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Machine keeps Rody ‘energized’

Machine keeps Rody ‘energized’.....»»

Category: newsSource: thestandard thestandardMar 29th, 2017

Rody says sorry to his & lsquo;all-forgiving God& rsquo;

Rody says sorry to his ‘all-forgiving God’ Source link link: Rody says sorry to his ‘all-forgiving God’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

Draw of another title lights postseason path of Warriors

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst One of the Golden State Warriors’ people, walking out of Smoothie King Center Sunday (Monday, PHL time), summarized the team’s season so far in detailing Kevin Durant’s 38-point performance against the Pelicans in Game 4 of the Western Conference semifinals. “Sometimes, people forget,” he said, a wry smile on his face -- and, yes, they do. With all that has gone on around the league this season, the Warriors’ storyline hasn’t been quite as eyeballed nationally this season compared with previous years. (Not that they should care. It’s just an observation.) The Cleveland Cavaliers blew things up last summer and reformed in the fall, blew it up again in the winter and reformed again in the spring. The Boston Celtics are displaying amazing resilience through seemingly devastating injuries to put themselves on the brink of another conference finals. The Philadelphia 76ers have their Fun Bunch. There was Paul George’s trade to Oklahoma City (and all that entailed, now and later) and the Toronto Raptors’ dramatic and successful changes throughout the year. And, at the forefront, there was the Houston Rockets’ rise as a legit and serious challenger to the Warriors in the Western Conference. During the regular season, the Warriors’ energy and productivity dropped off ever so slightly, like the planet killer in “The Doomsday Machine,” one of the all-time best original “Star Trek” episodes, after the doomed Commodore Decker drove a Shuttlecraft right down its throat. (Of course, Captain Kirk figured out to destroy it. Dude, come on. This is James Tiberius Kirk we’re talking about.) And at the end of the regular season, they were hit with a series of body shot injuries: Stephen Curry’s MCL strain, Durant’s ribs, Klay Thompson’s thumb injury, Draymond Green’s hip, and on and on. Those all sapped their continuity and made them look mortal down the stretch of the 2017-18 season, and the Warriors went 7-10 as the season waned. But, after dispatching the Kawhi Leonard-less Spurs in five games in the first round, and taking a 3-1 lead on the Pelicans now, they’re again on the precipice of the Western Conference finals. A date with Houston is looming and a chance at a third title in four seasons is still on their racket. “I think as the playoffs go on, every series requires a different intensity level,” Green said last week. “I think we met that standard that it takes to win playoff games at the level we’re at right now, which is the second round. It’s not our first rodeo. We’ve been here a lot of times and we know what it takes.” Steve Kerr rolled the “Hamptons Five” lineup out Sunday (Monday, PHL time), the Lineup Formally Known as Death -- Curry, Thompson, Andre Iguodala, Green and Durant. It’s been their trump card for almost two years, the lineup that can’t be solved by the opposition, even as it’s chipped away at most of Golden State’s other conventional units. Durant went for 38, and the Warriors rolled to a 118-92 win and a 3-1 series lead. They didn’t use it much this season -- that quintet only played 127 minutes together this season, after logging 224 minutes last season -- because of all the injuries, because they tried to limit their biggest players’ minutes and because using Iguodala as a starter thins out Golden State’s bench. The Warriors’ most frequently used five-man unit this season featured Zaza Pachulia at center; among five-man units leaguewide that played 200 minutes or more together this season, per NBA.com/Stats, that quintet was third in the league in Offensive Rating, at 118.6. But Pachulia hasn’t played a minute in the playoffs, and if the Rockets are the Warriors’ next opponent, he may not play much then, either, against Clint Capela. Kerr often points out that the Warriors have six centers on the current roster, and most of them have gotten at least a little run at various points. But after JaVale McGee was ineffective in Game 3 against New Orleans Friday (Saturday, PHL time), Kerr pulled his trump card. It’s still a game-changer, and when a season comes down to a best-of-seven series, one game can be the difference. “We all bring the best of each other,” Curry said of the Hamptons unit. “We increase the pace of the game, but the versatility [is] at the defensive end -- Andre, Draymond, KD shoring up the paint, switching a lot of the screens and the action from the offense and Klay doing what he does on the perimeter. I think the biggest thing offensively is that we’re all playmakers, try to look for the best shot, stay within ourselves and just make the right play.” Going back to the old playlist may give the Warriors comfort in what has been another drama-filled season, with the contretemps about being disinvited from the White House by President Trump in September getting things off to a rollicking start. But the end of the season was what raised eyebrows around the league. Curry’s absence down the stretch combined with a teamwide ennui -- “I really don’t like talking about it,” Thompson said -- that gave potential playoff opponents hope they might be able to catch Golden State napping. The Warriors’ boredom showed up most at the defensive end. After being in the top seven in both unadjusted and adjusted Defensive Rating in each of the last four seasons -- including first in the league in both categories in the first championship season of 2014-15 -- Golden State fell to 11th and 12th, respectively, in the regular season. They came out of the All-Star break focused -- they were fifth in the league in Defensive Rating on