Be a Pioneer in Black Desert Online – Early Access Starts Today in Southeast Asia!

Saddle? Check. Fishing rod? Check. Potatoes? Check. Pearl Abyss hopes that Southeast Asian Adventurers are packed up and ready to take their first step into the Black Desert. Although the official launch is a week away, adventurers can get ahead of the game and get started with Early Access. Adventurers who have purchased a Legendary […].....»»

Category: newsSource: metrocebu metrocebuJan 13th, 2018

Black Desert Online Officially Comes to Southeast Asia

Pearl Abyss announced that Black Desert Online has officially launched in Southeast Asia today. After a week of Early Access, they are ready to open the servers to all Adventurers who bought a package to conquer the Black Desert world. Thanks to all the fans in Southeast Asia, the early access period was a success. […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJan 20th, 2018

Black Desert Online Will Start Closed Beta Test in Southeast Asia Soon

Strap on your boots, grab your lassos, and get ready for an epic adventure in the Black Desert! Closed beta begins on November 22 (Wednesday) in Southeast Asia. The Black Desert Online closed beta officially... The post Black Desert Online Will Start Closed Beta Test in Southeast Asia Soon appeared first on MetroCebu News......»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsNov 18th, 2017

SMB, Magnolia eye semis berths

Reigning champion San Miguel Beer and Magnolia shoot for an early entry to the best-of-seven semifinals when they face separate foes today at the start of the quarterfinal round of the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) Season 43 Philippine Cup at the Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay City. The No. 1 Beermen, holder of a [...] The post SMB, Magnolia eye semis berths appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMar 5th, 2018

Garcia shoots 66 to share clubhouse lead at Singapore Open

SINGAPORE (AP) — Sergio Garcia opened his season with a 5-under 66 and a share of the clubhouse lead on Thursday in the first round of the weather-interrupted Singapore Open. Playing his first tournament of the year, the Masters champion rebounded after making an early bogey to collect four birdies and an eagle at the Sentosa Golf Club. He was later joined by American qualifier Kurt Kitayama in the clubhouse lead. Still on the course, Tirawat Kaewsiribandit was at 6 under through 16 holes when play was suspended for the day because of the threat of lightning. Louis Oosthuizen, the 2010 British Open champion, was at 5 under through 16 holes when he also had to stop his round because of the weather. Of the players who did finish their opening rounds, only three were within two strokes of Garcia and Kitayama. One of them was Casey O'Toole, who aced the par-3 second with a 7-iron. The 38-year-old Garcia dropped his only shot of the day on the par-4 15th, his sixth hole after teeing off on the back nine, when he missed the fairway and was unable to make par. But he made amends when he birdied the par-3 17th and then eagled the par-5 18th to go out in 33. "I was 1 over after (the) seventh but it didn't feel like I was playing badly," said Garcia, who made birdies on each of the two par-5s and one of the par-3s on the second nine. "But then I hit two greats in a row for holes 17 and 18. I got a birdie-eagle there, so that settled me a little bit and I could play solid in the back nine and it was a great round." Garcia made the shortlist for the Laureus Sports Awards in the Breakthrough of the Year category after claiming his first major at Augusta National last year and is hoping for more success this season. He credits the Singapore Open as having played a part in toughening him up for his Masters win because he opted to start his 2017 campaign in the stifling humidity of Southeast Asia to prepare himself for the bigger tournaments ahead. Although he finished tied for 11th in Singapore, Garcia won the Dubai Desert Classic the next week and was in peak form when he won the Masters two months later. Kitayama only secured his place in the $1 million event on Monday by finishing at the top of the qualifying competition, but he made a strong start with birdies on three of his first five holes. The 25-year-old Thai was 6 under through 13 holes but spoiled his otherwise flawless round with a bogey on his last. "I started with a birdie and I just let it roll from there. I had some good tee shots, which I think, is the biggest thing for this course," Kitayama said. "I'm a little tired, but I'm hanging in there. Whenever I have time off, I'll try not to think too much about golf.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 18th, 2018

