Malls asked to extend holiday schedule

MMDA has asked mall operators to maintain the “open late, close late” holiday schedule amid expectations of traffic congestion arising from the ongoing infrastructure projects under the “Build, Build, Build” program this year. #BeFullyInformed Malls asked to extend holiday schedule The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) has asked mall operators to maintain the “open late,… link: Malls asked to extend holiday schedule.....»»

Category: newsSource: manilainformer manilainformerJan 12th, 2018

QC bars same sale schedule of adjacent malls

Adjacent malls in Quezon City are now barred from having the same schedule of weekends-only sale this holiday season......»»

Category: newsSource: NewsOct 20th, 2016

Edsa @ 32: It happened long before we were born, but …

Visit us on Instagram To be You; Facebook: To be You; e-mail We asked young people what comes to mind when we talk about the Edsa People Power Revolution. What does it take to win back our freedom? Are violence and mutiny the only ways to break free from the clutches of an iron hand? Or had Edsa become just another holiday? But everyone who went to Edsa knew what they were doing. On Feb. 25, 1986, the world watched in awe as Filipinos stood their ground peacefully to put an end to the Marcos dictatorship. Through prayers and a show of unity and courage, they reclaimed the democracy they lost during 14 years of authoritarian rule. Edsa happened 32 ...Keep on reading: Edsa @ 32: It happened long before we were born, but ….....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 23rd, 2018

Mac Belo owns up to crunch-time blunders vs Magnolia

"Walang blowout [party]." Blackwater forward Mac Belo was disappointed that he and his team could not give head coach Leo Isaac the perfect birthday gift for his 57th birthday, which largely involved the letter 'W". Belo admitted that he incurred mental lapses in the late stages of the game wherein the Elite, which trailed by as much as 18 points, managed to stage a comeback to eventually knot things up at 72 in the waning stages of the game. As Blackwater went to the next possession, the ball only managed to stay in the former Tamaraw's hands, and was locked down by Ian Sangalang, and subsequently turned the ball over as he dribbled and stepped across the halfcourt line. "Akala ko tatawagan ng foul [si Sangalang] eh, ayon pero nagkamali nga, masyado ako nag-relax so on my part, mental lapses," Belo said after the game. Magnolia then turned the ball over which led to a two-on-one fastbreak between him, teammate John Pinto, and Pingris. Belo drove to the basket, but passed it to the cutting Pinto, who blew the potential game-tying lay-up. "Yun din (mental lapse) kasi may situation na pwede ako mag-lay-up pero mas pinili ko siya ipasa so medyo kinapos yung tira ni Nard [Pinto]. Sabi naman ni coach na walang sisihan." The damage had already been done and only what Belo and the team could say is to move on. Asked what they could have done differently, Belo lamented that the team should have started better, since they used up most of their energy in mounting the comeback. The Blackwater Elite have now lost four straight and may extend it to five as they face defending champions San Miguel on Sunday, and the former #1 pick says that the team needs to do a lot of soul-searching. "Mahirap. Mahirap pumunta sa practice na laging natatalo. Kami naman kailangan humanap ng ways para manalo, so tignan namin, kung ano ang ways to improve as a team." --   follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary.      .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 2nd, 2018

Up close with The Art of Eight Limbs : My first experience of watching Muay Thai live

