," he said Friday after a 4-under 66. That put him at 10-under 130, breaking by one the PGA Championship record and tying the 36-hole score for all majors. And it was only good for a one-shot lead over Kevin Kisner. There were two rounds of 63, one 64 and six 65s. And that was only half of the 156-man field. Still to be determined was whether Woodland's score even holds up as the lead. Storms arrived forcing a two-hour suspension, and the PGA of America declared the rest of the day a wash when rain pounded the course. Rickie Fowler had just birdied the 10th hole and was at 7 under. Tiger Woods had three birdies through seven holes as he tried to get in range. "I felt I was headed in the right direction," said Woods, who was at 3 under. "Tomorrow is going to be a long day for a lot of us." The second round was to resume at 7 a.m. local time. The greens would be slightly smoother, the course slightly longer, the approach unchanged — see flag, aim at flag. Perhaps it was easy for Woodland not to be overly impressed. He was playing with Kisner, who shot 29 on the back nine and was in the middle of the ninth fairway — his final hole — needing a birdie to become the first player to shoot 62 in the PGA Championship. He came up short of the green, chipped too strong and made bogey for a 64, leaving him one shot out of the lead Friday. Right in front of them was U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka, who had a 20-foot birdie putt he wanted to make for no other reason than he likes to make birdies. This one missed, and only later did Koepka realize it was for 62. Instead, he was the 15th player to shoot 63 in the PGA Championship. "My caddie said something walking off," Koepka said. "I didn't even think of it. I've been so in the zone, you don't know where you are." And then Charl Schwartzel made it 16 players with his eight-birdie round of 63. No one from the afternoon draw completed more than 12 holes. The plan was to finish the second round, make the cut and then immediately start the third round in threesomes off both tees. "I feel like we're in a good spot," Fowler said. "But the nice thing about the delay and going back out tomorrow morning, we'll get fresh greens." Bellerive really had no defense. Woodland and Kisner played in the same group, and they offered a great example that Bellerive is accommodating to just about any game. Woodland is among the most powerful players in golf. Kisner is not. He relies more on a clean hit with his irons and a great short game. The course is so soft — not so much from Tuesday's rain, but the extreme heat that requires more water on the turf — that every flag is accessible provided players find the ample fairways. "Greens are receptive, so my 4-iron stops as quick as his 7-iron," Kisner said. "If they were firm, I don't think I would have a chance with the way the greens are situated and the places they're putting the flags. But being receptive, that's my only hope." Woodland's 36-hole score broke the PGA record by one shot, most recently set by Jimmy Walker and Robert Streb at Baltusrol. It also tied the 36-hole record for all majors, matching Jordan Spieth at the 2015 Masters, Martin Kaymer at the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 and Brandt Snedeker (Royal Lytham & St. Annes in 2012) and Nick Faldo (Muirfield in 1992) at the British Open. Koepka was at 8-under 132, two shots behind. Dustin Johnson, the world's No. 1 player, had a 66 and joined Schwartzel and Thomas Pieters (66) at 133. Spieth still has hope in his second try at a career Grand Slam. Spieth didn't get under par for the tournament until his seventh hole Friday — the par-3 16th hole — and he managed to do enough right for a 66 to get within seven shots of the lead. Spieth has battled with his game all year, and his confidence isn't at its peak. It's the nature of the course that makes him feel he has a farther climb than the seven shots that separate him from Woodland. "A little frustrated at this place in general," Spieth said. "This course would be phenomenal — and probably is phenomenal — if it's not playing soft. You get away with more. You don't have to be as precise. ... Personally, I would prefer more difficult and firmer, faster conditions on the greens. Having said that, I would have shot a much higher score yesterday." Defending champion Justin Thomas was at 2 under through seven holes, while Rory McIlroy was frustrated with all pars in his seven holes. On a day like this, that meant losing ground. "It's been 16 pars in a row from yesterday to today, so hopefully I can break that run in the morning," McIlroy said. Midway through the afternoon round, the cut was projected to be even par. Woodland, even with the lowest 36-hole score in 60 years of stroke play at the PGA Championship, still had a long way to go. In conditions like Bellerive, no lead was safe. "I feel safe because I feel safe where my game is," Woodland said. "I'm not too worried with what anyone else is doing out there.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

Nicklaus cautions from experience against a Masters letdown

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press Tiger Woods built his comeback around the Masters, as was the case even in healthier years. He took a step back at Augusta National, not breaking par until the final round and finishing 16 shots behind Patrick Reed, the most he has trailed the Masters winner. Woods wasn't alone in his disappointment. Jordan Spieth geared his early part of the year toward being ready for the Masters, the major he says he most wants to win. He had a two-shot lead after the first round, and rounds of 74-71 meant even that closing 64 wasn't enough. Phil Mickelson took himself out of the hunt with a 79 in the second round. Jack Nicklaus can understand how they feel, and his message for anyone who puts so much emphasis on a green jacket is that the show goes on. "I had to learn that there were other tournaments in the country after Augusta," Nicklaus said at the Masters after hitting the ceremonial first tee shot. "I played Augusta a lot of times and lost. I won in '63, '65 and '66, and I just expected to win every year. I thought I would just continue to do that." Nicklaus missed the cut in 1967. He says that started a three-year trend in which it took him longer than it should have to get over not winning the Masters. "That was a humbling experience to miss the cut after you've won it twice in a row," he said. "But then the next couple of years, I think that it probably destroyed the rest of my year. Because I was so disappointed at not winning at Augusta that I had a downer most of the year." There's some truth to that. He didn't go more than two tournaments before winning again after the 1963, 1964 and 1965 Masters. After he repeated at Augusta in 1966, he ran off five consecutive top fives before winning the British Open at Muirfield to complete the career Grand Slam. But after missing the cut in 1967, he went five tournaments without winning and had one stretch of 10 straight rounds in which he failed to break 70. The following year when he tied for fifth at the Masters, Nicklaus didn't win again until the Western Open the first weekend in August. And after a tie for 23rd in the 1969 Masters, he didn't win again until the Sahara Invitational in October. "I put such a buildup to this tournament and the importance of winning that first major that it was to my detriment more times than a positive," he said. Nicklaus figured it out. Over the next four years, he never went more than three events after the Masters before winning again. Twice, in 1971 and 1973, he won in his next start after failing to win the Masters. CURTIS CUP Four years after Lucy Li qualified for the U.S. Women's Open at age 11, the Californian is headed to her first Curtis Cup. Li was among eight women selected for the June 8-10 matches against amateurs from Britain and Ireland at Quaker Ridge in New York. Li is the first 15-year-old to make the American team since Lexi Thompson in 2010. The other Americans selected for the team are UCLA star Lilia Vu, Andrea Lee, Jennifer Kupcho, Kristen Gillman, U.S. Women's Amateur champion Sophia Schubert, Lauren Stephenson and Mariel Galdiano. Lee and Galdiano played in the most recent Curtis Cup, which Britain & Ireland won in Ireland. AS THE WORLD TURNS For the second time since the World Golf Championships began in 1999, the PGA Tour is converting one of its regular tournaments into one of the four WGCs with a big purse ($10 million this year) and a limited field with no cut. Doral had been longest-running PGA Tour event on the Florida Swing until it morphed into the WGC-CA Championship in 2007. Now it's happening in Memphis, Tennessee. Bridgestone chose not to renew its increasingly expensive title sponsorship of the WGC at Firestone, which had hosted an elite event since 1976. Starting next year, the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational will move to the TPC Southwind in Memphis. That will assure the strongest field for Memphis, which dates to 1958. But much like Doral in 2007, it becomes off-limits to PGA Tour regulars. Based on this week's world ranking, only 16 players in the field for the St. Jude Classic last year would be eligible at a World Golf Championship. BALANCE AT THE TOP Each generation believes it had stronger and deeper competition, though there at least appears to be more balance. Perhaps one way to measure that is through Tiger Woods. When he won the 2008 U.S. Open for his 14th major, only seven other players in the top 20 in the world ranking had combined for 13 majors. Phil Mickelson (No. 2), Ernie Els (No. 5) and Vijay Singh (No. 9), each had three majors. Geoff Ogilvy (No. 4), Jim Furyk (No. 10), Padraig Harrington (No. 13) and Trevor Immelman (No. 15) each had one. Just like then, four of the top five in the world have won majors (all but 23-year-old Jon Rahm). However, 12 of the top 20 in the world from this week's rankings have won majors. The top 20 includes Mickelson (now with five majors), Rory McIlroy (four majors), Jordan Spieth (three majors) and Bubba Watson (two majors). Eight other players have won at least one major. It's certainly younger at the top. Woods was 32 when he won his last major, and only three players from the top 10 were in their 20s — Scott, Sergio Garcia and Justin Rose. This week, seven of the top 10 in the world are in their 20s. MANAGEMENT MOVES Jordan Spieth's manager has come full circle and is returning to IMG, and Jay Danzi is bringing his top client with him. Danzi has become a partner with California-based William Morris Endeavor, which owns IMG. Included in the move is Jordan Lewites, who was handling much of Spieth's day-to-day operations, and Laura Moses, who heads up Spieth's foundation. Spieth will be represented by WME and IMG. "Jordan is a world-class talent, and we're excited to welcome him to the family," said Patrick Whitesell, executive chairman of Endeavor. "When you look at what he and Jay have already accomplished and consider WME and IMG's ability to amplify Jordan's reach across entertainment and sports, the possibilities are endless." Danzi previously worked for IMG as global head of recruiting for its golf business. He left the Cleveland-based agency for Wasserman, and then started his own company (Forefront Sports Group) when he signed Spieth. The centerpiece of getting Spieth was a bold endorsement with Under Armour. Lagardere bought Forefront in 2013. Along with managing the three-time major champion, Danzi was in charge of Lagardere's brand consulting, sales and golf consulting groups. He left Lagardere last month. DIVOTS Ted Potter Jr. tied for 16th in the RBC Heritage, notable because he had missed his last five cuts dating to his victory in the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am. ... Satoshi Kodaira was the first player without PGA Tour status to win a regular PGA Tour event since Arjun Atwal at the Wyndham Championship in 2010. ... Cameron Smith, a 24-year-old from Australia, tied for 32nd at Hilton Head last week and moved past Jack Nicklaus on the PGA Tour career money list. ... Bryson DeChambeau moved into the top 50 in the world ranking for the first time, at No. 48. ... With his tie for fifth in the Masters, Bubba Watson became the 16th player to surpass $40 million in career earnings on the PGA Tour. STAT OF THE WEEK Rickie Fowler has been in the top 10 on the leaderboard in 20 out of the 32 rounds he has played this season. FINAL WORD "I will probably not wear it every day. But it is special." — Satoshi Kodaira on the tartan jacket he received for winning at Harbour Town......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 18th, 2018

