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People...are talking about: Morrisette Amon

People...are talking about: Morrisette Amon.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: thestandard thestandardSep 28th, 2017

People...are talking about: Morrisette Amon

People...are talking about: Morrisette Amon.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 11th, 2017

Looking for an edge: Teams trying to turn data into wins

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press Data is pored over by coaches and staff of the Orlando Magic on a regular basis. They’ll dissect how far a player runs during practice, how quickly that player accelerates and decelerates, how his performance changes as the workout goes along, biometric measurements like his heartbeat or when his workload is particularly heavy. The charts and graphs are detailed and precise. But how it’ll help the Magic win, that’s still an unknown. Wearable technology — chips worn during practice to collect information that analysts churn into reports — has been around the NBA for the past several seasons. It’s not permitted on game nights, and anything specific about processes the 30 teams are using falls into the category of closely guarded secrets. And when it comes to coaches deciding what play to call in the final seconds with a game on the line, it doesn’t seem to have an impact quite yet. “It’s all very beneficial stuff,” Magic coach Steve Clifford said. “But I can only digest X amount of information. And it has to be the right amount of information.” That’s one of the challenges that NBA teams are facing in this information age. Everyone knows analytics can help in countless ways. But the question remains simple: How? “You’ve got to take it and use it as best you can,” said New Orleans coach Alvin Gentry, who said he resisted using some data that he was presented several years ago when he coached in Phoenix — and wound up taking that Suns team to the Western Conference finals. “But at the end of the day, I think the instincts that you have as a coach become just as important, really.” There are some consistencies in what’s being collected. Regardless of what hardware a team is using, everything basically tracks the same things: distance of movement, speed of movement, acceleration and deceleration, workload and heart rate. Teams work on their own, largely without NBA oversight except for some rules laid out in the Collective Bargaining Agreement. It’s already been a boost in how teams monitor a player’s recovery from injury or surgery. But some also have wondered if the data collection is too invasive, or could be used against a player — something that isn’t supposed to happen under league rule. “It seems inherently geared to advantage the team,” University of Illinois law professor Michael LeRoy said in comments posted to his blog last year. “When it’s not linked to performance and not actually linked to injury, just correlation ... it’s hard to see where that data can be used to the advantage of a player.” The NBA has put together a list of what brands (like Catapult and STATSports) and types of products that teams can use, much in the same way it approves knee braces and other accessories. Teams aren’t mandated to share the data they’re collecting from the wearables with the league, although that may change once devices are permitted to be used during games. “Data collected through wearable devices has the potential to have a number of applications to improve player health — but it’s not a silver bullet,” said Dr. John DiFiori, the NBA’s medical director. “Information from wearables can add more detail on each player’s loading, which, together with a team’s overall toolkit, can help develop more individualized injury prevention programs, and assist teams in promoting safe return to play following an injury.” There could be benefits to standardizing the data, but that seems a long way off — especially since teams are still figuring out how to best go forward individually. The league and the NBA Players Association are working on finalizing a validation program will be in place to ensure that devices are measuring what the manufacturers say they’re measuring, and that they do so accurately. Atlanta rookie Kevin Huerter said in his short time as a pro, he’s learned a ton about his body that he didn’t even know because of what he’s gleaned off what his team has collected. “At this level, they worry and care so much more about your body,” Huerter said. “The technology monitors how tough practices are and how tough you’re pushing yourself. It’s a longer season, everybody knows that. So I think a lot of it is making sure guys stay healthy and listening when guys are hurting a little bit one day.” It might extend careers, help with injury management, maybe develop ways to avoid injuries. But whether this data will ever be sharpened to the point of helping a team figure out how to overcome a five-point deficit with 28.2 seconds remaining, that’s anyone’s guess. “Where the league is going, you’re looking for every edge,” Clifford said. “But as a coach, what you can’t do is you can’t stop watching the film. The data, talking to people, the numbers, all that, it’s all good information. But to have the clarity I think you need to make the right decisions, you better have watched enough film because that’s where you can see why, why, why it’s happening.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

How Liway became Cinemalaya s highest-grossing film ever

MANILA, Philippines— Liway holds the record for the highest-grossing film in Cinemalaya history. It may not be your typical romance-comedy top billed by big name celebrities but its authenticity was enough to get the audience talking. “I think people connected to it and ultimately, people learned about the film through word-of-mouth. ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 9th, 2018

Today in global market news

By Bloomberg It took a while to get there, but the U.S., Canada and Mexico have struck a revised trade deal. Meanwhile, oil reached the highest level since 2014, and India vowed liquidity support to a debt-laden financier. Here are some of the things people in markets are talking about. Nafta 2.0 President Donald Trump celebrated […].....»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2018

Enrile s ambush : Real or not?