I’ve been a combat sports fan for nearly a decade now. I began watching MMA back in 2009, around the time that stars like Georges St-Pierre and BJ Penn were at their peak, and immediately got hooked, and it’s actually that fandom that got me to where I am now today…a sportswriter. It’s also that appreciation for the sport that got me to try and get into combat sports, and I’ve been practicing on a regular basis since then. The first time I ever set foot inside a boxing gym and put on a pair of 16-ounce gloves was for my first ever Muay Thai class. I saw these fighters on TV throwing these beautiful kicks, knocking the bejeezus out of their opponents. I wanted to be able to do that too, I decided to try it out. That first session was really fun, but real tiring…and painful. I was sore for days after that, but I enjoyed it and decided to make it a regular part of my life. It wasn’t necessarily to be a pro-level practicioner, rather a way to keep fit and stay healthy. My first session was around eight years ago, and I’ve been going as regularly as I can ever since. Of course, my appreciation for the widely popular martial art grew, I started doing some research and watched some Muay Thai fights online, and eventually being able to try and train Muay Thai in Thailand and getting to watch a legit fight became parts of my ‘Bucket List’ so to say. Fortunately, I got to tick one of those things off my list late last year.   The Lumpinee Stadium in Bangkok, Thailand. Home of some of the world's best Muay Thai fighters. — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 When I was sent to Bangkok (to cover ONE Championship MMA, fittingly enough), I was able to catch a big Muay Thai card at the most popular Muay Thai arena in Thailand, the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium. A quick look at the Lumpinee Stadium schedule on their website shows that there’s usually a fight card thrice a week, every Tuesday, Friday, and Saturday, which gives you an idea of how popular it is to patrons, and how many competitors there are. It’s a 5,000 seater arena, no bigger than the San Juan Arena, but boy, the place was buzzing on that Friday night.   A look inside the Lumpinee Stadium. It's fight night Friday here in BKK. — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 Unlike here in the Philippines, where boxing or MMA shows don’t get filled up until about midway through the card, the Lumpinee Stadium had a decent number of people after the first fight of the night, and amazingly, the fans were already into it, a testament of just how big Muay Thai is in the country. It is, after all, their national sport.   But before I go on any further, here’s a quick backgrounder on what Muay Thai is. A striking-based form of self-defense and combat sport that rose to prominence in Thailand during the 1900s, Muay Thai makes use of one’s hands and elbows, knees, and feet to inflict damage. It’s commonly known as “The Art of Eight Limbs” because practicioners can punch, kick, knee, and elbow their opponents. Names like Samart Payakaroon, Buakaw Banchamek, and Saenchai have made names for themselves in Muay Thai. In MMA, former champions such as Anderson Silva, Jose Aldo, and Dejdamrong Sor Amnuaysirichoke are known for their high-level Muay Thai.   So, going back… The card I went to that night was apparently a big one, with three championships up for grabs. The ticket cost me 1000 Baht, which is around 1500 PHP. A small price to pay, I believe, to get to see some honest-to-goodness Muay Thai action in the country’s most popular stadium. (I did, however, get into an argument with the ticket lady because I tried haggling for a lower price, to the point that she let out an exasperated 'OH MY GOD!' in the thickest Thai accent I've ever heard.) There was no reserved seating, at least for the ticket I paid for, so I had to find a spot that gave me a good view. Being that the stadium itself was small, my spot wasn’t too far away from the ring. Think lower box seats. It was close enough for me to see the action.   Also known as 'The Art of Eight Limbs" Muay Thai utilizes punching and kicking techniques, as well as knee strikes, elbow strikes and clinching. — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 When I said that Thai fans were immediately in to the action, I meant it. When I got in, it was towards the end of the first fight of the night, but it felt like it was already the main event, as the fans were as rowdy as they could get.   While the 5000-seater stadium isn't particularly packed, the active crowd makes it feel as though it is. — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 With every kick and with every punch, the people would go “EYYYYYY!!!” whether or not it connected or it missed, and with every knee, they’d yell out “KNEEEEEE!!!” Every fight had that ‘big fight feel.” The fights lasted for up to five three-minute rounds, and while much shorter than boxing bouts, there was definitely no shortage of action. Again, with the small stadium, you could hear every time that flesh hit flesh, which was both entertaining and at the same time unnerving.   All the fights have this "big fight feel" because the crowd roars with every hit. — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 One thing that you’ll notice in Muay Thai fights is that the competitors do a little dance before the fight commences.   Before each fight, the fighters perform a ceremonial dance known as the Wai Khru. This is to give honor and pay respects to their teachers. — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 This ritual is called the “Wai Khru” and it’s done to pay their teachers respect and show their gratitude. Interesting note: the Wai Khru isn’t just limited to Muay Thai. Students in schools in Thailand participate in this ritual as well. I asked my trainer about this years ago, and he said that usually, the actions and gestures in the Wai Khru are thought of on the spot. The thing that struck me the most about this experience was that bets were being placed inside the arena as the fights were going on. After every round, a few people in the crowd, would yell out and call for bets, much like the ‘Cristo’ that you see in cockfighting arenas. I really hate the comparison, but it looked a lot like human cockfighting. Be that as it may, when you look past the gambling aspect of it, (which in reality, is prevalent anywhere anyway, just not as blatant), you’ll see that the martial art is very much a part of Thai culture. If you can fill up a 5,000 seater arena three times a week, I’d say that you’re doing something right. The experience was really something worth going through, especially if you enjoy combat sports in it’s purest form. I’ve gotten to watch boxing and mixed martial arts in bigger, sold out stadiums, but getting to watch Muay Thai in a tiny arena such as the Lumpinee Stadium was very different experience. The action and the atmosphere was unlike any I’ve ever seen before, and it’s something that I highly recommend to anyone who gets to visit Bangkok, whether or not you’re a fight fan. If you are a fight fan, it’s definitely something to experience. I’m really happy that I did. Now to check that other thing on the bucket list off........»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 19th, 2018