Tiger up to the task in a tough day at Innisbrook

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press PALM HARBOR, Fla. (AP) — Tiger Woods discovered how tough Innisbrook can be in a swirling wind, and he was up to the task. Trouble in the trees for Tiger. #QuickHits pic.twitter.com/SGVRs1t5oz — PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) March 8, 2018 Woods smacked his hands into an oak as he let loose of the club during a bold escape from the trees, came within inches of an ace on the next hole, and most importantly was among 27 players — just under 20 percent of the field — to break par Thursday in the Valspar Championship. The club twirl should have given it away. 🐅 Wow. #QuickHits pic.twitter.com/vuKjRfOcWi — PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) March 8, 2018 Canadian rookie Corey Conners, who got into the field as an alternate not long after he failed to get through Monday qualifying, didn't make a bogey until his final hole at No. 9 and shot a 4-under 67. That gave him a one-shot lead over Nick Watney, Whee Kim and Kelly Kraft. Only three other players, including former PGA champion Jimmy Walker broke 70. Woods made five birdies to counter his mistakes in his round of 70, the first time he broke par in the opening round of a PGA Tour event since his 64 in the Wyndham Championship in August 2015 — just six tour events ago because of back surgeries. This was his first time playing the Valspar Championship, and it got his attention. "I enjoy when par is a good score. It's a reward," Woods said. "There are some tournaments when about four holes you don't make a birdie, you feel like you're behind. Today, made a couple of birdies, all of a sudden puts me fourth, fifth, right away. That's how hard it is." It was like for everybody, especially Jordan Spieth and Rory McIlroy. Spieth, who won at Innisbrook in a playoff in 2015, didn't make a birdie after the par-5 opening hole and shot a 76. Only six other players had a higher score. Rory McIlroy, who like Woods was making his debut in this event, played in the morning and shot 74. Henrik Stenson, who played with Spieth and Woods, also shot 74. Morning or afternoon, it didn't matter. There was a chill in the Florida air, and the wind made it feel colder. Ultimately, the wind swirling through the tree-lined fairways made it tough to get the ball close. Innisbrook produced the highest average score for the opening round — 72.86 — of the 23 courses used this season. Conners managed just fine, taking advantage of a tournament he wasn't sure he would be playing. He went through Monday qualifying and shot 71, but moments after walking off the course, he was told he got in as an alternate. "Kind of had a mindset of trying to take advantage of a good break, I guess," he said. Watney holed a bunker shot on the par-4 16th, made the turn and had an eagle on the first hole. "Maybe I need to steal a few shots here and there and get some good things going," said Watney, winless since August 2012. Walker (69) and past Innisbrook champion Luke Donald (70) managed to go bogey-free, a rarity on a day like this. Also at 70 were Justin Rose, Masters champion Sergio Garcia, Adam Scott and Steve Stricker, who won last week on the PGA Tour Champions. Woods is playing his fourth PGA Tour event since returning from fusion surgery on his lower back, his fourth surgery since the spring of 2014. He has shown steady progress, and this might have been his most steady performance, even with four bogeys. Those were inevitable. One of the came at the par-3 fourth, when he was fooled by the wind and sent his tee shot sailing. It was next to a tree that Woods had to straddle just to advance toward the green. He also came up well short on the 12th into a strong wind. "Into the wind, it felt like you just hit walls," he said. Woods got within two shots of the lead by ripping a long iron from the top collar of a bunker on the par-5 11th and using the slope to chip close for a tap-in birdie. He dropped shots on the next two holes, going short into the wind on No. 12 and over the green with the wind at his back on No. 13. The only unnerving moment came at the 16th, when he tugged his iron off the tee into the trees. Woods realized he would hit the tree on his follow through, asking the gallery — thousands of them — to be careful in case the club snapped. He had to take it toward the lake on the right and bend it back to the left, and it came off perfectly. But it looked painful. Because he had to generate so much club speed, his left forearm and hands struck the oak and Woods dropped the club and winced on impact. "It didn't feel very good," he said. Woods followed with a 5-iron that rolled just right of the cup for a tap-in birdie and finished with a long two-putt par after getting fooled again by the shifting wind. "This is a tough golf course. Not too often in Florida do you find elevation. Great driving golf course," Woods said. "I asked Henrik, 'What do you around this golf course when there's no wind here?' He said it's still a hell of a test. We can all see that.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 9th, 2018

