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Travel goals: Quick tips from an expert

MANILA, Philippines - Been itching to scratch that wanderlust bite lately? By all means, do so! But... hold on. Where do you go (given budgetary and logistical limitations)? What do you do there? What things should you keep in mind ahead of time? Whether it's a spontaneous weekend away or ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerSep 26th, 2018

Naomi Osaka headed for big money with Japan, global appeal

By Yuri Kageyama, Associated Press TOKYO (AP) — Naomi Osaka used a powerful forehand and a matching serve to win the U.S. Open against Serena Williams two months ago, soaring as high as No. 4 this season in the WTA tennis rankings. Off the court — on the marketing front — she has the same potential. Maybe more. "It's very, very rare to find a Japanese-born female athlete who appeals to an international audience," said Bob Dorfman, a sports marketing expert and creative director at Baker Street Advertising in San Francisco, California. Serena Williams topped the Forbes list of the highest-earning female athletes this year at $18 million, almost all endorsements. Osaka appears to be the right woman in the right sport at the right time with the draw to overtake Williams. "What's more, tennis, especially women's tennis, is a sport that lends itself to a broad variety of sponsors: sporting goods, health and beauty, fashion, lifestyle, travel, personal care, you name it," Dorfman said. "And the sport's international following brings with it a large, loyal and affluent fan base. All the more reason why so many companies are lining up to sign her up." The big question is: Can she keep this up? Much has happened very quickly for her, notes former tennis star Chris Evert. "You know, it's going to be life-changing for her and very, very important," Evert said. "From what I see, she is very humble and from what I see, her parents are very humble people. Hopefully they won't go Hollywood on us. We don't want that to happen." Osaka's multicultural background — Japan-born but raised in the U.S. by a Haitian-American father and a Japanese mother — adds to her wide appeal, endearing her to fans in Japan and elsewhere. Her disarming charm, off and on the court, including how she handled the turmoil surrounding her win over Williams, is also winning people over. "She appeals to the young and old, men and women, everyone," said Shigeru Tanaka, advertising manager at Citizen, her sponsor since August. Tokyo-based Citizen Watch Co.'s 80,000 yen ($700) Naomi Osaka watch is selling out at stores in Japan, thanks to the exposure it got on her wrist at the U.S. Open. Citizen was quick to take advantage of her Grand Slam win, taking out a one-third page ad in the Yomiuri newspaper's extra edition report of her win. Companies won't say how much her contracts are worth, but they tend to be written so that if she keeps winning, her earnings will keep going up. If one company won't pay, another will just snatch her up, marketing experts say. Although Japanese baseball players like Ichiro and Shohei Ohtani are superstars, that sport doesn't have the global appeal of tennis. There are Olympians, but their appeal tends to come and go every four years. Japan is "just starving for a star," Evert said. Osaka has been wearing various Citizen watches in matches and in photo ops and has told reporters the first watch she got from her mom was a Citizen. She has also said her father drove a Nissan while she was growing up — another in a growing line of sponsors. Besides Citizen, Osaka has deals with instant noodle-maker Nissin Foods Group, Japanese badminton and tennis racket maker Yonex Co., and athletic-wear and sneaker giant Adidas. Nissan Motor Co. signed Osaka as its three-year "brand ambassador" in September. The deal was in the works for a while, but the timing couldn't have been better, coming right after the U.S. Open. The Yokohama-based automaker is mulling a "Naomi Osaka model" car. She is also getting keys to a silver GT-R sports car. Investing in Osaka enhances brand image for the long-term, said Masao Tsutsumi, general manager in charge of Osaka-related marketing at Nissan. He said her transformation from "every girl" to superstar parallels the automaker's commitment to technological innovation. "She also is such a nice person while being utterly professional," he added. Yonex has been supplying rackets to Osaka since she was 10, after receiving a letter from her mother. The Osaka effect is evident in the growing popularity of Yonex rackets among younger Americans, the company says. Appearing before Yonex employees in Tokyo, Osaka drew affectionate laughter by insisting on addressing the crowd in Japanese, though she managed only a few words, including "onaji," or "the same," says Nori Shimojo, the company's official in charge of tennis player service. At just 21, Osaka's got plenty of time to learn the language of her birthplace if she wants to. As for her sponsorship windfall, she is shrugging it all off. "I wouldn't really know because I have never been in this territory," she said during a recent tournament in Singapore. "For me, I just focus on my matches, and, I mean, like I'm a tennis player, so I just play tennis." ___ Sandra Harwitt in Singapore contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 9th, 2018

Undas travel tips for drivers and commuters

MANILA, Philippines – Are you going home to visit the tomb of your departed love ones for Undas? As thousands are expected to travel to and from the provinces for All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day, drivers and commuters are always reminded to exercise caution when traveling. (READ:  On road safety and courtesy ) Here ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 31st, 2018

