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Jennifer Aniston and Tig Notaro will play POTUS and FLO...

Jennifer Aniston and Tig Notaro will play POTUS and FLO........»»

Category: entertainmentSource: cnnphilippines cnnphilippinesMay 19th, 2018

PVL: Cagande making a name for herself in PVL debut

BaliPure-National University may be the youngest team in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Reinforced Conference with its core composed of high school standouts but the Water Defenders are already making their presence felt and could give other established squads a run for their money. After falling short in their debut, BaliPure went on a roll, winning their next three matches to climb to a share of the lead with Creamline and PayMaya. American import Janisa Johnson is scoring consistently since she checked in for BaliPure in their second match while young libero Jennifer Nierva is holding the fort on floor defense. But the recent success of the Water Defenders could also be attributed to the steady game and quick adjustments of setter Joyme Cagande. The incoming Lady Bulldog has been lording over the setting department with an average of 9.1 excellent set per frame.     Known for her superb playmaking for the four-peat UAAP high school champion Nazareth School of NU, Cagande continues to dazzle even in the import-laden commercial league. The reigning UAAP high school Best Setter delivered her best performance yet with 54 excellent sets Wednesday in BaliPure’s 25-22, 25-22, 22-25, 32-30, win over BanKo at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan.    Cagande welcomes the challenge of setting up plays to imports Johnson and Alexis Matthews, who are grizzled veterans in international play.      “Challenging siya kasi especially may imports. Iba kasi yung speed ng import, iba yung height ng import so kailangan talaga nandoon ang dedication mo para makuha ang eksaktong set for them,” said Cagande, daughter of a Philippine Star senior photographer Joven. Cagande is particularly comfortable playing with Johnson, making their tandem one of the most dangerous setter-hitter partnerships in the tournament. “Actually po kay Ate Janisa sobrang walang pressure kasi nandoon lang ang support niya lagi,” she said. “Always kapag ang set ko mali nandoon lagi ang feedback niya po kaya hindi gaanong mahirap makipag-work together with her.” Johnson in her previous interview said that she likes her role as mentor and ‘mother’ for the young BaliPure players. Cagande surely is learning a lot from the hitter, who is just coming off two big tournaments in France.  “‘Yung mga adjustments po sa mga mistakes (ang tinuturo niya). Sinasabi niya na OK lang mag-commit ng mistakes basta yung ibibigay nyong solution kaagad nandoon,” Cagande said of one of the things she learned from Johnson. With a 3-1 win-loss record the Water Defenders are in the thick of the battle for the outright semis seats. Expect Cagande to be one of the BaliPure players leading the way.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2018

Jennifer Aniston, Adam Sandler reunite in ‘Murder Mystery’

  Jennifer Aniston and Adam Sandler have been named to the cast of "Murder Mystery", a new comedy film from Kyle Newacheck of "Workaholics". "Murder Mystery" follows a New York Police Department officer, played by Sandler, who goes vacationing with his wife (Aniston) in Europe. While there, they become the prime suspects in a case concerning the death of a billionaire. James Vanderbilt, of "Independence Day: Resurgence" and the first two "Amazing Spider-Man" films, wrote the script for "Murder Mystery". The project's director, Kyle Newacheck, previously co-starred in, wrote for, directed and created episodic comedy series "Workaholics", and then "Game Over, Man" (aga...Keep on reading: Jennifer Aniston, Adam Sandler reunite in ‘Murder Mystery’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 1st, 2018

Selena’s ‘unlikely’ friend

Selena Gomez's unlikely friendship with Jennifer Aniston started in the unlikeliest of places---the bathroom. In an interview with Just Jared, Selena recalled running into the actress while the latter was retouching in the ladies' room at a party they attended in 2009. "She said, 'Hi!' My legs started to shake and I ran. I freaked out," she said. The two has since become good pals, despite their age difference: Selena is 25; Jennifer, 49. "She has a pizza oven. We've made pizzas in her house!" Selena related. "She's cool. She gives me a lot of ... maternal advice."---ALLAN POLICARPIO...Keep on reading: Selena’s ‘unlikely’ friend.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux announce they ve se...

Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux announce they ve se........»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  cnnphilippinesRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2018

Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux announce separation

LOS ANGELES — Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux are separating.  .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2018

Jennifer Aniston, Justin Theroux announce separation

LOS ANGELES, USA – Jennifer Aniston and JustinTheroux are separating after two years of marriage , they said in a statement to Agence France-Presse on Thursday, February 15. The pair, who shared a mansion in the upscale Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles, met on the set of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2018

Stars from Angelina Jolie to Jennifer Aniston to grace 75th Golden Globes

  LOS ANGELES---Angelina Jolie, Jennifer Aniston, Halle Berry, Dakota Johnson, Dwayne Johnson, Gal Gadot, Kit Harington, Emilia Clarke, Emma Watson, and Chris Hemsworth are among the stars expected to grace a special edition of the Golden Globes on Jan. 7 (tomorrow morning, Manila time)---the awards show's 75th anniversary. In addition to the star power at the highest wattage, the show at The Beverly Hilton will be politically charged, especially with Seth Meyers as the host in a Hollywood rocked by sexual allegations, #MeToo and #TimesUp movement and a contentious president in the White House.   Black on red Further stirring interest in the show is the r...Keep on reading: Stars from Angelina Jolie to Jennifer Aniston to grace 75th Golden Globes.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 6th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Witherspoon, Rhimes among founders of anti-harassment group

NEW YORK — Reese Witherspoon, Shonda Rhimes and Jennifer Aniston are among hundreds of Hollywood women who have formed an anti-harassment coalition called Ti.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 2nd, 2018

Liu Yifei Is the Mulan We Always Wanted

Disney fans are rejoicing after Chinese actress Liu Yifei was cast as Mulan in the upcoming live-action remake. This is refreshing news considering Hollywood's whitewashing of several films. And we have an online petition to thank for choosing an Asian actress to star in the film. The petition, which gathered 112,000 signatures, started after rumors spread that Jennifer Lawrence will play Mulan. Even though it was proven untrue, fans were still wary of the movie being whitewashed after Scarlett Johansson starred inGhost in the Shellearlier this year, among several other examples. Now that Liu Yifei has been chosen, the petition is now closed with the message, "We did it! Thanks...Keep on reading: Liu Yifei Is the Mulan We Always Wanted.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 1st, 2017

How Author Jennifer E. Smith Is Making Us Believe in Cheesy Stories Again

Many would say that love stories are overplayed by now and that there's nothing new about them anymore. But you have to admit that you don't forget the ones that you enjoy, regardless of how cheesy or seemingly unrealistic they are. When I was tasked to interview author Jennifer E. Smith, I suddenly remembered readingThe Statistical Probability of Love at First Sightway back in college. It was a long time but the story's main plot felt fresh in my head. Jennifer is known for writing romantic young adult fiction which mostly play on the concept of serendipity and "what ifs." Her new bookWindfallis no exception. I sat down with her before she started her two-city book signing, and w...Keep on reading: How Author Jennifer E. Smith Is Making Us Believe in Cheesy Stories Again.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 8th, 2017

Aniston not ‘a sad, childless human’

LOS ANGELES — Jennifer Aniston (photo) says she spoke out against tabloid culture because she “has worked too hard in this life and this career to be whittle.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 16th, 2016

Courteney Cox: Brangelina split ‘not about’ Jennifer Aniston

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Courteney Cox wants people to leave the name of her close friend and former "Friends" cast mate Jennifer Aniston out of any discussion about Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie's divorce......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsSep 29th, 2016

Jennifer Aniston memes explode in response to Pitt divorce

LOS ANGELES (AP) — 'Brangelina may be the top trending hashtag Tuesday, but Jennifer Aniston's face is the one saturating social media......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsSep 21st, 2016

JLaw and Chris Pratt play as lovers in “Passengers”

Set in the distant future, Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt play the characters of eventual lovers Aurora and Jim in Morten Tyldum's Passengers, according to em>Uproxx News /em>......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 14th, 2016

Jennifer Lopez to play cocaine queen Griselda Blanco for HBO

LOS ANGELES  — Jennifer Lopez is set to star as late drug lord Griselda Blanco in an upcoming HBO biopic about the woman known as "The Godmother" and the "Qu.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 12th, 2016