Warriors show off firepower, Cavs show off flaws in Finals rematch

By Steve Aschburner, CLEVELAND -- Tyronn Lue’s bathroom break came early in the fourth quarter. No, not literally. But the coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers had used the familiar call of duty to describe the suddenness with which a game against the Golden State Warriors can turn. And sure enough, on Monday night at Quicken Loans Arena, it turned on Lue and his team. “They’re the only team,” Lue told reporters before tipoff, “where you can be looking at the game and it’s a two-point game. You go to the bathroom, come back, they’re up 15.” Lue’s “loo” moment, figuratively anyway, came after David West sank two free throws to put the Warriors up 95-93 with 9:07 to play. There it was – the two-point lead – in what had been 39 minutes of mostly entertaining, back-and-forth, you-loved-them-then-you’ll-love-them-again basketball between the familiar adversaries. Draymond Green extends the @warriors lead to 10 on @NBAonTNT! 4:47 to play in Q4 #DubNation — NBA (@NBA) January 16, 2018 Exactly three minutes and 23 seconds later, Draymond Green cut to the basket, took a pass from Shaun Livingston and dropped in a layup that made it 105-95. It was the biggest lead of the night to that point. Lue twice had called timeouts during the run in an attempt to stop the bleeding. Now there was only 5:44 left. The Warriors’ margin would grow to 14. And the Cavaliers, to stick with Lue’s imagery, were circling the bowl. That the defending champions can go into hyperdrive against anybody is a reminder, not a revelation. But there were some things revealed, discovered and learned in the second and final regular-season clash of the respective West and East favorites, including: Isaiah Thomas has a way to go. This was our most extended look yet at Cleveland’s new point guard, their Kyrie Irving replacement, in circumstances most like those he’ll face when the meat of the Cavs’ schedule – the postseason – rolls around. Thomas scored 19 points, matching his high from the four previous games he played. He was on the floor for 32 minutes, nearly eight minutes more than his previous high. Both Thomas, who missed the season’s first 11 weeks recovering from a hip injury left over from last spring in Boston, and the Cavaliers know a) he’s not sharp or in great shape yet, and b) neither he nor the team has gotten familiar enough with the other to achieve the best results. Yet Thomas took 21 shots Monday (Tuesday, PHL time), more than LeBron James (18), more than Dwyane Wade (14) and more than double any other Cleveland player. He made just eight, including just one of his seven 3-point attempts. Lue, though, said he had no problem with Thomas’ gunning, as long as they were good shots. Thomas sounded as if he was seeking out work where he could find it. Granted, it was his hip that kept him out but his elbow, wrist and shooting hand apparently profit from heavy usage now too. “I’ve got to get in shape,” he said later. “I’ve got to get my legs back. Especially when I get a little winded, my legs get even heavier. “The only thing that’s gonna help me is getting reps. Running up and down the floor. Getting my hip, getting my body accustomed to taking a beating. ... Getting in basketball shape.” Kevin Durant didn’t put much stock in Thomas’ play Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) as a sign of how he’ll help Cleveland come springtime. Durant went through a similar enough trial in 2014-15, when surgery in October to repair a Jones fracture in his right foot sidelined him into December, then finally scuttled his season after just 27 games. “Obviously IT is just getting back,” the Warriors forward said. “He hadn’t played in seven months – you’ve got to give him some time. I know exactly how that feels. Especially being thrown in in the middle of the season and starting and playing 30-plus minutes now ... I know it’s gonna take him a while to get into a comfortable groove here.” What we saw is what we’d get. Mostly. It looked at various points as if both coaches were trying lineups, testing young players, tinkering with substitution patterns or probing matchups with an eye on a