Wentz s 3 TD passes give Eagles win vs. Jags in London

By Zac Boyer, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — After watching a fourth-quarter lead slip away twice this season, Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz didn't want to see it happen again. Thanks to his defense, it didn't. The Eagles held onto a 24-18 victory at Wembley Stadium on Sunday after the Jacksonville Jaguars were twice held to a field goal in the fourth quarter, and failed to convert on fourth down with 3:41 remaining. "We finished it," said Wentz, who threw for 286 yards and three touchdowns, all to different players. "At the end of the day, we finished it. We still didn't finish the way we wanted offensively. We had a chance to seal the deal but went three-and-out, and the defense stepped up. So I think at the end of the day, we finished well this week." Philadelphia (4-4) surrendered a 17-point lead in the final quarter of a loss to the Carolina Panthers a week earlier, and lost in overtime to the Tennessee Titans on Sept. 30 despite holding a seven-point advantage. Although the Eagles failed to pick up a first down when they got the ball back with 6:52 remaining — and rookie running back Josh Adams nearly fumbled on the first play, if not for the call being overturned on replay review — they otherwise converted 7 of 12 third-down opportunities. Jacksonville entered the fourth quarter down 17-12 after a failed 2-point conversion, and a pair of field goals by Josh Lambo kept them within six points even after the Eagles extended the lead on a 5-yard touchdown reception by tight end Zach Ertz. Blake Bortles, restored as the starter despite being pulled in a loss to the Houston Texans a week earlier, ran for 4 yards on fourth down with 4:26 left to prolong what would be the Jaguars' final drive. But he could not connect with Donte Moncrief on fourth-and-2 four plays later to seal the fate for Jacksonville (3-5). "They were on a roll," said Jaguars coach Doug Marrone. "They were getting on third down. We were having a tough time containing the quarterback ... and obviously, we couldn't contain the run." The Eagles finished with 395 total yards, their third-highest total this season, against the Jaguars, who entered the game with the league's second-ranked defense. Philly gained 133 rushing. Jacksonville claimed a 6-3 lead on two field goals by Lambo, including a career-long 57-yard attempt, but saw that disappear by halftime when rookie tight end Dallas Goedert had a 32-yard touchdown reception at the end of the second quarter. A 95-yard drive at the start of the third quarter ended with the Eagles taking a 17-6 lead after running back Wendell Smallwood took a screen pass 32 yards into the end zone, but the Jaguars marched 75 yards over nine plays and found the end zone when Bortles connected with Dede Westbrook under the uprights to trim their deficit to 17-12. That set the stage for the comeback, but the Jaguars' inability to get past the goal line despite two trips into the red zone ended their hopes of a fourth consecutive win at Wembley. NO BLAME FOR BORTLES Marrone said that Bortles was not the reason for the Jaguars' inability to win. Bortles, who went 24 for 41 with 286 yards and a touchdown, led the team in rushing with 43 yards on eight attempts. "He gave us a chance," Marrone said. "He went out there and gave us a chance. He ran the ball well (and made) quick decisions. I don't think we have a problem. I don't think he's the player that cost us the game. He played well overall. A total team effort." LAST IN LONDON The game, played before a record, pro-Eagles crowd of 85,870 fans, was the last of three played at Wembley this season. The Jaguars, who have played at the venue since 2013, have a contract to hold one game there annually through the 2020 season. INJURIES Philadelphia: RT Lane Johnson injured his left knee on the Eagles' opening drive and did not return. LT Jason Peters was evaluated for a concussion late in the second quarter but returned after halftime. OLB Kamu Grugier-Hill left in the first half after an unspecified injury but was able to return, and CB Jalen Mills (foot) was injured a minute into the third quarter and missed the rest of the game. Jacksonville: FS Barry Church was evaluated for a concussion midway through the fourth quarter, but scans were negative. CB Quenton Meeks (knee), starting for the injured A.J. Bouye, left in the fourth quarter. LB Telvin Smith (shoulder) and CB Ronnie Harrison (knee) left the game in the second quarter but returned. UP NEXT Philadelphia: Host the Dallas Cowboys on Nov. 11 after a bye week. Jacksonville: Face the Indianapolis Colts on the road on Nov. 11, also after a bye......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 28th, 2018

'LiveYoung: Angely Dub Shares 5 Travel Tips For Every Millennial

Access Travel's girl boss dishes her most practical tips!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 27th, 2018

Bulls Carter Jr. undergoing NBA big man s trial by fire

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CHICAGO – Every August, the NBA holds its rookie transition program to give its newly minted pros an idea of what life in the league is going to be like, from handling their money and dealing with reporters to fending off assorted unsavory outside forces. And then, every October, the young guys begin their real rookie transition. Consider Wendell Carter Jr. of the Chicago Bulls. In a span of five days, he will have gone through a gauntlet of imposing NBA big men that would have some 10-year veterans flinching and wondering if their tendinitis needed a night off. Carter’s on-the-job rigors began Thursday (Friday, PHL time), when he became only the 10th Bulls rookie to start on opening night and was met in his matchup at center with Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid. It continued Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) in Chicago’s home opener against Detroit, with Carter banging at various times against both Andre Drummond and Blake Griffin. Now the 19-year-old will travel to Dallas, where he’ll get his first test against the Mavericks’ salty DeAndre Jordan. And just for the record, in the Bulls’ final preseason game, he had to cope with Denver’s crafty Nikola Jokic. For someone so young, against such a slate of established or eventual All-Stars, Carter’s early lessons have been difficult. There really is no other way. “I’m sure it’s just chaos and confusion right now for him,” Griffin said after leading the Pistons with 33 points, 12 rebounds and five assists in a 118-116 victory at United Center. “He doesn’t look that way, but that’s just how you feel – no matter what – when you’re a rookie. The game is moving so fast.” Carter, the No. 7 pick from Duke in this year's Draft, fell victim to foul trouble early and the Bulls’ need to play catch-up late, which had coach Fred Hoiberg sticking with Jabari Parker at the end. Carter logged less than 18 minutes, finishing with eight points, two rebounds and two blocks. Drummond had foul issues of his own, exiting with his sixth after just 23:33. Still, Drummond and Griffin won the frontcourt battle with 43 points and 25 boards to Carter and Bobby Portis’ combined 14 and 16. It wasn’t the sort of Windy City debut Carter would have scripted. This was, after all, kind of a big deal – he’s the player Chicago landed after an entire 2017-18 season spent gaming the NBA’s Draft lottery system. The Bulls consciously tried to dive deep, won a little too counterproductively in December and January and wound up waiting until after the first six picks were gone. That tortuous process led everyone to Saturday, when 21,289 in the stands got their first official look at the alleged silver lining from last season’s dark cloud. Carter wasn’t happy with either his or his team’s performance afterward, pulling his clothes from the hangers in his locker as he dressed and bemoaning the Bulls’ lack of defensive communication (they’ve given up 245 points in two games). Not to worry, though, Griffin said. “He’s so talented, he’s going to be fine,” the Pistons star said. “It’s just a matter of time for him. I watched him play probably more than any other player in college last year – I really like his game. I’ve known of him since he was in high school. He would be the least of my concerns if I was over there in the front office or on the coaching staff.” Hoiberg and his staff have approached Carter’s trial by fire by starting him in response to the challenges he handled in summer league and in the preseason. He arrived with a maturity, poise and defensive bent some players never achieve – a young Al Horford was a frequent comp – and isn’t about to blow that image, no matter how many lumps he takes. “I appreciate the fact I’m able to play against these very talented bigs early on in my career,” Carter said. “Learn what I’ve got to work on. I’ve got to get stronger, that’s the first thing I recognized. … Just being up against the best, I love the competition. I love going against the best players.” Truth be told, Hoiberg said he talked with Carter on Friday (Saturday, PHL time) about handling the frustrations he’ll surely encounter. He’s a little cranky about the officiating, for example, picking up at least three fouls in all six preseason and regular-season appearances while playing fewer than 23 minutes every time. He’s does the “verticality” thing as if from a textbook and still hears a whistle. “At this point, I just feel like it’s rookie calls. I don’t care what nobody’s saying, that’s how I really feel,” Carter said. “I still have respect for the game, though. I have respect for the referees. If they call it, it’s a foul. I’ve just got to do better, learn from it.” Then there was the chatter from Embiid in Philadelphia, a 19-point Sixers romp. “He was telling me what I should and shouldn’t do,” Carter said. “‘C’mon rookie, you’ve got to do’ something ‘better.’ Carter didn’t chatter back, he said. “Not yet. I’m gonna get there at some point though.” Drummond didn’t pile on, thanks perhaps only to the referees. "If I played more, I think it woulda been more of a schooling,” the Detroit center said. “This is a helluva three games for him.” Drummond, 25, remembers what it was like six years ago, when he was the one absorbing the lessons. His rookie year got dinged 22 games due to a stress fracture in his back, an injury that compounded the basketball education. “I learned my lessons the hard way,” Drummond told NBA.com. “Physically. I started out being hurt. I had to just play and figure it out game by game. Watched films. Learned the guys that I played against. And figured it out.” Drummond wound up averaging 7.9 points, 7.8 rebounds and 1.6 blocks. He had nine double-doubles and earned all-rookie status. But he’s glad to be wiser now in the NBA’s ways, given how few the shortcuts were. “It was more of a sponge season for me,” he said. “Learning the NBA. I mean, I was a young kid. Just tried to have fun with it. It was the game I loved and I was playing it at the highest level, so I just tried to enjoy every moment and take it in.” That’s Carter today, way at the front end of his career. He’s got a notebook, he said, that he scribbles in bullet points, tips and lessons from each game after he’s left the arena, his mind clear. Portis said he’ll share more with Carter as the season goes on – there hasn’t been much time and the Bulls haven’t really hit the road yet – but most of this stuff will be hands-on. “It’s as important a thing as you’re going to face in this league,” Hoiberg said. “When you’ve got a 19-year-old kid out there, it’s human nature I think when you’re playing against an opponent like Wendell has gone against, to hang your head a little bit.” The coach added: “It’s something every player goes through in this league. It’s understanding who you’re playing against. We’re showing him a lot of personnel, film on who he’s going to be going up against.” Until the day, and it will come, when young guys are studying film of Carter, going through gauntlets of their own. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 21st, 2018