March 1. But all the injuries blunted their momentum, and the scariest of all -- a serious injury to second-year guard Patrick McCaw in Sacramento March 31 (April 1, PHL time) -- shook the team more than people on the outside realized. “Throughout that time, we had spurts,” Durant said. “We played a great OKC team. We went in there and won. Then we lost to Indiana by 20, and then it’s like, when you’re riding just on emotion a lot, you tend to go up and down. It’s like a roller coaster. I think that’s what it was. We had those spurts where we played well and played a focused game, but then Patty goes out, boom, and there was just so much that went on with that. Then Steph goes out with a freak injury. So much went on with that. I think we were just so up and down emotionally it kind of blinded us from our goal, which was to be good every single night as basketball players.” McCaw’s injury -- a bone bruise suffered when he fell after a dunk attempt against the Kings, which required him to be carried off the court in Sacramento on a stretcher -- hit everyone hard. “When Pat got injured, I think that took a little bit out of us,” Durant said. “It took a little bit out of Steve as well. You could just feel it, when Steph went out, then I went out, then Draymond, then Klay. Our emotions were so up and down. When your emotions are, you have too many emotions in the game of basketball, it can kind of blind you from what you really have to do. This is a technical game. So when you put too many emotions into it, it kind of took us away from what we wanted to do.” McCaw, who played in 57 games this season, was not only a part of Kerr’s rotation. He is also a well-liked person who was getting better on the floor. He was re-evaluated last week and will be checked out again in a month. Though he’s been traveling with the team during the playoffs, his season is almost certainly over. And as his injury came during the Warriors’ many injuries down the stretch, its chilling effect was multiplied. “It definitely got to everybody,” Green said. “Kind of the uncertainty of not knowing what’s going on with him. The rotations. Everybody’s like, ahh, kind of tiptoeing around, trying to make sure you get to the playoffs healthy. A lot of that makes a difference. I mean, that’s our brother. To see him down like that, not be able to walk off the court under his own power, him not being around us for two or three weeks, it was kind of like the unknown. It sucked. And I think it definitely had an effect on everything.” But Durant doesn’t like the metaphor of the proverbial switch being turned on at playoff time explaining the team’s improvement the last couple of weeks. “I don’t like when you call it a switch,” he said. “Because guys come in and get extra work in every single day. They work on their bodies every day, they get treatment. You come in here any time, you see guys in here working on their games. I think when you say ‘a switch turned on,’ if guys went cold turkey on everything as professionals during the season, and just tried to pick it up in the playoffs, I think that’s turning on a switch. Mentally, focus-wise, game plan-wise, I think you can turn on a switch, because you can lock in on an opponent, you know their tendencies, you can just focus in on one group of players instead of one day it’s San Antonio, the next day it’s Phoenix, next day it’s Sacramento. You’re going so up and down. If that makes sense. “So I think everybody’s putting in that work individually all year, and as a team, you know, stuff has to come together. We have to focus in on what we need to do, game plan wise, tendency wise, just try to take away things. I think that’s where you kind of turn it up just a bit.” Golden State has performed in fits and starts in the first two rounds. The Spurs didn’t have enough firepower to be a serious threat, but they played hard and were increasingly effectively on defense as the series went on. The Warriors didn’t really have an answer for LaMarcus Aldridge after Game 1. New Orleans had, until Sunday (Monday, PHL time), been more and more successful at making the Warriors shoot contested shots. That certainly gibes with Curry’s return after five weeks. He’s healthy, but rusty. After his adrenaline-filled return last Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) in Game 2 against the Pelicans, he made just 14-of-33 from the floor in the two games in New Orleans. There was talk afterward about breakthroughs for Curry cardiovascularly. The next few games will tell whether Curry is truly recovered and ready to be two-time Kia MVP Steph … or will he just be on the floor (as he was for long and important stretches in the 2016 playoffs after returning from a Grade 1 knee sprain). The Warriors still made The Finals, but Curry wasn’t Curry against Cleveland, and everyone, starting and ending with LeBron James, knew it. No one in NBA history has changed the geometry of basketball more than Curry, and when he’s on the floor, the ball starts flying around. “Our formula is simple: if we out-pass people, we win,” Warriors forward David West said. “Ball movement. With guys going in and out of the lineup, it causes moments where guys try to carry the load, maybe try to shoulder the load individually. But the strength of the group is the group.” But the Warriors can still throw so many different things and people at you. Iguodala shot a career-worst 28.2 percent on three-pointers in the regular season. He’s at 39.3 percent in the 2018 playoffs. Does anyone doubt he was biding his time until the postseason? No one wearing an NBA uniform is in better shape than the 34-year-old Iguodala, no one is smarter about the game or matchups, and no one is a prouder, fiercer competitor. The 2015 Finals MVP brings his bag of intangibles with him on the road even more than at home, as he did Sunday. In that game, he was making life miserable for the Pelicans’ Nikola Mirotic, creating deflections, making the right reads and impacting the game despite scoring just six