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Globe myBusiness Academy Offers Free Training for Aspiring Entrepreneurs

Globe myBusiness Academy Offers Free Training for Aspiring Entrepreneurs.....»»

Category: newsSource: metrocebu metrocebuSep 14th, 2017

Globe offers free training for aspiring entrepreneurs

Globe offers free training for aspiring entrepreneurs.....»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 9th, 2017

GOINGS ON: Bayan Academy, J.P. Morgan support Tesda’s Skillspreneurship program

In an effort to address the challenge to create a citizenry of entrepreneurs, a public-private partnership---between the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (Tesda), Bayan Academy, and the social responsibility arm of global banking giant J.P. Morgan---was formed with the objective of training Tesda trainers who can then teach 'skillspreneurship' or skill-based entrepreneurship to a broader population. Tesda, through its National Institute for Technical Education and Skills Development (NITESD) chose trainers from all over the region to attend the "National Training of Trainers on Skillspreneurship". "This program aims to introduce entrepreneurship to Tesda technic...Keep on reading: GOINGS ON: Bayan Academy, J.P. Morgan support Tesda’s Skillspreneurship program.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News1 hr. 20 min. ago

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 to engange Pinoy youth and coaches nationwide

Jr. NBA PH press release MANILA, PHILIPPINES, Dec. 23, 2017 – Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 presented by Alaska will tip off Jan. 13 at Don Bosco Technical Institute in Makati and runs through May 2018 as part of the league’s effort to encourage youth basketball participation. This year’s program is set to reach more than 250,000 participants and 900 coaches across the country.  Online registration is open now at www.jrnba.asia/philippines. Jr. NBA, the league’s global youth basketball participation program for boys and girls, teaches the fundamental skills and core values of the game at the grassroots level in an effort to enhance the youth basketball experience for players, parents and coaches.  During the 2017-18 season, the NBA will reach more than 26 million youth in 71 countries through a variety of camps, clinics, skills challenges, league play and outreach events.   The program remains free and open to boys and girls ages 10-14 throughout its four stages: skills clinics in schools and communities, Regional Selection Camps, a National Training Camp and an NBA experience trip.  Since its launch in 2007, Jr. NBA clinics have been implemented in 110 cities and municipalities across the country and the 2018 program will return to key provinces including Agusan Del Norte, Batangas, Benguet, Cavite, Misamis Oriental, and Negros Occidental.  Regional Selection Camps will be held in Bacolod (Feb. 10-11), Butuan (Feb. 24-25), Baguio (March 17-18) and Metro Manila (April 7-8), with the top 37 boys and 37 girls advancing for the National Training Camp in Manila in May 2018, which will feature an NBA and WNBA player or legend.  The program will culminate with the selection of 16 Jr. NBA All-Stars, comprised of eight boys and eight girls, who will embark on an overseas NBA experience trip with fellow Jr. NBA All-Stars from Southeast Asia.  Prior editions of the Jr. NBA Philippines program have featured notable alumni including Aljon Mariano, Kobe Paras, Kiefer and Thirdy Ravena, Ricci Rivero, and Kai Sotto.  “For the past 10 years, Jr.  NBA Philippines has established itself as a platform to improve the youth basketball experience and promote an active and healthy lifestyle among the Filipino youth,” said NBA Philippines Managing Director Carlo Singson.  “Together with Alaska, we are committed to providing proper guidelines to how the game should be played and taught to more youth, coaches and parents in the country.” “As part of our long-standing partnership with the NBA, Alaska Milk Corporation is proud to play an active role in shaping the basketball players of tomorrow through good nutrition and proper life values,” said Alaska Milk Corporation Marketing Director Blen Fernando.  “We look forward to making a lasting impact on the lives of aspiring athletes on and off the court through the Jr. NBA program.” The 2018 edition of Jr. NBA Philippines will also include the Jr. NBA Coach of the Year program, led by Jr. NBA Head Coaches Carlos Barroca and Alaska Power Camp Coach Jeff Cariaso, to provide training for 14 Jr. NBA coaches during the National Training Camp, with two Jr. NBA Coaches of the Year awarded with an NBA experience trip.   Jr. NBA Philippines furthers the mission of Alaska Milk’s NUTRITION.ACTION.CHAMPION. program that highlights the nutritional benefits of milk, encourages physical activity through play, and instills values that are essential to becoming a champion.   AXA, CloudFone, Gatorade and Panasonic serve as Official Partners of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines, while Spalding is a Supporting Partner.  ABS-CBN Sports + Action, Basketball TV and NBA Premium TV are the Official NBA Broadcasters of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines.  Coaches and participants can now register the Jr. NBA program online at www.jrnba.asia/philippines, where the program terms and conditions can be found.  Fans can also follow Jr. NBA on Facebook and the NBA at www.nba.com and on Facebook and Twitter. To learn more about the Alaska Milk Corporation, visit www.alaskamilk.com and follow PlayPH at www.playph.com and on Facebook and Twitter. About the NBA The NBA is a global sports and media business built around four professional sports leagues: the National Basketball Association, the Women’s National Basketball Association, the NBA G League and the NBA 2K League, set to launch in May 2018.  The NBA has established a major international presence with games and programming in 215 countries and territories in 50 languages, and merchandise for sale in more than 125,000 stores in 100 countries on six continents.  NBA rosters at the start of the 2017-18 season featured 108 international players from a record 42 countries and territories.  NBA Digital’s assets include NBA TV, NBA.com, the NBA App and NBA League Pass.  The NBA has created one of the largest social media communities in the world, with 1.4 billion likes and followers globally across all league, team, and player platforms.  Through NBA Cares, the league addresses important social issues by working with internationally recognized youth-serving organizations that support education, youth and family development, and health-related causes. About Alaska Milk According to the 8th National Survey of FNRI and DOH (as of 2013), obesity is one of the most prevalent nutritional problems of Filipino children and adults, with about 5 out of 100 Filipino children being classified as overweight. Obesity can lead to different health problems like heart diseases and even diabetes at a young age, which could lead to serious health, economic and social implications later on in life. In line with Alaska Milk’s mission to bring affordable nutrition and a love of active play to every Filipino household, powering the Jr. NBA is a major part of Alaska’s “NUTRITION. ACTION. CHAMPION.” initiative. By highlighting milk’s nutritional benefits and encouraging children to go out and play, Alaska consistently works to instill the values Determination, Hard Work, Teamwork, Discipline and Sportsmanship in tomorrow’s champions......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 23rd, 2017

