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All-Time NBA Draft: The best pick from every slot

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press There’s a definitive answer every year to the question of who is No. 1 in the NBA draft. But who is the No. 1 pick of all No. 1 draft picks ever? Or No. 1 among the list of No. 2 draft picks? Those are questions that have no definitive answer, except perhaps in a handful of rare cases. Here’s a look at The Best of The Best — the top all-time NBA picks in each of the top 30 draft spots. The best No. 1 overall pick, the best No. 2 overall pick ... and so on. One note: This doesn’t include the territorial selections that were used through 1965, which ruled out Wilt Chamberlain. The list of top picks in each of the 30 draft slots: 1. KAREEM ABDUL-JABBAR Arguments for the best-ever overall pick could and should be made for LeBron James, Shaquille O’Neal, Oscar Robertson and Magic Johnson, among others. When in doubt, give it to the man who has more points than anyone who ever played the game and who mastered perhaps the most difficult shot to guard in NBA history. 2. BILL RUSSELL You didn’t know Bill Russell was a No. 2 overall pick? Jerry West was too, and he’s The Logo for goodness sake, but the 11 rings make Russell the call here. Also, it’s time to lay off Portland. Sam Bowie wasn’t the biggest “oops” pick of all time. Si Green was picked before Russell in 1956. 3. MICHAEL JORDAN The easiest pick of them all. Except for Portland in 1984, when the Trail Blazers took Bowie No. 2 ahead of MJ. OK, now it’s really time to lay off Portland. 4. CHRIS PAUL Dikembe Mutombo, Chris Bosh and Russell Westbrook were all No. 4s as well, but Paul’s body of work over 13 seasons and counting can’t be overlooked. 5. DWYANE WADE Charles Barkley will think this pick is terrible. So will fellow No. 5s Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen, Scottie Pippen and Vince Carter. Wade’s scoring wins out. 6. LARRY BIRD Second-easiest pick of this process. Only Adrian Dantley comes close, and he absolutely doesn’t come close. 7. STEPHEN CURRY He will be the leader in 3-pointers, by a ton, when his career is over. Fellow No. 7s John Havlicek and Chris Mullin merit consideration, but why wait? 8. ROBERT PARISH As time goes on, people might forget how vital The Chief was to those Celtics teams of the 1980s. That shouldn’t happen. 9. DIRK NOWITZKI Jordan was the only true candidate at No. 3, Bird was the same at No. 6, and Nowitzki stands alone at No. 9 as well. 10. PAUL PIERCE Pierce and Nowitzki have haunted those who made the decisions at the top of the 1998 draft — where Michael Olowokandi, Mike Bibby and Raef LaFrentz went 1-2-3 — for 20 years and counting. 11. REGGIE MILLER Kiki VanDeWeghe was a No. 11 pick and so was Klay Thompson, but Miller is the deserving call here. His shot was art. 12. JULIUS ERVING Drafted in 1972 and didn’t come to the NBA until 1976, Doctor J ekes out the pick here over Chet Walker — a seven-time All-Star. 13. KOBE BRYANT This could easily have been Karl Malone. But Kobe has five rings and an Oscar. 14. CLYDE DREXLER The Glide was automatic for 20 points a night for basically his entire career. Apologies to Tim Hardaway. 15. STEVE NASH Someday, this spot might go to Giannis Antetokounmpo or Kawhi Leonard. But Steve Nash going this low in 1996 should remind everyone how good that draft was. 16. JOHN STOCKTON This is yet another reminder that Sam Bowie wasn’t the only mistake made in 1984. 17. DON NELSON This was a difficult group, and Shawn Kemp was probably the better player. Nellie gets the call on total body of NBA work. 18. JOE DUMARS There are some really good players at No. 18, including Calvin Murphy and the vastly underrated Ricky Pierce. Dumars’ role on the Bad Boys was invaluable. 19. TINY ARCHIBALD When looking at No. 19 picks, two things stand out: Rod Strickland should have been an All-Star, and that Tiny was better than many remember. 20. LARRY NANCE So consistent for so long, and now with his son in the league that means more people will get educated about Sr.’s game. 21. RAJON RONDO Michael Finley and Ricky Davis also went this far down in the draft. Rondo was an absolute steal in 2006 — except he wasn’t a steal for Phoenix, which drafted him and then traded him to Boston for cash. 22. REGGIE LEWIS Still sad. Still missed. 23. ALEX ENGLISH Tayshaun Prince was so good and World B. Free was as much fun as anyone, but English had about a 10-year run where he hardly ever missed a game and dropped about 25 every time he was out there. 24. ARVYDAS SABONIS Officially, the hardest of all 30 picks. Don’t just look at his NBA numbers. Look at his whole career. He did things no big man was doing 20 years ago. Terry Porter, Andrei Kirilenko, Kyle Lowry, Sam Cassell, Derek Fisher, Latrell Sprewell all went No. 24 as well ... good luck to whoever is No. 24 is this year. There’s a legacy to follow. 25. MARK PRICE Jeff Ruland was known as “McFilthy” and became a good college coach, Tony Allen was a true defensive star, but Price’s game is too solid to miss here. 26. VLADE DIVAC Now running the Sacramento Kings, Divac gets to pick No. 2 in this year’s draft. The guy he takes there would be well-served to learn from Vlade. 27. DENNIS RODMAN Before he became a political operative, Rodman was as good at rebounding and defense as anyone in the game. 28. TONY PARKER If he had grown up in the U.S. and played college basketball, there was no chance he would have gone this low in 2001. 29. DENNIS JOHNSON Hall of Famer, five-time All-Star and someone who was as good as there was in the NBA down the stretch of big games. 30. SPENCER HAYWOOD Another Hall of Famer, and every underclassman who gets drafted this year needs to thank Haywood. His suit vs. the NBA paved the way for them. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnJun 20th, 2018