points. Kerr likened him to Scottie Pippen after Game 4, but Iggy wasn’t buying it -- “Steve just does that to make sure I don’t get mad ‘cause I don’t shots,” Iguodala quipped. He may be right. But Iguodala and Green have a mind meld defensively that’s at the heart of the Hamptons’ effectiveness. “Andre and I, we’re usually on the same page,” Green said. “Two guys who really think the game, especially on that side of the ball. Sometimes we can talk things out and it works perfect and not say a word, and know what each other’s going to do. It definitely helps our team out defensively kind of having two coaches out there on the floor on that side of the ball.” Whether it’s switching to guard each other’s man, running at an open shooter to close before the ball gets there with the other man rotating, they know what the other guy is going to do. And that second or so the Warriors save defensively keeps them from being broken down. “How fast can you make that decision?,” Green says. “How demonstrative are you going to be about that decision? Are you going to second guess that decision? That’s usually when it doesn’t work; if you’re going to go, just go. That’s kind of the motto that Andre and I go by. If you’re going to go, just go; everybody else fall in line and rotate, and we’ll work it out from there.” And while Green and Rajon Rondo have been exchanging pleasantries throughout this series, Green didn’t pick up his first postseason technical foul until Sunday (Monday, PHL time). He’s been under control, coming up to the edge without going over. Someone without access to the internet asked Kerr if he’d ever played with anyone who instigated or tried to get under the skin of opponents. It’s a testament to Kerr’s comic timing that he actually did wait a beat before answering. “I did play with Dennis Rodman,” he said. Never be fooled by Kerr’s overall pleasant disposition and quick-with-a-quip acuity, though. He is a fierce competitor that wants to win big, the same as his current point guard, who is similarly underrated on the competition scale. Kerr has seven rings as a player and coach, and it’s not a coincidence he’s frequently been around teams that got it done in June. But the Warriors are playing for even bigger stakes than just winning the 2018 title. Legacies are created this time of year. A third title in four seasons, with four straight Finals appearances, would put Golden State in very rarified air in the modern game. San Antonio won three titles from 2002-07. But the Spurs, famously, never have won back-to-back titles. The Kobe Bryant-Shaquille O’Neal-led Lakers, which won three straight from 2000-02, are the closest modern-day team to pulling off what the Warriors are trying to accomplish. Before then, you’re talking about the Michael Jordan-led Chicago Bulls, with six titles in eight seasons -- the two non-title seasons coinciding with Jordan’s sojourn to the minor leagues of baseball. Moreover, the Warriors are the hub around which the modern NBA now spins. And that is an even bigger legacy. Almost everyone (hi, Thibs!) tries to play the way Golden State does now -- the quick hitters, ball movement, pace. Teams do it in different ways. The 76ers look very different than the Warriors, with Joel Embiid their centerpiece of operations, and with 6'10" Ben Simmons taking up so much space with the ball in the halfcourt. The Rockets look different still as there’s not a ton of ball movement. There’s just an unending series of screen and rolls with Chris Paul and James Harden with the rock, looking for the inevitable open man in the corner or way, way behind the three-point line. A lot of things have happened the last 15 years to lead us where we are now. The league changed almost all the rules regarding zone defense, and got rid of almost all defensive contact on the perimeter. Rockets GM Daryl Morey and others led the burgeoning analytics movement, which championed shooting more and more three-pointers as a primary means of scoring, not as a novelty. Mike D’Antoni’s Phoenix Suns went with Amar’e Stoudemire at center, surrounding him with four smalls that could all shoot it from deep, and scoring came out of its coma leaguewide. Kerr and Pelicans Coach Alvin Gentry have always been quick to credit D’Antoni’s influence on the modern game, starting in Phoenix and working through his current team in Houston. “He’s the guy that just eliminated the center position -- let’s just go small and fast and shoot more threes,” Kerr said of D’Antoni. “I was inspired by Mike, but I was also inspired by Pop (the Spurs’ Gregg Popovich) and Phil Jackson in terms of basic ball movement, screening. But pace is the name of the game these days, and people go about it in different ways. Ironically, Mike’s team (in Houston) is the slowest team in the league now. I didn’t see that coming.” But no one has put all of it together -- pace, small ball, shooting and defense -- like the Warriors have the last four seasons. The Rockets are the closest thing we’ve seen to Golden State, and they’re hungry, and they’re coming. And the Warriors and Rockets are just a win apiece away from seeing the clash of the Western Conference titans. They are in the middle of it, so they can’t stop and think about what it all means. We get that. But everyone wants to put a marker out there that’s hard to catch. LeBron is chasing a ghost. The Warriors have already made their mark on the game. They’re almost in position to do more. History is forever. “It’s important, because it’s what’s right in front of us,” Curry said Sunday. “We don’t think about the historical context of anything. For us, we have an amazing group of guys, amazing coaches sitting behind us. We’re appreciating the moment. That’s really all it is. You have tunnel vision for Game 5 at home, then a new series, hopefully (after that). The historic context doesn’t really seep into the locker room when it comes to what that means. It’s just about this year.” Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 8th, 2018

