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Our elusive chance at peace, prosperity

Our elusive chance at peace, prosperity.....»»

Category: newsSource: thestandard thestandardJan 12th, 2019

Rose embraces new home, blocks out doubters

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com MINNEAPOLIS – Don’t let go of the rope. It’s one of Tom Thibodeau’s most familiar exhortations, a mantra of sorts to keep his teams locked in, digging down and generally committed through whatever grueling test they’re facing, be it a game, a road trip, a spate of injuries or the entire season. The trouble for Derrick Rose with that particular Thibs-ism is, so often, he has been the rope. On one side of an unfortunate tug o’ war, we’ve had the Rose loyalists, the fans, friends and family who believe that the 2010-11 NBA Most Valuable Player’s return from injury hell to elite status is just one more, legit opportunity away. Pulling from the other side, there is a growing group of Rose skeptics who are convinced that the Chicago kid’s best days – his most explosive, elusive, game-changing moves – are behind him, strewn on the floors of too many surgical rooms and rehab gyms. Rose, 29, knows they’re there. One group pulling for him, the other doubting him. And in an unusually candid and forceful moment Saturday (Sunday, PHL time), the normally soft-spoken Rose delivered a stark message to them all. “Yeah,” Rose said after his first full practice since signing a minimum-salary contract Thursday (Friday, PHL tie) to join the Minnesota Timberwolves. “This is how I feel about the whole perspective on it: You can have your perspective on me as far as I’m a bum, I can’t play, I can’t shoot, this and that. All right. Cool. I have no hard feelings with that. I’m cool with that. If that’s how you feel, that’s how you feel. “But at the same time, I don’t need your [bleeping] validation.” Rose’s eyes burned bright, in a direct response to the many health challenges he has endured from acquaintances and strangers both, picking at whatever good or bad is left of his basketball career. “I know who I am,” Rose continued. “I know the type of player I am. So, you respect that and I respect that, and we should be good. That’s how I feel about it.” In other words, you work your side of the street, Rose will continue to work his. If there are NBA administrators like Thibodeau, the Wolves’ head coach and president of basketball operations, willing to give him another chance, he’ll be chasing the ghost of his own self while trying to help somebody win. One more chance Rose’s latest grab at faded glory could begin in Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) matinee against the defending champion Golden State Warriors at Target Center (editor's note: Rose wound up playing just seven minutes off the bench. He finished with two points on 1-of-5 shooting with a rebound, two assists, and two turnovers). It probably is his last, best shot to salvage something from a 2017-18 season that’s been largely lost due to injury, yes, but other factors outside Rose’s control as well. What looked like a terrific opportunity back in training camp – signing with Eastern Conference power Cleveland Cavaliers and home to the game’s best player (and Rose nemesis) in LeBron James – got sideways fast. In the Cavs’ second game, on a drive to the rim, Rose got whacked across the face and neck by Milwaukee center Greg Monroe. He landed badly on the baseline, suffering a “jacked-up” left ankle that left him in a walking boot and sidelined him for 11 of Cleveland’s next 15 games. Then word got out just before Thanksgiving that Rose had left the team, reportedly to contemplate his future as an NBA player. He was gone for nearly two weeks, at least part of it back home in Chicago, during what Cavs GM Koby Altman called “a very challenging and difficult time for Derrick.” Rose didn’t play again until Cleveland’s 44th game. In nine appearances over the next three weeks, he was a shell of the three-time All-Star he’d once been, averaging 6.3 points, 1.6 assists and 13.3 minutes, while shooting 39 percent. On Feb. 8 (Feb. 9, PHL time), he was one of six Cavaliers players dealt by Altman at the NBA trade deadline, sent to Salt Lake City as a throw-in to acquire Utah’s Rodney Hood and Sacramento’s George Hill. Two days later, the Jazz waived Rose. Four weeks passed before Thibodeau got the green light from Minnesota owner Glen Taylor to sign Rose. The Oklahoma City Thunder had sniffed in his