Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnJan 11th, 2018

'Nung dati I really hated San Beda eh, sa totoo lang' --- Babes Bolick

Robert Bolick sure enjoys handing San Beda NCAA championships now but there was a time "Babes" absolutely despised the Red Lions. Oh yes, back when he was still a La Salle Green Archer, Robert Bolick couldn't stand San Beda. "Nung dati I really hated San Beda eh, sa totoo lang," Bolick, who won a UAAP title with the Green Archers in Season 76, said Thursday after he won his second straight NCAA title with the Red Lions. "When we play against them sa FilOil, si coach Boyet pa yung coach sa kabila, I really hated them because they're really good eh. Pag San Beda kalaban I really don't like [it]," he added. After leaving Taft for Mendiola in 2015 though, Bolick has nothing but love for his new-found home now. His love was evident in the Season 93 Finals against the previously-undefeated Lyceum Pirates, hitting clutch shot after clutch shot to the delight of all San Beda fans. In hindsight, his decision to leave La Salle and go to San Beda was the best thing Bolick has ever done so far, basketball wise. And after this latest title, Bolick says he's staying one more year to complete his stint in San Beda. Why? Because he's loves it  there. "That's why I stayed for a year, because of them. Pwede na ako magpa-draft, pero it's my responsibility to give one more year for San Beda. The way they treat me, galing pa lang sa teachers, sa fathers, sa tao sa cafeteria, mga guards, kahit sino-sinong nandoon. You're inspired to play for them because they have the passion," he said. "I love San Beda," Bolick added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 16th, 2017

Serena Williams loses in 1st round at Miami Open to Osaka

By Steve Wine, Associated Press KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. (AP) — The match ended with Serena Williams grinning at the net. She saved the worst shot for last in a rare first-round defeat and had to laugh. Still rusty in her return from pregnancy, Williams was unable to overcome a tough opening draw at the Miami Open and lost Wednesday to Naomi Osaka, 6-3, 6-2. On the final point, Williams thundered forward to attack an easy shot at eye level, whacked the ball six feet past the baseline and responded with a sheepish smile. Not that motherhood has mellowed Williams. She left without talking to the media. The 20-year-old Osaka, who earned her first career title Sunday at Indian Wells, showed no signs of letup and overpowered the erratic Williams. Osaka had the stronger serve and worn Williams down in rallies working her from side to side. The matchup worthy of a final came about because both players were unseeded. Osaka is ranked a career-best 22nd, while Williams' ranking is 491st after a layoff of more than a year. Another new mother and former No. 1, three-time champion Victoria Azarenka, defeated Catherine Bellis 6-3, 6-0. Seeded players are in action beginning Thursday. Williams has been eliminated in the first round only four other times, most recently at the 2012 French Open. The latest defeat came at a tournament she has won a record eight times and considers her hometown event. The match was the last for Williams at Key Biscayne, 90 miles south of her home in Palm Beach Gardens. The tournament is moving next year to the Miami Dolphins' stadium, where Williams helped with the ceremonial groundbreaking Monday. Because of Williams' ranking, she entered the draw as a wild card, and looked the part. She needed only eight shots to win the match's first five points, but things became much more difficult after that. Playing her fourth match since returning to the tour, Williams was a step slow to balls in the corners and often late with her swing, while she put barely half her first serves in play. Early in the second set she resorted to her patented scream of "Come on!", but the outburst failed to turn things around and she lost the next three games. Typical of her struggle was an exchange midway through the last set. Williams scrambled forward to scoop a ball back, then retreated to hit an awkward, lunging overhead, and then stood and watched helplessly as a crosscourt forehand from Osaka whizzed past for a winner. Osaka, who has both American and Japanese citizenship and lives in Fort Lauderdale, was playing her idol for the first time but didn't seem a bit fazed. She improved to 14-4 this year. Things may get tougher for her in the second round, when she'll face No. 4-seeded Elina Svitolina......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 21st, 2018

Injured Warriors play short, don t have enough against Kings

By Janie McCauley, Associated PRess OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Buddy Hield made three free throws over the final 27.5 seconds, Willie Cauley-Stein had a late dunk and the Sacramento Kings won for the second time this season on Golden State's home floor, beating a Warriors team missing its top three scorers 98-93 on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). Hield finished with 22 points off the bench. He also had seven assists and seven rebounds. Quinn Cook scored a career-high 25 points on 10-for-13 shooting for Golden State, making his initial seven shots and also hitting a career-best five three-pointers after Kevin Durant was lost to a broken rib in a discouraging pregame announcement for the defending champions. Draymond Green returned from a one-game injury absence to produce 14 points, 10 rebounds, seven assists, four steals and two blocked shots. Hield made one free throw with 27.5 seconds left and then two more with 13.2 seconds remaining as the Kings withstood a frantic final minute after the teams entered the final quarter tied at 75. Sacramento also won at Oracle Arena on Nov. 27 (Nov. 28, PHL time). Before the game, NBA Finals MVP Durant became the latest Warriors star to go down. Then Golden State lost reserve Omri Casspi to an ankle injury early in the game. Durant will miss at least two weeks with a fractured rib on the right side, joining fellow All-Stars Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson on the injury list for the Warriors. An MRI exam Friday (Saturday, PHL time) revealed Durant's injury and he will be re-evaluated in two weeks. Durant said there's still time for the team to heal and get ready for the playoffs. He missed 18 games in 2017 before returning for the final two contests of the regular season. "No concern. I've got a couple weeks and I'm just trying to get healthy, and I'm just trying to make sure I'm out there being able to be me on the court," Durant said. "That's the most important thing. It's not great timing-wise, obviously. It's all about just feeling better when I'm out there playing." Cook scored 13 in the first quarter as the Warriors jumped out to a nice lead, but they held just a 59-57 edge at halftime. Both teams played the first of back-to-back games. TIP-INS Kings: The Kings shot 14-for-31 from three-point range and held a 47-40 rebounding advantage. ... Kosta Koufos, who had 12 rebounds, was hit with a technical early in the second. Warriors: Casspi limped off at the nine-minute mark of the second with a sprained right ankle. ... Curry missed his fourth straight game after re-injuring his troublesome right ankle. He will be re-evaluated Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), while Thompson has a fractured right thumb and will be examined again next Thursday (Friday, PHL time). ... Green became the eighth player in franchise history with 500 or more blocked shots. A CHAMP'S NIGHT In a sweet pregame moment, Steve Kerr brought up Champ Pederson on Warriors special needs night to help with the pregame media session before Pederson announced the starting lineups. Champ is 30 and has Down syndrome. He has worked part-time as a finance assistant for the Warriors since last fall and is the big brother of Dodgers outfielder Joc Pederson. "He could be in the lineup," Kerr joked. "I could be," Pederson said, grinning, "for Steph Curry." UP NEXT Kings: At Utah on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). Warriors: At Phoenix on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 17th, 2018