Warriors keep evolving in rivalry with Cavs

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CLEVELAND -- You might expect, given the familiarity from what’s gone on for four years now, that the Golden State Warriors and Cleveland Cavaliers have worked up some serious mutual contempt. They both covet what the other wants -- in fact, the Warriors or the Cavs could make a persuasive case that, if not for the other guys, one already would have notched a three-peat and be chasing Bill Russell’s Celtics in pursuit of a fourth consecutive championship. They both have poured buckets of blood, sweat, tears, money, Gatorade and offseason counter moves into their nouveau NBA rivalry. And they both, well, as Golden State coach Steve Kerr phrased it to the San Jose Mercury News Sunday (Monday, PHL time), “We just want to kick each other’s ass.” And yet the Warriors and the Cavaliers -- who play again Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) at Quicken Loans Arena in the NBA’s prime-time MLK showdown -- have more in common with each other than they do with any of the league’s other 28 teams. Playing 100 games or so every year. Locking in mentally and surviving physically longer than anyone else. Showing up each night targeted as a measuring stick, even a season maker, by the opponents. While trying like heck to keep things fresh. Renew. Find and tap into a new source of energy, because old ones wane over time. “It’s the biggest challenge of this whole season,” Kerr told NBA.com late last week, with the Warriors starting a back-to-back in Milwaukee and Toronto on their way back to The Land. Even if it were possible -- and it realistically is not, given free agency, injuries, trades, the salary cap, luxury taxes, hirings and firings each NBA offseason -- playing a pat hand from one championship-level season to the next isn’t desirable. Voices, locker rooms, relationships get stale. Rivals adjust and escalate in the arms race. Some players ebb in the pecking order, others flow. It’s important to inject new faces, add skills and even find fresh themes to fend off monotony, even boredom, through the 82-game slogs. The Warriors, in winning 20 of 23 games over the past seven weeks, largely have managed to do that. The Cavaliers, at 26-15 after 2-7 stretch that started at Golden State on Christmas (Dec. 26, PHL time)? Not so much. Golden State shifts gears after each season It’s easy to think of Golden State’s success since Kerr’s hiring before the 2014-15 season as one uninterrupted run of excellence. Three-pointers, “death lineups,” and the rest. But the differences from one year to the next have been fairly pronounced. “In Year 1, we were trying to prove ourselves to the world,” Kerr said. “Then we win the championship -- it was all so fresh. There were no letdowns at all that year. It was the most exciting, it was the most energized, it was the most refreshing. It was brand new to all of us. It felt like we were riding this wave all year -- we were all giddy, like, ‘Oh my God, we’re really good!’ We didn’t know we could be like that. And for me, it was my first year coaching.” Steph Curry won his first MVP award. He and Klay Thompson generated considerable conversation about the best shooting backcourts in league history. Draymond Green forever changed the old NBA notion of “’tweeners.” The Warriors finished 67-15, ranked second in the league in offense (111.6) and first in defense (101.4) and beat Cleveland in the Finals in six games. “It was maybe like the first stages when you fall in love,” Kerr said. “You’re just on Cloud 9 and she can’t do anything wrong. There’s infatuation and then you truly fall in love, and it’s amazing. “The second year, we sort of rode that wave of euphoria of being the best team in the league and having won the title. The next thing you know, we’re 24-0 and we’ve got a chance to set an all-time record. That 73-win mark carried us all year. We were going to prove that, not only were we the champs but we were one of the best teams ever.” The Warriors were -- by regular season standards. Curry won his second MVP award. Kerr missed the first 43 games due to health issues but assistant coach Luke Walton steered them to a 39-4 mark. They bought into the chase for 73 victories fairly late, but instead of a 16-5 playoff run like the previous spring’s, the Warriors went 15-9 -- coming up one victory short when the Cavaliers became the first team to claw back from a 3-1 deficit. That led directly to Golden State’s next new wrinkle, a reconfiguration that came close to buckling the league’s knees. “We got KD,” Kerr said. “Now we’re changing our team, right? Last year was about incorporating KD, welcoming this incredible player into our organization and our roster. Figuring how to do it, how we were going to adjust. I felt like there were times last year that were tiring, where our guys were done a little bit. But it was ‘new’ again.” Even the challenges were fresh, like counting Curry’s or Klay Thompson’s touches relative to Durant’s or closing ranks around Golden State’s thin man as his reputation took blows for the first time in his NBA career. Not interested in shooting for 74 victories, the Warriors simply took care of business and stayed coiled for the postseason. Then it was a 16-1 dash to title No. 2, Durant snagging the Finals MVP trophy after the five-game dispatching of the Cavs. All of which just set the Warriors’ bar higher, requiring them to search for something new, somebody borrowed, presumably nothing blue. “This year it’s just survive and advance,” Kerr said. “It’s ‘let’s get to April, May, June in one piece.’ There’s a reason we’ve lost six home games already. We don’t have the driving force that we had the last few years. We’re dealing with what any team in NBA history that’s tried to do this has dealt with. The Lakers (1982-85), the Celtics (1984-87, 1957-66)... It’s just really hard and you need that driving force.” Said Warriors vet Andre Iguodala: “Your body is mindful of it, because it hurts.” A couple of young guys -- Patrick McCaw, Kevon Looney -- have taken on bigger roles. Nick Young brings some sort of buzz into any locker room that will have him. Still, as veteran guard Shaun Livingston said: “We’re not chasing any records. We’re not adding another All Star. We’re just trying to make it through the marathon.” Cavs' challenges mount during 2017-18 The Cavaliers are just trying to make it through the marathon, too. But if they could, they might do it like Rosie Ruiz, the 1980 women’s “winner” of the Boston Marathon who perpetrated a hoax by hopping the subway and running only the final mile of Beantown’s famous race. The 2017-18 has been anything but fun for Cleveland so far. It began with the departure of All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving, a not-so-funhouse mirror image of Durant’s arrival a year earlier in the Bay Area. Irving, for reasons still not quite explained, made it known in the offseason that he wanted out. He wanted to be the man on his own team. Or he didn’t want to be left in the lurch if (when?) LeBron James took his talents elsewhere again. Or both. Or neither. Regardless, once the Cavaliers made his request come true by dealing him to Boston for All-Star point guard Isaiah Thomas and Brooklyn’s coveted first-round pick this June, their task got tougher and their season longer. Losing one of the league’s best ball handlers and shot makers doesn’t qualify as “renewal” any more than what went on in Oklahoma City when Durant packed up. There’s been more. Shooting guard J.R. Smith seemingly got old overnight. Jae Crowder, who came from the Celtics in the Irving deal, hasn’t meshed with the Cavs’ style. Kevin Love has been moved to center but hasn’t done anything to satisfy the Cavs’ need for rim protection. Thomas only returned to action from a hip injury as the calendar turned to 2018 and has played only four games in these two weeks. Even with so many new faces -- seven of the top 12 in coach Tyronn Lue’s rotation weren’t here 12 months ago -- it’s a group heavy on veterans, players a little too established or mature to naturally instill raw energy. James said recently that none of this is new, it’s another case of the Cavs biding their time for the “second” season that means everything. But Lue also introduced the topic of “agendas,” suggesting that some of his guys were looking out for their own responsibilities and performances -- particularly on defense -- rather than the group’s. At best, this is another dose of the midseason blahs, the Cavs in their doldrums in need of an All-Star break. At worst, though, they might be honing some bad habits that won’t be so easy to break in May or June. Especially if East rivals such as Toronto, Boston or Washington are emboldened after witnessing or administering some of the Cavs’ more embarrassing beat downs this season. Will any of this matter come spring? It will if the switch each team is minding stubbornly decides not to flip. “That’s the key. You’ve got to find that balance,” Kerr said. “Are you flipping the switch or are you navigating? The idea is, don’t let bad habits slip in. Right now, this moment, we’re into some bad habits. Our defensive efforts  the last five, six games [before the weekend] were awful. We got away with it because Steph was going nuts.” The Cavaliers repeatedly have not gotten away with bad defensive habits, even on nights when James has been dominant. “It’s tough,” Livingston said. “They’re a team that’s built for the playoffs. But our core guys still are in there prime. Their core guys are still good. But we’re talking about ‘prime.’” Most still would pick both Golden State and Cleveland to advance all the way to a “Finals Four” (after last year’s “Rubber Match” series). But one of these years, most will be wrong -- about one or both. That alone might be motivation enough. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 15th, 2018