Meet 2017 s ten most powerful people in sports in Asia

In Asia, sports equals passion, and these ten big names in the sporting world today have led their respective organizations to amazing heights this year. Let’s take a look at 2017’s Top 10 People Behind the Biggest Sports Media Properties in Asia.   #1 Gianni Infantino, President of the FIFA World Cup Gianni Infantino is a football administrator and the current President of the FIFA World Cup. The FIFA World Cup is an international football association and tournament held every four years. Men’s football is arguably the most popular sport in the entire world and the same is true for Asia. The sport retains large numbers in viewership and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Countries like Singapore, Korea and Australia all follow football religiously.   #2 Aleksander Ceferin, President of UEFA Champions League Aleksander Ceferin heads the UEFA Champions League, an annual football competition, unlike FIFA which is only held every four years. The Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) is one of the most prestigious football tournaments in the world and is participated by top-division European football clubs. Although it does not consist of Asian teams, UEFA remains popular among the Asian people due to the popularity of football as a sport.   #3 Chatri Sityodtong, Chairman and CEO of ONE Championship When billionaire Chatri Sityodtong conjured up the idea for ONE Championship, he envisioned the entire Asia united under a single sport. ONE Championship has achieved tremendous success since its establishment in 2011. Martial arts is considered a Pan-Asian sport and for the first time in Asian history, it is a sport that has transcended regional and cultural boundaries. Currently the largest global sports media property in Asian history. Today, ONE Championship is broadcast to over one billion viewers in over 128 countries across the globe.   #4 Horacio Muratore, President of FIBA Having been president of FIBA since 2014, Horacio Muratore has continued to develop the sport of basketball, not just in Asia, but in the entire world. The FIBA Basketball World Cup was established in 1950 and is an international basketball competition held every four years since its inaugural year. It also has popular variations in the FIBA Asia Championships and FIBA EuroBasket. The next tournament is scheduled for Beijing, China in 2019. Basketball’s popularity in Asia remains concentrated in the Philippines, Taiwan and China where the sport enjoys a very strong and faithful following.   #5 John Malone, Owner of Formula One Although Bernie Ecclestone, Formula One’s colorful chief executive remains at the helm of business operations, new owner American billionaire John Malone purchased the company in early 2017 and has since continued to deliver fans heart-pumping auto-racing action. Formula One, also known as Formula 1 or simply as F1, is the highest class of single-seater international auto-racing tournament in the world. Held in different variations depending on the region, the races are held regularly on an annual basis on purpose-built F1 circuits or public roads. The most popular variation in Asia is the Singapore Grand Prix which normally takes place on the Marina Bay Street Circuit. The Singapore Grand Prix was first held in 1966. It is the first of its kind in Asia.   #6 Rob Manfred, Commissioner of Major League Baseball Rob Manfred was named the 10th Commissioner in the history of Major League Baseball a wildly popular sport not just in the United States, but also in Japan, Taiwan, and China. Major League Baseball or the MLB is the most recognizable professional baseball organization in the world. It is immensely popular especially in Japan where baseball is almost considered a national sport. Since 1986, an all-star team from the MLB is sent to a biennial end-of-season tour of Japan. It is called MLB Japan All-Star Series wherein exhibition games are held in a best-of format against all-stars from the Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) league. Aside from MLB Japan Serie, there also exists an MLB China Series and an MLB Taiwan Series.   #7 Hemang Amin, Chief Operating Officer of Vivo Indian Premier League Heman Amin has been a part of the BCCI, which governs the Vivo Indian Premier League, for the past seven years. The IPL is a professional Twenty20 cricket league established in India which is held every April and May of every year. Cricket is by far the most popular sport in India. Although a relatively new organization, having been established as recently as 2008, the IPL is one of the fastest growing sports media properties in Asia. It is currently valued at US$1.6 billion which is a monumental achievement for such a young property.   #8 Chito Narvasa, Former Commissioner of the Philippine Basketball Association Former basketball player and coach, Chito Narvasa is the ninth Commissioner of the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA). Basketball is a wildly popular sport in the Philippines, and perhaps the most widely played in the entire country. The premiere proving ground of men’s professional basketball in the Philippines is the PBA, which owns the distinction of being the first professional basketball league in Asia, and the second-oldest continuously existing league in the world apart from the National Basketball Association (NBA). The PBA played its first game in 1975, and today fuels a hoop-crazy nation that loves its basketball.   #9 Cai Zhenhua, President of the Chinese Football Association China has a burgeoning football obsession, with support from Chinese President Xi Jinping himself who is helping to develop the sport. Cai Zhenhua is the current President of the Chinese Football Association, which governs the sport in China.China’s passion for football is manifest in the Chinese Super League (CSL), which is the highest tier of professional football in the country. With a season that starts in March and ends mid-November, the CSL features 16 football clubs in its current season. The league, the largest in China, now operates under the management of the Chinese Football Association. The current champions are the Guangzhou Evergrande.   #10 Mitsuri Murai, Chairman of Japan Professional Football League Inaugurated in 2014, Mitsuri Murai is the Chairman of the Japan Professional Football League, or more popularly known as the J.League. Japanese professional football league, J.League is one of the most successful football leagues in all of Asia. It is the top level of Japan’s professional football scene, which is one of the most popular sports in all the region. With an annual revenue of over $560-million, the J.League features three football levels: J1, J2, and J3. The league is also governed by FIFA on the global level......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 19th, 2017

