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Listed Season 2: Lasagna For Vegetarians? This, And More At Pipino Vegetarian Food By Pino!

Listed brings a new dimension to features by offering a more hands on, immersive experience to your usual lifestyle programming......»»

Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnJan 12th, 2018

Listed Season 1: Exploring More Of Tsinoy Food And Culture In Binondo

Listed brings a new dimension to features by offering a more hands on, immersive experience to your usual lifestyle programming......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2017

Listed Season 1: Exploring More Of Tsinoy Food And Culture In Binondo

Listed brings a new dimension to features by offering a more hands on, immersive experience to your usual lifestyle programming......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 21st, 2017

UAAP: La Salle captain Kib Montalbo out 4-6 weeks

And De La Salle University’s lineup is down to 11 for the foreseeable future in the UAAP 81 Men’s Basketball Tournament. The Green Archers will be missing the services of team captain Kib Montalbo after he sustained a fracture to his left thumb last Sunday. While the injury is on his non-shooting hand, sources said that Montalbo will have to sit out and rest his left thumb for four to six weeks. Or else, he risks aggravating the injury. The graduating guard has been averaging 3.7 points, 5.3 assists, 3.0 rebounds, and 1.3 steals in La Salle’s 2-1 start to the season. More than the numbers, however, his leadership and defense will be sorely missed by a team trying to move on from the Aldin Ayo and Ben Mbala era. In his absence, veteran guards Andrei Caracut and Aljun Melecio will have to shoulder a heavier load while the likes of Miggy Corteza, Gabe Capacio, and Encho Serrano will have to soak up more time on the floor. Montalbo joins Kiwi center Taane Samuel on the sidelines for the Green Archers who only listed 13 players on their roster for UAAP Season 81. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News17 hr. 33 min. ago

AgriNurture secures $1-billion rice import deal

Listed agricultural trading firm AgriNurture Inc. has sealed a $1 billion rice import contract from Vietnam Southern Food Corp. in a bid to address supply issues in the country......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

AgriNurture strikes deal with Vietnamese rice trader

LISTED firm AgriNurture, Inc. (ANI) has signed a memorandum of agreement with state-owned Vietnam Southern Food Corporation — Vinafood II to bring more rice into the country. The post AgriNurture strikes deal with Vietnamese rice trader appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

ANI, VINAFOOD ink $1-B annual rice import deal

Listed AgriNurture, Inc. (ANI) has signed an exclusive deal with Vietnam Southern Food Corporation -- VINAFOOD II, to import two million metric tons of rice to the Philippines starting this year valued close to US$1-billion. In a Memorandum of Agreement signed by ANI President and CEO Antonio Tiu and VINAFOOD General Director Nguyen Ngoc Nam over the weekend, Vietnam's largest grains exporter agreed to exclusively supply long grain rice to ANI to help address supply issues in the Philippines. VINAFOOD II is a state-owned corporation duly designated and assigned by the government of Vietnam to export rice and help achieve food security in Southeast Asia. In a disclosure to the Phili...Keep on reading: ANI, VINAFOOD ink $1-B annual rice import deal.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

