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Sister Act: U.S. women stampede toward elected office

NEW YORK CITY, USA – From a retired Navy pilot to a millennial web developer and an award-winning romance novelist – US women are running for office in record numbers, propelled by anger against Donald Trump to redress chronic inequality in political representation. Women, who currently make up only 20% ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerFeb 27th, 2018

Cayco elected as LVPI president

Arellano University’s Peter Cayco was elected as the new president of the Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. Thursday. Cayco, who received unanimous vote for the position, succeeded Joey Romasanta as head of the country’s volleyball association during the election held at the LVPI office in Arellano University-Taft. “We are very fortunate that a very able president is now leading LVPI,” said Romasanta, who was in office for three years. “The first order of the day, as much as we wanted to increase the number of membership before, we opted to have our election first pagkatapos in the first regular board meeting then we ascertain the membership qualifying rules and saka kung ano yung rights and privileges ng mga sasali,” added Romasanta. LVPI, which replaced the Philippine Volleyball Federation in 2015, named Romasanta as the vice president, a position previously held by Cayco. In the past three years, LVPI formed the men’s and women’s national team that saw action in two Southeast Asian Games with the 2015 Singapore edition marking as the country’s return in the biennial meet after a decade. LVPI also fielded a women’s team in the Asian U-23 (2015) and the AVC Asian Senior Women’s Volleyball Championship which the country hosted last year. And after 36 years the Philippines will again see action in the Asian Games under LVPI. Cayco said that he will continue what the LVPI started but also emphasized the association’s focus on its grassroots program with the LVPI-Shakey’s Inter-secondary tournament – a countrywide competition for high school boys and girls teams.   “We’ll buckle down to business continuing lang the program set by Mr. Romasanta. Kung ano ang ginagawa niya itutuloy lang natin,” he said. Philippine Superliga’s Ariel Paredes won as Secretary General, replacing Ricky Palou of the defunct Shakey’s V-League, in the election witnessed by Philippine Olympic Committee observer Robert Bachmann.        Colonel Jeff Tamayo got the position as treasurer while General Benjamin Espiritu was named chairman of the board.   Sitting as board members were Rod Roque, Dr. Ian Laurel and Atty. Mon Malinao.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

His fiancée’s sister is beautiful—and very flirtatious

Dear Emily, I am engaged to a woman seven years my senior. We met in a prayer meeting. She's soft-spoken, kind, helpful and a really nice human being. The eldest in a family of four women, she is the only unmarried sibling. The rest of her family is abroad, including their parents. She said she has no plan of following them as she's very settled here. I asked her to marry me recently, but she said there is plenty of time for that. A few months ago, her younger sister came to visit from abroad. She recently got divorced from her husband of 11 months, no children. Hers was a whirlwind marriage, discovered her new husband's womanizing, gambling and drug use too late. She came...Keep on reading: His fiancée’s sister is beautiful—and very flirtatious.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 12th, 2018