‘Amin Baco’ could be in Basilan, may recruit more Malaysians

MALAYSIAN MILITANT Amin Baco may be hiding in Basilan and could recruit more Malaysians for attacks in other parts of southern Philippines if he is still alive, a former hostage says. The Philippine authorities were earlier divided on whether Sabahan Amin was still alive and emir of the Islamic State (IS) in Southeast Asia, as claimed by an Indonesian militant captured in the besieged city of Marawi. But the latest statements by the Philippine military indicate that the seasoned terrorist may still be alive and is one of 10 militants who could be the new leader of the terror group’s regional arm. “Amin was definitely one of the leaders during the siege on Marawi,” college teacher Lordvin Acopio, who spent four months in captivity by the pro-IS groups which attacked Marawi, told FMT. “I can’t say how many groups were in Marawi. Amin led one of the groups. “Each group had 10-15 fighters, but the number depended on the size of the area they were guarding. “If Amin is still alive, it’s possible he’ll recruit more Malaysians to join in attack plots in other parts of southern Philippines.” Amin and others were said to be potential candidates to succeed IS’ Southeast Asia emir designate Isnilon Hapilon, who was killed last month in Marawi. Amin, who was from Tawau, was also reported to be an expert bomb-maker, recruiter and facilitator of weapons movement between southern Philippines and the east coast of Sabah. Malaysian counter-terrorism chief Ayob Khan Mydin Pitchay last week revealed Amin was Isnilon’s son-in-law, which caught analysts and experts by surprise. Some analysts said Amin’s family relationship with Isnilon, as well as his leadership position, vast experience and network, could set him apart from the other candidates for the top post. “If Amin is Isnilon’s son-in-law, most probably the IS’ regional leadership position was given to him after Isnilon was killed. The possibility is high,” Lordvin said. In October, FMT broke the news about a Malaysian teenager whom Lordvin had seen fighting troops alongside his militant father in Marawi. FMT withheld the identity of the militant and his son, but last week, Ayob Khan revealed the boy’s name, adding that he was Amin’s son. Lordvin, who was kidnapped on May 23, the first day of the Marawi war, said Amin and his son had access to siege leader Isnilon. “The boy was always at Isnilon’s place if he was not at the frontline fighting with his father,” Lordvin told FMT. “All of us hostages kept getting moved around, but wherever we were held, Isnilon was always in a building nearby and we weren’t allowed to go there. “Not everyone could see Isnilon at his place or command centre unless they were high-ranking militants. “I believe Amin’s son always visited his step-grandfather Isnilon at the command centre to collect firearms or to give situational reports.” Ayob Khan had said last week that Amin’s son was still alive and probably in Basilan, the base of the Abu Sayyaf group led by Isnilon. “If the boy is now in Basilan, then most probably Amin is also there because the duo never left each other’s side in Marawi,” Lordvin said. “In fact, intelligence reported by the Philippine media says militants are planning attacks there and elsewhere as revenge for the loss of their caliphate in Marawi. “Many relatives of those militants killed in Marawi are said to be doing recruitments now.” More than 1,000 people, mostly militants, were killed in the five-month clashes between the authorities and militants who wanted to set up a so-called IS caliphate in the lake city. (By Zam Yusa – Free Malaysia Today) 1,489 total views, 1,489 views today.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