Five local films to watch this rainy season

The gloomy weather and relentless rain isa great hassle for most of us, but be honest, the suspension of classes or work is something you look forward to, because it at least affords you some downtime to do whatever you want while waiting the storm out. And if the weather has got you feeling in a binge-watching mood, don't worry, we've got the perfect list of movies to get you started. If you're one to indulge on the melancholic, longing sentiment that comes with the gray weather, here are some local films you can check out which beautifully capture that feeling. So prepare your blanket, some chips, maybe some tissues, and hit play. Sakaling Hindi Makarating Sakaling Hindi Makarat...Keep on reading: Five local films to watch this rainy season.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News3 min. ago

As MLB mulls rule changes, union hints at work stoppage

By Ronald Blum, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Major League Baseball wants a broad discussion with players about rule changes to combat decreased offense and longer games, an initiative likely to be met by a testy union stung by declining free-agent prices and already raising the possibility of a work stoppage after the 2021 season. Commissioner Rob Manfred and players' association head Tony Clark outlined their differing agendas during separate sessions with the Baseball Writers' Association of America before Tuesday night's All-Star Game. "There is a growing consensus or maybe even better an existing consensus among ownership that we need to have a really serious conversation about making some changes to the way the game is being played," Manfred said. "We are not at the point where I can articulate for you what particular rule changes might get serious consideration. I can tell you the issues that concern people: I think that the period of time between putting balls in play, the number of strikeouts, to a lesser extent the number of home runs, the significance of the shift and what it's done to the game, the use of relief pitchers and the way starting pitchers are going to be used." Clark repeatedly maintained players are reluctant to change as "stewards of the game." "We may get to a point where those coming to the ballpark or have an interest in coming to the ballpark for whatever reason aren't 100 percent certain that what they are see is the type of game that they want to see," he said. More than 100 free agents remained unsigned when spring training began this year. Many agreed to deals at a fraction of the price they thought they were worth and for fewer years than they expected. "What we experienced last offseason was a direct attack on free agency, which has been a bedrock of our economic system, and if that is going to be different, then we have some very difficult decisions to make moving forward," Clark said. Baseball had eight work stoppages from 1972-95 but has had labor peace since. The current five-year contract runs through the 2021 season, and Clark left open a possible return to the era of strife. "To the extent there are challenges to those rights, historically I would suggest those have manifested themselves in a particular way," he said. The union filed a grievance in February against Miami, Oakland, Pittsburgh and Tampa Bay, accusing the teams of failing to appropriately spend revenue-sharing money in an effort to improve their on-field product. Manfred dismissed the allegations, saying the grievance was filed "really for publicity reasons." Manfred said the lack of interest in free agents was due to the dearth of quality. "At the end of the year you'll look at the performance of those players," he said, "I'm pretty sure, based on what's already in the books, you're going to make the judgment that the clubs made sound decisions as to how those players should be valued." Management is alarmed by what is taking place on the field. Strikeouts (24,537) are on track to surpass hits (24,314) for the first time. Strikeouts also are likely to set a record for the 12th straight season, and this year's average of 17.0 per game is up from 12.6 in 2005. The current big league batting average of .247 would be the lowest since 1972. There have been 20,587 shifts on balls in play, according to Baseball Info Solutions. That projects to a full-season total of 34,668 — up 29.8 percent from last year and an increase from 6,882 for the entire 2013 season. That has decreased the batting average of stars such as Washington's Bryce Harper, who is hitting just .214. And the average attendance of 28,568 is down from the 30,159 at the break last year, when the final figure was 30,042. MLB has not dropped below 30,000 since 2002. Manfred blamed early season bad weather. "We've made up some ground," he said. "We were down as much as 8, 9 (percent) early, we were back to like 5.5 percent down, and I'm optimistic." Lack of competitiveness among rebuilding teams also is a likely factor. Three teams are on track to lose 100 or more games, which would match the record set in 2002, and five others are on a pace for 90 or more defeats. Clark called the attendance drop "dramatic" and said while weather is partly to blame "the concerns that fans have in regards to the competitive integrity piece is one of them" along with "players being moved from teams that fans had a connection with." While he wouldn't cite teams for tanking, he said it appears many clubs are deciding to rebuild if analytics tell them they can't compete to win the World Series. "This is only what I am hearing, that teams are making decisions against the backdrop of what they believe their roster is going to yield and the landing place of where their team is going to be at the end of the year, that those data points suggest if you're not in a particular place, then it may make more sense not to look to be the last team standing," he said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News8 hr. 15 min. ago