Carmelo moves closer to Rockets after reported three-team trade

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst Half a Banana Boat Crew is better than nothing. Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) reported trade of Carmelo Anthony from Oklahoma City to Atlanta as part of a three-team deal also involving Philadelphia -- and which will be followed by the Hawks waiving Anthony -- obviously clears the way for Anthony to join Chris Paul in Houston, as has been rumored for weeks once it became clear OKC had to get rid of Anthony to lower what would have been a lethal luxury tax bill next year. The deal sends guard Dennis Schroder from the Hawks, which drafted him 17th overall in 2013 and who has been Atlanta’s incumbent starter the last two seasons, to the Thunder for Anthony and a Lottery protected (1-14) 2022 first-round pick. In addition, forward Mike Muscala was re-routed from Atlanta to Philadelphia through Oklahoma City, which will receive former first-rounder Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot from Philly. The 76ers will send third-year wing Justin Anderson to Atlanta to complete the deal. Anthony has told people for more than a week that he expects to wind up with the Rockets, according to a league source. The Rockets have been in flux this offseason, losing defensive stalwart and team leader Trevor Ariza in free agency to Phoenix, along with Luc Mbah a Moute, who returned to the Clippers after one season in Houston. The Rockets helped stanch some of their defensive losses by signing 3 and D wing James Ennis (career 36 percent on three's) from Detroit last week. Anthony would not help the Rockets much at the defensive end. But the 34-year-old Anthony can still score, even though his average fell to 16.2 points last season as the Thunder’s third option behind Russell Westbrook and Paul George. Houston’s offense doesn’t need upgrading -- the Rockets were just behind top-ranked Golden State in Offensive Rating last season (112.2), and of course, obliterated the rest of the league in three-point attempts and makes. But after Paul missed the last two games of the Western Conference finals against the Warriors, Houston’s offense bogged down at the worst possible times -- most notably the second half of Game 7, when the Rockets missed a seemingly impossible 27 consecutive three-point attempts. Anthony isn’t a great three-point shooter by any means, but he’s still a load in the post and is still able to get to the foul line -- his last season in New York, when he was more of a primary option, he still averaged almost five free throws a game. The Thunder’s main motivation to trade Anthony rather than use its stretch provision to get his $27.8 million off its books for next season was not just economic, though that was a key factor. OKC will save less money by trading Anthony rather than stretching him, but in doing so the Thunder will also address a major need that was clear to any who’ve watched the team the last couple of years -- an offense that falls apart whenever Westbrook is on the bench. If OKC had just stretched Anthony, it would have had $9.6 million in dead money on its books that it couldn’t have done anything with this year. The Thunder chose instead to take on Schroder’s $15.5 million for next year. Acquiring Schroder, who was obsolete in Atlanta once the Hawks decided to acquire the rights to rookie point guard Trae Young on Draft night, gives OKC a young veteran who can create offense for himself and others when Westbrook needs a blow. Schroder averaged 19.4 points and 6.2 assists last season. But Schroder has to deal with pending legal action against him stemming from an incident last September in DeKalb County, Georgia, in which he and three other men were involved in a fight with another man, who reported suffered a torn ACL and meniscus. The charges against Schroder were recommended to be upgraded from misdemeanor to felony. Assuming the charges are resolved before the start of the season -- a good assumption, or the Thunder would have never signed off on the deal -- OKC will upgrade its roster with a player who will provide incredible versatility as either a top-notch reserve, a player who could start alongside Westbrook or, at the worst, could be moved down the road. Schroder has three years and $46.5 million left on his deal. Atlanta made its intentions for Schroder clear when it picked Young rather than Luka Doncic, whose rights the Hawks sent to Dallas in a Draft night deal, and traded for veteran point guard Jeremy Lin from Brooklyn earlier this month. The Hawks just wanted a first for Schroder, and got one from OKC, which wouldn’t have been able to move Anthony’s whole contract without it. Muscala’s $5 million had to be included to make the deal work financially. He became coveted by Philadelphia after free agent Nemanja Bjelica backed out of a verbal agreement with the 76ers this week. Philly needed a stretch four who could shoot, and Muscala is a career 38 percent three-point shooter. Anderson was a former first-rounder (21st overall in 2015) with the Mavericks whose athletic ability and work ethic have made him a team favorite both in Dallas and Philly. The rebuilding Hawks will give him a look on the wings along with Taurean Prince, DeAndre’ Bembry and first-round pick Kevin Huerter. The Hawks have been shopping veteran forward Kent Bazemore since before this year’s Draft. SiriusXM radio host and longtime NBA reporter Mitch Lawrence was first to report the potential deal between the Thunder and Hawks. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News19 hr. 17 min. ago