Butler leads T-wolves with 33 points in 131-123 win vs. Cavs

By DAVE CAMPBELL ,  AP Sports Writer MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Jimmy Butler brushed off some early jeers from the jaded home crowd, scoring 33 points in 36 minutes to lead the Minnesota Timberwolves past the Cleveland Cavaliers 131-123 on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). Andrew Wiggins pitched in with 22 points and Anthony Tolliver hit three 3-pointers off the bench to bolster a vintage all-around effort by the four-time All-Star Butler, who requested a trade last month. Butler made 10 of 12 field goals and 12 of 12 free throws, with seven rebounds, four steals and three assists to help the Timberwolves (1-1) hold off a late charge by Kevin Love and the LeBron James-less Cavaliers. Love had 25 points, 19 rebounds and seven assists against his former team, but the Cavaliers (0-2) have a lot of work to do to become a contender again after James bolted for the Los Angeles Lakers. They've allowed an average of 123.5 points so far this season. Wiggins, who was taken with the first overall pick in the 2014 draft by the Cavs only to be traded to the Wolves two months later in the deal for Love, has averaged 27.2 points in nine career games against Cleveland. The Wolves led 83-62 early in the third quarter, when Love brought the Cavs to life with a 3-pointer that sparked a 24-10 spurt. Love had 13 points in the run. With a layup by Collin Sexton at the 4:02 mark, the Cavs were within 121-117, their closest since trailing 36-34 early in the second quarter. Cedi Osman's 3-pointer kept the Cavs within 125-120, but he missed his next one after a scoreless possession by the Wolves. Osman had 22 points, Jordan Clarkson added 19 points off the bench and Tristan Thompson totaled 14 points and 10 rebounds for the Cavs. BUTLER DID IT When the news of Butler's trade request broke exactly one month ago, the likelihood of him awkwardly suiting up in the home opener for the team he's seeking to leave was, well, extremely low. Yet here he was, taking the court at Target Center in the home blues with the white trim. Butler was the first starter introduced during the pregame pageantry, and boos rang out loudly as soon as the public address announcer said, "From Marquette University." They kept up each time Butler touched the ball on the first five possessions by the Wolves, until he stole a pass by Love in the backcourt and fed Taj Gibson for a dunk. The crowd immediately roared, as if the fans forgot who they were upset with because the play happened so fast. The four-time All-Star had plenty more highlight-reel dunks and steals from there. Soon enough, some "MVP! MVP! MVP!" chants even broke out. The Wolves enjoyed a 52-23 run over a 13-minute stretch until late in the second quarter, taking a 20-point lead on a three-point play by Wiggins that was launched when Karl-Anthony Towns blocked a layup attempt by Osman on the other end to start a fast break. TIP-INS: Cavaliers: Larry Nance Jr. has yet to play this season because of a sprained right ankle, though coach Tyronn Lue said he's hoping to have the center back soon. "It's a big loss," Lue said. "With the team we have, we need everybody." ... J.R. Smith played four minutes after missing the opener with a sore left elbow. Timberwolves: After scoring 27 points on 8-for-12 shooting on Wednesday, Jeff Teague went 3 for 9 for nine points. ... Towns had 12 points and nine rebounds. UP NEXT Cavaliers: Play the Atlanta Hawks on Sunday night in their home opener. Timberwolves: Travel to Dallas to play on Saturday night. They won all four games against the Mavericks last season......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 20th, 2018