Zverev beats Djokovic in 2 sets to win ATP Finals title

By Sam Johnston, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — Despite beating Novak Djokovic in straight sets to win the ATP Finals at only 21, Alexander Zverev knows keeping pace with the Serb isn't going to be easy. Zverev claimed the biggest title of his career with a 6-4, 6-3 upset on Sunday, becoming the youngest champion of the season-ending event since Djokovic claimed the first of his five titles a decade ago — also at age 21. "Oh my God," said Zverev, who also became the first German winner since 1995. "I've won one (year-end title). He's won five. He's won, I don't know what, 148 titles more than me. Let's not go there for now. I hope I can do great ... but just chill out a little bit." Top-ranked Djokovic was attempting to tie Roger Federer's record of six titles but followed the same path as the Swiss great, who lost to Zverev in the semifinals at the O2 Arena. Djokovic's serve hadn't been broken all tournament until the final. Zverev did it once in the first set and three times in the second, completing the victory with a spectacular backhand winner up the line. "There's a lot of similarities in terms of trajectory ... in our careers," said Djokovic, who ended a two-year Grand Slam title drought by winning Wimbledon this year, before going on to claim his 14th major trophy at the U.S. Open. "Hopefully he (Zverev) can surpass me." Both players began the match in the same form that had seen them earn straight-sets semifinal victories a day earlier, with few points going against the server. It was Djokovic, who had lost just two of his previous 37 matches and defeated Zverev in the round robin, who began to feel the pressure as consecutive forehand errors gave up his first break of the tournament for 5-4. Fans gave Zverev a huge ovation as he stepped up to serve for the set, and it appeared to inspire him. Three straight aces brought up three set points, the second of which he took when Djokovic sent another forehand long. "I was making way too many unforced errors," Djokovic said. "From 4-4 in the first set, my game really fell apart." Zverev even began to win the longer rallies, an area of the game that Djokovic usually dominates. A 26-shot duel brought up another break point in the opening game of the second set and, although Djokovic saved it, Zverev won another lengthy exchange moments later with a forehand winner to go 1-0 up. With the biggest win of his career in sight, Zverev began to show some nerves. Although he is the only active male player outside of the Big Four of Djokovic, Federer, Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray to possess three or more Masters titles, the young German has only reached one Grand Slam quarterfinal. Two double faults and two backhand errors gifted Djokovic an immediate break back, but Zverev quickly refocused to win a 28-shot rally on his way to breaking in the following game. "I lost my serve once against him today," Zverev said. "I think this is a pretty good stat, especially as he's the best returner we have in the game." From there he remained solid on serve, before ending with a flourish. A backhand winner on the run drifted past the helpless Djokovic and Zverev sunk to the ground in tears. "This trophy means a lot, everything," Zverev said. "You only have so many chances of winning it. You play against the best players only." Djokovic sportingly crossed the net to embrace the player who will now be considered among the favorites in Australia in two months' time to end the Serb's run of two consecutive Grand Slam victories. "I've had most success in my career in Australia," said Djokovic, who has won six times in Melbourne. "Hopefully I can keep that going." Earlier, American pair Mike Bryan and Jack Sock saved a match point in the deciding tiebreaker to beat Pierre-Hughes Herbert and Nicolas Mahut 5-7, 6-1, 13-11 for their first ATP Finals doubles title together. Having failed to take advantage of five championship points during the first-to-10 match tiebreaker, Bryan and Sock then had to save one against their French opponents before finally closing out victory. "It was a hell of a match," Bryan said. The 40-year-old Bryan has now won the tournament five times. He won four times with his usual partner — and brother — Bob, who has been out with an injured hip since May. Sock and Bryan have dominated since teaming up, winning Wimbledon and the U.S. Open before finishing their season in style in London. "It's been a hell of a ride," Bryan said. "This could be our last hoorah because Bob's training back in Florida.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

Zverev s ATP Finals win vs. Federer tainted by ball boy flub

By Sam Johnston, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — After pulling off one of the biggest wins of his career, Alexander Zverev was left apologizing for an unforced error he didn't make. Zverev denied Roger Federer a shot at a 100th career title by beating the Swiss great 7-5, 7-6 (5) at the ATP Finals on Saturday to advance to the championship match against Novak Djokovic. Federer was leading the second-set tiebreaker 4-3 and in the ascendancy of a rally on a Zverev service point when a ball boy at the back of the court dropped a ball. Zverev immediately signaled for the point to be stopped and the umpire ordered the point to be replayed. Zverev served an ace before going on to close out the match moments later. "I want to apologize for the situation in the tiebreak," said Zverev, who was booed by some of the crowd during his on-court interview. "The ball boy dropped the ball so it's in the rules that we have to replay the point. "I'm a little bit upset about the whole situation because this is not how I wanted it to end." Zverev is the youngest player at 21 to reach the final since 2009 and the first from Germany since 1996. He will face five-time champion Djokovic, who defeated Kevin Anderson 6-2, 6-2 to extend his semifinal win-loss record at the tournament to 7-1. Federer, 37, was seeking a record-extending seventh title, but was unable to cope with the pressure created by Zverev's power and precision at the O2 Arena. "He (Zverev) apologized to me at the net," Federer said. "I was like, 'Buddy, shut up. You don't need to apologize to me here. Congratulations on a great match and a great tournament so far. All the best for the finals.' And you move on." An inspired series of shots earned Zverev the first break points of the match in the 12th game and Federer sent a forehand wide to fall behind. Federer willed himself to a break for 2-1 in the second set, but Zverev quickly composed himself to hit straight back in the following game. Zverev overcame the freak interruption to establish a 5-4 lead in the tiebreaker, and Federer netted the simplest of forehand volleys to bring up match point. He saved the first, but Zverev confidently put away a backhand drive volley to set up a shot at the biggest title of his career and leave Federer waiting until next season for his 100th title. "Overall, I'm happy how the season went," said Federer, who picked up his 20th Grand Slam title at the Australian Open. "There's many positives. So I'm excited for next season." Despite having reached only one Grand Slam quarterfinal this year, Zverev is the only active player outside the Big Four of Djokovic, Federer, Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray to have won three Masters titles. But victory at the tour's flagship event would exceed those achievements. "Novak right now is the best player in the world," said Zverev, who lost to Djokovic in the round robin. "You have to play your best game to even have a chance. I hope I'll be able to do that tomorrow." The Serb maintained his record of having not lost a set — or service game — at the tournament as he thrashed debutant Anderson to give himself the chance to join Federer on six titles. "I played very well in the group stage against Sascha (Zverev)," Djokovic said. "But I don't think he was close to his best." Djokovic won 20 out of 27 points on Anderson's second serve as he broke the South African twice in each set. "It was the best match I've played so far this week," Djokovic said. Having ended a two-year Grand Slam title drought by defeating Anderson in the Wimbledon final, Djokovic went on to win his 14th major trophy at the U.S. Open and has already sealed the year-end No. 1 ranking. The victory extended Djokovic's record to 35-2 since the start of Wimbledon, a tournament he began ranked 21st after a right elbow injury interrupted his first half of the season. "It's remarkable what he's done since Wimbledon," Anderson said. "It seems like he's definitely right back playing some of the best tennis of his career.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 18th, 2018

Djokovic cruises, Federer battles, del Potro out in Shanghai

By Sandra Harwitt, Associated Press SHANGHAI (AP) — Roger Federer was stretched to three sets for a second consecutive match to reach the Shanghai Masters quarterfinals on Thursday. Nevertheless, the top seed insisted he was content with how he's playing. Federer defeated Roberto Bautista Agut of Spain 6-3, 2-6, 6-4, a day after being taken the distance by Daniil Medvedev of Russia. "I'm actually quite happy," Federer said. "Bautista really had to raise his level of play in that second set to stay with me. I mean, he really caught fire, I thought. I served, I think, 80 percent in that second set and got broken twice." Novak Djokovic cruised through his second-round match, but Juan Martin del Potro had to retire after hurting his right knee in a fall. Federer led Bautista Agut by a set and a service break when he became entangled in a fight that lasted until the second-to-last game of the third set. Bautista Agut, a finalist here in 2016, finally offered Federer an opening to take control by surrendering his serve in the ninth game of the third set. Federer will play eighth-seeded Kei Nishikori, a finalist in Tokyo last week, in the quarterfinals. Nishikori ousted Sam Querrey 7-6 (7), 6-4 on Thursday. Third-seeded Del Potro, who has been playing with a cold throughout the week, was playing Borna Coric when he fell near the end of the first set. Del Potro had the knee wrapped but called it quits after losing the first set 7-5. Djokovic earned partial revenge when he beat Marco Cecchinato 6-4, 6-0. The only other time the second-seeded Djokovic played Cecchinato was in the French Open quarterfinals, where the Italian upset him in four sets. A Masters event is a level below a Grand Slam, but Djokovic was rapt to crush Cecchinato. "I was making him play always an extra shot," Djokovic said. "I was aggressive when I needed to be. The second set was perfect, really." Since Djokovic lost that French Open match to Cecchinato, he's won 28 of his 30 matches. The Serb is on a 15-match winning streak, which includes title runs at Cincinnati and the U.S. Open. He's bidding to win a record fourth Shanghai title this week. He will take on seventh-seeded Kevin Anderson of South Africa, whom he leads 6-1 on head-to-head. Djokovic defeated Anderson in straight sets in the Wimbledon final in July. Anderson ousted 10th-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas of Greece 6-4, 7-6 (1). Fourth-seeded Alexander Zverev of Germany also advanced to the quarterfinals by pasting Alex de Minaur of Australia 6-1, 6-4. Zverev will play Kyle Edmund after the Briton defeated Nicolas Jarry of Chile 7-6 (5), 6-3......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