direction, only to opt for veteran backup Corey Brewer. Rose had family duties to attend to – he and Alaina Anderson had a baby girl in Chicago to start the week – but he also had spent time working out by himself in the Cavs’ facility or at Cleveland State’s gym. The end seemed near. Given Rose’s limited involvement this season, he probably would have been a long shot to land with one of the league’s 30 teams in 2018-19, had Thibodeau not reached out. The people on the dark end of Rose’s rope were winning. Now, this buys him time for a shout-out to the folks on the other end. “‘Don’t give up,’ Rose said he would tell them. Talking later at the downtown Minneapolis hotel where he’s staying, he wanted to assure people that his desire to play remains strong, his passion to keep trying still burns, and his mental fitness for this and future challenges on or away from the court is fine. “I still have faith,” Rose said, two bags of ice strapped to each leg. “No matter what happens, I still have a lot of faith in myself and my ability. It’s just about opportunity and catching a rhythm. Whenever I do catch a rhythm, I’d rather see what it is then. Than to, like, give up knowing I have so much left. Like, ‘Damn, I should have kept playing.’ “I’m going to give it my all. And once I do, then it’s like, ‘All right, cool. I gave it my all, now what’s this next phase in my life?’ “But as far as right now, I’m still in it. I’ve got two kids that can look at me now. The oldest, my boy [P.J.] is 5 years old. He’s looking at me right now. He sees everything. I’m going to tell him, ‘No excuses. Don’t come to me cryin’, this and that. Nah.’ He’ll see what I’ve had to go through. ‘Now suck it up and go out there and do what you’ve got to do.’” A career interrupted For some NBA players whose careers got waylaid by injuries – Brandon Roy, Greg Oden, Penny Hardaway – their bodies finally refused to cooperate. They went from 60-to-0, no wiggle room on whether they would continue. Rose, for all his setbacks, has worked his way back – not back to his previous form – from each and every injury. From the ACL blowout that started him down his hobbled path in April 2012 to three subsequent meniscus knee surgeries, from the left orbital fracture he suffered when he caught teammate Taj Gibson’s errant elbow in the face in the opening practice of 2015-16 to the lingering ankle sprain dealt by Monroe’s blow in October. In that sense, Rose is more like Bernard King, Sam Bowie or Grant Hill, standout players whose career trajectories were forever altered – but not ended – by injuries. Rose speaks as if he has reached some level of peace with his maladies, referring to his injuries as “part of the game” and his particular “cross” to bear. “I’ve just had five surgeries more than other people,” he said. “That’s the way I look at it. That don’t mean that I can’t play. That don’t mean that I lost my love for the game. No.” What Rose doesn’t like is the “fragile” label that’s been affixed to him. He’s less interested that he has played in only 486 of approximately 789 regular-season games so far, while proud of the 130 he logged with the Bulls (2015-16) and Knicks (2016-17) more recently. It seems clear that the reckless abandon with which Rose played – and the excruciating torque he put on his knees with his bounding, zig-zag attacks through the lane – wreaked havoc on his knees. Beyond that, though, he’s not buying any pattern business. “You see how I was injured [in October]? I was taken out of the air,” Rose said. “People are like, ‘Aw, he’s always injured.’ Are you just watching highlights, just looking at clips, like new fans are these days? Or are you watching an entire game? Are you just reading reports that come up on your phone?” Scouts say that Rose has lost both quickness and leaping ability, without developing a perimeter game to compensate. They also bundle his Cleveland hiatus with the AWOL episode last season with the Knicks, when Rose left the team without notice before a game against New Orleans, to question his reliability and commitment. Rose disputes the comments about his game, citing the circumstances in New York and Cleveland. “I could sit here and tell you, ‘I’m gonna try to change this. Do this and do that.’ Nah, I always felt, it starts with my rhythm,” he said. “[In] New York ... I was playing the triangle [offense favored by former Knicks president Phil Jackson] and still playing pretty well [18.0 ppg, 4.4 apg, 32.5 mpg]. In Cleveland, when did I really have a chance to catch a rhythm? When did I play 20 games straight? Or 10 games? Five games?” As for his reliability – or likelihood to take a powder on the Wolves the way he did on the Knicks and seemed to do on the Cavs – Rose said there is no issue there, either. In the past couple weeks, Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan (depression) and Cleveland’s Kevin Love (panic attacks) have opened up about psychological challenges they and other athletes face. But Rose shook his head as the question was asked. “Oh no, no, no,” he said. “I’m blessed, man. Beyond blessed. It’s not even ... what do I have to complain about? I don’t have anything to complain about. Of course, I wish I was on the court more. I think in time, with the right opportunity, I’ll be out there more. “I’m not depressed, even though I think everybody deals with some depression in some way. It’s about how you deal with it. We’re emotional creatures. We hold onto things. I try to meditate, try to do little things to change my mindset and try to read things to easy my nerves.” Rose admitted he did wonder if he would get another chance, once the Cavs traded him to a Jazz team that had no use for him. “Especially when you get dropped by a team like Cleveland, that needed players,” he said. “It makes other teams think, ‘Damn, if they didn’t keep him...’” Rose has not spoken with James since being dealt, he said. “The way I take it, I don’t take it as personal,” Rose said. “They didn’t need my services. That’s the way I look at it, OK? I understand. It’s business. Does that stop me from working hard? Does that stop me from still putting out goals and trying to reach my goals? No.” Familiar faces aid return Now Rose is reunited with Thibodeau, Gibson, Jimmy Butler (sidelined after his own meniscus surgery) and familiar coaches and staff making up the “TimberBulls.” He even trusts Thibodeau, often criticized for the heavy minutes he loads on his top players, not to break him. “If anything, I want him to play me,” Rose said. “I want to show to him that I can still play. I want him to see me and be like, ‘Damn, he’s still got it.’ I want him to count on me. I want to be held accountable. You know what I mean? I don’t just want to be, like, an average guy on the team riding along just to see how far they go. I really want to add.” Said Thibodeau, who ran Rose Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) through a rigorous refresher course on his playbook: “Obviously when he was at an MVP level, that was the peak. But he also, my last year in Chicago, he had a great year. ... He still has the potential to be very good. He’s young, that was the other part of it. He knows some of our guys, he knows the system. “Like all stories, there’s a beginning, there’s a middle and there’s an end,” the Wolves coach added. “I don’t think it’s a finished story.” Gibson thinks Rose can shoulder some of Butler’s late-game duties, simply because the scoring guard has strong muscle memory of such situations. He, too, hopes Rose’s story can take a happy turn. “I’ve got my fingers crossed,” the veteran forward said. “I truly believe in him. He’s got a lot left in the tank. It’s just, sometimes life doesn’t go your way and you have to push through it and keep fighting.” Thibodeau has said that Rose, like starter Jeff Teague and backup Tyus Jones, can play both backcourt spots, so he can mix-and-match based on situations. Rose anticipates no problem walking that line between asserting his game and rocking the Wolves’ boat. “My job coming here, I’m not trying to step on nobody’s toes. I’m not trying to take someone’s spot,” he said. “I’m not trying to show myself. Nah. I’m here to win. Me going out there and playing, hopefully you all see that. ‘He’s making money plays. He’s playing to win. And that’s what we wanted from him.’” Not that Rose, lest we forget from up top, needs anyone’s bleeping validation. Boosters and doubters can pull this way or that, but he said he’ll be the one who decides when his time is up. “When my love of the game is not there,” Rose said, sounding sincere near the end of his 10th season overall. “When I get tired of going to the gym. “Don’t get me wrong, we all go through that. But after a couple of days, I get antsy, I want to be in the gym. When a week or two goes by and I haven’t touched the gym, even in the summer, oh yeah, I’d know it was over.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Myanmar’s great hope fails to live up to expectations – The Guardian