Blockbuster trade not what Kawhi, DeRozan hoped for

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst Kawhi Leonard’s turbulent last days with the San Antonio Spurs ended Wednesday morning (late Wednesday, PHL time) with a trade that neither major party involved in the deal liked. The Spurs traded Leonard, the 2014 Finals MVP, two-time Defensive Player of the Year and two-time All-Star, along with veteran guard Danny Green, to the Toronto Raptors for four-time All-Star DeMar DeRozan, second-year big man Jakob Poeltl and a 2019 first-round Draft pick, which is protected from 1-20 next year. In doing so, San Antonio ended a relationship with the player that was poised to be the Spurs’ next lynchpin, but who had grown disenchanted with the franchise and wanted out. Leonard wanted to be traded to Los Angeles, closer to his hometown of Moreno Valley, Calif. He preferred the Lakers, and made that known in June, but was not averse to playing with the LA Clippers. However, the Spurs were adamant that they would not trade him to a Western Conference team, even though there was a strong likelihood that he would only stay with any team that traded for him until next year. That is when he would likely opt out of his contract, become a free agent and go to Los Angeles. Even though the 27-year-old Leonard told the Raptors in conversations between Toronto and his camp over the last week that he did not want to go there, the Raptors were willing to take the chance, anyway. DeRozan sought assurances from the Raptors that he wasn’t being moved in recent days. Both he and his representatives met with Raptors officials during NBA Summer League in Las Vegas, according to a source, at which time Toronto insisted that it wasn’t going to trade him. Now, DeRozan feels “lied to,” the source said, and, while having no personal grudges with the Spurs, is extremely upset at the deal. Meanwhile, @DeMar_DeRozan not backing off of claim he was lied to by Toronto regarding a potential trade, per source. Extremely upset. — David Aldridge (@daldridgetnt) July 18, 2018 Leonard also is not happy at going to Toronto, for several reasons, including the higher taxation rate in Canada than in Texas, which has no state income tax. Leonard’s camp had informed the Spurs he didn’t want to go there, but the Spurs made no promises either way. San Antonio had had significant discussions with the Philadelphia 76ers -- a team Leonard would have given a fair shake at convincing him to stay had it been able to make a deal with San Antonio. But the 76ers were unwilling to include guard Markelle Fultz, the former first pick overall in the 2017 Draft, or forward Dario Saric in any package proposals for Leonard. Leonard only played in nine games last season, citing an injured quad muscle that did not respond to treatment. But privately, Leonard was unhappy with what he thought was bad advice from the Spurs’ medical staff, and sought advice from his own group of doctors, removing himself from San Antonio to continue treatments in New York as the regular season ended and playoffs began. The Spurs did not push Leonard during his rehab, and referred questions about his status during their first-round series with the Golden State Warriors to his camp. Leonard’s uncle has acted as his agent for the last couple of years. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich informed Leonard’s camp of the trade early Wednesday (Wednesday, PHL time) in what was deemed a “cordial” conversation, according to a source. However, given the trade, Leonard is now contemplating not taking part in next week’s USA Basketball minicamp in Las Vegas. A final decision has not yet been made. For his part, the 28-year-old DeRozan let his feelings be known in an Instagram post early Wednesday (Wednesday, PHL time), saying in part, “Ain’t no loyalty in this game” after being dealt from the only team he’s played for in nine NBA seasons, and for whom he has been nothing but a first-class ambassador. The Raptors took DeRozan with the ninth pick in the 2009 Draft, during which time DeRozan became the franchise’s leader in several categories, including games, points and minutes played. He grew as the franchise did, helping lead it to the most successful period in its history alongside his close friend and All-Star teammate, Kyle Lowry. The backcourt did ads together, took vacations together with family and led Toronto to franchise records for wins, reaching the Eastern Conference finals in 2016. At every turn, DeRozan expressed happiness at playing for and living in Toronto, even as he had to make several cross-country trips last season to be with his ailing father in Los Angeles. DeRozan remade his game as part of the “culture reset” demanded by general manager Masai Ujiri after Toronto was beaten in the playoffs by LeBron James and the Cavaliers in 2017 -- a familiar outcome, as James and Cleveland beat the Raptors in three straight postseasons. DeRozan relied less on isolation sets than he had in years past, trying to move more without the ball and give it up so others could be more involved. Toronto won a franchise-best 59 regular season games last season and was the top seed in the Eastern Conference. However, Toronto suffered another playoff loss to Cleveland, this time a 4-0 sweep. It was especially galling considering the Cavaliers had been extended to a seventh game in their first-round series with Indiana, yet still managed to rally from a double-digit deficit to shock the Raptors in Game 1 in Toronto. The Cavs then cruised the rest of the way in the series. Ujiri fired coach Dwane Casey afterward, ultimately picking assistant coach Nick Nurse as Casey’s successor. But the reset of the team wasn’t complete. The Raptors believe strongly in their young core group of players, all of whom have been developed by Toronto the last few seasons -- guards Fred Van Vleet and Delon Wright, forward O.G. Anunoby and big man Pascal Siakham. Toronto initially opted to keep its existing vets around the kids, giving DeRozan a five-year, $138 million extension in 2016, then giving Lowry and forward Serge Ibaka extensions last summer – Lowry got a three-year, $100 million deal and Ibaka got a three-year, $65 million deal. However, after the latest playoff debacle, the Raptors let it be known around the Draft that none of their players were untouchable. If Toronto can get Leonard on board, the Raptors would have a potentially dynamic defensive group on the wings, with Leonard and Anunoby capable of guarding multiple positions. Ibaka isn’t the defender he was in Oklahoma City, where he was first team all-Defensive three years in a row, but he’s still a plus defender at his position. The 31-year-old Green is entering the final year of his contract. Long considered one of the best two-way guards in the game, Green was outstanding in the Spurs’ seven-game loss to the Heat in the 2013 Finals, making 27 3-pointers in the series en route to setting a Finals record. Poeltl, 22, was taken ninth overall by Toronto in the 2016 Draft. He worked his way quickly into the Raptors’ rotation, averaging 6.9 points and 4.8 rebounds last season. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 19th, 2018