One Rohingya’s struggle to empower women in Malaysia – Al Jazeera

Tucked away upstairs at a shopping plaza in this city’s north end is a small storefront turned classroom for dozens of Rohinyga women and children. The sound of these women reciting English phrases, laughing and the occasional cries of kids can be heard in the stairwell. Its founder, Sharifah Husain, 24, said she wanted to do something to help women and children in her community, who are not allowed to work or study in Malaysia. “I noticed we didn’t have a Rohingya women’s organisation that was standing up for women – to be the voice of women,” Husain said. Husain comes from Buthidaung village in Myanmar’s restive Rakhine state. Her father fled to Malaysia when she was five-years old, fearing for his life. Husain was left behind with her mother and two younger siblings. The village was attacked soon afterward, so Husain’s mother took them to Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar – then known as Burma. Her recollection of the traumatic moment when a local mob attacked her village is hazy. It took place almost 20 years ago. But it mirrors the accounts of Rohingya refugees now in Bangladesh, who’ve recently fled the Myanmar’s army clearance operations and local Buddhist mobs. “My mother was arrested in Yangon and sentenced to prison for not having official [identification or travel] documents,” Husain recounted. “This left me in charge.” Husain can’t remember how long she spent in Yangon, but she said she was separated from her siblings and sent north to Mandalay and forced into servitude. She spoke to her father in Malaysia, over the phone, and he agreed to pay human traffickers to bring Husain and her siblings to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia’s largest city. All three, including Husain, were smuggled by land, into Thailand and Malaysia. At that time the Southeast Asia trafficking route wasn’t as defined as it is today. Human trafficking groups in Bangladesh and Thailand now make a lot of money off of poor, desperate refugees fleeing war and violence in Myanmar. Today, the concern faced by the Malaysia government is if it recognises its refugees then that could send a signal to more to make the perilous journey, now taken by sea from Myanmar and Bangladesh to sanctuary in Malaysia, where they don’t face violent persecution. The UN refugee agency, UNHCR, states there are 152,170 registered refugees in Malaysia. The majority are Rohingya, displaced from their homes in Myanmar, like Husain. But the amount of unregistered refugees varies widely from 40,000 to 140,000, according to Asylum Access Malaysia. “The big question is – when are the boats going to come? There’s no indication they will now, but there’s definitely a high possibility that they will. And once new groups arrive, that complicates [the] situation,” said Deepa Nambiar, Asylum Access Malaysia director. UNHCR runs what it calls a “parallel school system” for refugees in Malaysia, allowing children to  access basic, primary-level education. Refugee groups and local faith-based organisations fund these schools, staffed by volunteers. One-hundred and twenty-eight informal refugee schools in Malaysia access funding from the UN. It provides education to 7,154 children, according to UNHCR. Malaysia’s Prime Minister’s Office states 16,809 Rohingya refugee children are registered with UNHCR. This means about 10,000, or more, refugee children in Malaysia are unable to access any form of education. A dozen or so more informal refugee schools exist but rely solely on donations and are understaffed, said Asylum Access. “To live in Malaysia, yes you can live, but you don’t have a future. You are in a box. You can’t go out of the box,” Husain said. Husain has received no formal education in Malaysia. This is remarkable considering her drive to educate refugee women and children. Malaysians are supporting Rohingya Women’s Development Network by volunteering as teachers and support staff. Rohinyga Women’s Development Network started officially last year. But Husain has spent the last decade educating her community’s most vulnerable women and children in their own homes. “I have built up a trust. The men especially trust me. They feel safe sending their wives to our centre because they know me,” Husain said. Word has spread and more refugee families are now attending Rohingya Women’s Development Network classes, where they receive English-language instruction, leadership training and brand new self-defence classes. “We want to stop domestic violence. We want to stop child marriages in the community. We want to build up women’s empowerment,” Husain said. “We really need the Malaysia government to recognise us.” Husain is trying to change the mentality in the Rohingya and wider refugee community in Malaysia, that women and girls can’t study, work, or earn an income. She receives some funding from UNHCR to run programmes but uses her own money to keep them going. “Of course I have support from my family. My father is my hero. My husband is my hero. Both of these men have really pushed me forward,” Husain added. The Rohingya Women’s Development Network has teamed up with Asylum Access Malaysia on a refugee theatre project. This will allow refugee women to educate the community on issues of sexual violence. “What I think is so innovative about Sharifah and the team is that when we were discussing this project they said ‘we need to get men involved’,” Nambiar said. Husain is appealing to others in the refugee community to support initiatives set up by the Malaysia government and civil society groups to help […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Pinoy combat athletes ready to deliver as AIMAG medal hunt starts