The script called for the lead actor, a Nobel prize winner, to seize control of a country, bring peace where there was conflict and prosperity where there was poverty. A nation emerging from years of military dictatorship was to become a beacon of hope not only for its cowed population but also for much of a fractured and turbulent south-east Asia. But like many political dramas – especially over the past 12 months – the script has not been followed by Myanmar and its de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. Now, a year since one of the world’s most famous prisoners of conscience came to power in the specially created position of state counsellor, the talk is not of progress. Instead, it is of drastically escalating ethnic conflicts that have simmered and sporadically exploded for decades; a new Rohingya Muslim insurgency that has prompted an army crackdown some say may amount to crimes against humanity; a rash of online defamation cases that have fostered a panic over freedom of speech; and a repressive legal framework that allowed the generals to jail so many still being in place. And all the while, Aung San Suu Kyi is accused of remaining mostly silent, doggedly avoiding the media. Many who led the campaign [to free her] were on the liberal side. I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher. Interviews by the Guardian with more than a dozen diplomats, analysts and current and former advisers reveal frustrations with a top-down government struggling to cope with immense challenges. Aung San Suu Kyi’s questionable leadership style, her inability or unwillingness to communicate a vision, and her reluctance to speak out against the persecution of minorities have raised the question of whether the popular narrative is misplaced. And although some defend her, saying it takes time to right the wrongs of decades, others see a fundamental misunderstanding of the woman herself. “Many of the people who led the campaign [to free Aung San Suu Kyi] … were more on the liberal side of the spectrum,” one diplomat put it. “I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher.” It’s a stark contrast to the Aung San Suu Kyi who, during 15 years of house arrest at her lakeside villa on University Avenue in Yangon, stood on rickety tables and delivered speeches about human rights over the gate. “And she was electric,” said David Mathieson, a longtime Myanmar researcher for Human Rights Watch who is now an independent consultant. “She was funny. She was informative. She was principled … And I think it’s lamentable that she’s not doing the equivalent of that now.” Five hours north by car from Yangon, Myanmar’s dystopian capital Naypyidaw stands surrounded by densely forested mountains. It is here, in the so-called Abode of Kings supposedly built to insulate Myanmar’s generals from attack, amid a landscape of deserted 20-lane highways and grandiose hotels, that Aung Sun Suu Kyi lives her life in power. The 71-year-old is a disciplined ruler. Her habit, established during imprisonment, is to wake before dawn and meditate in the house she shares with her pet dog and a small retinue of maids. She has breakfast with an adviser, often Kyaw Tint Swe, a former ambassador who spent decades defending the junta’s actions. An aide, Win Htein, says Aung San Suu Kyi eats very little. “The amount of food she is taking is like a kitten,” he said. “She doesn’t eat carbohydrates. Fruit and vegetables. No pork, or mutton, or beef. Only fish.” Her few indulgences include a vast wardrobe of luxurious silk longyis and evening film viewings, musicals being her favourite. Win Htein recently gave her a copy of La La Land. But mostly she works. And there is a lot of work. As well as state counsellor – a position created to get around the military-drafted constitution that bars her from the presidency – she is foreign minister, minister of the president’s office and chair of numerous committees. Widely described as a micromanager, she pores over documents after hours. A source close to the attorney general’s office says she asks to see a copy of every draft bill before it is submitted to parliament. Ministers routinely pass decisions upwards. “The problem is there are no policymakers in her cabinet,” said Burmese political analyst Myat Ko. People who know her say Aung San Suu Kyi inspires both devotion and fear. She is variously described as charming and charismatic, and sharp and authoritarian. “She feels like a real leader,” one diplomat said. “Intelligent, quick-witted, quite funny.” At the same time, he added: “I would say that she has appeared to be very keen to be the sole decision-maker to have no chance of establishing rival power centres.” Echelons above her subordinates in stature, the state counsellor is often depicted as living in a bubble, surrounded by a cabal of advisers who are too nervous to convey hard truths. A Yangon-based analyst working on the peace process said bad news often does not reach her. “In meetings, she is dismissive, dictatorial – in some cases, belittling,” said a senior aid worker who, like many others interviewed for this story, insisted on anonymity because he works with the administration. The government, he said, has become “so centralised, there is complete fear of her”. This is not the administration many hoped for when the National League for Democracy (NLD) took over the government [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 31st, 2017