30 Teams in 30 Days: Can Wizards realize their potential?

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com What offseason? That's a question many fans ask as the flurry of trades, free agent news and player movement seems to never stop during the summer. Since the Golden State Warriors claimed their third title in four years back on June 8 (June 9, PHL time), NBA teams have undergone a massive number of changes as they prepare for the season ahead. With the opening of training camps just around the corner, NBA.com's Shaun Powell will evaluate the state of each franchise as it sits today -- from the team with the worst regular-season record in 2017-18 to the team with the best regular-season record -- as we look at 30 teams in 30 days. * * * Today's team: Washington Wizards 2017-18 Record: 43-39, lost in first round to Toronto Raptors Who's new: Dwight Howard (free agency), Jeff Green (free agency), Troy Brown, Jr. (Draft), Austin Rivers (trade) Who's gone: Marcin Gortat (trade), Mike Scott (free agency) The lowdown: With John Wall limited to half a season because of knee surgery, Bradley Beal became a leading man and, on some nights, pushed the boundaries of stardom. If anything, he gave the Wizards confidence in knowing that, when the pair is healthy, Washington boasts a top-three-or-four backcourt in the NBA. Forward Otto Porter Jr. was third in the NBA in 3-point shooting (a blistering 44.1 percent) and served as a secondary source of scoring. However, the Wizards weren’t so clear-cut elsewhere. The frontline continued to be a source of mixed results and frustration and, other than Kelly Oubre Jr., depth was an issue. The Wizards went chilly late in the season, lost nine of their last 12 games and dropped to the eighth seed. In some ways, the Wizards are on the clock. They must seize the opportunity to win big while Wall, 27, and Beal, 25, are still in their primes. Yet they’ve rarely stayed healthy together and besides, nothing is promised. Remember, the Toronto Raptors broke up the sterling DeMar DeRozan-Kyle Lowry backcourt this summer when their patience finally ran out. Also, keep in mind the cost. Wall’s super max deal doesn’t begin until 2019-20. Beal is due $80 million the next three years, roughly the same money Washington will pay Porter Jr., who’s a good (but perhaps overpriced) complimentary player. For the time being, the Wizards will put their frontcourt faith in Dwight Howard, who arrives about five years past his prime, but should be an upgrade over Gortat. Howard, 32, came cheap after his Brooklyn Nets buyout and remains a deluxe rebounder (12.5 per game last season). The decision to bring in Howard could be the banana peel in the path of progress, however. This is his fourth team in four years. His “act” -- being easy-going, goofy and fun-loving -- didn’t play well with some previous teammates, including, among others, Kobe Bryant and James Harden. Howard is headed to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and anyone who believes otherwise is foolish -- the man did carry the Orlando Magic to the 2009 NBA Finals. For a seven-year stretch, he was one of the game’s biggest impact players. Yet his twilight is bewildering, which is not surprising. Howard never developed his offensive game (namely a go-to move or mid-range shot) and as a result, he’s a dinosaur in a changing environment, someone who shrinks considerably when he strays six feet from the basket. Plus, he’s not the defensive demon of before, although he stays in tremendous physical shape and still runs the floor. There’s also the matter of his personality, which might be overstated to a degree, yet was an issue ever since he left the Magic. Howard appears to be on a mission to please everyone and in the process, tends to ruffle some feathers along the way. Finally, he often becomes irritated when he doesn’t see the ball in the low post. He won’t get many touches on a team with Wall and Beal taking upwards of 35 shots a night. (Ball movement and sharing was a complaint Gortat voiced at times in the past, too.) Over the summer, Wall said he will do whatever he can to make Howard comfortable ... because what’s the alternative? Since Beal joined Wall in 2012-13, they have won three playoff series together -- but have never reached the East finals. However, the East is wide open this year with LeBron James out West. The Wizards chose not to trade Oubre Jr. in the offseason, but this situation bears watching. He’s a developing player at a stacked position, and the swingman spot became even more crowded when the Wizards drafted Brown, who’s cut in the same mold. It wouldn’t be surprising if the Wizards move Oubre Jr. or Porter Jr. by the trade deadline if the right deal comes along, simply because Washington can’t pay both. Plus, Oubre Jr. is eligible for a contract extension next summer. Brown, 19, brings court vision and a reliable handle, but it's hard to see him playing much given the bodies in front of him on the depth chart. After all the quality big men and point guards were gone (and they passed on picking Michael Porter Jr.), Washington was in a weird position at No. 15 in the Draft. They could either trade the pick or Draft a wing-type. They traded Gortat for Rivers, who’s listed at point guard but lacks the court vision and ability to create for others to see much time at the position. Rivers is more of a 3-point shooter, and he did well enough (37.8 percent) last season to ably bring that element off the bench. For the most part, the Wizards made minor moves this summer, none of which are expected to dramatically change the complexion of the club. It should be enough to keep them in the playoff mix, especially with LeBron gone. From there, their hopes will be tied to their health. Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

Import more food to reduce inflation?