Raptors will need to work some magic now after Kawhi trade

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press Raptors boss Masai Ujiri better have some magic plan. Because if he doesn’t, Lakers boss Magic Johnson certainly will. Before Kawhi Leonard and DeMar DeRozan — the headline pieces in a four-player trade between San Antonio and Toronto on Wednesday — play a single game for their new teams, this much is clear: The Spurs got better, the Raptors are taking a gargantuan risk and the Los Angeles Lakers are going to sit back and see what happens. San Antonio essentially swapped one All-Star for another, ridded itself of a headache — the Leonard-wants-out saga — and got a first-round draft pick as well. Hard to argue. In DeRozan, Toronto traded away a guard who led the Raptors in scoring in each of the last five seasons for a player who, without hardly ever saying a word, has made clear that he wants to be in Los Angeles. A bold strategy, but if Ujiri can win over Leonard in a year just like Sam Presti and Oklahoma City did with Paul George, it could work out like gangbusters for the Raptors. And if Leonard doesn’t see the virtue in making Toronto home for the long term, the Lakers will be waiting. Remember what Johnson said earlier this offseason about the Lakers’ strategy: that it will be a two-year mission. Getting LeBron James to sign with LA earlier this month was a big part of the plan, but it wasn’t the whole plan. Phase 2 is surrounding James with superstar talent, and it’s hard to see any reason why Leonard doesn’t end up in purple and gold at some point in 2019 — whether through a trade or free agency. Leonard probably isn’t happy, but he almost certainly can’t run the risk of sitting out another year. DeRozan clearly isn’t happy. That’s no disrespect to San Antonio — the Spurs are a model franchise and Gregg Popovich is a coach almost anyone would want to play for — but DeRozan rather would have stayed in Toronto. DeRozan got plenty of support from his NBA peers, including Dwyane Wade, who told The Associated Press that he hopes this trade reminds fans that teams will do what they want when they feel it’s time to move a player — so players shouldn’t be derided when they exercise their options to move on through free agency, either. “DeRozan gave everything to Toronto, everything they asked him to do from the standpoint of loyalty,” Wade said. “That’s why I hate loyalty and sports, those two words, they shouldn’t go together. You just feel for guys and their family. He committed to them. It’s a business and you understand the business, but from a player standpoint, it just sucks.” The Spurs were never going to trade Leonard to the Lakers. It made no sense. Why would San Antonio help a fellow Western Conference team get better, especially when the best team in basketball — Golden State — seems to have a chokehold on the Larry O’Brien Trophy with no plans of letting go anytime soon? Plus, the Lakers didn’t have the sort of assets the Spurs would have wanted for an elite player like Leonard. He played in nine games for the Spurs last season and was barely a factor. DeRozan will almost certainly give San Antonio more next year than Leonard gave the Spurs last year. Hence, they just got a lot better. Boston had the required assets but apparently wasn’t willing to part with them. Philadelphia did, too. But Toronto, to its credit, saw no reason why it shouldn’t be bold this summer. Dwane Casey was the coach of the year who won 59 games and led the Raptors to the No. 1 seed in the East last season. He got fired because the Raptors never figured out how to beat James in the playoffs. The Raptors are really good. Second-best record in the regular season a year ago, behind only Houston. But they know they’re not good enough to win a title, and while they stopped short of blowing up the team they sure gave the foundation a couple of good thwacks with a wrecking ball in dumping Casey and trading DeRozan. Can Leonard get them over the hump? Maybe. If he’s healthy, he could be the best player in the Eastern Conference, largely because of the way he can take a game over on the defensive end. That’s a player worth the risk. So now we see if Ujiri can work some magic. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 19th, 2018