FFA cool on Usain Bolt s A-League bid

SYDNEY (AP) — Football Federation Australia has responded cautiously to reports Usain Bolt hopes to play for the Central Coast Mariners in the A-League. Reports on Tuesday said the 31-year-old Bolt, an eight-time Olympic sprint gold medalist, has agreed to trial with the Mariners next month and may receive a one-season A-League contract if he impresses. However, in order to make a deal possible the FFA would have to top up any salary offered to Bolt from its $3 million fund to attract "marquee" players. The Mariners owner reportedly has offered to meet 70 percent of Bolt's salary but the FFA's contribution might still be around $900,000. In a statement late Tuesday, the FFA said, "While Usain Bolt is one of the most famous athletes on the planet, he's not a professional footballer. "If the trial goes ahead and Central Coast Mariners decided it stacks up and they want to offer him a contract, then we will have a discussion with them around that and what might be possible." Bolt, who quit the track last year, has already trialed unsuccessfully with Germany's Borussia Dortmund and South Africa's Mamelodi Sundowns. Many regard reports he might trial with the Mariners as a public relations stunt. His previous trials were with clubs which shared his major sponsor. Mariners chief executive Shaun Mielekamp said he hoped to have details of any trial finalized by late August. "It is crucial to note that all discussions between the Central Coast Mariners and Bolt require an initial six-week trial period and no contract is guaranteed," a club statement said. Bolt's long-time agent, Ricky Sims, confirmed the Jamaican athlete is considering the Mariners' offer of a trial. "Usain has made it quite clear that he's interested in playing professional football," Simms told the Australian Associated Press. "We're looking at a number of options and this is one of them." Australian player agent Tony Rallis, who first revealed Bolt's interest in playing in the A-League, said Bolt was genuine in his desire to play for the Mariners. "If he meets the benchmarks set by the coaches, he'll be given a contract," Rallis said. "He'll be treated like another one of the players and he doesn't want to be treated like a different player. "He's got a point to prove and he's determined to prove he's worth a contract.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News8 hr. 15 min. ago

Players open to expanded DH, wild card, but MLB not keen

By Ronald Blum, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Baseball players are open to extending the designated hitter to the National League and to expanding the winner-take-all wild-card playoff to a multi-game series. Management has little interest. The American League has used the DH since 1972, and there has been more discussion among fans and media of expanding it to the NL. "It's gaining momentum, I'll offer you that," players' union head Tony Clark told the Baseball Writers' Association of America on Tuesday. "Players are talking more about it now than they have in the past." DHs often are high-priced sluggers, a reason players are interested in having the rule cover both leagues. "Fans like to see offense," said Boston's J.D. Martinez, who has DHed in 54 of his 92 games this year. Not all players agree. "I lightly lean toward no, just because I'm used to the National League style of play," Cincinnati's Joey Votto said. "I find that the American League is a little more basic and the games are longer. That doesn't excite me. On the other side, I guess I do like the idea of the occasional break and getting to DH." Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred said change was unlikely. "I could have made a deal with the MLBPA on extending the DH to the National League," he said. "I think the most likely outcome at this point remains the status quo." MLB began one-game wild-card playoffs in each league in 2012, when the postseason field was expanded from eight to 10. There has been renewed scrutiny of the format because of the AL East race. Boston is 68-30 and on pace for 112 wins, and the New York Yankees are at 62-33, which projects to 105 wins. "Having series is always better ... for a player in a lot of ways than a one-game playoff," Clark said. He said complications include a schedule that can stretch from late March until early November and division winners not wanting to have three or four off days before the playoffs. Manfred said this year's AL East race is proof of the current format's success. "Under the old system the Yankees and the Red Sox wouldn't care who won the American League East," he said. "In contrast, under the new system we are all going to be treated to a pennant race that goes all the way through the end of September and they're going to be trying to win every single game to avoid that one-game wild card." He maintained that if the same circumstances occurred in the NL Central, if it were "the Brewers and the Reds that might be winning 100 games, that the uproar would probably be a little less." In an era when most calls are subject to video review, Clark said it was not yet clear whether computers could replace umpires in calling balls and strikes. "Electronic strike zones have been bantered about quite a bit," he said. "The discussions that we've had so far suggest that as much as we want that consistency, we also respect and appreciate the umpires and the human element of the game as well. I don't know where we're going to end up at this point. We have a lot more conversations to have with players." ___ AP freelance writer Ben Standig contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News8 hr. 15 min. ago