Seahawks roll behind Wilson s 3 TDs; Raiders QB Carr injured

By Zac Boyer, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Jaron Brown saw teammate David Moore go tumbling over the temporary video advertising boards. At no point was he concerned about his well-being. "Any time you catch a touchdown (pass), I don't think you're worried about what happens after," Brown said. Quarterback Russell Wilson threw touchdown passes to Brown, Moore and Tyler Lockett, and the Seahawks rolled to a 27-3 victory over the Oakland Raiders on Sunday at Wembley Stadium. Chris Carson rushed for 59 yards and rookie Rashaad Penny gained an additional 43 for the Seahawks (3-3), who played to a vociferously supportive crowd — a London-record 84,922 were in attendance — despite the Raiders (1-5) being the designated home team. Oakland quarterback Derek Carr left the game with an apparent left arm injury with 8:52 remaining in the fourth quarter after the last of his six sacks. He did not have the chance to return because the Seahawks ran out the clock. Carr went 23 for 31 for 142 yards and was hit by Jarran Reed on third down and immediately grabbed his upper left arm as he sat up before being helped to the sideline for evaluation. Coach Jon Gruden said afterward that Carr, who would have been dropped twice more had the Seahawks not been penalized on those plays, was angling to return but backup AJ McCarron would have entered. "Just too much fire today," Gruden said. "Too much fire today around the quarterback." Wilson, who completed 17 of 23 attempts for 222 yards with an interception, connected with Brown for a 5-yard touchdown pass in the first quarter, a 19-yard touchdown pass to Moore in the second and a 10-yard touchdown pass to Lockett in the fourth. After picking up a low snap, Wilson faked a throw and stepped forward, then made a throw to Moore over Daryl Worley. Moore punctuated his touchdown, his third in the Seahawks' past two games, by accidentally crashing into the screens set up around the field. "I kind of saw it at the last second, but I didn't think it was that hard until I hit it," Moore said. Former Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch, playing in his first game against his former team, was held to 45 yards on 13 carries as the Raiders unsuccessfully turned to Carr and their passing game to try to catch Seattle. Oakland even made it a point to try to establish Lynch early with three consecutive carries, but he gained 2 yards on a carry, 2 more yards on another and then lost 3 yards before a punt. "We ran three different types of runs and all three of them were rejected," Gruden said. "We wanted to get him in the game, we wanted to get him established. That was the beginning of the game, and after that, we were trying to make a first down and survive. It wasn't pretty." Matt McCrane, who missed a 48-yard field-goal attempt wide left in the second quarter, made one from 43 yards with 8:30 remaining as the Raiders avoided their first shutout since 2014 and the third at Wembley in the past four games. BALDWIN BACK Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin, held to one catch for 1 yard in the loss to the Los Angeles Rams last week, rebounded with team highs of six catches and 91 yards against the Raiders. Baldwin missed two games earlier this season after injuring the medial collateral ligament in his right knee in the season opener and insisted that the low output was not related to his injury. CLOSE TO HOME Sebastian Janikowski, who joined the Seahawks in the offseason after 17 seasons with the Raiders, made field goals of 44 and 26 yards. It was the second time Janikowski, who was born in Poland and moved to the United States as a teenager, played in London but the first time he converted a field goal attempt. INJURIES Seattle: CB Tre Flowers left the game with muscle cramps with 4:08 left in the third quarter. TE Nick Vannett (back) was inactive despite coach Pete Carroll saying on Friday he would play. Oakland: In addition to Carr, WR Amari Cooper (concussion) left the game with 13:40 remaining in the second quarter after taking a helmet-to-helmet hit from Seahawks safety Bradley McDougald. LG Joe Feliciano, starting for Kelechi Osemele (knee), left the game late in the second quarter with a rib injury and did not return, and WR Seth Roberts (concussion) left with 11 minutes remaining. UP NEXT Seattle: Travel to face the Detroit Lions on Oct. 28 after a bye week. Oakland: Will host the Indianapolis Colts on Oct. 28, also after a bye......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 15th, 2018