Bong Go urges NPAs to give peace a chance

FORMER SPECIAL Assistant to the President Christopher Lawrence “Bong” Go yesterday echoed President Rodrigo Duterte’s fresh initiative for peace talks […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJan 17th, 2019

Distasteful Duterte: The Maid Episode

Choosing the right candidate can be a daunting experience when candidates and their supporters barrage voters with heaven-on-earth promises and peace-and- prosperity images ........»»

Category: newsSource:  philnewsRelated NewsJan 5th, 2019

BANDILLO | Elusive peace

Efforts were made since early February this year for the possible resumption of formal talks. However, the government backtracked and pushed another track, the localized peace talks which discards the national peace talks held in neutral venue abroad. Last month, November, the President closed all doors to the possible revival of stalled peace talks. He then ordered government forces to wage all-out offensives against the NPA and adopted the whole-of-nation approach to crush the revolutionary movement......»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsDec 30th, 2018

An elusive peace in Asia

To judge by the stream of extraordinary images on the Korean Peninsula, you might think 2018 marked the beginning of an elusive peace in one of the world’s last vestiges of the Cold War......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 29th, 2018

PVL: Dela Cruz hopes BanKo moves on after tough loss

Just a solitary point and BanKo would’ve made a breakthrough Finals stint in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference. The Perlas Spikers came near their goal in the fourth set. Then again, six more times in the fifth. But the elusive winning point never came. “Very disappointing. Nagi-expect kami na pumasok sa Finals,” said BanKo coach Dong dela Cruz after his veteran-laden squad bowed down to a collegiate team, 25-21, 25-23, 17-25, 25-27, 19-21, Sunday in the decider of the best-of-three Final Four series at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. For the fourth straight conference, the Perlas Spikers came up short of making it into the championship round. And just like in the Reinforced Conference, BanKo will settle to compete for the consolation third place against PetroGazz. “'Yung tournament na to, one point na lang papasok na kami sa Finals. Pero 'yun nga, nandiyan na 'yan. 'Yung third place na lang ang pagtuunan namin ng pansin,” said Dela Cruz. BanKo actually took the series opener for their third straight win over the Lady Eagles in the season-ending conference but were swept by Ateneo-Motolite in Game 2.      After yielding the third set, BanKo was given the chance to seal the series in the fourth after making a telling run to move at match point, 25-24, but a costly service error by Kathy Bersola followed by a Maddie Madayag ace and a Nicole Tiamzon attack error forced a decider. The Perlas Spikers rallied from a 6-11 deficit in the fifth frame to take a 14-11 lead but allowed Ateneo-Motolite to save three straight match points and another three more in the closing stretch before BanKo setter Fhen Emnas committed a setting miscue that doomed their campaign as Lady Eagle Ponggay Gaston hammered the finishing blow.  “Sana maglaro pa rin sila nang mabuti,” Dela Cruz said of his wards. “Professional naman 'yung players ko, kumbaga talo na kami. Focus na kami sa third place.” Just like in Game 2, Dela Cruz pointed at their errors – 31 in total – as the culprit while adding that Ateneo-Motolite killed them with solid net defense that the Lady Eagles converted to 18 kill blocks. “'Yung error ulet namin, ang dami. Mahirap manalo kapag ganoon. Noong fifth set, error ulet ang tumalo sa amin,” he said. “I give it to Ateneo talaga, ang ganda noong blocking nila.”       --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2018