Tiger Woods with 3-shot lead and 1 round away from winning

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Tiger Woods made it look and sound as if he had never been gone. More than turning back time, every hole seemed like the one before Saturday at the Tour Championship. A tee shot striped down the middle of the fairway. The clean strike of an iron as he held his pose. A sonic boom of the cheers from around the green. Another birdie. "I got off to an ideal start," Woods said. "And the next thing you know, I was off and running." With the most dynamic golf he has played all year, Woods built a five-shot lead in seven holes before he cooled from there, settled for a 5-under 65 that gave him a three-shot lead over Rory McIlroy and Justin Rose and an ideal chance to end this comeback season with a moment that has defined his career. Winning. Woods has the 54-hole lead for the first time since his last victory in 2013 at the Bridgestone Invitational. He has never lost an official tournament when leading by more than two shots going into the final round, and his closing record with the lead is 42-2 on the PGA Tour. He has never been in better position to show he's all the way back from four back surgeries that once made him fear he might never play again. "I've gone through a lot this year to get myself to this point, and understanding and fighting my way through it," Woods said. "I'm certainly much more equipped than I was in March because of what I've gone through." Wood was at 12-under 198 and will be paired for the first time in final group with McIlroy on the PGA Tour. McIlroy birdied two of his last three holes for a 66. "It's obviously exciting for the golf tournament. It's exciting for golf in general that he's up there," McIlroy said. "But for me, all I can do is concentrate on myself. The game is hard enough without looking at other people. Go out there, take care of my business, and hopefully that's good enough." Rose started the third round tied with Woods, but not for long. Rose opened with two straight bogeys before battling back, but the world's No. 1 player already was four shots behind after four holes. He narrowed the gap with a birdie on the 16th as Woods had to scramble for bogey, a two-shot swing. "In some ways, it felt like a Sunday just with the energy," Rose said after a 68. "But I knew that it was halfway through a Saturday. Just wanted to sort of chisel a few back and give myself a chance going into tomorrow." Rose forgot about Woods and tried to beat East Lake, a game of match play in his mind, in a bid to stay in the game. He wound up with a hard-earned 68. There used to be no chance against Woods when he was atop the leaderboard going into the final round. His only losses with the 54-hole lead were the Quad City Classic in 1996 when he was 20 and making third start as a pro, and the 2009 PGA Championship at Hazeltine against Y.E. Yang. He also lost a two-shot lead to Lee Westwood in Germany at a European Tour event in 2000. Now? Woods has gone more than five years without winning. He also has won enough times — 90 tournaments around the world — to remember how. "It's a little more unknown now," Rose said. "Obviously, his history, his statistics from this point are impeccable. They're incredible. But he's human, and there's a lot on it for him tomorrow, as well as the rest of us." Woods has had four finishes in the top 5, a runner-up by one shot at Innisbrook and by two shots at the PGA Championship. Only once this year, however, has he started the final round within closer than four shots of the lead. Being up by three is a much better view. "Simple math says that if I play a clean card, the guys behind me have to shoot 67 to force it into extra holes," Woods said. "That helps. I don't have to shoot 63 or 64 and hope I get help. This is a spot I'd much rather be in than four or five back." The Saturday start was simply mesmerizing. Woods poured in a 20-foot birdie putt on the first hole. His wedge settled 8 feet below the hole on No. 3. His 20-foot birdie putt on No. 4 tumbled into the center of the cup with perfect pace. Two short birdies followed. And when he finally missed a fairway at No. 7, Woods hit a 9-iron from the bunker that hopped out of the first cut to about 5 feet for a sixth birdie in seven holes. The cheers were endless, and there was no doubting what was going on. "I've heard the roars all day, and it's been phenomenal," Paul Casey said after his 66. "What an atmosphere it is out there this week." Woods, however, made only one birdie over his last 11 holes, a wedge to 7 feet on No. 12. He missed badly on his tee shot at the par-3 ninth, and the shaggy rough to the right of the 16th fairway caused the face of his club to open, missing to the right. His flop shot didn't get up the hill and rolled back toward him, and his next pitch was a bump-and-run played to perfection that kept him from another double bogey. McIlroy also started strong, and being in the group ahead of Woods, he knew exactly what was happening. On Sunday, he get a front-row seat. The only other time they were paired together in the fourth round was at the 2015 Masters, when both were 10 shots behind Jordan Spieth. Rose won't be in the final group, but he has plenty on the line even if he doesn't catch Woods. He likely needs to finish in the top five to be assured of winning the FedEx Cup and the $10 million bonus......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

One of those weeks : Woods doing well except with putter

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press PARAMUS, N.J. (AP) — Tiger Woods has shown he can put together a series of sub-par rounds. Contending in consecutive tournaments has been more difficult. Woods took small consolation Saturday after his first bogey-free round of the year, mainly because he managed only three birdies at The Northern Trust on a soft Ridgewood Country Club that is yielding plenty of them. He made a 6-foot birdie putt on his last hole — no sure thing the way his week has been going — for a 3-under 68. That gives him seven birdies for 54 holes. "That's not going to get it done," Woods said. "As soft as it is, these guys are making a boat load of birdies. And I just haven't made any." It wasn't a lack of chances. Woods missed six birdie putts from about 12 feet or closer. He has hit nine out of 14 fairways all three rounds, and he rarely was out of position when he did miss the greens in the third round. He's just not seeing many putts go in, mainly because he says he can't get the right line with the right speed. On a few occasions, he's asked caddie Joe LaCava to help read the putts. It hasn't mattered. "I'm just not seeing the lines this week," Woods said. "Just the way it goes. I've called Joey in a few times this week. 'Joey, I see three different breaks here.' He said, 'Yeah, so do I.' I'm hitting in these spots where I've had double-breakers, if not triple-breakers, and I'm just not seeing or feeling correctly through those areas." Such is golf. Woods chalked it up on more than one occasion to "one of those weeks." But it extends a peculiar pattern this year of looking as though he were on the verge of winning, and then taking a step back. He had two straight weeks at the end of the Florida swing where he got within one shot of the lead on the back nine, and then he showed up at the Masters and finished in the middle of the pack. Woods showed plenty of momentum at The Players Championship (65-69 weekend) and the Memorial (67-68 in the middle two rounds), and then he missed the cut at the U.S. Open. One week after he briefly had the lead in the final round at the British Open, he tied for 31st at Firestone on a course where he has won eight times. He was runner-up at the PGA Championship in his most recent start, and now is playing for little more than pride or FedEx Cup points. Woods finished two hours before the leaders — Brooks Koepka and Jamie Lovemark — even teed off. His 68 at least allowed him to sleep in a little more on Sunday for the final round, though Woods all but conceded he was out of it. His hope was to finish at 10 under, which would mean a 64 in the final round. That would at least give him some good vibes going to the TPC Boston, where he won 12 years ago. "I think that would be a nice way to end the week," he said. "It's not going to win, but at least I can get some good momentum going into Boston." He started the FedEx Cup playoffs at No. 20, and with only 30 players advancing to the Tour Championship, he still has some work left......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 26th, 2018