Koreas extend conciliatory steps to Asian Games

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — With the Koreas, there's no separating their sports from their politics. The war-separated rivals will take their reconciliation steps to the Asian Games in Jakarta and Palembang, Indonesia, where they will jointly march in the opening ceremony and field combined teams in basketball, rowing and canoeing. "Sports have played the role of peacemaker between the Koreas," said Kim Seong-jo, vice chairman of South Korea's Olympic committee and the country's chef de mission at the Asian Games. "If the combined teams put out good performances and win medals, that would be putting the cherry on the top." North and South Korea have used sports diplomacy this year in a bid to decrease animosity and initiate a new round of global diplomatic efforts to resolve the nuclear standoff with Pyongyang. South Korea leaders consider goodwill gestures as crucial to keep the positive atmosphere alive for what could become a long and difficult attempt to persuade the North to give up its nuclear and missile programs. There's not much Seoul can do beyond such gestures, though, as joint economic projects are out of the question when lifting sanctions against North Korea is far beyond the South's control. The more substantial discussions on the North's denuclearization — including what, when and how it would occur— are always going to be between Washington and Pyongyang. Here's a look at what the Koreas are planning for the Asian Games and their ebbs and flows in sports diplomacy: ___ BLUE FLAGS AND COMBINED TEAMS In the opening ceremony in Jakarta, athletes from North and South Korea will parade together under the flag featuring a blue map that symbolized a unified Korean Peninsula. It will be virtual repeat of the joint march during February's Winter Olympics in the South Korean ski resort of Pyeongchang, minus the gloves, parkas and fur hats. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sent hundreds of athletes, artists and government officials to the Pyeongchang Olympics. The Koreas also fielded their first combined Olympic team in women's ice hockey, which drew passionate support from crowds despite losing all five of its games with a combined score of 28-2. At the Asian Games, the Koreas will be expected to deliver more than just feel-good stories. There's pressure for the investment to yield gold. A group of 34 North Korean athletes, coaches and officials have been in South Korea since last month for combined teams in women's basketball and the men's and women's events in rowing and canoeing. Coach Lee Moon-kyu, who has retained a core of South Korean players who won gold at the 2014 Asian Games at home in Incheon, got a first-hand look at North Korean players during exhibitions in Pyongyang in early July. Lee later picked three North Korean players for the Asian Games squad, including center Ro Suk Yong. Lee will also have a North Korean assistant coach on his bench. The Koreans will face Taiwan, Indonesia, Kazakhstan and India in their preliminary group. South Korean forward Lim Yung-hui said the chemistry between the players has been improving. "The Northern players share the same goal of the gold medal and we talk a lot about how we should be putting out a good performance there," Lim said. "We weren't given much time, but we are practicing hard in a positive atmosphere." The Koreas will field combined teams in dragon boat events in canoeing and the lightweight men's four, lightweight men's eight and lightweight women's double sculls in rowing. If a combined team wins gold, athletes on the podium will hear the traditional folk song of "Arirang,"used in both Koreas as an unofficial anthem for peace, instead of their respective national anthems. The Korean athletes are likely to become an attraction at the Asian Games, where the international media will follow closely. At the Pyeongchang Olympics, South Korean figure skater Kam Alex Kang-chan created a media frenzy by taking a selfie with North Korea's Kim Ju Sik and posting it on Instagram. The photo recalled a famous 2016 selfie taken by two North and South Korean gymnasts at the Rio Olympics which International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach described as a "great gesture." ___ THEY DON'T ALWAYS PLAY NICE The Koreas have a history of using sports to foster diplomacy since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War. The 1991 world table tennis championships in Japan were the first time the Koreas fielded a combined team at a major international event. The atmosphere wasn't always friendly, though. During the height of their Cold War rivalry and recurring periods of animosity since, sports often became an alternate political battlefield. North Korean athletes and coaches would reject handshakes with their South Korean competitors and berate South Korean reporters during news conferences. The sports detente of 1991 evaporated when a North Korean athlete who competed at the world judo championships in Barcelona defected and arrived in South Korea amid heavy media coverage. North Korea boycotted the 1986 Asian Games and the '88 Summer Olympics in Seoul, and relations dramatically worsened on the eve of the Seoul Olympics with the bombing of a South Korean passenger jet that killed all 115 aboard in December 1987. The inter-Korean warmth heading into this year's Asian Games contrasts with the awkwardness between the rivals surrounding the 2014 Asiad held in South Korea. Seoul's then-conservative government invited North Korean athletes to compete, but made it clear it had no interest in joint marches or combined teams. North Korean subsequently withdrew an offer to send its all-female cheering squad to Incheon after squabbling with the hosts over costs. North Korean leader Kim did send a senior government delegation to the closing ceremony, but they returned home without meeting then-South Korean President Park Geun-hye. The North was still seething over the Asian Game treatment years later as it gleefully observed Park's presidency crashing over a corruption scandal. "The Park Geun-hye group's mad confrontational racket is to blame for why (the North Korean) visit to Incheon did not result in improved relations," the North said in a statement in April last year. ___ WILL THE GOOD TIMES LAST? Kim has found a willing counterpart in Moon, a liberal who won the presidential by-elections to replace Park last year. Since the Pyeongchang Olympics, Kim has met Moon twice and leveraged the summits to get to U.S. President Donald Trump. After their June summit in Singapore, Kim and Trump issued a vague aspirational goal for a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula without describing specific plans. Sports exchanges and other goodwill gestures are important policy tools for Moon, who wants Seoul to be in the "driver's seat" in international efforts to deal with Pyongyang. The Koreas have also agreed to resume temporary reunions between relatives separated by the war and are holding military talks to reduce tensions across their heavily armed border. "Hopefully, (the Asian Games) will provide an opportunity to use sports to facilitate diplomacy and cooperation," Moon said while meeting Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi in Seoul last month. Seoul's presidential office hasn't announced yet whether Moon would attend the opening ceremony in Jakarta on Aug. 18. Whatever happens in Indonesia or with nuclear negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang, the Koreas will always have those heartening selfies posted by athletes. "Sports can be used to build momentum and trust, but they don't solve fundamental problems," said Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Dongguk University and a policy adviser to Moon. "There's not much South Korea can currently do, but at least it's trying to actively do the things it can to keep the positive atmosphere alive. ".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