Just as the rice harvesting season begins, Super Typhoon Ompong is predicted to hit food-basket Cagayan Valley today......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 14th, 2018

Cebu s longest-running football league coming to Luzon

In an effort to expand its reach in developing football nationwide at the grassroots level, AboitizLand is bringing Cebu’s longest running football league, Aboitiz Football Cup (AFC), for the first time in Luzon with the Aboitiz Pitch in The Outlets at Lipa as its main venue. Simultaneous with the 20th season of the Visayas leg, the Aboitiz Football Cup in Luzon will have 15 categories ranging from Mixed-U7 to Men’s Open. Partnering with  RSA1Group (RSA Una Group, Inc.), a sports marketing and management agency based in Luzon, it is  expected to host more than 100 teams composed of approximately 3,000 players, coaching staff, technical team, partners, and spectators  from all over Luzon. “Last year, we promised to bring the Aboitiz Football Cup to the national football scene and we’re just happy to accomplish that. Now, we envision to make AFC as the country’s premier football league as we continue to provide education through sports and provide a venue for local players to compete and exhibit their skills,” said Dudes Aboitiz, AboitizLand Commercial Business Unit Head. With the Aboitiz Pitch as its home venue, AFC - Luzon will kick off on October 13, 2018 at The Outlets at Lipa inside the Lima Estate located in Lipa-Malvar, Batangas. Games will be held every Saturday and Sunday and will run until mid-December.  The opening of Aboitiz Pitch alongside the expansion of AFC in Luzon reinforces the Aboitiz group’s objective to support the country’s grassroots football development, as well as in promoting  continuing education for football practitioners such as coaches and referees in the province and the region. Ultimately, The Outlets hopes to to host a Batangas-wide football club in the future and be the venue in developing homegrown athletes from the region.   About the Aboitiz Pitch Considered to be the largest artificial turf in Luzon, Aboitiz Pitch opened last June 2018 to complement global and local brands coming to The Outlets at Lipa. A 90-minute drive from Manila, The Outlets at Lipa is a 9.3-hectare property located inside Lima Estate located at Lipa - Malvar, Batangas. It will feature family-friendly open spaces with wide pathways, alongside an extensive variety of restaurants and food stops, positioning this shopping destination as one of AboitizLand’s biggest commercial developments.   For more information about the AFC-Luzon tournament, please contact the Secretariat at: Email: aboitizcup-luzon@rsa1group.com Mobile: +63 917 629 3599   For more information about the Aboitiz Pitch, please contact the admin at: Email: aboitizpitch@rsa1group.com Mobile: +63 917 858 0077   Registration for the 1st AFC Luzon is ongoing until September 20, 2018. Visit the Aboitiz Football Cup official Facebook page for the latest news and updates......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 14th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Lawmakers want P10 billion supplemental budget for NFA

Legislators from the House of Representatives are pushing for a P10-billion supplemental budget for the state-run National Food Authority (NFA) for the procurement of local palay in time for the main harvest season in the fourth quarter......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 10th, 2018

UAAP: UST s Germy Mahinay out to prove LPU wrong about redshirting him

Germy Mahinay was listed as a reserve for Lyceum of the Philippines University in the ongoing NCAA 94 Men’s Basketball Tournament. Just a week after the season started, however, the rookie big man was seen in training sessions of University of Sto. Tomas. As it turns out, Mahinay transferred from Intramuros to Espana for the betterment of his young career. “Lumipat ako (kasi) nawala yung usapan namin ni coach Topex [Robinson]. Sa part ko, masakit kasi pinangakuan ako sa harap ng parents ko na lineup ako sa season,” he shared. He then continued, “(Pero) opening day, sinabi sa akin na, as of now, reserve ka for us.” Last March, the Pirates secured the services of the 6-foot-5 big man, expectedly, to fortify the frontline that already includes Mike Nzeusseu, Toci Tansingco, and Ranzelle Yong. As to why he was left out of the active lineup, however, Mahinay said the Pirates had no explanation. “Wala naman (silang) sinabing reason,” he claimed. That is exactly why, now he has found a new home in UST, the former San Beda High School stalwart said he has a chip on his shoulder. “Ipapakita ko na medyo mali yung ginawa nila. Ipu-prove ko sila na wrong,” he said. That doesn’t mean, however, that Mahinay will be carrying too heavy of a load – even for head coach Aldin Ayo’s rebuilding crew. “Siguro, okay naman yung rookie year ko kasi halos lahat naman ng teammate ko, napapakisamahan ko nang maayos. Sa responsibilities siguro, gagawin ko lang part ko as a big man,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2018