possible re-re-rematch in June. Likewise, it would be understandable for Lue and Golden State’s Steve Kerr to hold back a few wrinkles, just to have something fresh to try the next time they face each other. ”We don’t hold too much back, to be honest with you,” Kerr said. “I think matchups can dictate some things that you do in the playoffs and sometimes you may make a few different play calls, whatever. But I don’t think there’s a conscious effort to hold anything back for fear of tipping the hand for later.” Kerr started rookie big Jordan Bell again, same as in the Christmas game in Oakland, for more mobility against Cleveland’s small lineup than center Zaza Pachulia would provide. The coach gave Kevon Looney, Nick Young and Patrick McCaw more tastes of the rivalry too. Lue, meanwhile, was asked if he had the Cavaliers target Steph Curry defensively to get him into foul trouble and generally make life difficult. That’s a tactic that has helped when most others have failed against the two-time MVP and it might come in handy down the road. “I can’t remember,” Lue said, pointedly declining to answer. Curry can dunk. And David West still can. It was a rare Curry-in-flight moment early in the second half when the Golden State guard, who usually does his damage from deep, threw down a two-handed dunk. It was his first of the season. Steph Curry throws down the two-handed jam on #PhantomCam! #DubNation — NBA (@NBA) January 16, 2018 “I think he was taking out some anger from the first half,” Kerr said. “Sometimes that will get him going. Steph loves to dunk more than anybody, you know that. Doesn’t happen often, so when it does, it jacks him up.” Said Durant, who fed Curry for the slam: “He surprised me on that one. Hopefully he’s feeling better tomorrow. I know it took a lot for him to get up there.” David West turns back the clock!#DubNation leads #AllForOne 103-95 with 6:16 to play in the 4th. 📺: @NBAonTNT — NBA (@NBA) January 16, 2018 West got his 37-year-old bones up there too, dunking off the dribble during his nine-minute, plus-nine stint in the fourth quarter. The veteran power forward had missed his three shots in the second.   “He was a little short on his jump shot to start the game,” Durant said. “But D. West is such a smart player, he makes adjustments, he doesn’t get discouraged. He made a huge play – his left-handed dunk kind of got us all going. That was definitely surprising when he turned that one over.” But seriously, Cleveland has issues. Besides losing for the eighth time in 10 games, the Cavaliers had their 13-game home winning streak broken in Monday's (Tuesday, PHL time) 118-108 loss. And when it was second unit vs. second unit to start the fourth quarter, the Warriors had little trouble switching on defense and crowding away the Cavs’ long-range game. Cleveland shot just 6-of-23 in the fourth quarter, and got outscored 61-44 in what Kerr considered one of his club’s most complete second halves.   The Cavaliers’ defensive leaks have been extensively criticized, and more IT as he gets his game back is not the best way to address those. Even more problematic is the offense now, which over the past few weeks has been grinding, with none of them having much fun with the ball or without. “This is an important time for us,” Wade said, “and we want to see how we respond coming out of this game. ... It’s not about just winning a ball game. It’s about building good habits as a team.” Given James’ record and reputation – seven consecutive trips to the Finals, most in spite of some in-season doldrums for his Heat or Cavs crews – there’s a lot of “In LeBron We Trust,” both inside and outside the Cleveland locker room. Until a rival in the Eastern Conference proves it can knock off the King, no one will believe it. But if the Cavaliers, after so many exposures to their Bay Area nemeses (9-17 in regular- and postseason meetings since the start of 2014-15), can’t come up with solutions, maybe NBA fans should want to see someone else get a crack at them. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 16th, 2018

TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT | MMDA asks mall operators for ‘late-open late-close’ shopping hours