The second episode of "JPE: A Witness to History" – supposedly intended to "correct" what had been written about Martial Law and the 1986 People Power Revolution – was released on Saturday, September 22. It featured ex-Senate president and former Martial Law administrator Juan Ponce Enrile talking to ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

Jimmy Butler made his move - now it s Wolves turn

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — Jimmy Butler knows that NBA players can force their way into trades. Forcing their way into a trade that suits the player, that’s an entirely different story. Butler has told the Minnesota Timberwolves that he has no intentions of re-signing with the club next summer, his way of saying “trade me now” or “lose me for nothing later.” The Athletic first reported Butler’s decision. It’s a power move that players can make. Thing is, it comes with risk — because what happens next is not up to Butler. This was the lesson learned from the Kawhi Leonard situation, from the Kyrie Irving situation, from the Paul George situation. Leonard supposedly was hoping for a trade from San Antonio to the Los Angeles Clippers. Irving wanted to be sent by Cleveland to either San Antonio and Miami. George was widely assumed to leave Indiana for the Los Angeles Lakers. Leonard is in Toronto , at least for one season. Irving got sent to Boston , and is a free agent next summer. George landed in Oklahoma City, and probably will be there for years. Not a whole lot of people saw those exact moves coming. But the teams did what was best for them. In all three cases, the Spurs, the Cavs and the Pacers got the best deal they could make. Now it’s Butler’s turn. It should be easy to deduce that Butler can see himself with the Clippers, New York or Brooklyn, since all of those teams will have the cap space to give him the $140 million (or $190 million) max contract he’s seeking. Miami would interest him as well, since Butler has raved about the city in the past and he’s still very tight with fellow Marquette alum and former Chicago teammate Dwyane Wade. Toronto is believed to be on his radar. Playing alongside LeBron James with the Lakers is something that hardly anyone in the NBA would sneeze at. A person with knowledge of the Timberwolves’ situation said that Minnesota has been talking to multiple teams, gauging the Butler market. The person spoke to The Associated Press Thursday on condition of anonymity because talks are ongoing. The Timberwolves aren’t exactly in a position of strength, since now everyone knows that Butler wants out and training camps start in a few days. But that doesn’t mean Minnesota doesn’t control how this will play out. When Leonard asked for his trade, the Spurs had the luxury of time and wound up getting a very good deal from Toronto. The Cavs and the Pacers also had plenty of time to work out something to their likings when moving Irving and George. Minnesota doesn’t have that same cushion. That’ll eventually lead to Butler being asked why he waited until the final days of the offseason to inform the team of his unhappiness, because not only did he potentially limit Minnesota’s options but he could have limited his own. “You should always try to get a perennial All-Star,” former NBA forward Caron Butler told TMZ Sports, adding that he thinks Jimmy Butler is “a real winner.” The Timberwolves can basically make any of the following decisions: — Move Butler right away and start camp without distraction; — Hang onto him for a while and see if he changes his mind; — Work out a sign-and-trade; — Make him play out the year. Butler was their leading scorer last season. He’s an All-Star. He helped them end a 14-year playoff drought. Losing him, no matter what they get back, wouldn’t seem to help the Wolves’ chances of returning to the playoffs in a still-loaded Western Conference. Sometimes, even irreconcilable differences work out. Houston won NBA championships in 1994 and 1995, led by Hakeem Olajuwon. People forget that in 1992, he demanded a trade in a very ugly situation sparked by the Rockets thinking that he was faking a hamstring injury. They mended fences and won titles. Most of the time, though, when a player wants out, they get out. Dwight Howard demanded to be traded by Orlando in 2012, and got his way. Shaquille O’Neal wanted to leave the Lakers in 2004, got sent to the Heat, and then eventually forced them to send him to Phoenix. Chris Paul and Chris Webber have forced trades, too. And it’s not a new thing — Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar wanted trades and got them. Butler got his trade ball rolling. Where it goes, at least this season, that’s up to Wolves coach and president Tom Thibodeau — whose own future in Minnesota might be hanging by a thread as well right now — more than anyone else. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