Cagulangan teams up with David to give LSGH its first-ever title

Joel Cagulangan has won at least three games for College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills in the NCAA 93 Juniors Basketball Tournament. It was only fitting that he was winning the championship for them as well. Cagulangan’s free throws coupled with Joshua David’s definitive defense energized the Junior Blazers right through now-dethroned champion Mapua University, 75-74, in a thriller of a triumph on Friday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. Now, Greenhills will be celebrating the first-ever championship in its school history. “We joined the NCAA in 1998 and for all the players who played since 1998 until today, this is for them,” a beaming head coach Marvin Bienvenida said. Trailing by one with less than a minute remaining, the 5-foot-9 point guard got a rebound and got a foul for his troubles. Sent to the line, he coolly converted both free throws to put his team up by one. At the other end, the Red Robins put the ball in the hands of red-hot Clint Escamis only to see David get two defensive stops on him in the same possession. “Nakukuha naman ng mga ‘to lagi yung bola,” Bienvenida said of his guards. The off-guard, standing at six-feet, was also sent to the line but muffed on both his charities. He made up for it at the other end, however, bothering towering Warren Bonifacio just enough as time was running out on Mapua. The ball ended up in the hands of Mike Enriquez, but his triple try went backrim. And so, CSB-LSGH reached the mountaintop after the steepest of climbs. “After the buzzer sounded, it seemed like I was in a dream. I cannot describe this,” the head coach said. They lost five of the last six games in the elimination round and had to win a knockout bout against resurgent San Sebastian College-Recoletos for the fourth-seed. Once there, they then downed top-seed and twice-to-beat San Beda High School to move onto the Finals. The championship experience of Mapua showed and yet, the Junior Blazers didn’t give up. At the forefront of it all was Cagulangan with 19 points, nine rebounds, seven assists, and four steals while David had 26 markers, six boards, and two assists. Both will be back next season as they go for back-to-back championships. There, Bienvenida is shying away from what would now be new targets on their backs. “Yes, I could say we could be the favorite, pero ‘di naman basta-basta binibigay yun. Papaghirapan namin,” he said. For the Red Robins, Escamis topped the scoring column with 21 points. He will be left behind by all of graduating players Bonifacio, Mike Enriquez, Joaqui Garcia, Will Gozum, and Carl Lacap. BOX SCORES CSB-LSGH 75 – David 27, Cagulangan 19, Lao 8, Fornilos 6, Marcos 5, Lepalam 4, Mosqueda 3, Perez 3, Morales 0, Pedrosa 0, Sangco 0 MAPUA 74 – Escamis 21, Lacap 13, Gozum 12, Bonifacio 10, Enriquez 8, Ramos 6, Garcia 4, Jabel 0, Dennison 0, Arches 0, Sarias 0 QUARTER SCORES: 15-19, 32-44, 53-56, 75-74 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 24th, 2017