2018 Summer League standouts: Day 6

NBA.com staff report A look at top performers from the third day of action at the MGM Resorts NBA Summer League: Keita Bates-Diop, Minnesota Timberwolves The No. 48 pick, signed to a guaranteed contract on Friday (Saturday, PHL time), led the Wolves to a win over the Raptors, scoring 24 points and grabbing 11 rebounds. After making just one of his seven three-point attempts in the Wolves' loss to Denver on Friday (Saturday, PHL time), the 6'7" forward shot 3-for-6 from beyond the arc on Sunday (Monday, PHL time) and got to the line eight times. Willy Hernangomez, Charlotte Hornets The Miami Heat played without Bam Adebayo, and Hernangomez took advantage to the tune of 22 points and 10 rebounds in the Hornets' win. The departure of Dwight Howard could give the 6'11" Hernangomez, a First Team All-Rookie selection in 2016-17, a shot a back-up center minutes in Charlotte this season. R.J. Hunter, Houston Rockets It wasn't quite Game 8 of the Western Conference finals, but Rockets-Warriors went down to the wire. Houston got the win and Hunter was the star, scoring 24 points on 8-for-14 shooting, connecting on five of his 11 three-point attempts, including one that beat the halftime buzzer. Jonathan Isaac, Orlando Magic Isaac scored just 12 points, but it was the other end of the floor that the Magic dominated in their rout of the Grizzlies. The frontline of Isaac and Mo Bamba looked like it could be a defensive force. They helped the Magic hold Memphis to just 26 percent shooting, with Isaac blocking five shots and nabbing two steals as the Grizz improved to 2-0. Justin Jackson, Sacramento Kings The second-year wing missed a couple of big shots late, but finished with 28 points on 10-for-19 shooting (4-for-7 from three-point range) in the Kings' loss to the Clippers. The focus in Sacramento is on the development of De'Aaron Fox, Marvin Bagley III, Bogdan Bogdanovic and Harry Giles, but Jackson – the No. 15 pick in last year's Draft – could complement them as a long-armed floor spacer. Jake Layman, Portland Trail Blazers The third-year forward led the Blazers to an easy win over the Atlanta Hawks with 23 points on 9-for-14 shooting. He made as many three's (4-of-5 attempts) as he made all of last season. Devin Robinson, Washington Wizards The Wizards' 6'7" wing had a few highlight dunks (including one on Spurs rookie Lonnie Walker IV) on his way to 24 points on 9-for-18 shooting. He also made an impact on the other end of the floor, registering three steals and two blocks as Washington fell to San Antonio......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018