Anticipating heavy traffic congestion when the government ramps up its infrastructure projects this year, the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) has asked shopping mall operators to sustain the “open late, close late” schedule of commercial hours. “We had a meeting with the mall operators to maintain the 11 am opening,” said Jojo Garcia, MMDA assistant […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Ricci reduced to being an observer for first Gilas practice of 2018

Despite not being part of the preliminary Gilas Pilipinas pool for the 2023 FIBA World Cup, La Salle star Ricci Rivero still attended the first practice of 2018 of the national team Monday at the Meralco Gym. Rivero, who was excluded in the original #23for23 because La Salle asked head coach Chot Reyes to hold off for the moment, was a keen observer in practice. And since he wasn't suiting up, the high-flying combo guard instead met with top officials and the rest of the Gilas coaching staff. With the second window of the Asian Qualifiers coming up, Gilas officially opened camp following the holiday break. Aside from the main team that saw action in the opening window back in February, a handful of the #23for23 pool members were also present in practice. [Related: BACK TO WORK: Gilas opens first practice for 2018] For now, Gilas Pilipinas will meet once a week every Monday in preparation for a road game against Australia and a home outing vs. Japan next month.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 8th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Birthday letdown: Mitchell scores 29, Jazz top James, Cavs

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- Donovan Mitchell scored 29 points, and the Utah Jazz handed LeBron  James and the Cleveland Cavaliers their third straight defeat, 104-101 on Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time). James had 29 points, eight rebounds and six assists on his 33rd birthday as Cleveland lost at Utah for the sixth straight time. The Cavs' three-game losing streak is their second this season. Mitchell blew by J.R. Smith with the dribble and finished a layup in traffic over James with 35 seconds remaining to give the Jazz a 100-97 lead. James then missed a layup, and Utah finished off the game from the free-throw line. The Jazz snapped a three-game losing streak. Mitchell shot 10-for-17 from the field. Ricky Rubio had 16 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists. James did not record a point or an assist during the game-changing third quarter, which Utah opened with a 23-3 run. Cleveland connected on just 4-of-19 shots in the quarter. James powered the Cavaliers' late rally, but the Jazz were able to hold on. The Cavs led by 10 in the first quarter. Utah chipped away in the second and trailed 53-48 at halftime. TIP-INS Cavaliers: Coach Tyronn Lue said Isaiah Thomas (hip), who has not played this season, looked good during a Friday (Saturday, PHL time) scrimmage and felt good Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). Doctors have not yet cleared Thomas to play, Lue said. Jazz: C Rudy Gobert was re-evaluated Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) and will miss at least two more weeks with a sprained PCL. BRUTAL STRETCH The Jazz had lost 10-of-12 while playing a brutal schedule that included 11 games against teams in position to make the playoffs. Coach Quin Snyder acknowledged there's been a psychological toll, but said the team is resilient. "We try to make it about more than winning and losing," Snyder said. "I think a focus on the process or improving and those things. "I don't sense us being incredibly despondent. But that doesn't mean there's not some psychological toll that's taken a little bit." BIRTHDAY MEMORIES James was in a storytelling mood at the pregame shoot-around when asked about his favorite birthdays. He enjoyed turning 18 but said there was "this false notion that you're a grown man." Even James couldn't do whatever he wanted. "There was always certain clubs and stuff I used to go to and they were like, `Come on LeBron, we know you're not 21," James said with a laugh. "`We cannot let you in here and mess up our liquor license.' So 21 was pretty cool, too. ... I turned 21 and went to Vegas and that summer. I was like, back then I was so happy to show my card! `I'm 21, let me up in here! I'm up in here!" Fake identification wasn't an option, considering he was on the cover of Sports Illustrated before he was 18. "I wish," James said. "Who was I going to be?" UP NEXT Cavaliers: Host the Portland Trail Blazers on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). Jazz: Host the New Orleans Pelicans on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 31st, 2017