ASHGABAT, Turkmenistan – The Philippines will officially kick off its medal hunt in the 5th Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games today with Filipino fighters in ju-jitsu, wrestling and taekwondo expected to deliver. The national track and field team headed by reigning Southeast Asian Games gold medalist Eric Cray and former Asian long-jump queen Marestella Torres will also see action as the country aims to secure medals in 17 out of the 41 events that Filipino athletes have been entered on Monday. Grappler Alvin Lobreguito pocketed the first medal for the Philippines in the men’s freestyle -57kg traditional wrestling a day before last night’s lavish opening ceremony at the ultramodern Ashgabat Olympic Stadium here. Over 6,000 athletes from 62 countries will compete in 21 sports during the 12-day sportsfest considered as the biggest indoor Games in the continent with the inclusion of the Ocenia region led by Australia and New Zealand. Cray, the SEAG 400m hurdles record-holder, will try his luck in the 60m hurdles on Monday and 60m sprint on Tuesday. Also competing here is former Asian long jump queen Marestella Torres-Sunang. A gold medal winner during the 2009 Asian Athletics Championships in Guangdong, China, the 36-year-old Torres-Sunang hopes to get a podium finish, something she’d like to do as she nears retirement. She captured a bronze medal in the last KL SEA Games. Also seeing action at the Indoor Trand and Field Stadium are Mervin Guarte and Marco Vilog, participants in the 800m preliminary round, with Guarte also set to compete in the 1500m preliminaries. The finals of the 800m and 1500m are scheduled Wednesday. Janry Ubas, meanwhile, will aim for a podium finish in the long jump event set Tuesday. Taekwondo jins Jenar Torillos (54kg), Samuel Thomas Morrison (74kg), Karen Celis (46kg) and Levita Ronna Ilao (46kg) are set to see action, all targeting to get a medal in this event organized by the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA). In jiu-jitsu, the Philippines will have Asian champion Apryl Eppinger (62kg), Alexander Lim (69kg), Terrence Hansel Co (77kg), Gilbert Ombao (94kg) and Lou-Ann Jindani (70kg). The grapplers that will vie for medals in the traditional wrestling classic include Michael Vijay Cater (57kg), Jonathan Maquilan (62kg), Jhonny Morte (68kg), Jeff Manatad (75kg), Cristof Hoffman Jr. (90kg), Grace Loberanes (52kg) and Noemi Tener (58kg). .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2017

Geeks on a Beach 2017 in Palawan starts today

DICT, successful Silicon Valley Fil-Ams lead 400 participants Some 400 participants from the government and the private sector, including successful technology entrepreneurs from Southeast Asia and Silicon Valley, has gathered in Puerto Princesa, Palawan as Geeks on a Beach 2017 starts today. For two days, participants will get to listen to valuable insights from big [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  boholnewsdailyRelated NewsAug 24th, 2017