Morning Tip Q& A: Mohamed Bamba

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst They have come seemingly all at once -- new, freakish size in the NBA with the ability to put the ball on the floor, shoot from deep and block everything that moves. Kristaps Porzingis begat Joel Embiid, who begat this year’s group of young big men who have grown up facing the basket rather than with their backs to it. Among the most intriguing of the 2018 Draft class is Mo Bamba, the 20-year-old from Texas via Harlem, where he grew up -- fast, as city kids tend to do, learning the game on the hardtops around New York City, while his parents, natives of Ivory Coast, wondered what the increasing fuss was around their son. He, on the other hand, has tended to handle the attention with aplomb and a smile. In a group full of long, tall people, Bamba still stands out, with an insane wingspan of 7'10" that allows for court coverage the likes of which hasn’t been seen. Bamba has been in the spotlight for a while -- the Westtown (Penn.) High School team on which he played featured teammates like Cam Reddish, a blue-chip guard who’ll play for Duke next season -- and played against the likes of the No. 1 pick in 2018, Deandre Ayton. At Texas, he starred for Coach Shaka Smart, himself among the biggest names in the sport. After one season in Austin, where he shattered the school record for blocked shots in a season, Bamba declared for the Draft, assured he’d be a high Lottery pick. But Bamba has also shown a willingness to work on what he doesn’t -- or, at least, didn’t -- do that well. He went to California for weeks with noted player development coach Drew Hanlen, who deconstructed Bamba’s jumper from the ground up. Hanlen lowered Bamba’s shot pocket, adjusted his fingers on the ball and eliminated a hitch Bamba had before shooting. Bamba displayed much improved form before the Draft, but even if he couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn, he was going high -- and, he did, to the Orlando Magic with the sixth pick overall. Desperate to regain relevance in the East, the Magic hired Steve Clifford after he was fired by Charlotte to try and improve their awful defense. At the least, Clifford inherited ridiculous size on his roster, with Bamba joining 6'10" second-year forward Jonathan Isaac and newly re-signed 6'9" forward Aaron Gordon. Bamba must show he can be a killer on the floor like Embiid, and will work to make that happen. The only significant question about him coming into the Draft was the consistency of his motor at Texas. In Las Vegas this week for Summer League with his new team, Bamba is getting his feet wet while keeping them firmly planted to the ground. David Aldridge: I know you’ve spent a lot of time with Drew on the shot. What feels better now? Mo Bamba: Everything. The mechanics are so much cleaner now than they were in college. I think the difference between college and now is just a matter of just repetition, being able to change my jump shot dramatically because of how much I’ve gone in and worked on it. DA: So with time, you can basically improve anything? MB: Yeah, my jump shot is night and day. DA: He also told me that one thing he wanted to keep working with you on after the Draft was, you have a little jump to your left when you shoot? MB: Yeah, that’s a bad tendency that I have. That’s something Drew didn’t want to change. He changed a lot of things, and that’s one of the best things about working with Drew -- he knows boundaries, and he knows how much is too much. That’s one of the things he didn’t want to change right off the bat. But that’s something I’ve been conscious of and something I’ve been working on since he pointed it out. DA: Given where you played high school, was there more pressure on you playing for Westtown or playing for Texas? MB: I’d say there was more pressure playing -- well, actually, it was both, equal. My sophomore year at Westtown, there was a lot of pressure, because I was at a program that had never won a state championship, and had gotten to the finals three or four years in a row. At Texas, I was coming to a team that hadn’t made the NCAA Tournament the year before. So I’d say it was pretty equal. DA: I would imagine playing on a team like that in high school, with Cam and all the others, maybe prepared you not only for college, but playing in the pros. MB: Yeah, Cam can go. He’s a really good basketball player. And I know for a fact I’ll see him here next year. DA: What was Harlem like to grow up in, day by day? MB: It was, when people ask that, I pretty much tell them that you just grow up fast. You’re making decisions at a very young age that most kids don’t even come close to making. I credit a lot of my success to being from Harlem, growing up there. DA: Harlem’s changed a little the last few years. MB: Yeah, gentrification is real. It’s real. DA: What was it like seeing that demographic shift? MB: Well, I was kind of there before gentrification kind of really hit. Obviously there was a bunch of condos that went up and it was pretty cool to see. It was every time I came back home -- I’d see a new development going up. DA: Best advice your parents ever gave you? MB: I wouldn’t say it was direct advice or a quote. I’d say the best thing my parents passed on to me was to let me make my own mistakes and figure out on my age how to kind of see the world on my own. Growing up as the youngest child, one or two years after your siblings, obviously that’s great. You’re learning without truly making the mistakes on your own. But at some point in your life, you’re gonna have to learn on your own. You’re gonna have to fall to rise. DA: Conversely, then, what’s the biggest mistake you’ve made so far? MB: I’d say that the biggest mistake I’ve made so far was not committing to Texas earlier. I think waiting was awesome. I was very methodical about waiting, very strategic about what I wanted in a university. But at the same time, if I could go back, I probably would have committed my junior year, so I could hit the ground running and build the relationships, get to know people. DA: How much freedom did Shaka give you when you were there to try things on the floor that might not necessarily be good for the team, but could be good for you individually down the road? MB: Coach Smart, he’s given me so much freedom to sort of grow into who I was. That’s been a big thing in my life -- my parents and all of my coaches. Coach Smart did a great job of just letting me come to terms with myself, as a basketball player and a person. DA: I saw in one of your interviews before the Draft that you don’t think people really understand you when you say you’re a unicorn. So define that for me as you see it. MB: Well, I mean, people kind of have a concept of what it means. To me, it’s just someone who makes plays that have never been seen before -- a seven-foot big guard, those are all unicorns to me. DA: You played against Ayton and guys like Jarrett Allen (the Nets’ first-round pick in 2017) in high school, and I know how much you’ve looked at Joel Embiid on tape. Are you guys the new normal when it comes to the next generation of bigs? MB: Yeah, I think this is becoming a theme, and you’ll see it more and more with guys coming out of high school. One of the guys you’ll see coming up is James Wiseman (the 6'11" rising senior center currently playing at East High School in Memphis, and who is considered by many to be the top college prospect in the Class of 2019). He’s younger, but he does a lot of the things that I do, that Deandre does, that Jarrett does. It’s refreshing to see so many people that can do what I do. DA: If you were six-feet tall instead of seven, what would you be doing? MB: I’d have to be around the game, like a scout or a GM, something around the game. DA: How did the basketball bug bite you so hard growing up? MB: Honestly, it’s just my competitive nature. It bleeds over into other aspects of my life. But basketball is just something that I really excelled at, and whenever I hit kind of adversity, or whenever I do something that makes me vulnerable enough to get better and to ask for help, I just took this and ran with it. DA: Since you’re a kid, I have to ask you how good you are at Fortnight? MB: I play recreationally. One of my best friends is really good at it, and whenever I play him I get Ws. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018