Go Negosyo Kapatids support ARMM

When we launched our program “Negosyo Para sa Kapayapaan sa Sulu” in December 2016 in Malacañang, the mission was to bring peace and prosperity to the poorest provinces in the country, most of which are in Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM)......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2018

Robredo to speak at int’l summit in Nepal

  Vice President Leni Robredo is set to leave the country on Wednesday to speak at the Asia Pacific Summit 2018 to be held in Kathmandu, Nepal.   The Office of the Vice President said Robredo was invited to give the keynote speech for the December 1 event. She will join other government officials and leaders, experts, business executives, and civil society leaders from various countries at the summit's welcome banquet.   The summit's topics will revolve on issues such as challenges faced by countries, interdependence, mutual prosperity, universal values, climate change concerns and good governance.   It is organized by the Universal Peace Federati...Keep on reading: Robredo to speak at int’l summit in Nepal.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 28th, 2018

DUTERTE LATEST NEWS – NOVEMBER 20 2018 | PRESIDENT XI JINPING OF CHINA ARRIVES IN MANILA PHILIPPINES – Manila Video

DUTERTE LATEST NEWS – NOVEMBER 21 2018 | “Since President Duterte took office, thanks to the joint efforts of our two sides, we have reopened the door of friendship and cooperation to each other, bringing real benefits to our people and making an important contribution to regional peace, stability, and prosperity.” President Xi Jinping “Pres.… link: DUTERTE LATEST NEWS – NOVEMBER 20 2018 | PRESIDENT XI JINPING OF CHINA ARRIVES IN MANILA PHILIPPINES – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsNov 21st, 2018

Nune Alvarado launches exhibit, ‘Songs from the Sea’

IN the coastal city of Sagay in Negros Occidental, Filipino artist Nunelucio Alvarado has made not only a home but a community. “Inaawitan ako ng dagat,” says Alvarado of the peace he found in this place—the kind that has paved the way for a new kind of prosperity, one that feeds back into his community […] The post Nune Alvarado launches exhibit, ‘Songs from the Sea’ appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

What Rico J. Puno would’ve sung to Imelda Marcos

    Your mantra for the week: "My peace of mind brings me my prosperity." Today, at the temple, we are celebrating 11-11-11, which, in numerology, is a reminder that the most important thing in life is to have peace. Eleven is considered a Master Number, which stands for the Cosmic Number of Peace. In IAMISM, we believe that heaven is your mind at peace, which lends greater credence to what Jesus said: "The kingdom of heaven is at hand," implying that when one is at peace with oneself and with others, truly, heaven is on earth. That state of mind cannot be attained, unless we open our hearts and minds to forgiveness, which means not only forgiving others but also...Keep on reading: What Rico J. Puno would’ve sung to Imelda Marcos.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 11th, 2018