Carrie Underwood opens up about her miscarriages

  View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Carrie Underwood (@carrieunderwood) on Apr 4, 2018 at 8:01am PDT As heartbreaking as it is, miscarriages are actually more common than people think. I imagine that going through it is a difficult process and not everyone is comfortable talking about it. However, there are some women out there who choose to open up about their experience. In an interview on CBS Sunday Morning, Carrie Underwood spoke up about hers. She is pregnant now but getting there wasn't easy. "We got pregnant early 2017, and it didn't work out," she shared. "Got pregnant again i...Keep on reading: Carrie Underwood opens up about her miscarriages.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Ariana Grande s Sweetener : A grandiose pop panorama

It is impossible not to think of the Manchester tragedy when talking about Ariana Grande’s new album, Sweetener. Right after her Dangerous Woman Tour concert in the Manchester Arena in England on May 22, 2017, a suicide bomber detonated a bomb that killed 22 people and injured around 500 ......»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2018

‘Premature to talk about martial law extension’

Malacañang has ceased talking about the possibility of extending martial law in parts of Mindanao after the deadly attacks in Sultan Kudarat that left three people dead and several others wounded last Tuesday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 31st, 2018

Lacson: Martial law, BOL could not guarantee peace in Mindanao

        The recent bombing in Sultan Kudarat only suggests that "neither martial law nor the Bangsamoro Organic Law could guarantee peace in Mindanao," Senator Panfilo Lacson on Thursday.   "Instead, it is my view that the National Security Council and our ground security forces should take a hard look at their security plans and strategy, especially in the South, and try to avert the vicious cycle of talking peace with one tribal group while alienating the others," he said in a statement.   The bomb attack in Isulan, Sultan Kudarat on Tuesday night left at least three people dead and dozens of others injured.   READ: S...Keep on reading: Lacson: Martial law, BOL could not guarantee peace in Mindanao.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 30th, 2018

PVL: Lady Falcons, Lady Maroons start Final Four showdown

Unbeaten Adamson University looks to reassert its mastery over University of the Philippines on Wednesday in Game 1 of the best-of-three Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. The Lady Falcons went on a rampage in the elimination round, sweeping their seven assignments including a 25-22, 19-25, 25-23, 26-24, victory over the Lady Maroons. Adamson wants to duplicate that win in the battle set at 2:00 p.m. not only to move closer to a breakthrough Finals appearance but also to prove that their victory in their first is no fluke.   The game will air via livestream. “Me and (UP) coach Godfrey (Okumu) after the game (in the elims) we have this really competitive banter. But I know he wants to kick my ass and I wanna kick his ass too,” said Lady Falcons coach Air Padda, who is a good friend of Okumu. “So I think going into the semis I’m excited and I wanna play him again. Because I don’t want people talking about how we barely won. So if I beat you twice so there’s really nothing to talk about. But I know it’s going to be a good series.” The Lady Maroons advanced in the semis after eliminating San Beda College in straight sets last Sunday. Okumu hopes that this time UP will get a different result in their rematch with Adamson. “We played them before and it was a seesaw game, even though we lost against them, but the game was pretty much balanced,” he said. The Lady Falcons will bank on veterans Eli Soyud, Joy Dacoron, Bernadette Flora and setter MJ Igao against the Lady Maroons led by Isa Molde, Marian Buitre, Marist Layug and Ayel Estranero.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2018

Hundreds line up to pay respects to Aretha Franklin

DETROIT --- Hundreds of people are lining up to pay their final respects to Aretha Franklin. Fans outside Detroit's Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History have been talking about their memories of the Queen of Soul as they wait before dawn Tuesday for the start of public viewing. Occasionally the crowd bursts into song. Many of those in line are from Detroit, but others traveled from as far as Las Vegas and Miami. Paula Marie Seniors says the setting for the public viewings Tuesday and Wednesday couldn't be more fitting. The associate professor of Africana studies at Virginia Tech says Franklin is "being honored almost like a queen at one of the most important ...Keep on reading: Hundreds line up to pay respects to Aretha Franklin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 28th, 2018