Biado rules Indonesia 10-ball tilt

Carlo Biado stamped his class, ruling the Jogja 10-Ball Open International Billiard Tournament 2018 Sunday at Rama Billiard in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The 34-year-old pool wizard bested fellow Filipino Jundel Mazon, 13-11, in the final to take home the $10,000 cash prize. His latest conquest further established his position as one of the top cue masters in the world after also winning the 2017 World 9-Ball Championship that earned him the distinction of being named as one of the three Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) Athlete of the Year awardees. Biado first downed hometown bet Ricky Yang of Indonesia, 11-5, in the semifinals, while Mazon edged compatriot Hushley Ju...Keep on reading: Biado rules Indonesia 10-ball tilt.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Rose embraces new home, blocks out doubters

By Steve Aschburner, MINNEAPOLIS – Don’t let go of the rope. It’s one of Tom Thibodeau’s most familiar exhortations, a mantra of sorts to keep his teams locked in, digging down and generally committed through whatever grueling test they’re facing, be it a game, a road trip, a spate of injuries or the entire season. The trouble for Derrick Rose with that particular Thibs-ism is, so often, he has been the rope. On one side of an unfortunate tug o’ war, we’ve had the Rose loyalists, the fans, friends and family who believe that the 2010-11 NBA Most Valuable Player’s return from injury hell to elite status is just one more, legit opportunity away. Pulling from the other side, there is a growing group of Rose skeptics who are convinced that the Chicago kid’s best days – his most explosive, elusive, game-changing moves – are behind him, strewn on the floors of too many surgical rooms and rehab gyms. Rose, 29, knows they’re there. One group pulling for him, the other doubting him. And in an unusually candid and forceful moment Saturday (Sunday, PHL time), the normally soft-spoken Rose delivered a stark message to them all. “Yeah,” Rose said after his first full practice since signing a minimum-salary contract Thursday (Friday, PHL tie) to join the Minnesota Timberwolves. “This is how I feel about the whole perspective on it: You can have your perspective on me as far as I’m a bum, I can’t play, I can’t shoot, this and that. All right. Cool. I have no hard feelings with that. I’m cool with that. If that’s how you feel, that’s how you feel. “But at the same time, I don’t need your [bleeping] validation.” Rose’s eyes burned bright, in a direct response to the many health challenges he has endured from acquaintances and strangers both, picking at whatever good or bad is left of his basketball career. “I know who I am,” Rose continued. “I know the type of player I am. So, you respect that and I respect that, and we should be good. That’s how I feel about it.” In other words, you work your side of the street, Rose will continue to work his. If there are NBA administrators like Thibodeau, the Wolves’ head coach and president of basketball operations, willing to give him another chance, he’ll be chasing the ghost of his own self while trying to help somebody win. One more chance Rose’s latest grab at faded glory could begin in Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) matinee against the defending champion Golden State Warriors at Target Center (editor's note: Rose wound up playing just seven minutes off the bench. He finished with two points on 1-of-5 shooting with a rebound, two assists, and two turnovers). It probably is his last, best shot to salvage something from a 2017-18 season that’s been largely lost due to injury, yes, but other factors outside Rose’s control as well. What looked like a terrific opportunity back in training camp – signing with Eastern Conference power Cleveland Cavaliers and home to the game’s best player (and Rose nemesis) in LeBron James – got sideways fast. In the Cavs’ second game, on a drive to the rim, Rose got whacked across the face and neck by Milwaukee center Greg Monroe. He landed badly on the baseline, suffering a “jacked-up” left ankle that left him in a walking boot and sidelined him for 11 of Cleveland’s next 15 games. Then word got out just before Thanksgiving that Rose had left the team, reportedly to contemplate his future as an NBA player. He was gone for nearly two weeks, at least part of it back home in Chicago, during what Cavs GM Koby Altman called “a very challenging and difficult time for Derrick.” Rose didn’t play again until Cleveland’s 44th game. In nine appearances over the next three weeks, he was a shell of the three-time All-Star he’d once been, averaging 6.3 points, 1.6 assists and 13.3 minutes, while shooting 39 percent. On Feb. 8 (Feb. 9, PHL time), he was one of six Cavaliers players dealt by Altman at the NBA trade deadline, sent to Salt Lake City as a throw-in to acquire Utah’s Rodney Hood and Sacramento’s George Hill. Two days later, the Jazz waived Rose. Four weeks passed before Thibodeau got the green light from Minnesota owner Glen Taylor to sign Rose. The Oklahoma City Thunder had sniffed in his direction, only to opt for veteran backup Corey Brewer. Rose had family duties to attend to – he and Alaina Anderson had a baby girl in Chicago to start the week – but he also had spent time working out by himself in the Cavs’ facility or at Cleveland State’s gym. The end seemed near. Given Rose’s limited involvement this season, he probably would have been a long shot to land with one of the league’s 30 teams in 2018-19, had Thibodeau not reached out. The people on the dark end of Rose’s rope were winning. Now, this buys him time for a shout-out to the folks on the other end. “‘Don’t give up,’ Rose said he would tell them. Talking later at the downtown Minneapolis hotel where he’s staying, he wanted to assure people that his desire to play remains strong, his passion to keep trying still burns, and his mental fitness for this and future challenges on or away from the court is fine. “I still have faith,” Rose said, two bags of ice strapped to each leg. “No matter what happens, I still have a lot of faith in myself and my ability. It’s just about opportunity and catching a rhythm. Whenever I do catch a rhythm, I’d rather see what it is then. Than to, like, give up knowing I have so much left. Like, ‘Damn, I should have kept playing.’ “I’m going to give it my all. And once I do, then it’s like, ‘All right, cool. I gave it my all, now what’s this next phase in my life?’ “But as far as right now, I’m still in it. I’ve got two kids that can look at me now. The oldest, my boy [P.J.] is 5 years old. He’s looking at me right now. He sees everything. I’m going to tell him, ‘No excuses. Don’t come to me cryin’, this and that. Nah.’ He’ll see what I’ve had to go through. ‘Now suck it up and go out there and do what you’ve got to do.’” A career interrupted For some NBA players whose careers got waylaid by injuries – Brandon Roy, Greg Oden, Penny Hardaway – their bodies finally refused to cooperate. They went from 60-to-0, no wiggle room on whether they would continue. Rose, for all his setbacks, has worked his way back – not back to his previous form – from each and every injury. From the ACL blowout that started him down his hobbled path in April 2012 to three subsequent meniscus knee surgeries, from the left orbital fracture he suffered when he caught teammate Taj Gibson’s errant elbow in the face in the opening practice of 2015-16 to the lingering ankle sprain dealt by Monroe’s blow in October. In that sense, Rose is more like Bernard King, Sam Bowie or Grant Hill, standout players whose career trajectories were forever altered – but not ended – by injuries. Rose speaks as if he has reached some level of peace with his maladies, referring to his injuries as “part of the game” and his particular “cross” to bear. “I’ve just had five surgeries more than other people,” he said. “That’s the way I look at it. That don’t mean that I can’t play. That don’t mean that I lost my love for the game. No.” What Rose doesn’t like is the “fragile” label that’s been affixed to him. He’s less interested that he has played in only 486 of approximately 789 regular-season games so far, while proud of the 130 he logged with the Bulls (2015-16) and Knicks (2016-17) more recently. It seems clear that the reckless abandon with which Rose played – and the excruciating torque he put on his knees with his bounding, zig-zag attacks through the lane – wreaked havoc on his knees. Beyond that, though, he’s not buying any pattern business. “You see how I was injured [in October]? I was taken out of the air,” Rose said. “People are like, ‘Aw, he’s always injured.’ Are you just watching highlights, just looking at clips, like new fans are these days? Or are you watching an entire game? Are you just reading reports that come up on your phone?” Scouts say that Rose has lost both quickness and leaping ability, without developing a perimeter game to compensate. They also bundle his Cleveland hiatus with the AWOL episode last season with the Knicks, when Rose left the team without notice before a game against New Orleans, to question his reliability and commitment. Rose disputes the comments about his game, citing the circumstances in New York and Cleveland. “I could sit here and tell you, ‘I’m gonna try to change this. Do this and do that.’ Nah, I always felt, it starts with my rhythm,” he said. “[In] New York ... I was playing the triangle [offense favored by former Knicks president Phil Jackson] and still playing pretty well [18.0 ppg, 4.4 apg, 32.5 mpg]. In Cleveland, when did I really have a chance to catch a rhythm? When did I play 20 games straight? Or 10 games? Five games?” As for his reliability – or likelihood to take a powder on the Wolves the way he did on the Knicks and seemed to do on the Cavs – Rose said there is no issue there, either. In the past couple weeks, Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan (depression) and Cleveland’s Kevin Love (panic attacks) have opened up about psychological challenges they and other athletes face. But Rose shook his head as the question was asked. “Oh no, no, no,” he said. “I’m blessed, man. Beyond blessed. It’s not even ... what do I have to complain about? I don’t have anything to complain about. Of course, I wish I was on the court more. I think in time, with the right opportunity, I’ll be out there more. “I’m not depressed, even though I think everybody deals with some depression in some way. It’s about how you deal with it. We’re emotional creatures. We hold onto things. I try to meditate, try to do little things to change my mindset and try to read things to easy my nerves.” Rose admitted he did wonder if he would get another chance, once the Cavs traded him to a Jazz team that had no use for him. “Especially when you get dropped by a team like Cleveland, that needed players,” he said. “It makes other teams think, ‘Damn, if they didn’t keep him...’” Rose has not spoken with James since being dealt, he said. “The way I take it, I don’t take it as personal,” Rose said. “They didn’t need my services. That’s the way I look at it, OK? I understand. It’s business. Does that stop me from working hard? Does that stop me from still putting out goals and trying to reach my goals? No.” Familiar faces aid return Now Rose is reunited with Thibodeau, Gibson, Jimmy Butler (sidelined after his own meniscus surgery) and familiar coaches and staff making up the “TimberBulls.” He even trusts Thibodeau, often criticized for the heavy minutes he loads on his top players, not to break him. “If anything, I want him to play me,” Rose said. “I want to show to him that I can still play. I want him to see me and be like, ‘Damn, he’s still got it.’ I want him to count on me. I want to be held accountable. You know what I mean? I don’t just want to be, like, an average guy on the team riding along just to see how far they go. I really want to add.” Said Thibodeau, who ran Rose Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) through a rigorous refresher course on his playbook: “Obviously when he was at an MVP level, that was the peak. But he also, my last year in Chicago, he had a great year. ... He still has the potential to be very good. He’s young, that was the other part of it. He knows some of our guys, he knows the system. “Like all stories, there’s a beginning, there’s a middle and there’s an end,” the Wolves coach added. “I don’t think it’s a finished story.” Gibson thinks Rose can shoulder some of Butler’s late-game duties, simply because the scoring guard has strong muscle memory of such situations. He, too, hopes Rose’s story can take a happy turn. “I’ve got my fingers crossed,” the veteran forward said. “I truly believe in him. He’s got a lot left in the tank. It’s just, sometimes life doesn’t go your way and you have to push through it and keep fighting.” Thibodeau has said that Rose, like starter Jeff Teague and backup Tyus Jones, can play both backcourt spots, so he can mix-and-match based on situations. Rose anticipates no problem walking that line between asserting his game and rocking the Wolves’ boat. “My job coming here, I’m not trying to step on nobody’s toes. I’m not trying to take someone’s spot,” he said. “I’m not trying to show myself. Nah. I’m here to win. Me going out there and playing, hopefully you all see that. ‘He’s making money plays. He’s playing to win. And that’s what we wanted from him.’” Not that Rose, lest we forget from up top, needs anyone’s bleeping validation. Boosters and doubters can pull this way or that, but he said he’ll be the one who decides when his time is up. “When my love of the game is not there,” Rose said, sounding sincere near the end of his 10th season overall. “When I get tired of going to the gym. “Don’t get me wrong, we all go through that. But after a couple of days, I get antsy, I want to be in the gym. When a week or two goes by and I haven’t touched the gym, even in the summer, oh yeah, I’d know it was over.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Artist Offemaria reimagines the Catholic ‘urna’