The British Open returns to the nasty links of Carnoustie

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press Carnoustie is known as much for the calamity it causes as the British Open champions it crowns. Any mention of Carnoustie immediately brings back that image of Jean Van de Velde, equal parts tragedy and comedy, standing in Barry Burn on the 18th hole with water up his shins and rising. He made triple bogey to lose a three-shot lead, and then completed as great a collapse as can be found in a major championship by losing in a three-man playoff in 1999. Just don't get the idea Van de Velde owns all the rights to bad endings at Carnoustie. Jose Jurado was the first victim. He had a three-shot lead going into the final round in 1931 and was still two shots clear late in the round until coming undone in the brutal closing stretch, topping one shot on the 17th hole into the burn. He lost out to Tommy Armour. More recently was Padraig Harrington , only it worked out well for him in 2007. Playing the 18th with a one-shot lead, the Irishman hit his tee shot into the Barry Burn. He took a penalty drop and then hit his next shot into the winding stream. Harrington managed the best double bogey of his life. It got him into a playoff when Sergio Garcia made bogey from the bunker, and Harrington went on to win his first major. Of the six previous Opens on these menacing links, Ben Hogan is the only winner to hold a 54-hole lead. For most everyone else, Carnoustie always seem to dish out its share of carnage. Rod Pampling once opened with a 71 and had the lead. He followed with an 86 and missed the cut. Phil Mickelson still hasn't seen a weekend at Carnoustie. Garcia made his major debut as a professional at Carnoustie. He shot 89. "That's a brutal course," Bernhard Langer said. He speaks from experience in 1999, when Langer had his third-highest score of the 23 Opens he completed. He shot 297, and he tied for 18th that week. The first time Tiger Woods went an entire round without a birdie in a major was in 1999 at Carnoustie. "I think I made one birdie on the weekend and I finished three or four back of the playoff," Woods said. "That was ridiculous how hard it was." One month after Shinnecock Hills was punishing as ever in the U.S. Open, golf's oldest championship doesn't figure to be much of a reprieve. Scotland has been going through a warm, dry patch of weather, which figures to make it firm and bouncy. Mickelson, who played Carnoustie a week before the Open, said it was unlikely he would even carry a driver. "I'm either going to carry a driver or that hot 3-wood, but there's only two or three holes — there's actually only two holes I plan on using it, both par 5s. I have a low 1-iron that I've been putting in the bag and ... it's very low. Gets on the ground quick. I'll hit that on probably the last ten holes, almost every hole." Carnoustie in any conditions is regarded as a beast, with a reputation as the toughest links in the world. Sir Michael Bonallack, the former R&A secretary, might have sized it up the best when he said, "When the wind is blowing, it is the toughest course in Britain. And when it's not blowing, it's probably still the toughest." In recent Opens, it has picked up a nickname: Car-nasty. For so much of the field, it will be a new experience. Only two players from the top 10 in the world have played a British Open at Carnoustie — Justin Rose and Rory McIlroy , who was an 18-year-old amateur in 2007 and immediately showed his potential when he opened with a 68. He tied for 42nd that week. Only 33 players in the 156-man field have played an Open at Carnoustie, and only 12 have played it twice. Defending champion Jordan Spieth only knows it from television. He was 13, just starting to blossom as a junior, and he watched the Open from home as Garcia and Harrington tried to survive the finish. "I remember ... how good of a score par was on that hole and will continue to be for Opens going forward," Spieth said. "It's one of probably the toughest closing holes in the Open Championship anywhere, and that creates some drama when it comes down to Sunday, as we've seen. And I don't think it will be any different this year." Carnoustie gets its mean streak from the way the course was set up in 1999, with narrow fairways and high grass. But its strength comes from the wind, like most links courses, and this course near the North Sea is particularly exposed. It measures 7,402 yards, which is 19 yards shorter — yes, shorter — than it was in 2007, the last time the Open was at Carnoustie. Spieth will try to become the first player in 10 years to repeat as British Open champion, and right now he'd simply settle for a chance. Since his closing 64 at the Masters to finish third, Spieth has finished at least 12 shots out of the lead in four of his seven tournaments. He missed the cut in the other three. Like most majors these days, the Open figures to be wide-open. Dustin Johnson, who lost a four-shot lead over the final two rounds at Shinnecock, is back to No. 1 in the world and eager to pick up another major. He has not played since the U.S. Open. The next three players behind him in the world ranking — PGA champion Justin Thomas, Rose and U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka — all have a chance to replace him at No. 1. Recent history would suggest a young American — the last five majors have been won by Americans in their 20s. "It's definitely been pretty one-sided, and the Americans are dominating," Rose said. "So it would be lovely to turn that around next week." Woods is happy to get another crack at it. Carnoustie was his first experience with links golf in 1995, when he was still at Stanford and came over for the Scottish Open at Carnoustie ahead of the British Open at St. Andrews. He opened with a 69, closed with a 78 finished 48th. "Carnoustie is an unbelievable driving golf course," Woods said. "You have to drive the ball well there, but also it's not your traditional in (and) out golf course. It's a lot of different angles, so a lot of different crosswinds. I have to be able to maneuver the golf ball both ways there efficiently. You just have to hit the golf ball well." There is no faking. Nothing comes easily. No one really conquers Carnoustie. It's more about survival. The highest compliment might have come from Tom Watson, who won his first major at Carnoustie in 1975 in a playoff over Jack Newton. "Carnoustie is like an ugly, old hag who speaks the truth no matter how painful," Watson once said. "But it's only when you add up your score, you hear exactly what she thinks of you.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 13th, 2018

Ancer, Molinari share lead at National as Tiger stalls

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press POTOMAC, Md. (AP) — Tiger Woods ran off four straight birdies and finished the front nine with seven consecutive one-putt greens. Unlike Francesco Molinari and Abraham Ancer, he couldn't keep it going Saturday in the Quicken Loans National. Ancer and Molinari each handled the scorching heat on the TPC Potomac at Avenel Farm and shared the lead going into the final round. Ancer birdied two of his last three holes for the lowest score of his career, an 8-under 62, giving the 27-year-old Mexican his best shot at a first PGA Tour victory. Ancer has never been in the top 10 going into the final round in 22 previous starts. Molinari also is going for his first official PGA Tour victory, though that comes with an asterisk. He won a World Golf Championship in Shanghai in 2010, though the PGA Tour did not recognize the HSBC Champions as an official win until a year later. They were at 13-under 197, two shots clear of Ryan Armour (68) and Zac Blair (66). Woods was six shots behind, the seventh straight tournament he has been at least five shots behind going into the final round. It sure didn't sound that way, and for most of the round, it didn't look that way. With his fifth birdie of the front nine, Woods was one shot out of the lead. And then he opened the back nine with a pair of birdie chances just inside 10 feet and missed the both. He never really regained his momentum, finished with another bogey and shot 68. Considering the scoring average was 69.6 in the third round, he wound up losing two shots to the lead. "It was frustrating because I played better than what my score indicates," Woods said. "I thought that 10 under would have been a good score for me to end up at for the day, and I could have easily gotten that today on the back nine." He didn't, and now has more ground to make up. The nine players ahead of him have combined for just five (official) PGA Tour victories. Molinaro has five European Tour victories, has played on two Ryder Cup teams and is No. 17 in the world. The Italian is playing at the National and plans to be at the John Deere Classic in two weeks, even though the European Tour is in the meat of its summer schedule with national opens in France, Ireland and Scotland leading up to the British Open. Molinaro is currently among qualifiers for the Ryder Cup team, but his FedEx Cup standing is at No. 123. He's making the most of his first trip to the TPC Potomac. Even though he missed a few short putts on the front nine, he closed with a 30-foot birdie putt on the par-3 17th and hit wedge into 5 feet for birdie at the 18th. "It's where I want to be," Molinari said, referring more to his position on the leaderboard than in heat approaching 100 degrees. "I would have been happy with even 11 or 12 under. The main thing today was to stay close to the leader, so I've done a very good job of that. Tomorrow I just need to go out and do my best, hit as many good shots as possible and see if that would be enough." Ancer was tied for the lead after the opening round at the Memorial, which is the only other time he has been atop the leaderboard after any round on the PGA Tour. Conditions have been changing since the opening round with so much sun, no rain and fairways that are getting faster. That was more bothersome to Ancer than the heat. "I grew up in Mexico, in the north part of Mexico where it's very hot," he said. "Didn't bother me. I would rather play in this than cold weather." The course certainly has everyone's attention. Woods found that out the hard way with three shots from the rough that sailed some 30 yards over the green, leading to bogeys. "You have to hit it good. There's no way around it," Ancer said. Armour shared the 36-hole lead with Beau Hossler and Brian Gay, who both failed to break par. Hossler shot a 71 and was five shots behind, while Gay had a 72. Rickie Fowler, the only player from the top 10 in the world at the TPC Potomac, had a 69 and was eight shots behind......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018