The “-ber” months have started

We suggest early preparation for the holiday season with regard to gifts, food stuff, menus and all things relevant to our traditional celebration......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

ANI gets original proponent status for proposed JV arrangement with NFA

Listed AgriNurture Inc. (ANI) said the National Food Authority (NFA) had granted granted 'original proponent status' to its unsolicited joint venture (JV) proposal for the financing and p.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

NFA okays ‘original proponent status’ to Agrinurture’s joint venture proposal

Listed Agrinurture, Inc. (ANI) on Thursday disclosed that the National Food Authority (NFA) has granted ‘original proponent status’ to its unsolicited joint venture proposal for the finan Source link link: NFA okays ‘original proponent status’ to Agrinurture’s joint venture proposal.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

AgriNurture Inc. gains competitive edge in rice supply bid

Listed agricultural trading firm Agri-Nurture Inc. has secured the original proponent status for its unsolicited proposal to supply the rice requirements of the National Food Authority......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

NFA okays original proponent status to Agrinurture s joint venture proposal

Listed Agrinurture, Inc. (ANI) on Thursday disclosed that the National Food Authority (NFA) has granted 'original proponent status' to its unsolicited joint venture proposal for the finan.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 16th, 2018

Udonis Haslem having talks with Heat, deciding on return

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — Udonis Haslem is creating jobs, while working toward getting his Miami Heat job back for another season. Haslem has had talks with the Heat in recent days as he continues working through the process of deciding whether to return for a 16th season. There is no timetable for a decision, but there are now indications that he is clearly leaning toward a return. “It was a great conversation,” Haslem said at the opening of his latest Einstein Bros. Bagels, one of several franchises that he and his business partners have collaborated on in the Miami area in recent years. “At the end of the day, it’s was a conversation about if they want me back and if I want to be back.” He’s also planning a meeting with Heat coach Erik Spoelstra in the coming days. Heat officials, including team president Pat Riley, have said they want Haslem back. Haslem’s on-court role has been limited over the last three years. He appeared in only 14 games last season, all off the bench, and hasn’t gotten more than 20 minutes in any game since Jan. 1, 2017. But his voice in the locker room is vital. The 38-year-old Miami native remains one of the team’s captains, and it’s not uncommon for him to mentor teammates on the bench during games or raise his voice at halftime — even before coaches enter the room — when things are not going to his liking. Even this week, several Heat players joined him for his usual midday outdoor workout under the sweltering Miami sun. “I was glad to have them,” Haslem said. “It’s usually lonely out there.” He’s taken the same approach that he’s brought to basketball to the business world. Haslem and his partners have created well over 200 jobs with their food-service ventures, with more projects looming. “I like being invested in the things I’m investing in,” Haslem said. “I don’t just sit around and wait for the check. My life has pretty much become basketball, working out, business and my family. Those are my four vices.” Haslem has played with 126 different Heat teammates, not even counting those players who were signed for training camps and never actually appeared in a regular-season or playoff game. His return for a 16th year would mean that he’s been with the franchise for more than half its history; the Heat had played 15 seasons before he signed with them in 2003. For his career, Haslem has averaged 7.7 points and 6.8 rebounds. He was a starter on the Heat championship clubs in 2006, 2012 and 2013......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 15th, 2018