Anger grows in South Korea over US anti-missile system – ABC News

The anger is palpable on a narrow road that cuts through a South Korean village where about 170 people live between green hills dotted with cottages and melon fields. It's an unlikely trouble spot in the world's last Cold War standoff. Aging farmers in this corner of Seongju county, more than 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital Seoul, spend the day sitting by the asphalt in tents or on plastic stools, watching vehicles coming and going from a former golf course where military workers are setting up an advanced U.S. missile-defense system. &'8220;Just suddenly one day, Seongju has become the frontline,&'8221; said a tearful Park Soo-gyu, a 54-year-old strawberry farmer. &'8220;Wars today aren't just fought with guns. Missiles will be flying and where would they aim first? Right here, where the THAAD radar is.&'8221; THAAD is shorthand for Terminal High Altitude Defense, which the South Korean and U.S. governments say is critical to cope with a growing missile threat from North Korea. When completed, the battery will consist of six truck-mounted launchers that can fire up to 48 interceptors at incoming missiles detected by the system's x-band radar. Anger has boiled over in Seosongri village since last week when U.S. and South Korean military workers used the early-morning hours to rush key parts of THAAD into place. The system had been scheduled to enter operation by the end of the year, but South Korea's Defense Ministry said Tuesday that it is already capable of defending against North Korean missiles. The ministry didn't say when the deployment would be completed. Hundreds of banners hang on trees and fences along a kilometer (half-mile) stretch of the road up to where police have cut off access. They say &'8220;Withdraw the illegal THAAD immediately&'8221; and &'8220;Stop US militarism,&'8221; slogans that would feel familiar in a leftist rally but are unusual in the country's traditionally conservative southeast. &'8220;Yankee, go home!&'8221; a man yelled as he banged his fist on a car apparently carrying American soldiers, before dozens of police officers peeled him and other protesters away from the vehicle. The local anger highlights what has arguably become the most explosive issue ahead of a presidential election next week. The May 9 vote will likely end a decadelong conservative rule that maintained a hard line against North Korea and agreed to the THAAD installation. Front-runner Moon Jae-in, who calls for engagement with the North, has said the deployment of THAAD should be reconsidered. Some media have questioned whether the United States and a caretaker government that took over for ousted former President Park Geun-hye are rushing to complete THAAD before the election. Earlier polls had showed overwhelming public support for THAAD following North Korean nuclear tests and a long-range rocket launch last year. But public opinion has become more divided amid the corruption scandal that led to Park's downfall and criticism that the government was pushing ahead without seeking the consent of Seongju residents. Opposition was further inflamed after President Donald Trump said he would make South Korea pay $1 billion for THAAD. Seongju residents say comments by Trump show the United States may be preparing for a pre-emptive strike against North Korea. They worry that if the North retaliates, THAAD would make their county a main target. There's also frustration about an increasingly heavy police and military presence in an area where outsiders had been mostly limited to small groups of weekend golfers. Residents are also concerned about the rumored harmful effects the electromagnetic waves from THAAD's radar might have on them and their crops. Seoul's Defense Ministry calls such worries groundless. &'8220;We have been living very peacefully as farmers, but our daily lives have been shattered after the arrival of this weapon; we can't rest comfortably for a day and can't work without worrying,&'8221; said Kim Yoon&''seong, a 60-year-old melon farmer. He says many younger residents with children are considering leaving Seongju. Residents say at least 13 people were treated at hospitals for injuries including broken bones and teeth after a violent clash last week between dozens of villagers and supporters and some 8,000 police officers who were mobilized to remove them from the road. Three days later, more than a hundred police officers ended an hourslong standoff by swarming a handful of people who had been blocking a mountain path with a tractor to prevent construction equipment from entering the THAAD site. Police detained a man and drove away the tractor as villagers showered them with insults, including &'8220;dogs&'8221; and &'8220;Americans' slaves.&'8221; &'8220;We won't allow any U.S. military and construction vehicles to pass through the two roads,&'8221; said Rev. Kang Hyun-wook, a minister of Won Buddhism, an indigenous form of the religion. The grounds include a site Won Buddhists consider as sacred and are no longer allowed to visit. &'8220;If they fly in (the THAAD parts) with helicopters, then fine, it's their money to spend and we can't do anything about that.&'8221; Several people were hurt in another clash on Sunday as police tried to remove protesters blocking two U.S. military oil trucks from entering the THAAD site. Residents said the trucks turned away because cars protesters had parked to block the road couldn't be towed. Moon, the presidential front-runner, says THAAD's security benefits would be offset by deteriorating relations with China, which sees THAAD's powerful radar as a threat to its own defense. South Korea's largest trade partner, China has [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2017