For summer vet Goodwin, NBA hope springs eternal

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press LAS VEGAS (AP) — Archie Goodwin is about to set a record. It won’t be cause for celebration. Goodwin is a veteran of 165 NBA games, has scored 20 points on 10 different occasions, had a monthlong stretch with Phoenix two years ago where he started and averaged 16 points per game while playing against a slew of All-Stars in that span. He thinks he’s proven. The rest of the league doesn’t see it the same way. So he’s back in the NBA Summer League — where, after scoring six points for Portland on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) in the Trail Blazers’ 93-78 win over the Utah Jazz, he moved within 13 points of matching Coby Karl’s all-time record for the Las Vegas event. Karl scored 337 points, Goodwin is up to 324, according to data compiled by RealGM. “It comes with the job,” Goodwin said. “My world is just different. I’m just trying to stay positive and continue to fight, looking for a chance to show how I can help a team.” Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) was Day 2 of the Summer League in Las Vegas, with another 10 games on the schedule. More 10-game slates await on Sunday and Monday (Monday and Tuesday, PHL time), and the tournament runs through July 17 (July 18, PHL time). Most guys in Vegas are playing for the first or second time. Goodwin is playing in the event for the fifth time. Drafted No. 29 overall by Oklahoma City in 2013, Goodwin has gotten NBA time with Phoenix, Brooklyn and New Orleans. He appeared in five preseason games with Portland last season as well, but doesn’t even have as much as a training camp deal for this fall. “I’m a resilient person,” Goodwin said. “That speaks to how I was raised that way, to never give up on my dreams. Hopefully the right situation pops up.” Goodwin was one of the best guards in the G League last season, averaging 19 points on 53 percent shooting. “I feel like I’m not getting a fair shake,” Goodwin said. “But that’s how it is. That’s my motivation. I’m going to keep knocking at the door and hopefully someone realizes that this kid — I’m only 23-years-old — can help a team and bring a lot of value to a team.” Saturday’s (Sunday, PHL time) summaries: TRAIL BLAZERS 93, JAZZ 78 Wade Baldwin IV scored 20 points for Portland (1-0), which got 16 points from Gary Trent Jr. and 13 rebounds from Caleb Swanigan. Grayson Allen, Georges Niang and Tony Bradley all scored 16 for Utah (0-1). Allen struggled again from the field just as he did in two summer games at Salt Lake City earlier in the week, shooting 6-for-17, but added six rebounds and five assists. PACERS 86, SPURS 76 TJ Leaf scored 17 for Indiana, which took control by outscoring San Antonio 22-8 in the third quarter. CJ Wilcox added 13 for the Pacers (1-1). Derrick White scored 19 for the Spurs (0-1), who got 15 points from Lonnie Walker IV. SUNS 71, KINGS 63 Top pick Deandre Ayton scored 21 points on 8-of-11 shooting and grabbed 12 rebounds for Phoenix (2-0). Davon Reed added 12 points and Josh Jackson scored 10. Dragan Bender, the fourth overall selection in the 2016 draft, was scoreless on 0-for-5 shooting. Harry Giles had 17 points, six rebounds and five steals for Sacramento (0-1). Marvin Bagley III, the No. 2 pick, had 15 points and seven rebounds. PELICANS 110, HEAT 84 Trevon Bluiett was 10-of-16 shooting, including 6-of-10 from three-point range, and had 26 points to lead New Orleans (2-0). The guard out of Xavier, who went undrafted last month, has scored 50 points, including 12 three's, in two Las Vegas Summer League games. Walter Lemon Jr. had 19 points, eight rebounds and nine assists, Cliff Alexander added 15 points and Cheick Diallo scored 14 for the Pelicans. Duncan Robinson scored 18 points, hitting 4-of-6 3-pointers, and Jarrod Jones had 15 points and 12 rebounds for Miami (0-1). KNICKS 91, HAWKS 89 Kevin Knox, the ninth overall selection in last month’s draft, led New York (1-0) with 22 points and eight rebounds. Troy Williams added 17 points and Allonzo Trier, who went undrafted out of Arizona, had 15 points, six rebounds, four assists and three steals. John Collins scored 30 points, hitting 4 of 7 from 3-point range, and Tyler Dorsey added 15 points and 14 rebounds for Atlanta (0-1). No. 5 pick Trae Young had 21 points and 11 assists. THUNDER 90, NETS 76 Deonte Burton scored 13 points on 6-of-8 shooting and Daniel Hamilton had 12 points, nine rebounds and seven assists for Oklahoma City (1-1), which won for the first time in Las Vegas after 11 consecutive losses. Theo Pinson, who went undrafted last month out of North Carolina, led Brooklyn (0-2) with 16 points, Yuta Watanabe scored 13 and James Webb III added 12. GRIZZLIES 73, PISTONS 70 Wayne Selden scored 20 points and first-round pick Jaren Jackson Jr. had 12 points, eight rebounds and four blocks for Memphis (1-0). Kobi Simmons added 12 points and Deyonta Davis scored 10 and grabbed nine boards as the Grizzlies held on. Henry Ellenson had 15 points and seven rebounds for Detroit (0-2) but was 5-of-21 shooting, including 1-of-10 from three-point range, and committed seven of the Pistons’ 14 turnovers. Second-round picks Khyri Thomas and Bruce Brown Jr. had 13 and 12 points, respectively. BULLS 86, CAVALIERS 81 Antonio Blakeney scored 25 points and Wendell Carter Jr., the seventh overall pick in last month’s draft, had 16 points, nine rebounds and five blocks for Chicago (1-0). First-round pick Chandler Hutchison added 13 points. Ante Zizic led Cleveland (1-1) with 25 points on 11-of-14 shooting, and grabbed 11 rebounds. First-round selection Collin Sexton added 14 points but was just 6-of-15 from the field......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 8th, 2018