30 Ilonggos train on animation for free

THIRTY artists embarked on a free training on animation at the Toon City Academy (TCA)-University of Iloilo (UI)-PHINMA to improve their skills and meet global standards. The training, which runs for 8 to 12 weeks, is a joint effort of TCA (a 25-year-old animation firm based in Metro Manila) as implementer; UI-PHINMA as host institution; […] The post 30 Ilonggos train on animation for free appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsNov 29th, 2017

Hyper Court: Basketball at your fingertips

Access to basketball has never been this easy for aspiring basketball players and professional ballers alike. Nike on Saturday officially launched the Hyper Court app that gives exclusive basketball content to Filipino hoopers. During the event, selected members of the media experienced what the interactive training is all about. Basketball stars Kiefer Ravena, LA Tenorio, Jayson Castro and Jeff Chan helped conduct shooting and dribbling drills. The training routines are part of the Hyper Court app, which allows Filipino ballers free access to videos. "It's very convenient knowing it's in our hands and everybody is into technology nowadays," Ravena, a two-time UAAP champi...Keep on reading: Hyper Court: Basketball at your fingertips.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 19th, 2017

Champions On and Off the Pitch: Milo, FC Barcelona train young footballers in Road to Barcelona Camp

div> MANILA, Philippines, 20 September 2017 – Inspired by MILO and FC Barcelona’s (FCB) shared values of humility, effort, ambition, respect, and teamwork, over 140 kids participated in the MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Camp last September 2 to 3 at the Mckinley Hill Stadium in Taguig. The weekend training saw young footballers from Metro Manila, Cavite, Laguna, IloIlo, and Cebu gather to showcase their skills and embrace life values in sports, with the hopes of being nominated to the team representing the country in the FCB Escola Camp in Barcelona happening in October.  The four-year values-driven partnership between MILO and FC Barcelona was formally launched globally earlier this year, aiming to help more young Filipinos aspire to be the best they can be and realize their dreams through sports and the programs of MILO and FCB. The MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Camp provided free world-class training to deserving young Filipino football players under the tutelage of esteemed FCB Escola Camp Coaches from Barcelona, Spain. These athletes were exposed to playing the Barca way while also getting the opportunity to make new friends among their peers from different clubs, all in the spirit of fun and friendly competition. Aside from this one-of-a-kind training session, the MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Team will also be on the lookout for two of the most deserving players who will stand a chance to get an all-expense paid trip to Barcelona, Spain. They, along with other identified players from the other MILO markets worldwide, will get to go on a once-in-a-lifetime experience to train in Camp Nou, the home stadium of FC Barcelona, in October. A selection panel led by the MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Team will help identify the players who will be included in the event. Just as important as skill, the principal values that define the spirit of FCB and the essence of MILO, will be included in the criterion for selection of the said players. Joining MILO and the Philippine Football Federation in the selection camp were FC Barcelona coaches Arnau Blanco and Marti Vila, who’ve previously held international FCB Escola camps in Europe, Asia, South America, and Australia. Arnau and Marti conducted football drills for the kids which included theoretical concepts that underlined the football club’s system and culture. Bannered by the message of 'TEAMMAKESME, the young athletes were also taught the value and role of their team around them—teammates, coaches, family, and friends who play an important role in their holistic growth to be come champions on and off the field. “You see the kids smiling, improving, enjoying, trying to understand our philosophy, and it really is fulfilling for us coaches. Having them play together as a team and learn the values and skills in football is amazing to witness. For us, it is important that we help Filipinos experience the Barca way through our program,” said FCB Escola Camp coach Arnau Blanco. “We are grateful and honored to have had the opportunity to do this for the local football community. With the our partners, FC Barcelona and the Philippine Football Federation, MILO is eager to search for the most deserving players to send to a once-in-a-lifetime experience in Camp Nou. It is truly encouraging to see these  athletes from all walks of life come together, and we send a big thank you to their supportive parents and coaches who joined them in this journey.The selection process will be a challenging one, but we’re looking forward to providing Filipino athletes a platform to share their talents on a world stage and benefit from the life-changing opportunity this partnership offers,” said de Robbie De Vera, Sports Marketing Executive of MILO Philippines. /div>.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

Globe offers free calls, text messages for 15 days in Marawi

Globe offers free calls, text messages for 15 days in Marawi.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 23rd, 2017

Globe offers free call, texts to Marawi City customers

lobe Telecom Inc. is offe........»»

Category: newsSource:  manila_shimbunRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2017

OWWA Offers Free Management Training to Filipino Seafarers

OWWA Offers Free Management Training to Filipino Seafarers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsMar 29th, 2017

CANADIAN BUSINESS EXPERTS TO MENTOR IN DTI NEGOSYO CENTERS

&'160; Aspiring and existing Filipino entrepreneurs can soon avail of free business mentorship from Canadian business experts, as the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) partners with a Canadian development organization focusing on capacity building to stimulate entrepreneurship for the long-term. DTI signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Canadian Executive Service Organization (CESO) [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  boholnewsdailyRelated NewsJan 19th, 2017

Globe myBusiness Helps SMEs Become Future Proof

Globe myBusiness has brought its valuable expertise and tried-and-tested products and solutions to the country’s favorite tourist destination, Boracay, to help small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) become future-proof. The workshop, dubbed as Globe myBusiness Digital Tools to Future-Proof Your Business, centered on the most prominent industries currently flourishing in Boracay such as tourism, hotels and […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJan 17th, 2018

20th Century Fox’s Award-Winning Movies in Cinemas This February

Shaping to be this year’s major award frontrunners, 20th Century Fox’s / Fox Searchlight’s highly-acclaimed films “The Shape of Water” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” have already bagged major awards from the 75th Golden Globe Awards and the 23rd Critics’ Choice Awards. “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” is a darkly comedic drama from Academy […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJan 17th, 2018