Alibaba doubles investment in southeast Asia e-commerce firm Lazada

SHANGHAI, China – Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba said on Monday, March 19, it will appoint one of its founders as head of Lazada and inject another $2 billion into Southeast Asia's leading online shopping firm, boosting its regional expansion. Alibaba, which already owns 83% of Lazada with two investments totalling $2 ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

Alibaba doubles investment in Southeast Asia e-commerce firm Lazada

Shanghai, China — Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba said Monday it will appoint one of its founders as head of Lazada and inject another $2 billion into Southeast Asia’s leading online shopping firm, boosting its regional expansion. Alibaba, which already owns 83% of Lazada with two investments totaling $2 billion as of June last year, has […] The post Alibaba doubles investment in Southeast Asia e-commerce firm Lazada appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

French couturier Hubert de Givenchy dies at 91

  PARIS --- French couturier Hubert de Givenchy, a pioneer of ready-to-wear who designed Audrey Hepburn's little black dress in "Breakfast at Tiffany's," has died at the age of 91.   The house of Givenchy paid homage to its founder in a statement as "a major personality of the world of French haute couture and a gentleman who symbolized Parisian chic and elegance for more than half a century."   "He revolutionized international fashion with the timelessly stylish looks he created for Audrey Hepburn, his great friend and muse for over 40 years," the house of Givenchy said. "His work remains as relevant today as it was then."   Along with Christ...Keep on reading: French couturier Hubert de Givenchy dies at 91.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 13th, 2018

Woods looks closer than ever to winning again

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press PALM HARBOR, Fla. (AP) — The red shirt didn't have a collar. His head doesn't have quite as much hair. His lower spine has been fused. Everything else about Tiger Woods is starting to look familiar. For the first time since the late summer of 2013, Woods worked the fans into a frenzy on the weekend and keep them on their toes right to the very end. He wound up one shot — one putt — short to Paul Casey in the Valspar Championship. He broke par all four rounds and tied for second, the first time he had done either of those since the start of the FedEx Cup playoffs in August 2013. All that did was turn attention to this week at Bay Hill, where Woods has won eight times and twice ended long victory droughts. He won the Arnold Palmer Invitational in 2009 for his first victory after reconstructive knee surgery. He won there again in 2012 for his first victory since the scandal in his personal life, followed by various leg injuries. "It's going to be good for me to get back," Woods said. "I've had some great memories there." Casey ended a nine-year drought on the PGA Tour when he took the lead with three straight birdies on the back nine at Innisbrook, saved par over the last four holes for a 6-under 65 and then settled into a leather sofa in the locker room to see if anyone could catch him. A playoff looked imminent when Patrick Reed tied for the lead with a birdie on the 14th hole and was in the middle of the 18th fairway, 133 yards away, for a chance at birdie for the win or a par to force a playoff. And then someone else entered the picture. Woods, who opened with a two-putt birdie to briefly share the lead, had gone 15 consecutive holes without a birdie and needed to finish birdie-birdie to catch Casey. His tee shot on the par-3 17th was long, rolling out some 45 feet away. From the time the ball left his club, there was something inevitable about the putt . Woods posed, waiting for the grain in the green to take over, and it did at just the right time. The ball moved left and dropped into the cup, setting off more pandemonium. Brandt Snedeker, playing with Woods, just smiled. Casey even got caught up in the emotion that swept over Innisbrook for four days. "I loved his putt on 17. That was amazing," Casey said. "I thought he was going to hole the one on 18." Maybe next time. But after a week like this, next time doesn't seem all that far away — not with Bay Hill four days away, and the Masters a few weeks behind it. Casey won on the PGA Tour for the first time since the Houston Open in 2009, a span of 132 starts, though he had won five around the world since. It was the second time he won a tournament with Woods in the field. The other occasion was in 2006 at the HSBC World Match Play at Wentworth, when Casey wore a red shirt Sunday. Woods had been eliminated at the start of the week. Woods signed for his 70 and worked his way through the crowd of camera crews and officials to seek out Casey. "It's the only time he's congratulated me immediately after a victory," Casey said. "Normally, it's the other way around. That's something special. Just really cool. I'm sure he was disappointed he didn't get the victory. I actually thought he was going to win today before the round started. I thought it was just teed up beautifully for him. I said a couple times, 'If I don't win this thing, I actually want Tiger to win it.' "I'm glad it's this way." Casey, a 40-year-old from England, is among the players from the previous generation who want to see Woods at his best again. Interest spikes, as record crowds and a big boost in TV ratings indicated. The energy makes a sleepy tournament feel just short of a major. They remember the dominance. The young kids don't. "I just want the young guys to see what we saw for such a long time," Casey said. There might be a chance, which is remarkable considering the most recent timeline. Woods won by seven shots at Firestone in the Bridgestone Invitational in early August 2013 for his 79th career victory on the PGA Tour and still his last one. Back problems first began to surface a week later. The following year, he missed the Masters after back surgery and returned too soon on a couple of occasions. Another back surgery followed in September 2015, then another a month later. He returned after 15 months and lasted two starts before he had fusion surgery. Woods still didn't know what his future held at the Presidents Cup last October. Then, on Oct. 7, he posted a video of him hitting an iron . Eight days later, another video showed him hitting a driver. Another eight days passed, and he was hitting a stinger. What really gets attention are the results. He still hasn't won. By all accounts, he's getting closer......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