Christianity is a religion filled with and built on significations. The Bible and the Eucharist, for instance, two among the religion's most central traditions, hold and employ narratives and rituals, which resist from being understood at a superficial level, as they reveal deeper and sublime meanings. It is in this metaphorical tendency of the religion that Wilfredo Offemaria Jr. couches his latest solo exhibition on. Titled "Urna 2.0," the exhibition reimagines the retablo---the grandiose centerpiece of the church interior, and refigures the urna---similarly an altar, but used in smaller and more intimate traditions, sometimes at home. The exhibit formally opened at M...Keep on reading: Artist Offemaria reimagines the Catholic ‘urna’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 11th, 2018

New era, new challenges emerge for Warriors

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst "It’s the lack of faith that makes people afraid of meeting challenges, and I believe in myself. He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life. I figured that if I said it enough, I would convince the world that I really was the greatest." -- Muhammad Ali Ali defended his heavyweight championship 20 times, during two eras: when he was young and unstoppable, after beating Sonny Liston in Miami in 1964, and when he was old and vulnerable, after beating George Foreman in Zaire in 1974. He was the fastest heavyweight ever in the first era; he was smart and could take a punch in the second. A generation later, the Golden State Warriors are defending their NBA title for a second time, in three years. But they, too, are doing so in two eras. In 2014, no one had seen anything like what Golden State did on a basketball court, and how Stephen Curry’s and Klay Thompson’s shooting range changed the geometry of NBA defenses. They stretched to the breaking point trying to get out to Curry and Thompson. They couldn’t figure out how to handle the Warriors’ five-man switching defenses. They couldn’t stand up under Golden State’s withering pace. There is no need to hold a telethon yet for the Warriors, three years later. They are 49-14 today, with four All-Stars among their five starters, including Kia MVP candidate Kevin Durant, in the prime of his career, who wasn’t there when the Warriors first beat the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2015 Finals. They are still first in the league in Offensive Rating, first in True Shooting Percentage, first in Effective Field Goal Percentage. They still are unsolvable to most opponents. But maybe not all, not anymore. The margin of separation between Golden State and the rest of the league is still there, most of the time. But there are tiny signs of slippage. Tiny. You recall what Warriors assistant coach Bruce Frasier said in the preseason, when no one is injured and everyone thinks they’re going 82-0. “Teams are starting to figure us out a little bit,” he said then. “We’re talented, so that sometimes overrides strategy. But I feel like teams are figuring certain things out to do to counter what they’ve seen. Year one, it was really hard, because it was all new. The pieces have changed a little bit, but I feel like our challenge will be to see if we can layer on some of the offense, our fluid movement, and counters, and change things up, and execute better. Defense is always big, too, so I wouldn’t go into the complacent (problem). I think it’s going to be more execution, and how smart can we really be, and can we keep that energy up through this year?” In each of their previous three seasons, the Warriors led the league in margin of victory -- 10.1 points in 2014-15, 10.8 points in 2015-16 and 11.6 points last season. This year, though, they’ve fallen to third, behind the Houston Rockets and Toronto Raptors -- and their win margin is down to 8.5 points per game. Two years ago, the Warriors were fourth in the league in Defensive Rating (100.9). Last season, Golden State was second (101.1). This season, the Warriors are fifth, at 103.4. In 2014-15, they were 14th in the league in points allowed in the paint; this year, they’re 24th (to be fair, they were 23rd last year, when they won it all anyway). Are they bored? Tired? Aging? Is their bench inconsistency this year the result of vets saving themselves for the playoffs, or guys just getting old? And will it matter against anyone other than Houston? “Once you start getting a little older, it’s harder and harder,” guard Shaun Livingston said last week. “We definitely need the youth, we definitely need the health. We’ve got to be healthy. We’ve got to be healthy. Sometimes you see teams that maybe are over the hill -- they have the experience, but maybe not (the ability). It’s human nature. Obviously, I don’t think we’re there yet. We’ve got guys that are still in their prime. It’s mental now.” In the Jean-Pierre Coopman phase of their latest title defense (oh, how one misses spectacles like Ali fighting Coopman, the “Lion of Flanders” -- with Pat Summerall and Tom Brookshier on the call!), the Warriors came to Washington last week. There was no White House visit on the docket, only time with D.C. area kids and a trip to the African-American History Museum, with owner Joe Lacob and GM Bob Myers on the trip as well. They have been in the public eye for five years now, back to Mark Jackson’s last season as coach, when the Splash Brothers exploded into the national consciousness. That’s a long time for one NBA team to have all that light and heat on it. For a minute, the Warriors tried to convince themselves that there was a backlash building against them nationally, that people had grown tired of their 3-pointers and video game point totals. It was, of course, a ridiculous posit -- Golden State and its players are more popular than ever, the love for Curry such that he felt perfectly comfortable posting a photo of the glass table he accidentally smashed in his hotel room on Instagram, any criticism surely to be muted amid America’s love for the two-time MVP.   when you feel like you’re on the @pgatour so you gotta get some swings going in the hotel room 😂😂😂 #idiot A post shared by Wardell Curry (@stephencurry30) on Mar 1, 2018 at 1:33pm PST “There was a little guy who was probably eight years old, and he came up and introduced himself,” Steve Kerr said. “His name was Ryan, and I’m talking to him, and he goes ’oh, my God, there’s Quinn Cook!’ And he ran over to Quinn Cook. Not Steph, not me -- he loved Quinn Cook. That was cool.” Throughout the Warriors’ run, they’ve faced down different challengers in the Western Conference -- the first iteration of the Rockets with Harden, a hybrid inside-out attack where Houston unhappily and unsuccessfully tried to meld Harden and Dwight Howard in the post. The Durant/Russell Westbrook one-two combo in Oklahoma City. The Spurs, morphing from the Tim Duncan/Tony Parker-led team to the Kawhi Leonard-dominant one. The “Lob City” Clippers, followed by the Chris Paul/Blake Griffin halfcourt version. But this season’s Rockets, with Paul at the point, may be the most unique and dangerous threat to the Warriors. They are much more than a team that just rains 3-pointers on you -- though they most certainly do that, and do it historically well. They’re also an outstanding defensive team, with the additions of P.J. Tucker and Luc Mbah a Moute giving them a grit they haven’t had in past seasons to pair with the shot blocking and rim presence of Clint Capela. The numbers are stark: Houston is 32-1 this season when Paul, Harden and Capela all play, including two wins over the Warriors The Rockets have no obvious weakness. They have no fear of Golden State, either, having won two of the three meetings with the Warriors this season. It’s not just that they’re good, it’s how they’re good that makes them look like the greatest challenge yet to Golden State’s hegemony in the West. “I mean, yes, because they do it a different way, I guess,” Curry said last week. “They adopted the power of the three ball and try to use it as a main weapon, and obviously with James and CP together. Honestly, we know that they’re playing well. We’re chasing that number one seed and keeping tabs on how they’re playing and whatnot. But at the end of the day, we’ve got a lot of time left before we have to face them again. We know they’re serious. But so are we.” The Warriors have had to deal with great adversity during their run, to be sure. The biggest challenge came about this time last year, when a collision between teammates -- Zaza Pachulia and Durant, in D.C., ironically -- culminated in a Grade 2 MCL sprain and bone bruise for Durant, taking him out of the lineup at the worst possible part of the season. Golden State had just ripped off wins in 23 of its previous 27 games since a lamentable Christmas Day loss to the Cavs. Curry had started to figure out how to play with KD, and vice versa. They were in the middle of a brutal stretch of seven road games in eight overall, with the one brief return home to play the Celtics. When Durant went down, the initial fear was that he’d torn his ACL and would be out for the season. The Warriors’ locker room was funeral after the Wizards game. “Obviously, we were trying to figure out if he was like ’done-done’ for the year, or whether or not there was going to be a chance he’d return,” forward David West said. “We were, at the time he got hurt, we were just starting to figure out the sort of roles, everybody was getting comfortable with roles. We basically had to reset., change some of the functions we were doing. We lost a few games  trying to literaly just figure out and recalibrate and re-balance. That was one of those periods where we were just looking at each other, trying to start this thing -- we lost this huge, huge piece.” Yet the Warriors figured it out on the fly. And how they responded then provides a big clue to how they might respond to the challenge the Rockets present to them now. “It took us, I think we needed to get home before we were able to stablize,” Kerr said. “I want to say we lost three of the last four on the trip or something  (they did lose three of four, but one of the three losses was at Oracle in that one home game with the Celtics). We got home and righted the ship and got going. But sometimes (an injury is) a galvanizing force when a guy gets hurt, and you have to do certain things. Like, for us, when Kevin got hurt, we talked about it and we said we have to be the best defensive team in the league. We don’t have that luxury of throwing the ball to Kevin and saying ’get us 30 points tonight.'” During that stretch without Durant (March 2, 2017 to April 5, 2017), who returned just before the start of the playoffs, the Warriors led the league in the league in Defensive Rating (100.0, just head of San Antonio’s 100.2), first in opponent field goal percentage (.429), tied for second in opponent 3-point percentage (.316) and fourth in opponent points allowed per game (100.9). And once Durant returned for good, the Warriors again flexed. They tore through the West, winning all but one game en route to a third straight NBA Finals. And they took the Cavaliers apart in five games for their second title in three years. “You could see Draymond, Klay, Andre, Shaun, those guys, even Loon (Kevin Looney), were like, ’we didn’t have KD last year,’ ” West said. “For someone like myself, I just followed their lead. Klay got a little more aggressive. Draymond sort of settled everybody defensively. And we started winning.” That muscle memory will come in handy this year. Durant and Curry have missed time with injuries, and Golden State hasn’t figured out things at center just yet. (Would it shock me if rookie Jordan Bell played a big role there down the stretch? No, it would not.) But the Warriors still are smoking people in the second halves of games; per, the Warriors lead the lead in third-quarter scoring margin at 5.3 points per game, more than double the margin of the second-place Denver Nuggets. Whether it’s adjustments or something else (“mainly, fiery halftime speeches, Knute Rockne style,” Kerr opines), they have again put a lot of opponents away with 12 minutes to spare. Since the All-Star break, they’re fourth in the league in opponent field goal percentage (.433) and Defensive Rating (100.3). “This year, obviously, knock on wood, we want to stay healthy,” Curry said. “We want to continue to push in the right direction. Every year’s different. That’s the fun part about this league. No matter how much success you’ve had and what your expectations are, it’s a different journey every year. We’re right in the middle of that right now. We have an amazing record, considering how we’ve played. I think we’d all say we haven’t lived up to our own expectations. That’s okay. We have an opportunity to build the right habits and the right momentum going into the playoffs this year and do it, all 15 guys.” Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