Jags ‘threw a tantrum’ when Marrone started making changes

By Mark Long, Associated Press JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Jacksonville’s locker room was abuzz late last season. Four guys played table tennis while others crowded around a small table for dominoes. Two 80-inch televisions were tuned to a sports highlight show, and music blared from one corner of the room. Doug Marrone, the team’s offensive line coach at the time, walked through and shook his head. “Can you believe this?” Marrone whispered. The Jaguars were in the middle of a nine-game losing streak that would ultimately cost coach Gus Bradley his job. Marrone had watched from afar for two years, witnessing an atmosphere he felt was too loose, too laid-back and too lenient amid losing. So when Marrone was hired to replace Bradley last January, high on his to-do list was to change the culture in Jacksonville. His success is one reason the Jaguars (12-6) are in the AFC championship game against New England (14-3). The ping pong table was the first to go. Dominoes followed. The locker room stalls were overhauled, too, with Marrone mixing and matching position groups and putting certain players next to veteran leaders and/or NFL role models. “We definitely threw a tantrum,” Pro Bowl defensive tackle Malik Jackson said. “Went in there and talked to him about it. Definitely wasn’t happy. I learned just to be quiet, you know, and go with the flow. He’s been at it longer than I have, and I’m just the football player. He says do this and I go do it. Just learn to follow him, and I’m glad I did.” Marrone saved the most significant changes for the practice fields. Marrone, top executive Tom Coughlin and general manager Dave Caldwell wanted a much tougher and more physical team. They drafted bruising running back Leonard Fournette and fiery left tackle Cam Robinson to complement a defense that was significantly beefed up in free agency with the addition of All-Pro pass-rusher Calais Campbell, Pro Bowl cornerback A.J. Bouye and veteran safety Barry Church. They also designed an offseason program that was more grueling than most players had experienced. Marrone’s message was clear: Go hard or go home. “You remember guys in camp talking about this took a few years off their lives,” Jackson said. “It’s pretty funny just to see us now. I guess he does know what he’s doing.” The Jaguars were in full pads nearly every day during training camp, a tortuous stretch in draining heat and humidity that left rookies and veterans questioning the process and wondering if it would pay off. It was the NFL’s version of boot camp. Break them down, then build them up. It ultimately brought players closer, making them accountable to each other and causing them to care more for each other. Winning was the final piece, and thumping Houston 29-7 in the season opener was all the proof players needed. “It was the toughest training camp I’ve ever been a part of,” said linebacker Paul Posluszny, in his 11th season. “Coach Marrone would talk to us and say, ‘Listen, I have a plan and you have to trust me.’ With that, guys were able to say, ‘OK, we haven’t gotten what we wanted in years past doing things a certain way, so we have to buy in, trust the head man and know that that’ll bring us success when it’s time.’ “It was difficult just because of so many changes from what we were used to. I think the most important thing is we always said, ‘Well, if it helps us win, then it’s all good.’” Jacksonville had lost 63 of 80 games over the previous five seasons — the worst record in the NFL during that span — and had been through two coaching changes. Coughlin’s return was a key part of the team’s revival, and although the two-time Super Bowl-winning coach with the New York Giants gets much of the outside credit for the team’s turnaround, the reality is Marrone was the one pushing all the right buttons. Marrone has been other places where players resisted, prompting personnel moves that would slow progress. That wasn’t the case in Jacksonville, and he credited his players for being open to change. “They gave our staff the opportunity to say, ‘This is what we want to do. This is what we believe in as coaches or as an organization. This is how we want to handle ourselves,’” Marrone said. “We are still working toward that. It is not perfect by any means.” It’s clearly working, though. The Jaguars are in the title game for the third time in franchise history, one victory away from their first Super Bowl appearance. “They say (stuff) rolls downhill,” Jackson said. “Well, the good stuff rolls downhill, too. ... It’s all worth it when you win.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2018

Capitol offers first health billing course in PHL

BACOLOD City – The provincial government of Negros Occidental through its language and information technology center will offer a course for medical billing, the first in the Philippines. The Negros Occidental Language and Information Technology Center (NOLITC) will fund the training program for Billing and Coding Certified Specialist and Certified Professional Coder courses in 2018. […] The post Capitol offers first health billing course in PHL appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJan 14th, 2018

2018 Jr. NBA Philippines targets 250,000 participants

As the NBA continues to spread its influence on the global sporting community reaching 26 million kids in 71 countries, Jr. NBA Philippines plans to do the same. For its 2018 edition, Jr. NBA plans to target 250,000 participants and 900 coaches across the archipelago. The program remains free for children aged 10 to 14-years-old who are eligible to join throughout four stages that will begin with skills clinics in schools and local communities. The Regional Selection Camps will follow with a National Training Camp to further trim down the number of participants with the best of the roster getting to experience a full NBA trip. "For the past 10 years, Jr. NBA Philippines h...Keep on reading: 2018 Jr. NBA Philippines targets 250,000 participants.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Jr. NBA goes digital as it enters new decade