Embiid, Redick help 76ers beat Knicks, end 5-game skid

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Joel Embiid had 25 points and 16 rebounds, JJ Redick scored 24 points, and the Philadelphia 76ers snapped a five-game losing streak with a 105-98 victory over the New York Knicks on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time). Neither player was cleared to play until going through pregame warmups, and their presence gave the 76ers just enough to win their first Christmas Day appearance since 2001. Embiid, who has been battling a bad back, powered through a big-man duel with Enes Kanter, who had a season-high 31 points and a career-best 22 rebounds. Redick, who missed the last game with right hamstring tightness, helped the 76ers pull away from an 89-all tie midway through the fourth quarter. Kristaps Porzingis scored 22 points for the Knicks, who fell to 22-30 on Christmas with their fifth straight loss on the holiday. Backup point guard T.J. McConnell had Philadelphia’s final eight points of the third quarter, and the 76ers pushed the lead to nine with about nine minutes left in the game. The Knicks battled back to tie it at 89 on Porzingis’ three-point play with 5:20 left, but Philadelphia promptly scored the next seven to go up 96-89 on Redick’s three-pointer with 3:34 to play. Philadelphia’s young stars kept the Knicks from getting much closer, with Embiid making a three-pointer and Ben Simmons stealing Porzingis’ pass and dunking it, both times hiking the lead back to eight. TIP-INS 76ers: The 76ers waited until after Embiid had gone through warmups to determine he could play. Coach Brett Brown called Embiid a “borrowed stud” who they get to “inherit” when he is able to play. “He doesn’t practice and he comes in and plays games and we’re trying to grow him into a situation where he is a normal part of a team,” Brown said. Knicks: Hall of Famer Bernard King, who set the Christmas record when he scored 60 points for the Knicks against the Nets in 1984, was at the game. ... New York had won seven straight at home over Philadelphia. FULTZ No. 1 pick Markelle Fultz, who has missed two months with right shoulder soreness, is on the trip with the 76ers. Brown said the purpose of having the guard from Washington with the team was “to make sure that he understands completely he is a significant part of our future and that we are with him unconditionally.” “We will help move him forward in a timeline that’s responsible and I just like having him with his extended family, his teammates, with me, with us,” Brown added. “Those types of things.” WHAT COULD’VE BEEN Porzingis could’ve been playing for the 76ers instead of against them Monday. The Knicks took him with the No. 4 pick in 2015, one spot after Philadelphia went with Jahlil Okafor, who eventually fell out of the rotation entirely and was dealt earlier this month to Brooklyn. But Brown declined to look back, saying “next question” when asked if he ever wondered “what if?” when it came to Porzingis. TRADE TALK Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek spent two seasons with the 76ers, going to Philadelphia as part of the 1992 trade that sent Charles Barkley to Phoenix. He said he wasn’t happy about being traded but thought it ended up as a good deal that benefited both sides, comparing it to the Knicks’ swap of Carmelo Anthony for Kanter and Doug McDermott. “Oklahoma City is now playing better. They’re getting together with their three stars. And with Enes and Doug here, it’s helped us,” Hornacek said. “That’s how trades should be.” UP NEXT 76ers: Visit Portland on Thursday (Friday, PHL time). Knicks: Visit Chicago on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 25th, 2017

BANK ADVISORIES | BDO, BPI, PSBank announce holiday sked

Banco de Oro, Bank of the Philippine Islands, BPI Family Bank and PS Bank have issued advisories to guide customers on their extended hours and special schedule for the busy holiday season......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsDec 21st, 2017