Dutch humiliate Germany in Nations League, Gibraltar wins

By The Associated Press Germany's UEFA Nations League campaign took a humiliating blow after a 3-0 loss at old rival Netherlands on Saturday. Germany remains without a win in the top-tier League A and has yet to score a goal. In the second-tier League B, the Czech Republic got its first win in the new competition — beating host Slovakia 2-1 — and Ireland and Denmark drew 0-0. In League D, Gibraltar won its first competitive game on a memorable night for the tiny territory. Here's a look at Saturday's games. NO GOALS FOR GERMANY Following its disastrous World Cup defense in Russia, Germany has been under pressure to show some progress but it didn't come at the Johan Cruyff Arena on Saturday night. The Germans failed to score for the third straight competitive game, including a humiliating 2-0 loss to South Korea in Russia and a 0-0 draw with France at home in the Nations League. Captain Virgil van Dijk scored only his second international goal before Memphis Depay and Georginio Wijnaldum added two more as the Dutch ran riot late in the game. The comprehensive defeat left Germany at the bottom of Group 1 with a single point, days before it heads to Paris to take on group leader and World Cup champion France. France leads the Dutch by a point at the top of the standings. The result also heaped more pressure on Germany coach Joachim Loew, who opted to stay in the job after the 2014 world champion crashed out of the summer's World Cup in Russia at the group stage. "Why are we not scoring? That's difficult to answer, we have clear chances," Loew said. "Had we lost 1-0, it would have been acceptable but breaking apart like this in the last 10 minutes is not good." Germany's scoring woes were personified by Loew's decision to play Mark Uth as a lone striker despite the 27-year-old Schalke player failing to score a goal this season. Uth didn't impress and was substituted in the second half. A corner from the right by Depay exposed German defensive frailties in the 30th. Ryan Babel rose between Jonas Hector and Mats Hummels to head against the underside of the bar and the ball bounced up invitingly for the unmarked Van Dijk to head in. Depay doubled the lead in the 87th, calmly finishing after a quick break down the right by substitute Quincy Promes. The Olympique Lyon striker then hit the crossbar in extra time before Liverpool midfielder Georginio Wijnaldum made it 3-0 with virtually the last kick of the match as Germany crumbled. CZECHS WIN Substitute striker Patrik Schick scored the winning goal for the visiting Czech Republic to beat Slovakia 2-1 in Trnava. All the goals were in the second half. Three minutes after coming off the bench, Schick rose in the area in the 76th minute to head in a cross from captain Borek Dockal for his second goal in two matches. It was the first win for the Czechs in the competition after losing to Ukraine. Ukraine leads Group 1 in second-tier League B, with three more points than the Czechs. Slovakia remains pointless. Playmaker Marek Hamsik marked his record 108th appearance for Slovakia with his 22nd goal, a rebound after a corner, after Czech striker Michael Krmencik scored the opener following a through ball from Dockal. Ireland drew with Denmark in Group 4 in the only other game in League B later Saturday. Denmark tops the group with four points, one more than Wales in second. Ireland has one point. BULGARIA LEADS Ole Selnaes scored the only goal for Norway to beat Slovenia 1-0 in Group 3 of League C for its second win and trail leader Bulgaria by three points. Bulgaria rallied from a goal down to beat Cyprus 2-1. Cyprus has three points while Slovenia is on zero. GIBRALTAR ENDS LOSING STREAK Gibraltar's national team has recorded its first victory in a competitive match, a 1-0 win at Armenia, after losing its previous 22 competitive games. Joseph Chipolina got the historic winner from the penalty spot in the Group 4 game in League D. Gibraltar players had to listen to the national anthem of Liechtenstein before the match, a mistake for which Armenia FA apologized. Gibraltar hosts Liechtenstein on Tuesday. Macedonia kept a perfect record in the same group with a 4-1 victory over Lichtenstein to lead with nine points. The other three teams are tied on three points. In Group 1 of League D, Georgia made it three wins in three by beating Andorra 3-0 to dominate the standings with nine points. Andorra, Latvia and Kazakhstan all have two points after Latvia and Kazakhstan drew 1-1......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

Penny-pinching tips to increase your savings

Do you find yourself wishing you could stretch your money just a bit further and be able to add more to your savings? Building your savings for your short or long-term goals can really be difficult at times especially when certain events beyond your control arise. Still, it can be done. And, for you to […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 6th, 2018

Flacco throws 2 TD passes, Ravens trip up Steelers 26-14

By Will Graves, Associated Press PITTSBURGH (AP) — Joe Flacco threw a pair of early touchdown passes, Justin Tucker kicked four second-half field goals and the Baltimore Ravens pulled away from the Pittsburgh Steelers 26-14 on Sunday night. Flacco completed 28 of 42 passes for 363 yards and TD passes to John Brown and Alex Collins as the Ravens (3-1) ended a three-game losing streak to their AFC North rivals. Tucker accounted for all the scoring after halftime as Baltimore ended Pittsburgh's long run of success on Sunday nights. The Steelers (1-2-1) came in having won nine straight Sunday night appearances, a streak that included a pair of victories over the Ravens. Baltimore brought Pittsburgh's run to an abrupt end by shutting down Pittsburgh in the second half. Ben Roethlisberger finished 27 of 47 for 274 yards with a touchdown and an interception for the Steelers. Antonio Brown caught five passes for 62 yards, including his second touchdown pass in as many weeks. Pittsburgh's high-powered offense, however, sputtered after erasing an early 14-point deficit. The Steelers managed just 47 yards in the second half and converted 2 of 12 third downs. "These ain't the same Ravens," safety Eric Weddle said. "You can't become a true Raven until you win in Pittsburgh. I've officially become a Raven. What a great team win." The Ravens were only too happy to play keep-away after the break. Flacco put together a string of clock-consuming possessions that ended with field goals by the ever reliable Tucker as Baltimore proved its strong start was no fluke. The Steelers came in hoping the defense was slowly starting to find itself after forcing four turnovers last Monday night in Tampa during a victory Pittsburgh believed would resuscitate its season. Not quite. Flacco wasted little time helping Baltimore build a quick 14-point lead. He found Brown open on a 33-yard touchdown pass on Baltimore's opening possession. Brown was double covered when Flacco let the ball go. By the time Brown chased it down in the end zone, both Steelers were two steps behind him and the Ravens were in front. Three snaps later Baltimore had the ball back thanks to a strip by safety Tony Jefferson. It took the Ravens just four plays to go up two touchdowns, when Flacco flipped the ball in the flat to a wide-open Collins. The score marked the 13th straight red-zone trip by Baltimore that ended with a Ravens touchdown, the longest streak to start a season in NFL history. Baltimore's 14th red-zone trip ended up far differently and briefly swung momentum. The Ravens had the ball at the Pittsburgh 2 with a chance to move ahead three scores when Steelers free safety Sean Davis ripped the ball from Collins and Pittsburgh rookie strong safety Terrell Edmunds recovered. Pittsburgh put together a lengthy drive that resulted in a Chris Boswell field goal to get within 14-6. The Steelers tied it with 2:50 left in the first half on a pretty 26-yard back-shoulder throw by Roethlisberger to Brown in the end zone and the ensuing 2-point conversion grab by Conner. Baltimore, however, kept coming and Pittsburgh's offense sputtered. UP NEXT Ravens: Visit Cleveland next Sunday. Steelers: Host Atlanta next Sunday. Pittsburgh has won its last two meetings against the Falcons......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 1st, 2018