Jr. NBA is back in business and for 2018, it's about to be bigger than ever. Kicking off a new decade of the youth basketball program, Jr. NBA Philippines has once again teamed up with Alaska to launch the 2018 edition Saturday at Don Bosco Technical Institute in Makati. The Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 will run through May and is expected to hit more than 250,000 participants all over the country. "This year is our 11th year and we wanna make it bigger and better," NBA Philippines Managing Director Carlo Singson told ABS-CBN Sports. "Last year we had about 30,000 players and coaches participating and obviously we want to grow that number but we also want to create new digital, mobile, and social content so that more people can benefit from Jr. NBA," he added. Speaking of the planned move to digital by Jr. NBA, Singson says that their website has been re-launched to accomodate free content. It should allow basketball enthusiasts, even those who cannot directly participate to Jr. NBA events, to access useful tips and drills. "A lot more content geared towards players, coaches, and just fans of the game," Singson said. "So if you're a young basketball coach that has a team and wants new ideas, that will be on our site they can just watch or stream it, potentially even download it. Basically, it's gonna be on 365 days a year. That's the vision for the website, a lot of content is gonna be up. That is one of our key initiatives, to build our presence on the digital side," he added. Following this weekend's tip off, several coaching clinics will run until March while regional selection camps will go until April. Finally, a national training camp will take place in May with the main event slated for May 20 at the SM Mall of Asia. Online registration for Jr. NBA Philippines is now live at www.jrnba.asia/philippines   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

All’s quiet for Cubs at fan convention

CHICAGO --- There was no surprise return for Jake Arrieta. No dramatic entrance for Yu Darvish, Alex Cobb or Greg Holland, either.Kris Bryant   Not even close. The Chicago Cubs settled five of their six potential arbitration cases before the start of their annual fan convention on Friday, including a record $10.85 million, one-year deal for third baseman Kris Bryant. But they remain at an impasse when it comes to another free-agent addition or a big acquisition via trade --- a common refrain during one of the slowest winters for baseball in a long time. "We're not done. We have confidence in this group if this is the 25 we end up taking to spring training," president of baseba...Keep on reading: All’s quiet for Cubs at fan convention.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Josh Donaldson agrees to $23M, 1-year deal with Blue Jays

TORONTO (AP) — Third baseman Josh Donaldson and the Toronto Blue Jays agreed to a $23 million contract, the largest one-year deal for an arbitration-eligible player. The 32-year-old, a three-time All-Star, topped the $21,625,000, one-year deal covering 2018 agreed to last May by outfielder Bryce Harper and Washington. Donaldson, the 2015 AL MVP, got a $6 million raise after rebounding from an injury-slowed 2016 to hit .270 last season with 33 homers and 78 RBIs in 113 games. The sure-handed infielder missed time from April 14 through May 25 with a calf injury, which also hampered him during spring training. Donaldson was coming off a $28.65 million, two-year deal. He is eligible for free agency after this season. Toronto also agreed Friday to one-year deals with outfielder Ezequiel Carrera ($1.9 million) and left-hander Aaron Loup ($1,812,500). Carrera earned $1,162,500 last season, when the 30-year-old Venezuelan played every outfield spot and batted .282 with eight homers and 20 RBIs in a career-high 131 games for the Blue Jays — 91 of those in left field. Toronto's other arbitration eligible players are right-handers Dominic Leone, Roberto Osuna, Aaron Sanchez and Marcus Stroman, outfielder Kevin Pillar and second baseman Devon Travis......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Orioles avoid arbitration with Machado, Britton

BALTIMORE (AP) — The Orioles agreed to a $16 million contract with third baseman Manny Machado and a $12 million deal with injured closer Zach Britton, avoiding arbitration with both stars. Machado, who can become a free agent after this season, hit .259 with 33 homers and 95 RBIs last year, when he made $11.5 million. He has been mentioned in persistent trade rumors. Britton ruptured his right Achilles tendon in offseason training and could miss part of the 2018 season. The 30-year-old left-hander made $11.4 million last season, when he had 15 saves and a 2.89 ERA. In 2016, he had a 0.54 ERA and was perfect in save opportunities with a major league-leading 47. Britton also can also become a free agent after this season......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018