ASIAN GAMES: 3 Pinoy pugs aim to reach gold medal round

JAKARTA --- Three Filipino boxers climb the ring on Friday hoping to beat their respective foes to reach boxing’s gold medal round in the 18th Asian Games. After five Filipinas bagged for the country four gold medals, the men on the 272-member Team Philippines will try to get close to capturing golds of their own. They are Eumir Felix Marcial, Carlo Paalam and Rogen Ladon. “We have three remaining boxers chasing the elusive medal. Hopefully, they can survive the great odds like they did in the past,” said Association of Boxing Alliances of the Philippines Executive Director Ed Picson, referring to Ladon, Paalam and Marcial, who have assured the Philippines of at least three bronze medals and will shoot for the gold-medal round in their respective semis bouts. Of the three, the middleweight Marcial has the biggest chance of advancing, owing to his credentials as a two-time SEA Games champion and a silver medalist in the 2015 Thailand International Boxing Tournament and the Asian Boxing Championship in the same year and country. Marcial, whose most impressive performance here was a Referee-Stopped Contest against pro boxer Nn Kuok Kun of Macau in the preliminaries, takes to the ring at 7:45 p.m. (8:45 in Manila) against Uzbekistan’s Israel Madrimov, who himself isn’t a slouch as he was a former Asian Boxing Champion in 2017. The flyweight Ladon, a SEA Games silver medalist (2015), takes on at 2:15 p.m. Thailand’s Tongdee Yuttapong, a recent champion of the 2018 Thailand Boxing Tournament. Meanwhile, the light flyweight Paalam, a Presidents Cup (2017) and Thailand Boxing Tournament (2018) titlist, fights at 6:15 p.m. India’s one-named boxer Amit, a Grand Prix Usti (2017) and Strandja Memorial (2018) champion. “They have to dismantle all obstacles in the last two stages to reach the podium. It’s a difficult task. I have trust and confidence they can do it because they possess innate boxing skills and experience. They are grizzled veterans and battle-tested,” said Picson. The last time a Filipino boxer won a gold medal in the Asiadwas during the 2010 Guangzhou Games, courtesy of flyweight Rey Saludar. During the 2014 Incheon Asiad, lightweight Charly Suarez settled for a silver after he was beaten by Mongolia's Otgondalai Dornjyambuu in the finals. In Jakarta, five Filipino boxers could not make it past the first round, namely Joel Bacho, Mario Fernandez, James Palicte, Nesthy Petecio and Irish Magno, leaving the huge task of carrying the fight to Ladon, Marcial and Paalam......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 30th, 2018

This Week’s Festivals: Aug. 27 to Sept. 5

  Aug. 27 to 30 Hamungaya Festival   Residents of Isulan in Sultan Kudarat province give thanks for a good harvest year during the celebration of the town's 61st founding anniversary. This year's theme is " Isulan: A picture of a bountiful harvest of progress, peace and prosperity." Festivities include a float competition during the opening ceremonies, a farmers' day, street dancing competition and a cleanup drive.   Sept. 1 to 5 Tuna Festival   The city of General Santos in South Cotabato province pays tribute to the fishermen who have played a major role in turning the city into a booming agri-industrial area and one of the country's ...Keep on reading: This Week’s Festivals: Aug. 27 to Sept. 5.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 25th, 2018

ASIAN GAMES: Medal drought continues for PHI keglers

PALEMBANG --- The Philippines’ quest for a medal in 18th Asian Games bowling remained elusive for the second straight day on Thursday as the No. 1 team of Kenneth Chua, Merwin Tan and Enzo Hernandez wound up in 10th place in men’s trios at the Jakabaring Bowling Center here. Similar to their women’s counterparts the previous day, the Filipinos couldn’t cluster their big games together, combining for a six-games series of 4134, 210 pins off victorious Japanese Tomuyuki Sasaki, Shogo Wada and Shusako Asato with 4344. Malaysia (4235) bagged silver, narrowly relegating Singapore (4226) to the bronze medal at the sold-out bowling arena built specifically for the Games. The other Philippine squad of Jomar Jumapao, Kenzo Umali and Raoul Miranda combined for a meager 3777 to languish in 27th out of 33 teams. “Sayang we had a good chance for bronze going into the last game but missed some crucial spares,” head coach Paeng Nepomuceno said. “Kailangang sabay-sabay na maganda ang laro to win a medal.” For men’s coach Biboy Rivera, the main problem was “lack of sustained focus and penalties, which proved to be very costly.” He cited the case of Tan, who fouled at least three times during the series, resulting to a zero score for that particular frame that subsequently pulled the rest of the team down. “But Merwin is a resilient bowler and I know he will be able to recover and play better in the succeeding events,” said Rivera of Tan, who was a member of the four-man squad that copped a bronze medal in the World Youth Championships early this month in Allen Park, Michigan. With the new scoring system putting premium on strikes,  Chua, Tan and Hernandez were unable to keep abreast with the sizzling scoring pace, combining for 2059 after the first three games to lie in 13th spot, 227 pins behind the frontrunning Japanese. At the hallfway mark, Asato was in blistering form with a three-game average of 269.5, capped by the tournament’s first perfect score of 300 in the third game. Hostilities resume on Friday with the women’s six-man team event with entire squad of Lizal del Rosario, Lara Posadas, Alexis Sy, Rachelle Leon, Dyan Coronacion and Maria Lourdes Arles all seeing action......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

Is the federalist project doomed?