Berrios pitches Twins past White Sox 2-1 in 1st game

By DAVE CAMPBELL,  AP Sports Writer MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Twins' pitching staff has finally caught up in the strikeout era, with Jose Berrios leading the way. Berrios became the first Minnesota pitcher in eight years to reach 200 strikeouts, throwing seven smooth innings for the Twins in a 2-1 victory over the Chicago White Sox on Friday in the first game of a day-night doubleheader. "It means a lot, obviously. That was one of my goals before the season started," Berrios said. "That's when I wrote it down, and I accomplished it and I'm thankful to God for that." Berrios finished his All-Star season with a career-best 3.84 ERA and 202 strikeouts. The last time a Twins pitcher topped that milestone was Francisco Liriano (201) in 2010, with Johan Santana (235) in 2007 the most recent prior to that. The Twins are 16th in the major leagues in strikeouts, after finishing next-to-last in 2017. From 2011 through 2015, they were last. Berrios (12-11) struck out nine batters, allowing just three hits and one run on Leury Garcia's RBI single in the third. Berrios walked four, including Avisail Garcia to lead off the sixth, but he followed that by fanning Daniel Palka, Matt Davidson and Omar Narvarez in a 10-pitch span to finish the inning with his fastball buzzing. "Pretty special kid," White Sox manager Rick Renteria said. "Nice mix of pitches. Breaking ball was diving, sinking. He's got a quick arm. Just kept us off balance." Though Berrios had a 4.15 ERA and just a 3-4 record in 12 starts after the All-Star break, the right-hander took another step toward being the ace at the top of the rotation the Twins have been lacking since Santana was traded 11 years ago. "I want to be one of the best pitchers in the league," Berrios said. "I think I have the material to do that and to be the best pitcher on this team, so that Minnesota can construct around me and build a winning team." Reynaldo Lopez (7-10) turned in another strong start for the White Sox, with the exception of matching his season high with five walks. The righty struck out five in six innings with four hits and two runs allowed. Tyler Austin's RBI groundout in the first and Willians Astudillo's sacrifice fly in the sixth were all the Twins needed. After four outs by Taylor Rogers, Trevor May struck out the last to batters to notch his second save and end the game that was a makeup from the mid-April weekend when the White Sox and Twins had three straight games postponed by a snowstorm. Paid attendance was still announced at 20,245, with a first-pitch temperature of 51 degrees. Joe Mauer, playing possibly the final games of his career with an expiring contract and a pending decision about whether or not to retire at age 35, had two singles and is hitting .352 (19 for 54) over his last 14 starts while reaching base at least once in each. Astudillo has 16 RBIs in his last 15 games for the Twins, who improved to 46-32 at home. They're 27-12 since June 24, the fifth-best record in MLB in that span. WHIFFING WHITIES The White Sox struck out 12 times, raising their season total to an MLB-most 1,563. That's also only eight less than the all-time record of 1,571, set last year by the Milwaukee Brewers. Yoan Moncada has the team lead with 214, followed by Davidson with 161. FINISHING STRONG Lopez logged 40 innings over his last six starts, with a sparkling 1.13 ERA and 41 strikeouts. The 24-year-old finished with a 3.91 ERA in 188 2/3 innings. "I'm leaving this season in a much better way than how I entered the season," Lopez said through a team interpreter. "I learned a lot." GIVING BACK The last time the White Sox played in Minnesota, on Aug. 20 , manager Rick Renteria experienced light-headedness in the afternoon and was hospitalized overnight as a precaution. He wound up missing four games. As a thank-you to the staff at Hennepin County Medical Center for his care, Renteria sent popcorn and donated 200 tickets to children being treated at the facility. UP NEXT White Sox: RHP Lucas Giolito (10-12, 5.81 ERA) takes the mound in the nightcap. Twins: RHP Chase DeJong (0-1, 3.86 ERA) starts the second game......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 29th, 2018

Kings looking to De’Aaron Fox to lead faster paced offense

By MICHAEL WAGAMAN, Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Sacramento Kings coach Dave Joerger wants his team to run more this season and plans to give speedy point guard De’Aaron Fox all the room he needs. Fox was one of the fastest players in the NBA last year as a rookie, but the Kings offense was uneven most of the season and frequently bogged down in the half-court. With an influx of young, quick players added to an already youthful roster, the hope is that Fox can get Sacramento out and running and, possibly, back into the postseason. “The best thing you can do for him is play fast and give him as much room as possible,” Joerger said Monday at the Kings practice facility during media day. “To play small and try to do that is best for De’Aaron. He’s our franchise guy. I think he is and I think everybody kind of agrees on that.” The fifth overall pick in 2017, Fox started 60 games and averaged 11.6 points with 4.4 assists, but shot only 41.2 percent while struggling with an inconsistent mid-range jumpshot. The Kings were 20th in the NBA with 10.4 fastbreak points. Those are numbers Fox hopes to improve in his second season. “That’s the way I’ve always played,” Fox said. “I’ve always played for a team that gets up and down, high school college, AAU, all of that. That’s what (Joerger is) emphasizing this year. I’m excited to see what happens.” The Kings drafted Fox with the first of their three first-round picks a year ago, but used him sparingly early while George Hill ran the point. Hill was eventually dealt to the Cleveland Cavaliers as part of a multi-team trade. Fox flourished at times, but Sacramento struggled with its half-court offense and finished 27-55. Correcting the problems the Kings had there, as well as getting better in the fastbreak, are Fox’s main goals. “When we did do it, it was pretty effective but you don’t see too many young teams really executing at a veteran level in the halfcourt,” Fox said. “That’s something that I definitely need to work on as a point guard myself and us as a team.” Sacramento used the second overall pick this year on 6-foot-11-inch power forward Marvin Bagley III of Duke. Harry Giles, the 20th overall selection in 2017 who sat out his entire rookie season injured, is also back to add speed and size to the frontcourt. They also signed 6-10, 240-pound forward Nemanja Bjelica to play the stretch-four when the Kings want to go small. “Last year, our fastest lineup was playing Justin Jackson at power forward next to Bogdanovich and Buddy Hield,” Joerger said. “That group analytically would have been the fastest-paced team in the NBA. That serves to De’Aaron’s strength.” Better rebounding will also help, Joerger said. “It’s not easy to run when you’re always taking the ball out of bounds after a made shot,” Joerger said. “We have to try, try to get some stops. It’s fundamentals, fundamentals, fundamentals. It’s a commitment. DeAaron’s going to have to push it, but it takes all five guys.” Fox will be without his backcourt mate, Bogdan Bogdanovic, for the start of training camp. Bogdanovic underwent minor surgery Monday on his left knee after having a similar procedure done in April to repair a slight tear of the medial meniscus. No timetable has been given for his return. “It puts us behind a little bit,” Joerger said. “I was hoping to play he and Buddy Hield, either of them or play them together, at backup point guard. I wanted to see how that looks and put more scoring, shooting on the floor. So that will be a little behind.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 25th, 2018