Barangay officials in city learn the ropes

By: Emme Rose Santiagudo DEPARTMENT of Interior and Local Government (DILG)-Iloilo City Director Ferdinand Panes encouraged barangay officials to participate in the Barangay Newly Elected Officials (BNEO) orientation program. “Ang akon office in coordination with the Liga ng mga Barangay and the City government of Iloilo, nag-come up na sang isa ka activity design and program […] The post Barangay officials in city learn the ropes appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

Sorsogon City gets ready for formal declaration as drug cleared

Sorsogon City gets ready for formal declaration as 'drug cleared' Vox Bikol Tue, 03/07/2017 - 04:40 SORSOGON CITY, March 2 (PNA) —- This city will be declared “cleared” of illegal drugs in formal ceremonies to be attended by Chief Supt. Melvin Ramon Buenafe, director of Police Regional Office in Bicol (PRO5), at the Bibincahan Gymnasium here Friday. Sorsogon City is the last local government unit to be declared as drug-cleared in the province of Sorsogon since the intensified anti-narcotics drive of the government that was aimed at both high-profile and street level drug personalities started in July 2016. The Sorsogon City Anti-Drug Abuse Council (SCADAC) came up with the declaration as contained in its resolution No 1-2017 dated February 27. According to the resolution, all of the city’s 64 barangays have been declared as “drug-cleared” villages based on the declaration of their respective barangay councils and Barangay Anti-Drug Abuse Councils (BADAC). It also stated that the intensified operation of “Project Double Barrel” resulted in the total eradication of the presence of drug personalities and illegal drug activities in the city of Sorsogon.” City Mayor Sally Lee lauded the declaration as she attributed it to the relentless efforts of the community stakeholders, especially the Philippine National Police, barangay officials, schools, women, senior citizens, students and youth organizations. In January, PRO5 cited the Sorsogon Provincial Police Office (PPO) headed by Senior Supt. Ronaldo Cabral for recording the lowest crime rate among the six PPOs and one city PPO in Bicol for 2016. Cabral attributed this to the various community relations program of the PPO that proved effective in engaging various sectors in curbing the drug scourge that has been seen as contributing to the high incidence of crime in the province. Lee said the government remains steadfast in its commitment to maintain the city free from the perils of illegal drugs. “We will continue all programs and activities that have brought about this declaration even as we assure those who have surrendered that the city government will assist them in the best ways possible,” she stressed. PRO5 officials said their assessment of the performance of the PPOs in Bicol with regards to the government’s drug war uses the term “drug clear” as only the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) has the authority to declare a local government unit as drug-free. On Monday, the PNP is expected to reassume its leading role in the illegal drug campaign after the PNP was temporarily suspended from administering “Operation Tokhang” in the wake of a controversy that hounded the killing of a Korean businessman last month. The suspension prompted the government to hand over to PDEA the major role in the campaign with the PNP taking a supporting role. (PNA) LAP/GVR/BQL/CBD.....»»

Category: newsSource:  voxbikolRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

WWE s Kane elected Tennessee mayor

Image: Facebook/WWE Kane The Big Red Machine is set to take on another role outside of the ring--public office. Glenn Jacobs, popularly known as Kane from World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), won t.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2018

LVPI strengthens grassroots program with nationwide tourney

As part of his first order of business, newly-elected Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. president Peter Cayco looks to strengthen country's grassroots program. Cayco, who replaced former association head Joey Romasanta in the election held at the LVPI office in Arellano University-Taft, reiterated the importance of tapping and developing young talents that will eventually fill the national pool.      LVPI was able to get the support of long-time volleyball patron Shakey’s in its endeavor. The national sports association partnered with the corporate sponsor for the staging of LVPI-Shakey’s Inter-secondary tournament for boys and girls teams. “It’s going to be school-based. Maganda yun kasi may NCAA, UAAP then si Shakey’s naman all over the country. So mako-consolidate na natin ang grassroots program,” said Cayco. In fact, the tournament opened its National Capital Region leg last June 12. “Katatapos lang actually ng inter-secondary which was managed by Ariel (Paredes). Shakey’s na ang sumuporta roon, Shakey’s and LVPI,” said the LVPI head. “We started with 16 boys team and 14 girls teams. Noong mag-start kami ang daming humahabol, after the opening, ang sabi namin ‘hindi na gugulo ang schedule e.’” The tournament will also have regional legs where top teams will then compete in the National Finals to be held in Manila April next year. “So mayroon na kaming naka-set na Visayas (Bacolod) magkakaroon sila ng legs sa kanila local, Cagayan De Oro, Davao. Sa Cebu nagni-negotiate pa kami eh,” said Cayco. “Tapos sa norte sa Ilocos Sur ilalagay. Yung Baguio naka-ready na raw sila.” “Right now magiging regional eliminations then balak namin magkaroon ng National Finals pero maikli lang para yung mga nasa province hindi na masyadong mababad rito,” he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