Who would quarrel with a promised path to economic prosperity and lasting peace after decades of persistent poverty and incessant rebellion? Well, it now appears that not everyone agrees with it and they’re not just a small minority. From where we sit, the Federalism proposal and the Charter change that it necessarily entails both seem […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Duterte urges Bangsamoro people to give BOL a chance

President Duterte made the pitch for peace in Mindanao as he urged the Bangsamoro people to take part in the upcoming plebiscite that will ratify the measure creating new autonomous region. Source link: Duterte urges Bangsamoro people to give BOL a chance.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 7th, 2018

In mayor’s view, CCPO, PDEA chiefs have a lot to live up to

HE remains willing to give the police a chance, but recent attacks have made Cebu City Mayor Tomas Osmeña look back at how well previous chiefs of the police force and an anti-drug agency handled peace and order. “We’re always willing to talk. I give my reports every day. They don’t give their reports to… link: In mayor’s view, CCPO, PDEA chiefs have a lot to live up to.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2018

LP officials on BOL approval: Mindanao is a step closer to peace

Officials of the Liberal Party (LP) commended the Moro and indigenous peoples, lawmakers, and other stakeholders after the bicameral conference committeeapproved the Bangsamoro Organic Law (BOL). Party officials, consisting of chairperson Vice President Leni Robredo, president Senator Kiko Pangilinan andsecretary-general Representative Kit Belmonte, said in a joint statement on Sunday that with the BOL, Mindanao is a step closer to peace. "We commend the Moro leaders, lawmakers, and other stakeholders for getting the work done," they said. "This brings the Filipino people a critical step closer to peace and prosperity, and our Moro brothers and sisters to their quest for the rig...Keep on reading: LP officials on BOL approval: Mindanao is a step closer to peace.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2018

PVL: Cool Smashers sweep way to breakthrough crown

Crowd-favorite Creamline quenched its thirst for the crown after completing a best-of-three Finals sweep over PayMaya, 25-19, 25-20, 25-11, to rule the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Reinforced Conference Wednesday at the MOA Arena. After a couple of third place finishes in the inaugural season, the Cool Smashers finally captured the elusive title with a dominating series victory over the High Flyers. Creamline's win also handed BanKo the bronze medal after the Perlas Spikers defeated the dethroned Pocari Sweat-Air Force in Game 2 of their battle for third series in four sets. BanKo evened the series 1-1 but took the podium finish by virtiue of higher qoutient. Alyssa Valdez, who won her first title after three years and since winning the defunct V-League Reinforced Conference back in 2015,  led the Cool Smashers with 19 points built on 15 kills, three aces and a kill block. Michele Gumabao and Thai import Kuttika Kaepwin added 12 markers each while American Laura Schaudt had nine. Prized playmaker and Best Setter winner Jia Morado was named Finals Most Valuable Player after tallying 29 excellent sets for the Cool Smashers. Morado averaged 8.7 excellent sets per frame in the Finals.               Creamline played with the same intensity and power it showed when the Cool Smashers took the opening game in four sets, 25-21, 22-25, 25-20, 25-19, ast Sunday and never gave PayMaya a chance to mount any significant resistance. The High Flyers already waved the white flag in the third set after getting buried by as much as 23-9.  Gumabao pushed Creamline at match point, 24-10, before PayMaya saved a point in the next play. Jerrili Malabanan then surrendered the match after sending her service long as the Cool Smashers celebrate their conquest. American Tess Rountree was the only High Flyer in double figures with 12 points while Grethcel Soltones was limited to only six.        --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 11th, 2018