Al Jazeera’s Mahmoud Hussein detained for one year – Al Jazeera

When his daughter Hagar graduated from high school, Mahmoud Hussein clipped articles from newspapers about universities from the confines of his prison cell. He wanted to be there for Hagar as she was about to embark on a new journey – higher education, and inform her of the best choices. “When I visited, I found that he’d made a list of universities that are suitable for her,” says Zahra Hussein, Hagar’s sister. At 23 years old, Zahra is the second oldest of Hussein’s nine children. Wednesday marks one year since Egypt arrested the Al Jazeera journalist, who is now 51 years old having celebrated a recent birthday at Cairo’s Tora prison. To date, Hussein has not been formally charged. “We’re all unable to adjust,” says Zahra. “The house is dead. Dad is under arrest, so there is no happiness coming in.”  An Egyptian national who was based in Qatar, Hussein was stopped and questioned for 15 hours by authorities, after travelling to Cairo on holiday last December 20.  He was accused of “incitement against state institutions and broadcasting false news with the aim of spreading chaos”, allegations he, his lawyers and Al Jazeera strongly deny. He is in poor physical and mental condition and is being denied adequate medical treatment. After he fractured his arm last summer, officials refused to let Hussein undergo surgery or have his cast changed. Human rights groups say there are currently around 60,000 political prisoners in Egypt, many of whom have disappeared. There are at least 20 journalists currently languishing in Egyptian prisons, according to a new report from the Committee to Protect Journalists. “I go through many phases of depression, and then I feel that I can’t continue,” says Zahra, who has adopted the role of family caretaker since her father’s arrest. As Hussein was being branded a “terrorist who works for Al Jazeera” by Egypt’s media, her bosses sacked her, saying they could not risk keeping her employed. She now works from home as a freelance translator. “I never wanted to be placed in this terrifying situation. I’ve always had this comforting idea that dad’s here. If any problem arises, dad will solve it.”  As part of his imprisonment, Hussein spent around three months in solitary confinement before being moved to a cell with other prisoners.   At the time of his arrest, Sherif Mansour of CPJ said: “Egyptian authorities are waging a systematic campaign against Al Jazeera, consisting of arbitrary arrest, censorship, and systematic harassment.” Al Jazeera Media Network has said it “rejects all the baseless allegations against Hussein, and condemns the unfair detention, in addition to obtaining false confessions by force. Furthermore, the network holds the Egyptian authorities responsible for Hussein’s safety and well-being”. Hussein is the oldest of nine siblings and hails from a village within the Giza governorate. The first member of his family to attend school, he has two degrees from Cairo University – one in political science, and another in law. “I loved school very much,” he told Al Jazeera in a March 2016 interview for an internal staff magazine. “I used to be top of my class through high school.” In 1988, Hussein started his journalism career as politics editor with the Cairo-based Sawt al-Arab Radio (Voice of Arabs Radio). He later became a broadcaster at the station.   During his years in radio, he also worked for several research centres in Egypt. He joined the state-run Nile TV in 1997 as a political affairs correspondent, before later being promoted as the channel’s head of correspondents.   During his years in radio, he also worked for several research centres in Egypt. He joined the state-run Nile TV in 1997 as a political affairs correspondent, before later being promoted as the channel’s head of correspondents. He spent years in Palestine where he interviewed Yasser Arafat, former chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO), and covered major events such as Israel’s withdrawal from the Gaza Strip in 2006.  He then worked with several Arabic news channels, eventually becoming Sudan TV’s Cairo bureau chief. During those years, Hussein also taught at the Radio and Television Institute in Cairo, giving courses on news production and editing.  In 2010, Hussein joined Al Jazeera’s Cairo bureau as a correspondent, after freelancing for the network. He covered Egypt’s 2011 revolution which toppled former President Hosni Mubarak and the events that followed, up until the closing of Al Jazeera’s Cairo bureau in 2013. He then moved to Al Jazeera’s headquarters in Doha, where he worked as a news producer. Hussein is someone “who knows how news is made”, says Majed Khedr, his manager in Doha. Sitting in Al Jazeera Arabic’s bustling newsroom, Khedr remembers Hussein’s ability to lighten the mood in a stressful work environment. “What is unique about Mahmoud is his fun spirit. He has a good sense of humour,” Khedr says. “He always brought food, and it was usually Egyptian food …This was Mahmoud’s spirit, God bless him.  “His name is still in our daily work schedule because we are still convinced he is with us.” Anas Zaki, a news editor at Al Jazeera Arabic, described Hussein as someone who “was always there for his friends”. The pair studied at university together and have been friends for more than 30 years. If someone called Hussein in distress late at night, he would rush to their house and “never make him feel like he sacrificed his sleep or comfort”, Zaki says. […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsDec 20th, 2017

How Disney is bringing the brand to more Filipinos

By Cathy Rose A. Garcia, Associate Editor IF YOUR FAVORITE SM mall is looking more like a Disney wonderland these days, it’s just part of the mall giant’s multi-year partnership with The Walt Disney Company (Philippines), Inc. This holiday season, Christmas decorations at SM malls are all about Disney. For instance, a giant Christmas tree […] The post How Disney is bringing the brand to more Filipinos appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsDec 17th, 2017