Golf lacks dominant player halfway through the year

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press POTOMAC, Md. (AP) — Tiger Woods already has played 10 times as the year reaches the halfway point. Some might consider that a surprise considering where he was a year ago. Woods has finished within five shots of the lead only once, a runner-up finish in the Valspar Championship, and he was never in the picture at either of the two majors. Some might consider that a surprise considering how well he is swinging the club. Six months into 2018, golf hasn't offered a lot of clarity with Woods, or anyone else. Golf keeps trending younger, with few exceptions, a point driven home two weeks ago at the U.S. Open when 28-year-old Brooks Koepka made it five straight majors won by players in their 20s. Dustin Johnson is still No. 1 in the world, a ranking he has held for all but four weeks. But there still isn't a dominant figure, except when it comes to attracting a crowd. Woods is at the Quicken Loans National this week, a field so weak that Rickie Fowler (No. 8) is the only player from the top 10 in the world, and no one from the top 15 in the FedEx Cup is playing. There's still plenty of energy along the Potomac River, mainly because of the No. 82 player in the world — Woods. With two majors, the FedEx Cup, the Ryder Cup and the Race to Dubai still to come, here's how golf is shaping up so far: BEST PLAYER Given the significance of majors, Masters champion Patrick Reed gets the nod going into the second half of the year. Reed and Koepka each have only one victory — the best kind — and while Koepka didn't really start his year until two months ago, Reed had a share of the lead during the final round of the U.S. Open and looked certain to get into a playoff at the Valspar Championship until he had a putt roll back to his feet on the 18th green. Johnson, meanwhile, is No. 1 for a reason. Even with two victories, his year is shaping up as what might have been. He shared the 54-hole lead at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am and the U.S. Open. Going back to the PGA Tour season that began in October, he lost a six-shot lead in the HSBC Champions. MOST IMPROVED Bubba Watson has as many victories in the last four months as the previous three years combined. Watson has recovered from a health issue (he won't say what it was) that caused him to lose 20 pounds, and he abandoned the Volvik colored golf balls he used last year. The result is another victory at Riviera, another victory at Hartford and another World Golf Championship at the Dell Match Play. Watson lobbied to be an assistant captain at the last Ryder Cup. He now is No. 5 in the Ryder Cup standings. He was at No. 117 in the world going into Riviera. Now he's up to No. 13. RISING Among the top players, Rory McIlroy and Jason Day appear to be on the cusp of at least having a chance to get back to No. 1 in the world. McIlroy dropped out of the top 10 until winning with a big charge at Bay Hill, his first victory since September 2016. His momentum stalled when he closed with a 74 at the Masters while playing in the final group, lost a weekend lead at Wentworth and missed the cut at the U.S. Open. Day had gone nearly two years without winning until his playoff victory at Torrey Pines, followed by another victory at the Wells Fargo Championship. That at least got him back into the top 10, though he still has a long road to get back to the top. SLIDING Jordan Spieth had a mathematical chance to get back to No. 1 in the world at the U.S. Open, which suggests his year isn't all that bad. But so far, it is. It's not because Spieth hasn't won since the British Open last summer. It's because he has given himself so few chances. The only time he was in the serious contention this year was the Masters, where he made bogey on the 18th hole and still shot 64 to finish two shots behind Reed. In his seven starts since the Masters, Spieth has finished 12 shots or more out of the lead, except for the three times he missed the cut. BIGGEST SURPRISE Ted Potter Jr. had missed 46 cuts in 103 starts since his last victory and was No. 246 in the world. And then he went head-to-head with Johnson at Pebble Beach and beat the No. 1 player in the world. Since then, Potter has missed the cut in seven of his 12 events and only once finished in the top 25. BEST FINISH Justin Thomas nearly holed a wedge on the 18th hole to force a playoff at the Honda Classic, and he won with a 5-wood over the water to set up a two-putt birdie. He was even better one week later in Mexico City, where he holed a wedge on the final hole for eagle that got him into a playoff. This one didn't turn out so well, as Thomas made bogey in the playoff and lost to Phil Mickelson......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 27th, 2018

Rose practicing patience, perspective in the majors

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Justin Rose was coming up on 15 years as a pro and still didn't have a major. What he found was perspective. "Between 30 and 40, that's going to be my opportunity to go really out and get things done," Rose said. "That's 40 major championships. I'm going to create chances with those 40. I'm going to be on leaderboards." More than getting into weekend conditions, however, was realizing that it wasn't always going to work out. It was OK to fail. That was the secret to playing so well under pressure at Merion, where he broke through in the 2013 U.S. Open. "I think what happened to me at Merion, I also realized I'm going to win majors, and I'm also going to lose majors," he said. "You can't skip through your career without one or two slipping through the net. It's a byproduct of being on the leaderboard that those things happen. So I wasn't scared of losing, and that helped me win my first major championship. I wasn't shying away from the pressure of trying to win my first major." Rose had top 10s in the majors, but he didn't have a lot of chances in his 20s. The lone exception was 2007 at the Masters, where he started the final round one shot out of the lead, closed with a 73 and finished three shots back. Since his victory at Merion, he played in the final group at the 2015 Masters and couldn't make up any ground on Jordan Spieth's four-shot lead, and he lost a two-shot lead on the back nine in the 2017 Masters before losing in a playoff to Sergio Garcia. He also started three back on the final day at St. Andrews in 2015. "Ideally in your career, you grasp more than slip away, right?" he said. "But it's a byproduct of being a good player and being on the leaderboard that both things are going to happen." The message applies to Rickie Fowler, who finished one shot behind Patrick Reed at the Masters. Fowler also had a share of the lead on the back nine at Valhalla in the 2014 PGA Championship, and he played in the final group at two majors that same year. A year ago at the U.S. Open, Fowler started the final round two shots behind. "He's creating those opportunities," Rose said. "He played plenty well enough at the Masters that it could have been his year. He will let one or two go in the future. He's going to be on the leaderboard for a long, long time, and I'm sure things are going to line up for him more than once." ___ WEDDING BELLS Rickie Fowler was lugging around something and it was high time he got rid of it. So he asked girlfriend Allison Stokke to marry him while they were on a Long Island beach. "There was nothing planned out," Fowler said Wednesday, four days after he and Stokke, a former track and field athlete at Cal, got engaged. "I just really didn't want to carry the ring around any longer." That comment drew hearty laughter at a news conference for the U.S. Open. "So it worked out perfectly," he added. "We kept things very, very casual. And like I said, I didn't have anything planned out. ... I didn't want to have to keep toting that thing around for that long." Fowler got traditional, getting down on his knees to ask for her hand in marriage. Waves broke against the shore just behind the couple as Fowler's friend and PGA Championship winner Justin Thomas snapped photos. ___ PEBBLES IN THE SAND The USGA has a local rule for Shinnecock Hills in this U.S. Open that allows players to remove stones and pebbles from bunkers without penalty. Phil Mickelson could have used that 14 years ago. Tied for the lead with two holes to play, Mickelson made double bogey from the bunker on the 17th hole and finished two behind Retief Goosen. Mickelson never talked about the bunker shot after his round, but Fred Funk revealed what happened in a 2014 interview. There was a small rock under his ball. "We didn't know the rock was there, but you could hear it," said Funk, who played with Mickelson in the final round. "Phil showed me his pitching wedge. But he never said anything about it (to the media)." Mickelson's shot ran out about 5 or 6 feet above the hole. The bigger problem was running the putt by 4 feet and missing the comebacker. Funk thought small rocks could be removed as long as the player could see it, though the USGA confirmed the local rule was not in effect in 2004. ___ ALL-AMERICAN This year's U.S. Open will be a chance to celebrate the state of golf in the country. Americans hold all four of golf's major trophies for the first time since 2004. Patrick Reed won the Masters this year, joining PGA champion Justin Thomas, British Open champion Jordan Spieth and last year's U.S. Open winner, Brooks Koepka. The last time that happened was 2004, when Phil Mickelson won his first major. At the time, Jim Furyk (U.S. Open), Ben Curtis (British) and Shaun Micheel were the reigning champions. But it's not just the majors. The United States also won the most recent Ryder Cup, Presidents Cup, Solheim Cup and Walker Cup. Rory McIlroy, who hopes to end the streak, attributed it to golf going in cycles. And he said some of the credit goes to Tiger Woods. "European golf was very healthy a few years ago for a long time," he said. "It seemed every major, someone from the island of Ireland turned up to, we were winning it. It doesn't seem that long ago. But the great young players from this country, they're playing well. They have probably a couple of guys, but one in particular that they try to emulate who's back out here playing, and he's become a friend of theirs. "I think that's been a huge part of all this," he said. "A lot of these guys have gotten to know Tiger. And being able to say, 'OK, this is what he does, and we might not be able to achieve everything that he has, but you can at least try to do that.' I think that's been a huge thing for Ryder Cups and Presidents Cups, and them as individuals." ___ AP Sports Writers Barry Wilner and Jimmy Golen contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