Fortigate 600d earns 99.7% rating for security effectiveness

FORTINET® (NASDAQ: FTNT), the global leader in high-performance cybersecurity solutions, recently announced the results of the latest NSS Labs Next-Generation Intrusion Prevention System group test report.  The testing revealed that Fortinet’s FortiGate 600D earned a 99.7% rating for Security Effectiveness, the lowest Total Cost of Ownership per Protected Mbps in the Security Value Map and received NSS Labs’ coveted ‘Recommended’ rating. NSS Lab’s NGIPS report is the industry’s most comprehensive test of security effectiveness for Intrusion Prevention Systems offered today and helps security customers select the best solutions based on real-world performance. The FortiGate 600D IPS achieved a security effectiveness score of 99.7%, blocking 100% of live attacks used in active threat campaigns and stopping 99.45% of attacks from NSS Labs’ entire exploit library.  The FortiGate 600D was one of only four vendors capable of thwarting 100% of the evasion techniques used in NSS Labs testing. “Today’s newly discovered vulnerabilities are being exploited at machine speeds that are outpacing the capability of IT teams to patch. This is increasing the urgency for many enterprises to integrate effective IPS capabilities with their overall security architecture. The latest NSS Labs results reinforce a decade of Fortinet IPS technology leadership, providing devices that scale from 150 Mbps up to 120 Gbps to help organizations of all sizes close gaps in their attack surface,” said John Maddison, senior vice president of products and solutions, Fortinet. Intrusion Prevention is Critical  but Not All Systems Are Equal Recent attacks like WannaCry and Petya have highlighted how quickly unpatched vulnerabilities can be exploited on a global scale. The ever-increasing number of operating systems, applications and new devices running on networks challenges even the most diligent IT teams trying to keep up with the latest updates. IPS solutions can provide protection from these newly disclosed vulnerabilities and advanced evasion techniques, providing enterprises with the critical time needed to test and push new patches to their various systems, but not all solutions are created equal. This is why Fortinet consistently invests in extensive third-party testing and validation of its solutions. Working with organizations like NSS Labs provides customers with the data needed to select the most effective security solutions to defend their businesses and ensures that Fortinet continues to deliver the most effective and highest performing cybersecurity to meet their needs.  Dedicated NGIPS Protection with Superior Security Fabric Integration As an extension of the Fortinet Security Fabric, FortiGate IPS meets all the requirements of a standalone next-generation solution by combining a high-speed, effective IPS engine with evasion techniques, context and reputation awareness, extensive application and user control capabilities, advanced threat detection, and a performance-optimized platform. FortiGate IPS functionality leverages the Fortinet Security Fabric and FortiOS to deliver real-time updates that continuously defend against the latest threats and zero-day attacks emerging across the threat landscape. Powered by purpose-built hardware and Fortinet Security Processing Units (SPUs), FortiGate IPS provides leading in-line protection with performance that won’t slow down enterprise networks.  .....»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 19th, 2017

Sara still at it, trains gun on Rody& rsquo;s critics, & lsquo;Tindig& rsquo;

Sara still at it, trains gun on Rody& rsquo;s critics, & lsquo;Tindig& rsquo;.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 15th, 2017