Albayalde: No holiday break for Metro Manila cops

        No holiday breaks would be granted to police personnel in Metro Manila during the holidays as they would remain on "full alert" this Christmas season, according to the director of the National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO).   NCRPO chief Regional Director Oscar Albayalde said that all five police districts have already been ordered to step up safety and security measures all throughout the metro.   "I gave orders to all our field commanders to ensure deployment of our personnel in churches... and in malls, and open markets," Albayalde said in a statement Friday evening.   READ: Police to increase visibili...Keep on reading: Albayalde: No holiday break for Metro Manila cops.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 16th, 2017

Second round of UAAP Juniors football action kicks off December 17th

The exciting football action continues in the UAAP Juniors division, as the second round of the Season 80 tournament kicks off on Sunday, December 17th at the Rizal Memorial Football Stadium.  Ateneo de Manila takes on National University at 8:00 AM, while De La Salle Zobel and University of Santo Tomas go head to head at 3:00 PM.  Following the Holiday break, action resumes on Sunday, January 7th, with UST taking on defending champions Far Eastern University at 8:00 AM and NU facing DLSZ at 3:00 PM, also at the Rizal Memorial Football Stadium.  Check out the complete second round schedule below:.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 13th, 2017

Mindanao bishop opposes martial law extension 

SHARIFF AGUAK, Maguindanao: Cagayan de Oro Archbishop Antonio Ledesma voiced out his vehement opposition to the extension of martial law in Mindanao, saying, “Martial law will only affect the economic standing of Mindanao. There are [fewer]investors because of that.” President Rodrigo Duterte on Monday asked Congress to extend martial law in the region until the end of… link: Mindanao bishop opposes martial law extension .....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsDec 13th, 2017

Lazada, Zalora expect record holiday sales in PHL

By Krista A.M. Montealegre, National Correspondent E-COMMERCE portals are poised to rake in record holiday sales this year, as malls pursue their expansion at a time when consumers can shop from the palm of their hand. Lazada and Zalora are luring shoppers away from malls this holiday season by offering massive discounts in their respective… link: Lazada, Zalora expect record holiday sales in PHL.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsDec 13th, 2017

Opposition to raise martial law issue in Supreme Court

Opposition senators on Tuesday said that executive department officials had no legal basis for a yearlong extension of martial law in Mindanao and that it was likely their justification for it would be questioned in the Supreme Court. The military said it had recommended the extension for its "psychological impact" on troops, but the senators said there was no armed uprising or actual rebellion in Mindanao, a requirement under the 1987 Constitution for the imposition of military rule. President Rodrigo Duterte has asked Congress to extend his martial law declaration in Mindanao for a year from Jan. 1, citing continuing threats from the remnants of the Islamic State (IS)-inspire...Keep on reading: Opposition to raise martial law issue in Supreme Court.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 13th, 2017

Lazada, Zalora expect record holiday sales in PHL

By Krista A.M. Montealegre, National Correspondent E-COMMERCE portals are poised to rake in record holiday sales this year, as malls pursue their expansion at a time when consumers can shop from the palm of their hand. Lazada and Zalora are luring shoppers away from malls this holiday season by offering massive discounts in their respective […] The post Lazada, Zalora expect record holiday sales in PHL appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsDec 12th, 2017

Is a New York Christmas Just All Hype?

Is Christmas the same everywhere else in the world? They probably don't have the second national anthem that is "Christmas in Our Hearts" by Jose Mari Chan but I bet they have their own share of holiday music blasting in their malls. Is it a "White Christmas" as the movies would make you believe? Or is it just a holiday overshadowed by other occasions such as Thanksgiving and Halloween? In New York City, it certainly looks like Christmas is true to what we've seen on-screen. Kristelle Batchelor, who moved to the Big Apple early this year, tells us that it can get a little manic as well. "Malls and shops were very crowded starting from Black Friday up to Cyber Monday because of the...Keep on reading: Is a New York Christmas Just All Hype?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 12th, 2017