End of an era for The Players Championship in May

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Webb Simpson popped the cork on a champagne bottle to celebrate his victory in The Players Championship. Though not by design, the moment also could have signaled the close of an era. The Players Championship, which has all the trappings of a major except public recognition as one, ended its 12-year run being played in May. Simpson set or tied four records, one of which drained the former swamp of drama the TPC Sawgrass can deliver in any month. He had a seven-shot lead going into the last day, the largest in the tournament's 45-year history. No one got closer than four shots Sunday. The only other time that happened at The Players was in 1994 when Greg Norman didn't make a bogey until the 13th hole of the final round and set the scoring record at 24-under 264. The idea behind moving to May was to give golf a big event every month starting with the Masters in April, to have better weather and more daylight, and to present a great chance at firm, fast conditions. This year's edition was a mystery. Even without any rain, the course was never on the edge. With minimal wind, at least by Florida's standards, the scores were unusually low. At one point in the final round, Jason Dufner made a birdie to break out of a 10-way tie for third by reaching 12-under par. There were 1,754 birdies for the tournament, breaking by 136 birdies the record from 1996. Simpson tied the course record of 63 on Friday with a double bogey on the 17th hole when his sand wedge hit the wooden frame on the front of the green, landed on the back of the green and tumbled over the back onto the water. Brooks Koepka matched the record on Sunday, though that required an albatross when he one-hopped a 6-iron into the hole for his second shot on the par-5 16th. Everyone was expecting far tougher. "This golf course over the weekend will turn into a beast," Charl Schwartzel predicted on Friday. Charles Howell III had a bogey-free round of 67 on Friday and expected to see "a lot more brown than green tomorrow afternoon." It never materialized. It was almost as if the PGA Tour wanted players to have their way with the Stadium Course in case there was any debate about moving back to March. The turf was as pure as it has ever been, lush with grass. Henrik Stenson suspected when he arrived on Tuesday that it was too good, too green, to be able to make it the ultimate test by the weekend. "It's the easiest I've seen it play," Stenson said. "Hopefully, in March it gets back to feeling major-like. Because this was more like any other tour event, I think." Adam Scott won The Players in March and never has been a fan of the May date. "I don't think they ever got the setup right in this date," Scott said after he tied for 11th at 11-under 277. That was one higher than his winning score in 2004. "It's in phenomenal shape. I just don't think they took the risk they should have in preparing the course differently. To see those scores today, it's too easy. There's not enough risk and a lot of reward." There have been eight rounds of 63 at The Players since it moved to the TPC Sawgrass in 1982 — six of those record-tying scores since 2013. Mark Russell, vice president of rules and competition for the PGA Tour, said the primary explanation was lack of wind. He also correctly noted that to take Simpson out of the equation, the winning score would have been in the ballpark of recent years. "That golf course, there's a disaster at every turn," Russell said. "But if you navigate it properly, you can score." He also said it would be different in March. The fairways were sand-capped ahead of the move to May, so it should drain better. The problem was having to rely on the weather ahead of the tournament, and a cooler-than-normal spring meant the rough was down. "I think we'll have a lot more control over it in March," Russell said. What the tour can't control is the perception of its premier event. When it last was held in March, it was the anchor of the Florida swing and just two weeks before the Masters. There was much anticipation about Augusta National even as The Players was going on. Next year, there is a bit of a buffer. They Players will be the third of four stops in Florida, and there will be three more weeks (two in Texas) before the Masters. It still might feel like the undercard to the Masters. But it probably has a better chance of feeling like a major......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 16th, 2018

Wawrinka has his fitness back - now he needs confidence

By Andrew Dampf, Associated Press ROME (AP) — The good news for Stan Wawrinka is that he finally feels physically fit again following surgery on his left knee. The challenge now for the three-time Grand Slam champion is regaining his confidence and fluidity of movement on the court. Playing his first match in three months, Wawrinka was more pleased than upset despite losing to 55th-ranked Steve Johnson 6-4, 6-4 Sunday in the first round of the Italian Open. "My level is really high, better than what I expected," Wawrinka said, adding that he returned to proper on-court training only 12 days ago. "I'm happy with physically where I am right now." Wawrinka committed 30 unforced errors to his American opponent's 17, was broken once in each set and failed to take advantage of his only two break opportunities. "I was nervous during the match. A lot of hesitation with my game, with my movement and everything. Quite tight with my body. And that's going to make a big difference, especially for me, the way I move and the way I play," said Wawrinka, who draws enormous power from his robust frame. "Even with that, it was a tough match. One, two points could have changed the match." Wawrinka was operated on in August — twice — and returned in January at the Australian Open, where he was eliminated in the second round by Tennys Sandgren. "When I came back in Australia, it was quite clear that I wasn't ready at all," the Swiss player said. "I wasn't at my top physically." Wawrinka then retired from a match against 193rd-ranked Ilya Ivashka in Marseille, France, in February, citing a left knee injury — and hadn't played since. "I wanted just to play a few tournaments to test the knee," he added. "I was positive to see that the knee was doing OK. But I knew I needed a lot of time to work on my fitness. "And that's what I did when I stopped after Marseille. I went back to doing fitness almost every day for like three months. ... It was some tough weeks." Magnus Norman has returned as Wawrinka's coach after leaving the Swiss player's staff in October — to Wawrinka's dismay at the time. "He's going to keep working with me, hopefully the full year," Wawrinka said. "I still have a lot of work to do. I still need a lot of time, play matches, keep trying to play week after week to find the confidence back." Three other Americans were also in action on the Foro Italico's red clay. Twelfth-seeded Sam Querrey was eliminated by Peter Gojowczyk of Germany 6-2, 7-6 (7); 13th-seeded Jack Sock beat Spanish veteran David Ferrer 6-3, 6-4; and Ryan Harrison eliminated Yuichi Sugita of Japan 7-6 (5), 6-3. Also, Italian wild card Lorenzo Sonego had strong fan support as he came back from a set down to defeat Adrian Mannarino 2-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Meanwhile, two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova withdrew from the tournament citing a muscular injury that occurred during a grueling three-set win over Kiki Bertens in Saturday's Madrid Open final — her second title in two weeks after also taking the Prague Open. "After these incredible two weeks of tennis my body needs to rest and recuperate," Kvitova said. The women's tournament at the Foro Italico starts Monday. It's the last Masters 100 event before the May 27-June 10 French Open — a tournament that Wawrinka won in 2015......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 13th, 2018

Reed s defense of Masters title starts early

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — Patrick Reed won't have to wait until next April to defend his title in the Masters. Even as he slipped into a green jacket, he was perceived more as a villain than a victor. The loudest cheer from the first tee at Augusta National was for Rory McIlroy, who played with Reed in the final round. The loudest cheer on the 18th green was for Rickie Fowler, who finished ahead of Reed. The mood all afternoon screamed out, "Anyone but Patrick." Reed had the last shot, a 3-foot par putt for a one-shot victory and his first major championship. All he did was play a brand of golf that champions from any era would embrace. He seized control on Saturday with two eagles on the back nine, the second a 3-wood from just under 270 yards into the wet, heavy air that barely cleared the water in front of the 15th green. From there, he chipped in from 80 feet. And on Sunday, he heard the cheers ahead of him for Jordan Spieth and answered with a 25-foot birdie putt on No. 12 and an 8-foot birdie putt on No. 14. That's how you win majors and earn respect. The applause, however, sounded more like acceptance than celebration. Instead of looking ahead to how much more this Masters champion might achieve, the inclination was to look into the past of a flawed character in a green jacket. Reed wasn't anyone's favorite Sunday outside of his immediately family, and that includes parents with whom he has had no contact for more than five years. They live a few miles from Augusta National. That's not unusual at the Masters. Danny Willett wasn't the patron's choice in 2016 when he took advantage of Spieth's misfortunes at the 12th hole. Charles Coody played the best golf in 1971 when the Masters could have had Jack Nicklaus or 23-year-old Johnny Miller. Even without a checkered past at two colleges — Georgia and Augusta State — or Reed's brash claim after his third PGA Tour victory that he considered himself among the top five players in golf, the role of villain fit as snugly as that green jacket. There was McIlroy — honest, refreshing, talented — who already had paid his dues at Augusta National with that final-round 80 in 2011 and now lacked only this major to complete the career Grand Slam. It wasn't Reed's fault that McIlroy couldn't buy a putt. Then it was Spieth, who says and does all the right things off the course, making a Sunday charge that even Nicklaus could appreciate. He was one swing away from the lowest final round and perhaps the greatest comeback in Masters history. His tee shot was too far left and hit a tree limb. And finally it was Fowler's turn. If he isn't the best player never to have won a major, he is the most popular player without a major by a wide margin. Fowler hit all the right shots, especially on the 18th hole for a birdie that gave the gallery hope and left Reed no room for a mistake. Reed loves a moment like this. "It's just a way of God basically saying, 'Let's see if you have it,'" Reed said. He had it all, except the affection that appears to be harder to find than the wide fairways of Augusta National. Reed didn't care when someone asked Saturday night why fans don't embrace him. "Why don't you ask them?" he said. "I'm out here to do my job, and that's to play golf. I feel like if I'm doing it the right way, then that's all that really matters." Reed is part of the youth movement, primarily because of his age (27). The consummate team player can be a bit of a loner. He does his work quietly on the range, rarely without his wife along for observations. He doesn't have regular partners for practice. You won't find him on any social media channels during spring break in the Bahamas. He wears boots, not flip-flops. And yes, he has flaws. He inevitably has let people down, even if he was never a hero to legions of fans. There were plenty of American fans cheering for him at Hazeltine in 2016 when he matched McIlroy shot for shot and at one point wagged his finger at him. That finger was pressed against the lips when he had the audacity to shush a Scottish crowd during Ryder Cup debut in Gleneagles. Top 5 in the world? Maybe at annoying people. "He's a member of the Masters Club now. He'll have a green jacket forever," Spieth said. "His name is etched in history, and I'm sure he's going to carry everything that he went through today and go into Paris and try and win a Ryder Cup on European soil." They love him in red, white and blue. Perhaps one of these days, they'll come to embrace him in green......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 11th, 2018