New lease on life for Xian’s hoop dreams

For Xian Lim, portraying a music executive in Joyce Bernal's Pinoy iteration of the Korean hit, "Miss Granny," isn't just another "bread trip." "Playing Lawrence, my character in the film, wasn't really much of a stretch, because we both love music," the dashing actor mused. "But there's something about the movie's theme of giving people second chances that strongly resonates with me. And it's making me realize there are things we should never lose sight of ... that there are dreams we should continue pursuing till we realize them." If you think Xian is talking about acting or the pursuit of fame, think again. That little-discussed "dream" actually began to take shape 10 years ...Keep on reading: New lease on life for Xian’s hoop dreams.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

NFL preseason games see players demonstrate during anthem

By The Associated Press Player demonstrations took place during the national anthem at several early NFL preseason games Thursday night. In Philadelphia, Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins and cornerback De'Vante Bausby raised their fists during the anthem, and defensive end Chris Long placed his arm around Jenkins' shoulder. Jenkins had stopped his demonstration last December. Defensive end Michael Bennett walked out of the tunnel during the anthem and walked toward the bench while it played. It appeared all the Steelers stood. "Everybody is waiting for what the league is going to do," Jenkins said. "We won't let it stop what we stand for. I was very encouraged last year with the direction and that obviously took a different turn. "I think it's important to utilize the platform as we can because for whatever reason, we have framed this demonstration in a negative light, and often players have to defend why we feel the need to fight for everyday Americans, and in actuality we're doing the right thing." At Miami, Dolphins receivers Kenny Stills and Albert Wilson and defensive end Robert Quinn protested during the anthem. Stills and Wilson kneeled behind teammates lined up standing along the sideline. Quinn stood and raised his right fist. There were no apparent protests by the Buccaneers. Stills kneeled during the anthem during the 2016-17 seasons and has been vocal discussing social injustice issues that inspired the protest movement by NFL players. Former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, a leader of the movement, tweeted support for Stills and Wilson. "My brother @kstills continued his protest of systemic oppression tonight by taking a knee," the tweet said. "Albert Wilson joined him in protest. Stay strong brothers!" And in Seattle, three Seahawks players ran into the tunnel leading to the team's locker room prior to the playing of "The Star-Spangled Banner." Defensive linemen Branden Jackson and Quinton Jefferson, and offensive lineman Duane Brown left the field following team introductions and before the start of the anthem. They returned to the sideline immediately after it concluded. All three were among a group of Seattle players that sat during the anthem last season. In Jacksonville, four Jaguars remained in the locker room during the national anthem, and team officials said it would be up to the players to explain why they weren't on the field. Cornerback Jalen Ramsey, linebacker Telvin Smith, and running backs Leonard Fournette and T.J. Yeldon joined teammates on the sideline after the anthem. "As a man, I got certain beliefs," said Smith, who wore "Salute the Service" cleats. "You know what I mean? This is not going to become a distraction, and Jacksonville's not going to become a distraction for this team. I got beliefs. I did what I did. I don't know if it's going to be every week, can't answer if it's going to be every week. "But as a man I've got to stand for something. I love my team, I'm dedicated to my teammates, and that's what we're talking about. I did what I did. It was love. I hope people see it and respect it. I respect views." At Baltimore, both teams stood, but while most of the Ravens lined up shoulder to shoulder on the sideline, second-year linebacker Tim Williams stood alone in front of the bench with his back toward the field. All of the players on each team at New England appeared to stand for the national anthem, some bowing their heads and others placing their hands on their hearts. The Patriots observed a moment of silence beforehand for Weymouth, Massachusetts, police officer Michael Chesna, who was killed last month in the line of duty. The league and the players' union have yet to announce a policy for this season regarding demonstrations during the anthem after the league initially ordered everyone to stand on the sideline when "The Star-Spangled Banner" is played, or remain in the locker room. "The NFL has been engaged in constructive discussions with the NFL Players Association regarding the anthem and issues of equality and social justice that are of concern to many Americans," league spokesman Brian McCarthy said in an email. "While those discussions continue, the NFL has agreed to delay implementing or enforcing any club work rules that could result in players being disciplined for their conduct during the performance of the anthem. "Meanwhile, there has been no change in the NFL's policy regarding the national anthem. The anthem will continue to be played before every game, and all player and non-player personnel on the field at that time are expected to stand during the presentation of the flag and performance of the anthem. Personnel who do not wish to do so can choose to remain in the locker room. "We remain committed to working with the players to identify solutions and to continue making progress on important social issues affecting our communities."  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