Sara still at it, trains gun on Rody’s critics, ‘Tindig’

Sara still at it, trains gun on Rody’s critics, ‘Tindig’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 15th, 2017

Rody blows top over ‘onion-skinned’ remark

Rody blows top over ‘onion-skinned’ remark.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 1st, 2017

Lady Bulldogs secure semis berth, send Lady Eagles on the brink of elimination

National University booked a semifinals ticket and put Ateneo de Manila University in danger of missing the Final Four cut Saturday in Group A of the inaugural Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. The Lady Bulldogs bounced back from a disastrous second set flop to shoot down the Lady Eagles, 25-21, 13-25, 25-19, 25-22, and occupy the first best-of-three semis berth sporting a clean 5-0 win-loss record. 'Test of wits ito more than anything,' said NU coach Babes Castillo.  “Sa amin importante kasi ito because we’re discovering how are we gonna work together, dini-discover din ng ladies and sistemang ini-introduce,” he added. “Syempre, a win is a win, maganda ‘yan na booster sa spirit nila. 'Yun lang ang sa akin, we can take that and carry it on sa mga susunod na laro.” Energized in the third set by the arrival of their drummers and cheering squad, which came all the way from the Big Dome after the UAAP basketball match of the Bulldogs against the same school, NU overhauled an 8-12 deficit and took an 18-14 lead. With Jaja Santiago, Risa Sato, Jorelle Singh and Aiko Urdas getting good sets from playmaker Jasmine Nabor, the Lady Bulldogs built a 24-18 cushion in the third set. Jho Maraguinot saved a set point for Ateneo only to see the Lady Eagles commit an overreaching error in the next play to go down, 1-2. The Lady Bulldogs raced to an early 11-4 lead in the fourth before the Lady Eagles made a telling run to take a 16-14 advantage. NU countered to erase an 18-20 deficit with three straight points to take a 21-20 lead capped by an ace by Nabor. The Lady Bulldogs went ahead 23-21 before Maraguinot kept Ateneo afloat with a kill. Urdas put NU at match point before Sato sealed the win with a kill block on Maraguinot. Singh finished with 17 points on a balanced offensive outing with 11 coming off attacks, three from kill blocks and three aces for NU. Santiago had 12 with all but one coming off spikes while Sato and Audrey Paran got 11 and 10, respectively, for the Lady Bulldogs. Urdas had eight points while Nabor tallied 41 excellent sets for NU.  Ateneo dropped to 3-2 slate and will need to pray hard for Lyceum of the Philippines University (1-3) to win against Far Eastern University (3-1) on Monday to force a playoff for the last Final Four spot. Adamson University and Arellano University are through to the semis in Group B. Maraguinot finished with 14 points, Kat Tolentino scored 12 while skipper Bea De Leon chipped in with 10 for the Katipunan-based squad.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 30th, 2017

Rody vows to keep CHR ‘hanging’ till Gascon quits

Rody vows to keep CHR ‘hanging’ till Gascon quits.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 18th, 2017

Rody downplays ‘boots issue’ in mosque visit

Rody downplays ‘boots issue’ in mosque visit.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 13th, 2017

Rody won’t fall for Iloilo pol’s ‘antics’

Rody won’t fall for Iloilo pol’s ‘antics’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 6th, 2017

Anne Curtis launches ‘Dream Machine’

Anne Curtis launches ‘Dream Machine’.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 1st, 2017

Rody’s Russia ‘junket’ yields P9b

Rody’s Russia ‘junket’ yields P9b.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 30th, 2017

‘Vice lords out to stop Rody’s war’

‘Vice lords out to stop Rody’s war’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 30th, 2017

LP won’t join ‘impeach Rody’

LP won’t join ‘impeach Rody’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 21st, 2017

‘Rody like Singapore founder’

‘Rody like Singapore founder’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 14th, 2017

Rody ‘can’t keep SSS promise’

Rody ‘can’t keep SSS promise’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 3rd, 2017

Pivot to China Rody’s ‘safety net’ vs Donald

Pivot to China Rody’s ‘safety net’ vs Donald.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 9th, 2016

Leila snipes at ‘sexist’ Rody

Leila snipes at ‘sexist’ Rody.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 14th, 2016