Flacco shines as Ravens deal Broncos first loss, 27-14

By David Ginsburg, Associated Press BALTIMORE (AP) — Baltimore's offensive line handled Von Miller, Joe Flacco took care of the football, and the Ravens sliced through Denver's depleted defense. Flacco found the time to throw for 277 yards and a touchdown, and the Ravens pushed aside the previously undefeated Broncos 27-14 Sunday. Baltimore (2-1) got 68 yards rushing from Alex Collins, but the line's most ample contribution was giving Flacco time to pass against a defense led by Miller, who came in with an NFL-leading four sacks. "That's a stout run defense. We kept hammering in there and bled some yards," Ravens coach John Harbaugh said. "But our pass protection really stepped up and did a great job." Flacco went 25 for 40 without an interception on a rainy afternoon. He threw 28 passes in the first half alone, when Baltimore took control. Miller finished with two tackles and no sacks. "He's able to get in there and make a ton of plays and change a game when you look at him on film," Flacco said. "That was the biggest thing, just not letting him be a factor." Flacco's success came against a Denver backfield that began the day without injured cornerback Adam Jones (thigh) and lost cornerback Tramaine Brock (groin) in the first quarter. As a result, rookie Isaac Yiadom saw significant playing time at right cornerback. "I think we kind of made it easy for them," Broncos safety Darian Stewart said. "We gave them a lot of stuff." Javorious Allen caught a 12-yard touchdown pass and ran for a score for the Ravens. Baltimore made 20 first downs, totaled 342 yards and converted half its third-down attempts. "That wasn't the game we had intended for," Miller said. "At times, we couldn't get off the field as a defense." Denver (2-1) was coming off two home wins, both by virtue of fourth-quarter comebacks. This time, the Broncos could not rally after Allen's 1-yard TD run made it 27-14 midway through the third quarter. The Broncos were flagged 13 times for 120 yards. "We probably cost ourselves 20 points today on penalties," coach Vance Joseph said. Denver's lone turnover was just as costly. The Broncos were inside the Baltimore 5 with 9 minutes left before Case Keenum was intercepted by Patrick Onwuasor, whose 89-yard return for a touchdown was wiped out by a block in the back. The Ravens took consolation in preventing Denver from getting within a touchdown. "That was a huge stop," said Harbaugh, who celebrated his 56th birthday in style. The Broncos' next drive ended at the Baltimore 11, and the Ravens ran out the clock over the final three minutes. Keenum completed 22 of 34 passes for 192 yards. Denver got a touchdown after blocking a punt and also swatted away a field goal try. Chris Harris Jr. took the second blocked kick 58 yards for a touchdown, but an illegal block nullified the second-quarter score. On the ensuing series, Broncos rookie running back Phillip Lindsay was ejected for throwing a punch during the scramble for a fumble by Keenum. "He's obviously a big part of what we do offensively," Joseph said. "Losing him, that's a big deal." A wild first half ended with Baltimore up 20-14. After Denver's Joseph Jones blocked a punt to set up a 6-yard touchdown run by Royce Freeman, Collins ran in from the 6 for Baltimore. Broncos wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders made it 14-7 with a 35-yard end around, his first career rushing touchdown. Justin Tucker sandwiched a pair of 52-yard field goals around a 12-yard touchdown throw by Flacco. Tucker now has six career games with multiple field goals of 50 yards or more, an NFL record. He has also connected on his last eight attempts from at least 50 yards. LEWIS RETURNS The Ravens welcomed back linebacker Ray Lewis, who was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in August following a 17-year career with Baltimore. After the players were introduced, the song "Hot in Herre" by Nelly boomed over the PA. Lewis emerged from the tunnel wearing his yellow Hall of Fame jacket and performed his trademark dance while the soggy crowd cheered. Lewis was presented with his Hall of Fame ring during a ceremony at halftime. He was joined by Jonathan Ogden, the Ravens' other HOF member. INJURIES Broncos: Stewart left in the second quarter with a shoulder injury but returned. Ravens: MLB C.J. Mosley was inactive with a bruised knee. UP NEXT Broncos: Host Kansas City in an AFC West showdown Monday night, Oct. 1. Ravens: Travel to Pittsburgh for a Sunday night matchup between AFC North teams......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 24th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Quick tips on how you can save your mobile data

  It's expensive to have unlimited mobile data. As much as Filipinos are an internet-loving bunch that would browse anytime, anywhere and even more so during rush hour traffic, it's just impractical and costly. So it's best to know how to maximize your data plan, and that includes knowing where your speeds are the highest and knowing how you use most of your data. This will make sure that you don't get those annoying data fees or worse, get your data throttled. A TechAsia survey in 2015 showed that mobile data in the Philippines was among the most expensive in the ASEAN region, and Smart released a statement in 2017 that mobile data is now its biggest source of revenue in ...Keep on reading: Quick tips on how you can save your mobile data.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 28th, 2018

Quick tips on how you can save your mobile data

  It’s expensive to have unlimited mobile data. As much as Filipinos are an internet-loving bunch that would browse anytime, anywhere and even more so during rush hour traffic, it’s just impractical and costly. So it’s best to know how to maximize your data plan, and that includes knowing where your speeds are the highest… link: Quick tips on how you can save your mobile data.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 28th, 2018

UFO expert Giorgio A. Tsoukalos wants to visit Mars

Since his last Manila visit two years ago, "Ancient Aliens" host Giorgio A. Tsoukalos has been pretty busy, racking up frequent-flyer miles and traveling to countries near and far. For the 11th season of the History Channel program, Tsoukalos visited places as exotic as Sardinia and Egypt. "I'm really excited about this season because we got the chance to travel worldwide to new locations that we have not ever seen before," the renowned UFO expert told the Inquirer during the recent History Con. "On the island of Sardinia in Italy, we investigated the ancient mythological stories of giants. Incredible! I was there last April and it was truly extraordinary." Another highlight...Keep on reading: UFO expert Giorgio A. Tsoukalos wants to visit Mars.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 19th, 2018