French Navy ship visit to PH shows France commitment to security, freedom of navigation

THE visit of the French Navy’s light patrol frigate to the Philippines shows France as a “Pacific power” that is committed to “security” and adherence to the principle of freedom of navigation in Southeast Asia, officials said after the Vendmiaire docked at a port in Manila on Monday. In his speech, Rear Admiral Denis Bertrand [...] The post French Navy ship visit to PH shows France commitment to security, freedom of navigation appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Uber selling Southeast Asia operations to rival Grab – report

SAN FRANCISCO: Uber is selling parts of its Southeast Asia operations to local rival Grab, getting a piece of the action in the process, according to US media reports. Grab is on the cusp of buying Uber’s business in some Southeast Asia markets in a deal that would give the California-based smartphone-summoned ride service a [...] The post Uber selling Southeast Asia operations to rival Grab – report appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMar 9th, 2018

GMA dramas now airing in on Thai TV

The Filipino artist continues to break through Southeast Asia as GMA Network, in an emailed statement to The Manila Times announced that a number of its top-rating dramas, are now showing in Thailand. Thai company JKN Global Media acquired over 1,000 hours of GMA dramas through GMA Worldwide, including “Ang Dalawang Mrs. Real” (retitled “The [...] The post GMA dramas now airing in on Thai TV appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMar 4th, 2018

Rain or Shine clinches quarterfinals spot, beats top seed SMB

  Rain or Shine secured a spot in the quarterfinals after beating San Miguel Beer, 95-80, in the 2018 PBA Philippine Cup Wednesday night at Mall of Asia Arena. Beau Belga had an all-around effort with 19 points, seven rebounds, four assists and five steals to lead the shorthanded Elasto Painters, who were without injured veterans Chris Tiu and James Yap. E-Painters center Raymond Almazan also left the game early after hurting his hand and did not return. "At least now we're assured of a playoff spot," said ROS head coach Caloy Garcia. "But we also want to win our game on Friday so we could get to number four." "I credit the players. They battled it out today. [San Miguel] a...Keep on reading: Rain or Shine clinches quarterfinals spot, beats top seed SMB.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018

Taiwan reaches out to Southeast Asia

From a manufacturing and electronic equipment-producing economy, the vibrant Republic of China (Taiwan) has emerged as a major player in global affairs, especially among its Southeast Asian neighbors. As expressed by Representative of Taiwan, ROC to the Philippines Gary Song-Huann Lin, culture is an important instrument of diplomacy in this day and age. “Cultural diplomacy [...] The post Taiwan reaches out to Southeast Asia appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 24th, 2018

Gilas hosts Japanese team today

Chot Reyes and his wards hope to regain their rhythm as Gilas Pilipinas faces Japan in a rematch at 7:30 p.m. today in the International Basketball Federation (FIBA) Asian Qualifiers second window at the Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay City. “Two teams fighting for big cause. Japan is fighting for survival, fighting for its [...] The post Gilas hosts Japanese team today appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 24th, 2018