Dining Delight: Master Distiller Eddie Russell Spirits Us Away On The Golden Mile Of Bourbon!

Dining Delight: Master Distiller Eddie Russell Spirits Us Away On The Golden Mile Of Bourbon!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 5th, 2018

Gilas Pilipinas back as 30th-best team in the world

Gilas is back as one of the 30 best teams in the world. After dropping to 31st following the first window of the Asian Qualifiers, the Philippines is up one spot in the latest FIBA rankings released at the end of the second window this week. Gilas Pilipinas is 30th in the world after going 1-1 in February, losing to Australia in Melbourne and beating Japan at home. With 254.8 points, Gilas is fourth in Asia behind Australia (no. 10), Iran (no. 24), and China (no.28). The Philippines is also ahead of bitter rival South Korea. The Koreans are 31st with 229.2 points. There's no movement at the top of the rankings as the United States and Spain kept their no. 1 and no. 2 rankings respectively. France is up one spot for third, replacing Serbia which dropped to fourth. Argentina complete the top 5. The Philippines will see action in late June and early July against Taipei and the Boomers to complete the third and final window of the first round. Gilas is through to the second round of the Asian Qualifiers.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 2nd, 2018

NRA, Florida face backlash after latest school shooting

Published: 6:26 p.m., Feb. 24, 2018 | Updated: 7:20 p.m., Feb. 25, 2018 NEW YORK --- The National Rifle Association, and now the State of Florida, faced a growing backlash Saturday as companies cut ties to the gun industry following the latest school massacre, and student survivors called for tourism boycotts of their home state until gun control measures are enacted. The latest companies to end their ties with the NRA were Delta and United Airlines, two of the three largest US-based airlines. Corporate ties to the NRA aren't the only elements undergoing scrutiny after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 dead on Valentine's D...Keep on reading: NRA, Florida face backlash after latest school shooting.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 25th, 2018

Three bombs hit Myanmar’s Rakhine state

YANGON: Three bombs exploded in different locations around Rakhine’s state capital Sittwe early Saturday morning, including at the home of a high ranking official, Myanmar police told AFP, adding that no deaths were reported. It is the latest violence to hit Rakhine, which is festering with ethnic tensions and has been roiled by communal violence [...] The post Three bombs hit Myanmar’s Rakhine state appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 24th, 2018