Cowboys sort through roles for receivers without Dez Bryant

By Schuyler Dixon, Associated Press OXNARD, Calif. (AP) — Allen Hurns isn't sure when, or even if, more specific roles will be settled for Dallas Cowboys receivers in the first season without Dez Bryant. Offensive coordinator Scott Linehan said it's more "when" than "if." "Right now, you guys have probably noticed, we're moving guys around a lot," Linehan said about a week into training camp in California. "That's a positive, especially early and now. But the thing that's gotta be improved upon is OK, when it gets down to crunch time, this is the guy, he's a go-to player in this route or this play." "We're making strides. But we've got to make strides here quickly," he said. The Cowboys don't have a so-called No. 1 receiver after dumping Bryant, the franchise leader in touchdown receptions, in a cost-cutting move during the offseason. Cole Beasley, with 53 fewer career TDs (20), is the Dallas dean in a mix of holdovers, newcomers and rookies that lacks anyone even close to the pedigree of Bryant. Before skipping a couple of practices with a mild leg issue, the 6-foot-1 Hurns was with the diminutive pair of fellow newcomer Tavon Austin and Beasley in three-receiver sets with the first team. Austin and Beasley, both listed at 5-8, are on the field a lot together. "I'd rather see it as two fast, quick guys," receivers coach Sanjay Lal said when asked about two small guys on the field at the same time. "Yes, an advantage I think." Hurns spent most of his four seasons with Jacksonville as an inside receiver but said his best year — the only 1,000-yard season among the dozen receivers the Cowboys brought to camp — came when he spent more time outside. Austin, acquired in a trade with the Los Angeles Rams after five disappointing seasons as the eighth overall pick in 2013, had at least as many carries as catches three times in those five years. So there's little question he will move around in formations. But he probably won't be the only one moving around. "The main thing for us, everybody needs to know all three positions and get comfortable at what you've got to do," Hurns said. "Right now, no one has like a set position where you're just inside or just outside." And Beasley tends to think it doesn't matter. "You're still getting open and catching balls," he said. "It's about production, whether it's from the inside or outside. Wes Welker led the league in receiving as a slot receiver. We've got tons of guys who can do both. If you're a receiver, you're playing all of them." Michael Gallup, the first receiver drafted by Dallas post-Bryant as a third-rounder, is the rookie most likely to get significant playing time. Sixth-round pick Cedrick Wilson is probably out for the season with a shoulder injury sustained on the first day in pads at camp. The receiver best built for the outside is the easiest one to forget: 6-2, 210-pound Terrance Williams, Dallas' third-round choice five years ago. After breaking his foot in January, the former Dallas high school player was arrested for public intoxication in May coming off the first season of his career without a touchdown. Having recently settled all the claims with police in the Dallas suburb of Frisco, where the Cowboys have their headquarters, Williams is quietly trying to work his way into the rotation. Williams, who isn't talking to reporters during camp, has been getting first-team work after starting out with the second group at camp. "He's worked really hard to come back from the injury," coach Jason Garrett said. "He has been limited the whole time. We anticipated that. Hasn't hit any roadblocks where he's going backward." Williams isn't alone in switching spots on the depth chart. The Cowboys have been doing that since the start of the offseason. And it's not out of the question that it could continue into the regular season. "That's the one thing I like about the whole situation," Austin said. "I don't care who the one, two or three receiver is. The more people we've got, the faster we are." With the retirement of 15-year tight end Jason Witten, the Cowboys don't have a pass-catcher in his 30s. The oldest — by two months over Beasley — is another newcomer in journeyman Deonte Thompson. From Linehan's point of view, it's a young group. "Every day we're learning something about our guys," Linehan said. "Finding the balance is out here and the proof's in what you're able to do and how you're able to perform when you've got a matchup and you've got to win that matchup. We're finding who those guys are right now.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018

ONE: Former champion Eduard Folayang is fighting his way back to main event status