Breaking Down Gilas vs Kazakhstan

From the get-go, it was obvious that this iteration of Gilas Pilipinas would be a bit different. Coach Yeng Guiao, who could have opted on a more offensively potent starting unit, decided to go with familiarity and defense, starting three players from the Rain or Shine core in Gabe Norwood, Maverick Ahanmisi, and Beau Belga, and inserting JP Erram at center and Stanley Pringle at the point guard spot. The effect was immediately evident, as the corner triple from Norwood off a Pringle assist in the first play of the game set the tone. The trio of Norwood-Ahanmisi-Pringle showed why they are probably one of the strongest, more athletic, quick, and defensive-minded perimeter trios that Gilas has fielded in recent years. Practically switching everything on the outside, they did not allow Kazakhstan any room to operate, nor to get any rhythm from the field while forcing multiple turnovers, with Ahanmisi getting two steals that led to transition layups early. It was a 12-2 start for the Philippines before Kazakhstan could blink. The only thing going for the opposing team was their offensive rebounding, albeit these only prevented further transition baskets from the Philippines, as the Kazakhs couldn’t convert on the put backs. One thing Gilas has to adjust to however, is the way the international referees call the game, as their bigs – Almazan and Belga – got into foul trouble early, and penalty situation allowed Kazakhstan to make some headway from the line despite shooting just 1/13 from the field in the first. It was a low scoring first quarter, with Gilas held scoreless for the last 4 minutes and Kazakhstan unable to capitalize on the penalty situation, missing multiple charities. The quarter ended 16-9, Philippines. The second quarter started with Kazakhstan giving up their 7th turnover, which would be a recurring theme throughout the game thanks to Gilas’ defensive pressure. With 6 steals through the first 15 minutes of the game, Gilas prevented their opponents from getting any rhythm offensively, despite Rustam Yergali coming out more aggressive on the offensive end.  James Yap came off the bench and poured in 7 points in the first half, hitting 1 of Gilas’ 6 first half triples. They were 6/19 from deep while holding Kazakhstan, who is known for their outside shooting, to 1/12 at the half. Defense was once again the key in the 2nd quarter, as Gilas allowed just 11 Kazakhstan points, with themselves scoring 25. They forced 15 turnovers with 11 steals total in the first half, scoring 18 turnover points as a result; while they themselves committed just 5 turnovers, yielding 0 turnover points for the Kazakhs. The only downside was they gave up 18 freethrows to Kazakhstan, who luckily only converted on 11 of them. The half ended with the Philippines holding a commanding 21-pt lead, 41-20. Stanley Pringle was impressive to say the least, running the offense and controlling the pace of the game, living up to the all the accolades thrown his way prior to the Asiad. Kazakhstan came out of the halftime huddle with a lot more urgency, employing full court pressure all throughout the 3rd quarter, and outscoring Gilas 9-5 in the first 2 1/2 minutes. They also continued to hold the rebounding edge, especially on the offensive glass. While the Philippines continued to pressure defensively, doubling the ballscreens, Kazakhstan was able to adjust, hitting the rolling big man on multiple occasions for easy undergoal baskets. It was here that Fil-German Standhardinger went to work, getting offensive rebounds and scoring on back-to-back baskets midway through the 3rd, despite picking up his fourth personal with still 4 minutes left in the quarter. This turned out to be Kazakhstan’s best quarter, and the only one where the breached the 20-pt mark, outscoring Gilas 23-20. Whether it was the adrenaline rush with the arrival of Jordan Clarkson in the venue or an earful from Coach Yeng at the end of the third, Gilas started out much better in the fourth, with Pringle once again leading the charge. He hit back-to-back baskets to get to his game high 18pts to start the fourth period; while Almazan – who had multiple skirmishes throughout the game – also hit back-to-back baskets. By the time Paul Lee hit his 3rd consecutive triple midway through the fourth – his only field goals of the game – the game had been blown wide open on a Gilas 20-9 fourth quarter run, 81-52. At that point everyone started getting into the scoring picture while they kept the defensive intensity and held Kazakhstan to just 16 points in the fourth for an emphatic 96-59 opening day win. It was an impressive start to the tournament for Gilas, despite the absence of Kazakhstan’s best player due to injury, and more so with all that had happened prior to arriving in Indonesia. They now have four days to prepare for a key matchup with powerhouse China. With Clarkson, they get not just another elite athlete on the perimeter, but a legitimate NBA talent in his prime. It will take a lot more than that however, as the game against Kazakhstan showed. There will be no room for error against the huge and athletic Chinese frontline, and their younger guards. Defensively they’ll have to communicate as well, if not better; and our bigs will have to work extra hard to box out their Chinese counterparts. We can’t give up too many fouls, as the Chinese are tremendously better free throw shooters, and putting our already thin frontline in foul trouble will further limit their ability to implement Coach Yeng’s defensive gameplan. Offensively, I’m confident we have the talent to compete or even surpass China in the perimeter, and everyone knows Coach Yeng is a master at bringing out the best in his players. If our guards can wreak havoc and break China’s perimeter defense, and we’ll be able to get open looks both inside and out. If our bigs, Belga, Erram, Standhardinger, Almazan, and Taulava can limit China’s 2nd chance opportunities and give us a decent amount of 2nd looks, then we definitely have a shot. This Gilas squad definitely looks promising. I’m sure glad we decided to send one.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Expert tips on how to limit screen time for kids

  Evidence is growing that too much time in front of a screen can be bad for our eyes and our health in general, especially for children and teens. Too much screen time has been linked to an increased risk of obesity, dry eye, headaches, eye strain, poorer sleep, and an increase in the rate of myopia, or near-sightedness. It can be hard to tear children away from their favorite smartphone apps, video games or e-books, though. Here we round up some expert advice to help you limit your child's screen time. Encourage regular breaks Ophthalmologists recommend taking a 20-second break from near reading every 20 minutes, as extended reading can cause eye strain. K. Davi...Keep on reading: Expert tips on how to limit screen time for kids.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 16th, 2018