Fowler, Spieth make Reed earn his 1st major championship

By Paul Newberry, Associated Press AUGUSTA, Georgia (AP) — After the final putt disappeared into the cup, Rickie Fowler waited outside the scoring room at Augusta National. Once again, he was congratulating someone else on winning their first major championship. For Fowler, the wait goes on. "I was ready to go win," he said. "Unfortunately, I was one shot short." This has become a familiar lament for Fowler, who lugs around the unwanted baggage as the best player without a title in one of golf's biggest events. He had his best chance yet on a stirring on Sunday at the Masters, making six birdies over the final 11 holes — including an 8-footer at the 72nd hole that finished off a 14-under 274. It's a score that would've been good enough to win most years. But Patrick Reed had one less stroke on his card, claiming the green jacket by sinking a short but testy par putt at No. 18 . "Glad I at least made the last one to make him earn it," Fowler said. Jordan Spieth did his part, too, to make Reed earn it. The Texan turned in one of the greatest closing rounds in Masters history, shooting an 8-under 64 that pushed him into the mix after he started the day with a daunting nine-shot deficit. Spieth thought it would be a nice, stress-free day out on the course. Instead, he horned his way into one of the greatest duels this place has ever seen, actually grabbing a share of the lead by sinking a 35-foot birdie putt at the 16th hole. "Are you kidding me?" Spieth mouthed to his caddie. Reed, playing in the final group, answered with a birdie at the 14th. Spieth's hopes ended at the 18th hole after his tee shot clipped a tree, falling to the ground just 177 yards away. He pulled off two dazzling shots to give himself a shot at saving par. But an 8-foot putt slid by the edge of the hole — his only bogey of the day. "I was pretty gutted at the finish," Spieth said. "I hit a tee shot that wasn't that bad. It just caught the last little branch of that tree. Obviously, I want to go back to that tee shot right now. But it was a phenomenal day." Spieth sure knows his way around Augusta National, where he won in 2015, finished second two other times, and now has a third-place showing on his resume. His worst performance in five appearances was a tie for 11th last year. Fowler couldn't resist a little jab at his good friend. "Solo second feels and sounds better than tied for second, so it was nice to edge out Jordan," Fowler said with a smile. But Spieth already has three major titles on his resume. Fowler is still chasing the first. He's certainly had plenty of opportunities, most notably finishing in the top five of all four majors in 2014. Fowler now has eight top-five finishes in 31 majors over his career. This one felt different than all the others. Fowler played like a champion on the final day. He went to the last hole with a real shot to win. "I am ready to go win a major, but this was kind of the first major week that I understood that and knew that and felt that," he said. "I'm ready to go. I'm really looking forward to this year and the three majors that are left. "It should be," he added confidently, "a very good major season." Fowler will need to get off to a better start than he did in Augusta, where he was just 2 under through the first two rounds. He really turned it on over the weekend, surging into contention with a 65 on Saturday before matching the best closing round of his Masters career. He showed his mettle by battling through a tough start on Sunday — his first seven holes resulted in six pars and a bogey — but got things going with back-to-back birdies before making the turn. Fowler added four more birdies on the back side, the best he's ever played with a major title hanging in the balance. It wasn't quite good enough, but it left no doubt that he's got the game to break through some day. "I gave it my all. I left everything out there on the golf course," Fowler said. "Patrick went out there and outplayed all of us this week, and he earned it. So, you've got to give it to him. He's your Masters champion." Someone asked Fowler about his goals going forward. "My next goal?" he said. "Win a major. We're close. That's the No. 1 priority.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 10th, 2018

Cantlay extends Riviera lead; Woods begins near cut line

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — Patrick Cantlay came within an inch of a hole-in-one, the start of three straight birdies that led to a 2-under 69 and a two-shot lead in the Genesis Open. Cantlay, the No. 1 amateur in the world when he played at UCLA, had to wait until the end of Friday to see if the lead held up. Tiger Woods was among those playing in the afternoon, when the greens typically are at their worst. Woods was on the cut line when he began the second round. Cantlay was coming off a three-putt bogey when his tee shot at the par-3 sixth — the hole with a bunker in the middle of the green — landed above the flag and to the right, and then rolled back down the slope just over the right edge of the cup. "I actually missed a little to the right, but it's a bowl back there so as long as you get the number right, it should be pretty close," Cantlay said. He followed with a short iron into 5 feet for birdie, a 15-foot birdie on the next hole and then a wild drive that led to a bogey on his final hole. Cantlay, who won in Las Vegas last fall, was at 7-under 135. Tony Finau, who shared the 18-hole lead with Cantlay, recovered from a sluggish front nine with a 3-3 start to the back nine that helped him salvage a 71. He was two shots behind among the early finishers. Bubba Watson, a two-time winner at Riviera, ran off five birdies in a six-hole stretch around his turn before he was undone by a double bogey on No. 5. His approach went into shin-high grass short of the green and he three-putted. Even so, he had a 70 and was in the mix heading toward the weekend. That would be considered progress. Watson hasn't won since his most recent Riviera victory in 2016. He was at No. 4 in the world after that title. He arrived this week at No. 117. The two-time Masters champion says he is getting back some weight he lost when he was ill. More putts are going in. One aspect of his personality hasn't changed. When Watson is in L.A., he takes in a lot more than golf. Watson was scheduled to play for Team Clippers in the celebrity game during NBA All-Star weekend. He suggested that he might have taped a show with Jay Leno and perhaps spent time with a friend named Ellen (DeGeneres). He was in full celebrity mode when he won at Riviera in 2016, so maybe that's the recipe. Dustin Johnson was just happy to still be in the game. He managed a 69 on Friday, which should enable the defending champion at No. 1 player in the world to make the cut. Depending on how the afternoon went, Johnson still would only be eight shots behind. That's a tribute to firm, dry Riviera and greens that get bumpy in the afternoon and make it hard for anyone to get to hard ahead. Rafa Cabrera Bello tried in the morning. The Spaniard opened with six birdies in seven holes, but he still only managed a 67. He joined two-time U.S. Open champion Retief Goosen (71) and Troy Merritt (71) in the group at 3-under 139. Jordan Spieth had a 70 and was six shots behind......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2018

Woods to play Honda Classic

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Tiger Woods is playing the Honda Classic, this third PGA Tour start as he tries to build up his game for the Masters. It will be the first time since 2014 that Woods plays at PGA National, about a 20-minute drive from his home in South Florida. He withdrew from the final round that year with back spasms, played the following week at Doral and then had the first of four back surgeries a few weeks later. Woods waited until the final day to commit to the Honda Classic. He said earlier in the week that he wanted to make sure he could play back-to-back weeks. His best finish at the Honda Classic was in 2012, when he closed with a 62 to finish runner-up to Rory McIlroy......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2018

Blue Eagles fend off Maroons, close in on UAAP elims sweep

Ateneo moved a win away from an elimination round sweep after holding off University of the Philippines, 96-82, in the UAAP Season 80 men's basketball tournament Wednesday night at Smart Araneta Coliseum. The No. 1 Blue Eagles, who will shoot for a 14-0 record against defending champion De La Salle on Sunday, went on a 17-3 run in the final four minutes and 11 seconds to break away from a 79-deadlock. "We showed a lot of character in the end. It was a tough game, we were challenged from the start and I'm happy that the players stepped up to the challenge," said Ateneo coach Sandy Arespacochaga. READ:Perasol welcomes solid support from alumni: 'It pressure us to deliver' M...Keep on reading: Blue Eagles fend off Maroons, close in on UAAP elims sweep.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 8th, 2017