Reintegrated Mahrez helps Leicester into FA Cup quarters

By Steve Douglas, Associated Press Back in favor at Leicester, Riyad Mahrez helped the team reach the FA Cup quarterfinals by resuming his lethal partnership with Jamie Vardy on Friday. Vardy earned Leicester a 1-0 win over second-tier Sheffield United in the fifth round by heading in a cross from Mahrez, who was starting for the first time since the collapse of his move to Manchester City at the end of the January transfer window. Mahrez spent more than a week in self-imposed exile after being denied a transfer to the English Premier League leader, missing two games and a string of training sessions. He began his reintegration by going on as a substitute last weekend — coincidentally in a league match against Man City — and was given a standing ovation by Leicester fans when substituted in injury time on Friday. He applauded them back. "The most important thing in the game was the fans supported Riyad," Leicester manager Claude Puel said, "and when I replaced him, it was a good feeling with the fans. It's important to stay united about this." Chelsea also advanced against opposition from the League Championship, beating Hull 4-0 with Willian scoring twice and Olivier Giroud netting his first goal since joining from Arsenal. ___ LETHAL COMBINATION Vardy and Mahrez linked up to devastating effect when Leicester stunned the soccer world by winning the Premier League in 2016. During that memorable season, Vardy set a record by scoring in 11 straight league games and the England striker is on another run, having scored in five straight games in all competitions. His latest goal was a far-post header that looped over the goalkeeper in the 66th minute, following a cross from the right by Mahrez. "To see Riyad and Jamie play together again on the pitch was a good feeling," Puel said. The goal would have given Vardy extra satisfaction, considering he is a boyhood Sheffield Wednesday fan. ___ PASSING THE AUDITION With Eden Hazard rested, this was a chance for other members of Chelsea's attack to stake a claim for a starting place in next week's Champions League match against Barcelona. They didn't disappoint. Giroud, Willian and Pedro Rodriguez, the three-pronged forward line, all scored in the first half against Hull as Chelsea roared into a 4-0 lead by the 42nd minute. Both of Willian's strikes were from outside the area and came off passes by Giroud, who scored the fourth with a neat near-post finish from a cross by debutant Emerson Palmieri. Cesc Fabregas set up Pedro's goal with a superb pass over the defense. Chelsea manager Antonio Conte now has plenty of options up front for the last-16 first leg against Barcelona, with Giroud vying with fit-again Alvaro Morata for the striker spot while Pedro and Willian are competing for a place alongside Hazard. "For sure when I go home, I have many good doubts," Conte said. Chelsea reached the quarterfinals for the 12th time in 17 seasons. ___ REMAINING GAMES The rest of the fifth round takes place from Saturday to Monday, with the two Manchester clubs and Tottenham still involved. City finishes off the round by visiting third-tier Wigan in a repeat of the 2013 final won surprisingly by Wigan. United visits Huddersfield on Saturday, when it's also: Sheffield Wednesday vs. Swansea, West Bromwich Albion vs. Southampton; and Brighton vs. Coventry. Tottenham is away to fourth-tier Rochdale on Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2018

Egypt says 4,400-year-old tomb discovered outside Cairo

CAIRO (AP) --- Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered a 4,400-year-old tomb near the country's famed pyramids at the Giza plateau just outside Cairo, the Antiquities Ministry said Saturday, the latest discovery that authorities hope will help revive the country's staggering tourism sector. The tomb was found in a wider area of Giza's western necropolis, which is known to be home to tombs from the Old Kingdom. It likely belonged to a woman known as Hetpet, who archaeologists believe was close to ancient Egyptian royals of the 5th Dynasty. The tomb, unveiled to the media on Saturday, is made of mud brick and includes wall paintings in good condition depicting Hetpet observing...Keep on reading: Egypt says 4,400-year-old tomb discovered outside Cairo.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 4th, 2018

MPBL: Navotas, Batangas claim back-to-back victories

Navotas and Batangas claimed back-to-back victories Saturday night against their respective rivals for a share of the lead in the Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League Anta Rajah Cup at the Batangas City Coliseum. The Athletics rode on their third quarter explosion to dictate the tempo of the match and turn back Gary David-led Defenders, 88-73, to the delight of their home crowd. Batangas turned a tight 37-36 contest at halftime into an 11-point advantage heading into the payoff period thanks to a 29-point third quarter spurt for their second win in as many outings. The Athletics had seven players in double figures with Val Acuna scoring 13 points to lead the home team. Adrian Santos, Moncrief Rogado and Paul Varilla had 11 each while Jhaymo Eguilos finished with a double-double with 10 points and 11 rebounds while Lester Alvarez and Teytey Teodoro each chipped in with 10 markers for Batangas, which spoiled the 32-point outing of ex-pro Gary David for the Defenders. Meanwhile, Navotas leaned on the clutch jumper by Rey Publico with 56 seconds left to repel the Bulacan Kuyas, 77-76, in overtime to remain unbeaten in two games. Publico, who finished with eight points, drilled the basket to give the Cluth enough cushion, 77-73, to seal the win after Marlon Monte swished a triple for the Kuyas with two ticks left in overtime. Gino Jumao-as led Navotas with 16 points and six rebounds, Chester Saldua had 14 while Ron Dennison and JP Calvo got 13 and 12 markers, respectively, for Navotas. Jovit Dela Cruz had 15 points for Bulacan......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 4th, 2018