Q2 corporate earnings cut by inflation, fuel costs

The unabated increase in inflation, soaring fuel costs and the depreciation of the peso against the dollar have cut consumer-related companies’ second quarter earnings, dampening the outlook for the rest of the year for some listed companies which thrive on food, beverage and other consumer-driven goods......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 12th, 2018

Cowboys sort through roles for receivers without Dez Bryant

By Schuyler Dixon, Associated Press OXNARD, Calif. (AP) — Allen Hurns isn't sure when, or even if, more specific roles will be settled for Dallas Cowboys receivers in the first season without Dez Bryant. Offensive coordinator Scott Linehan said it's more "when" than "if." "Right now, you guys have probably noticed, we're moving guys around a lot," Linehan said about a week into training camp in California. "That's a positive, especially early and now. But the thing that's gotta be improved upon is OK, when it gets down to crunch time, this is the guy, he's a go-to player in this route or this play." "We're making strides. But we've got to make strides here quickly," he said. The Cowboys don't have a so-called No. 1 receiver after dumping Bryant, the franchise leader in touchdown receptions, in a cost-cutting move during the offseason. Cole Beasley, with 53 fewer career TDs (20), is the Dallas dean in a mix of holdovers, newcomers and rookies that lacks anyone even close to the pedigree of Bryant. Before skipping a couple of practices with a mild leg issue, the 6-foot-1 Hurns was with the diminutive pair of fellow newcomer Tavon Austin and Beasley in three-receiver sets with the first team. Austin and Beasley, both listed at 5-8, are on the field a lot together. "I'd rather see it as two fast, quick guys," receivers coach Sanjay Lal said when asked about two small guys on the field at the same time. "Yes, an advantage I think." Hurns spent most of his four seasons with Jacksonville as an inside receiver but said his best year — the only 1,000-yard season among the dozen receivers the Cowboys brought to camp — came when he spent more time outside. Austin, acquired in a trade with the Los Angeles Rams after five disappointing seasons as the eighth overall pick in 2013, had at least as many carries as catches three times in those five years. So there's little question he will move around in formations. But he probably won't be the only one moving around. "The main thing for us, everybody needs to know all three positions and get comfortable at what you've got to do," Hurns said. "Right now, no one has like a set position where you're just inside or just outside." And Beasley tends to think it doesn't matter. "You're still getting open and catching balls," he said. "It's about production, whether it's from the inside or outside. Wes Welker led the league in receiving as a slot receiver. We've got tons of guys who can do both. If you're a receiver, you're playing all of them." Michael Gallup, the first receiver drafted by Dallas post-Bryant as a third-rounder, is the rookie most likely to get significant playing time. Sixth-round pick Cedrick Wilson is probably out for the season with a shoulder injury sustained on the first day in pads at camp. The receiver best built for the outside is the easiest one to forget: 6-2, 210-pound Terrance Williams, Dallas' third-round choice five years ago. After breaking his foot in January, the former Dallas high school player was arrested for public intoxication in May coming off the first season of his career without a touchdown. Having recently settled all the claims with police in the Dallas suburb of Frisco, where the Cowboys have their headquarters, Williams is quietly trying to work his way into the rotation. Williams, who isn't talking to reporters during camp, has been getting first-team work after starting out with the second group at camp. "He's worked really hard to come back from the injury," coach Jason Garrett said. "He has been limited the whole time. We anticipated that. Hasn't hit any roadblocks where he's going backward." Williams isn't alone in switching spots on the depth chart. The Cowboys have been doing that since the start of the offseason. And it's not out of the question that it could continue into the regular season. "That's the one thing I like about the whole situation," Austin said. "I don't care who the one, two or three receiver is. The more people we've got, the faster we are." With the retirement of 15-year tight end Jason Witten, the Cowboys don't have a pass-catcher in his 30s. The oldest — by two months over Beasley — is another newcomer in journeyman Deonte Thompson. From Linehan's point of view, it's a young group. "Every day we're learning something about our guys," Linehan said. "Finding the balance is out here and the proof's in what you're able to do and how you're able to perform when you've got a matchup and you've got to win that matchup. We're finding who those guys are right now.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018