PENRO Isabela orients barangay officials on env t laws

CITY OF ILAGAN, Isabela, July 31 (PIA) - The Provincial Environment and Natural Resources Sub-Office in this province has recently conducted an orientation to the newly-elected barangay officials of t.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

Arroyo, Alvarez Vow to ‘Continue Good Relationship’

MANILA — Newly-elected Speaker Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and former Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez on Wednesday met for the first time following a leadership shakeup at the House of Representatives. The meeting at Alvarez’s office came two days after Arroyo’s ascension to the speakership. Pampanga Rep. Aurelio Gonzales said it was Arroyo who initiated the meeting with her […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJul 28th, 2018

Are we moving forward or backward?

THE House of Representatives is at its ugliest form again. Forgetting that they are called honorable men and women, lawmakers shouted at each other in full view of TV cameras the other day as they fight over the process in which the new House leader was elected. Of course, many….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJul 26th, 2018

From ARMM to BARMM: ARMM’s elected in BTA; ARMM with BTC as “caretakers”

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 24 July) — The elected officials of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) will be able to complete their three-year term of office until June 30, 2019 even if the ARMM is abolished earlier than that. The Bicameral Conference Committee on the proposed Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL) amended some provisions […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsJul 25th, 2018

Conchita Carpio-Morales: Probes still pending vs Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo

Newly elected Speaker Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo is still under investigation for plunder in connection with her alleged misuse of intelligence funds of the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office when she was still president......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

Violence against women, a silent killer - Ombudsman R6

BACOLOD CITY, July 20 (PIA) -- The Office of the Ombudsman is stepping up its fight on violence against women calling it a silent killer and calls for the protection of the family. During the recent.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

Violence against women, a silent killer - Ombudsman R6

BACOLOD CITY, July 20 (PIA) -- The Office of the Ombudsman is stepping up its fight on violence against women calling it a silent killer and calls for the protection of the family. During the recent.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

Youth leader backs ‘TokGang’

The president of the Sangguniang Kabataan federation in Iloilo City, Leila Luntao, backed the TokGang program launched by the Women and Children’s Protection Desk of the Iloilo City Police Office (ICPO). TokGang (Toktok Hangyo sa mga Gang) aims to identify youths below 18 years old who are involved in gangs and have violated several ordinances […] The post Youth leader backs ‘TokGang’ appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJul 18th, 2018

DILG warns of sanctions vs uncooperative village officials

WINNING a seat in the barangay council entails duties and responsibilities and that includes acting as witnesses in the conduct of physical inventory of confiscated illegal drugs and/or paraphernalia. Recently, the Iloilo City Police Office – City Drug Enforcement Unit (ICPO-CDEU) reported that some elected officials failed or refused to act as witnesses to the […] The post DILG warns of sanctions vs uncooperative village officials appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJul 13th, 2018

Davao Region teenage pregnancy rise blamed on lack of discussion on sexuality

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 9 July) – The rise in the number of teenage women getting pregnant in the Davao Region was blamed on the failure to encourage discussion on sexuality, an official from the City Health Office (CHO) said on Monday. The Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA), in fact, reported that the Davao Region recorded the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018

Miss or Mrs? Serena’s marriage shows Wimbledon’s use of courtesy titles

LONDON --- Serena Williams' recent marriage has shined a spotlight on one of Wimbledon's many quirky traditions. Suddenly "Miss Williams" has become "Mrs. Williams" in the words of chair umpires --- a small change that has led to bigger-picture questions about whether the All England Club is too old-fashioned. Only the women at the grass-court Grand Slam are addressed with a title before their names to reflect their marital status. In other words, when a chair umpire announces that Serena has won a game, it's, "Game, Mrs. Williams." For her sister Venus, it's, "Game, Miss Williams." And for Roger Federer, it's simply: "Game, Federer." It's a difference that is ...Keep on reading: Miss or Mrs? Serena’s marriage shows Wimbledon’s use of courtesy titles.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 5th, 2018

2 years of Duterte presidency a rights calamity, says int’l group

New York-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) describes the second year of President Rodrigo Duterte in power in just four words: a human rights calamity. "On this day two years ago, Rodrigo Duterte took his oath of office as President of the Philippines --- and immediately unleashed a human rights calamity in the guise of a 'drug war' that has claimed the lives of thousands of men, women and children," Carlos Conde, HRW Asia researcher, said in a statement on Saturday. "This is a day of mourning, not celebration. Mourning for the thousands of poor Filipinos that have been subjected to brutal summary killings by the police and 'unidentified gunmen' --- who are often also state agents ---...Keep on reading: 2 years of Duterte presidency a rights calamity, says int’l group.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018