BLOGTABLE: Can Bucks make a push for third in the East? blogtable With Jabari Parker set to return to the lineup this week, can you see the Milwaukee Bucks securing a top three seed in the East? * * * David Aldridge: I don’t think so. The Cavs and Wizards, with Kevin Love and John Wall each out at least six weeks with hand and knee injuries, are both vulnerable to be sure and likely to be bottom four in the East rather than top four. But I have the feeling Miami’s going to be a buyer at the deadline and add another piece in order to rise to and solidify that third spot. Now, if Milwaukee moves John Henson or otherwise makes an impact deal at the deadline to add more shooting, I might feel differently about it. Plus, I do think it’s going to take Parker a while to get back up to speed, and that adjustment period could cost Milwaukee in the short term. Steve Aschburner: With Parker set to return and with Kevin Love out for 6-8 weeks with a broken hand and with John Wall missing 6-8 weeks to knee surgery? That’s how the question really sets up, with two of the three reachable teams ahead of Milwaukee in the standings losing the services of a vital player for the near future. But y’know what, I’ll still say no. First, the Bucks will have their own adjustments to make to adding a player rather than subtracting one -- they’ve got to learn anew how to best blend Parker, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Khris Middleton and Eric Bledsoe. Second, Milwaukee doesn’t need the first three seeds but it sure could use the fourth for homecourt edge in Round 1. If we get a little more separation among those teams, that’s where I see the Bucks aiming: No. 4. Trey Kerby: Jabari Parker will help the Bucks in a lot of different ways -- more scoring, more shooting, another starter-caliber player on the court to take a little responsibility off the shoulders of Giannis and Bledsoe -- but he’s still just 22 years old and coming off his second knee injury in four NBA seasons. Considering the Bucks are chasing teams that have one of the best offenses (the Raptors), defenses (Celtics) or players (Cavaliers) in the league, I can’t see them making a realistic run at a top three spot in the Eastern Conference. Homecourt advantage in the first round should be the goal for this team. Tas Melas: Whose spot would they take? The Celtics and the Raptors aren’t going anywhere, but the 3rd-seeded Cavs, in the words of the late Tom Petty, are "Free Fallin’". I would pick Miami as more likely to jump Cleveland based on a more home-heavy schedule and less growing pains of working with a new (interim) coach and new-ish rotational player. Shaun Powell: Uh, no. You're asking Jabari Parker to hit the ground running after missing two-thirds of the season, and the Bucks are also getting used to a new coach and a tweaked system at the moment. That's a lot going on for a team that's still very inconsistent. Their ceiling is the four or five spot because Miami is on a roll and the Cavs will figure it out in time to prevent a free-fall in the standings. John Schuhmann: Kevin Love's injury might make things more interesting, but it's still hard to see Parker giving the Bucks enough to catch the Cavs for third place in the East. Prior to getting hurt last season, he didn't move the needle much on either end of the floor. But the hope should be that he can help in the minutes when Giannis Antetokounmpo is on the bench, when the Bucks have been almost 14 points per 100 possessions worse than in the minutes with Antetokounmpo on the floor. Either way, Milwaukee is the clear favorite to secure the 4 seed in the East, and not because Parker is coming back. The Wizards are without John Wall for the next 6-8 weeks and Miami isn't as good as their record (they're 4th in the East with the conference's 10th best point differential). Sekou Smith: No. I can't see it right now. Not from here. But that doesn't mean it's impossible. Jabari Parker could provide the Bucks with a huge boost if he's ready to get back to playing the way he was before his latest injury occurred. But that's asking a lot, more than what is fair, to be honest. Parker is probably eager to prove me, and anyone else who doubts the Bucks' lofty playoff ambitions, wrong. And he should be. But not at the expense of his comeback. He has to find his rhythm first. And with a new point guard and new head coach, that won't be as easy as some people think. A top four seed should be the carrot the Bucks chase the rest of the way. Anything beyond that is a bonus......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 1st, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 31st, 2018

One-pan wonder: Creamy tomato and basil chicken

What a rewarding experience to whip up a lovely meal for oneself---that is until one has to face a sink brimming with greasy pots, pans and other kitchen stuff. The prospect of all that dishwashing to feed just one person can be discouraging, but who says home-cooked meals have to end on a sour note for the (single and occasional) home cook? This rich, flavorful chicken and tomato special, courtesy of Janina Raella "Ninay" Zamora, the young proprietor and barista of Arc & Vine Caf in Makati (Facebook Arc & Vine Cafe, Instagram @arcandvine), requires only one pan for sauting, frying, simmering as well as reducing wine. So, instead of worrying more about the cleanup, one ...Keep on reading: One-pan wonder: Creamy tomato and basil chicken.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 28th, 2018

Zagat survey reveals biggest tippers, spenders in US dining

The results of Zagat's latest National Dining Trends survey for the United States sheds light on the country's most generous tippers, most expensive dining cities and the biggest deal breakers that put off diners today. For the survey, the burgundy guide asked 13,000 diners about everything from their spending habits to social media influences and dining do's and don'ts. Here are a few highlights: Nation's biggest tippers That distinction goes to Philadelphians, who tip an average of 20 percent, compared to the national average of 18 percent. Diners in Denver and Washington D.C. trail not far behind, at 19 percent. The trend to eliminate the practice of tipping, meanwhile, has...Keep on reading: Zagat survey reveals biggest tippers, spenders in US dining.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

This Hong Kong hotel is your home away from home – but fancier

MANILA, Philippines – Just an hour away from Manila by plane, Hong Kong is always great for a quick weekend getaway. With Hong Kong Disneyland , Ocean Park , and an entire city filled with endless shopping and dining options, it's a city particularly suited to families, especially those with young ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 11th, 2018

Dining Delight: Into Korean? This Resto In Malate Boasts Of Good Food And A 3-Michelin Starred Chef!

Find signature Korean favorites served in the most straightforward, no frills way......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018