On Friday night at ONE Championship: Reign of Kings at the Mall of Asia Arena, former ONE Lightweight world champion Eduard ‘The Landslide’ Folayang will be taking on undefeated Russian Aziz Pahrudinov. It will be the second straight time that Folayang will be pitted against an undefeated Russian grappler, but it’ll also be the second time in as many fights that he faces a relative unknown who’s set to make their ONE Championship debut. Back in May, Folayang rudely welcomed Kharun Atlangeriev to ONE Championship with a dominant beatdown in Singapore for the Unanimous Decision win. It was his first time back since losing his championship to Martin Nguyen in Manila back in November of 2017. After headlining his last two business trips in Manila, Folayang now finds himself in the middle of the card, and while others may see that as a relegation, the former champion sees it as just another challenge to go through as he works his way back up ONE Championship’s lightweight ranks. “As a martial artist, you need to face the challenges that come to you.” Folayang said during Tuesday’s Reign of Kings Press Conference at the City of Dreams Grand Ballroom. “You lose on Monday, but it’s up to us if we will be losing on Tuesday and the other days of the week, so I think being a martial artist, you need to do your part and keep improving so that whatever opponent you’ll be facing, you know that you’ll be able to give the very best that you have.” A win against Pahrudinov on Friday will definitely push Folayang back into the title picture, says ONE Championship founder and chairman Chatri Sityodtong. “For the record, Eduard is not a gatekeeper, I still consider Eduard very much a title contender. Of course, we gave him two tough fights, two undefeated Russian contenders, especially Aziz, who’s a Combat Sambo world champion, this is no walk in the park.” “Eduard’s not a gatekeeper. If he wins this fight, he’s very much back in the title picture.” “It’s great that he beat an undefeated Russian in his last fight. This fight, again with Aziz, is going to be a very tough fight, but again, if he beats a Combat Sambo world champion from Dagestan, Russia, who’s undefeated, 20-0, it says something about who he is a as a warrior.” Sityodtong continued. Sityodtong has always been vocal about his belief in Folayang. When the Pinoy MMA icon lost his title back in November, Sityodtong was one of the first to say that he believes Folayang will bounce back. The ONE Championship head honcho even took offense to people who thought that Folayang’s days as a competitor were over. “When Eduard lost, everyone wrote him off, I remember a lot of people saying he should retire. I said bullsh*t, because they don’t know what they’re talking about, they don’t know martial arts.” “I said Eduard’s gonna come back, watch.” Sityodtong added. Now, eight months later, Eduard Folayang is indeed back, and could be taking another step back towards redemption after Friday's fight night.   Former ONE Lightweight World Champion Eduard 'The Landslide' Folayang meets unbeaten Russian Aziz Pahrudinov at ONE: Reign of Kings on Friday, July 27th at the Mall of Asia Arena. Catch it LIVE starting at 8:30 PM on ABS-CBN S+A channel 23!.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

Cacai on estranged ‘Love’ Ahron: Who am I not to forgive?

There are people who just aren't meant to be together romantically and are probably better off as friends," said comedienne Cacai Bautista when asked about the status of her relationship with actor Ahron Villena. Cacai admitted not talking to Ahron for over a year because she felt hurt that the latter publicly denied ever having had a romantic relationship with her. This was even though they were often seen together and went on trips abroad, or that Cacai would refer to him as "Love." "I've learned a lot of lessons from what happened between us. I'm sure he picked up a lot of things from it, as well. I've become more mature because of it. Who am I not to forgive?" the comedienn...Keep on reading: Cacai on estranged ‘Love’ Ahron: Who am I not to forgive?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2018

Cacai on estranged ‘Love’ Ahron: Who am I not to forgive?

There are people who just aren’t meant to be together romantically and are probably better off as friends,” said comedienne Cacai Bautista when asked about the status of her relationship with actor Ahron Villena. Cacai admitted not talking to Ahron for over a year because she felt hurt that the latter publicly denied ever having… link: Cacai on estranged ‘Love’ Ahron: Who am I not to forgive?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2018

God’s Folly

If there is one way to describe President Duterte is that he can be consistent. I am not talking about his political agenda or economic plan, but about his recent statement calling God stupid. Saying those words is consistent with how his administration treated people. His lack of respect towards God is seen in his actions and policies. The outrage that many people felt following his tirade against God and the Catholic Church is valid. We hear about those who denounced Duterte as blasphemous while others were strong to defend the account of Adam and Eve in Genesis......»»

Category: newsSource:  davaotodayRelated NewsJun 30th, 2018