Suns Booker signs 5-year, $158 million deal

By Bob Baum, Associated Press PHOENIX (AP) — Devin Booker, the high-scoring guard at the heart of Phoenix’s rebuilding plans, has signed a five-year, $158 million maximum contract with the Suns. Booker, 21, tweeted a photo of himself smiling as he signed the contract Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time), moments before the Suns announced the deal, which makes him the highest-paid player in the franchise’s history. I am humbled & honored to commit to the Suns organization long term. I loved calling Phoenix home the last 3 seasons as this team & community are special to me. Thank you to the Suns for drafting me and believing in me. I look forward to the future & pursuing a title as a Sun. pic.twitter.com/AHRaraPww6 — Devin Booker (@DevinBook) July 8, 2018 The 13th overall pick in the 2015 draft out of Kentucky, Booker has averaged 19.8 points per game in his three NBA seasons. He averaged 24.9 points last season, shooting 38 percent from three-point range. He won the NBA three-point contest at All-Star weekend in February. Booker set a franchise record by scoring 70 points in a game at Boston on March 24, 2017, just the sixth player in NBA history to score that many. “I am humbled & honored to commit to the Suns organization long term,” he wrote. “I loved calling Phoenix home the last 3 seasons as this team & community are special to me. Thank you to the Suns for drafting me and believing in me. I look forward to the future & pursuing a title as a Sun.” The announced signing came five days after Booker and his agent met with Suns owner Robert Sarver, general manager Ryan McDonough and vice president of basketball operations James Jones in Los Angeles to discuss the contract. The contract takes effect in the 2019-20 season. Signed, sealed... BOOKED. 🤝#Max pic.twitter.com/Qrr8eeseZM — Phoenix Suns (@Suns) July 8, 2018 “‘Book’ has been a pillar for the Suns franchise ever since he arrived in Phoenix in 2015,” McDonough said in a news release announcing the signing. “Devin and the team both wanted to extend this agreement with the club as long as we possibly could. This agreement reflects a commitment from both parties to the Phoenix community, the state of Arizona and Suns fans worldwide.” Booker topped 4,000 career points last March 2 (Mar. 3, PHL time), becoming the third-youngest player to reach that milestone. Only LeBron James and Kevin Durant were younger. But while Booker has amassed big individual statistics, there has been little team success. The Suns have missed the playoffs the last eight seasons and had the worst record in the NBA last season at 21-61. After the season, Booker said his days of missing the playoffs were over. That may be a bit optimistic, but the team added to its talented core of young players big-time when it selected center Deandre Ayton with the No. 1 overall pick in the draft. Ayton and fellow first-rounder Mikal Bridges join Booker and Josh Jackson as the talented young core of the team under new coach Igor Kokoskov. Booker will be 26, and presumably approaching his prime, when the new contract expires......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 8th, 2018

BLOGTABLE: Time to change All-Star fan voting?

NBA.com blogtable The All-Star game abandoned the East-West format last season and had captains pick teams regardless of conference. Isn’t it time to do the same thing on the All-Star ballot? Have fans vote for the 10 best players, period? * * * Steve Aschburner: No, see, we need to maintain the conference setup on the ballot to exert pressure on the players and their agents to stem the “westward ho!” flow of talent ... nah, kidding. The fuzzy concept of missing out on an All-Star berth obviously hasn’t deterred anyone from crowding into the West. So yes, it’s appropriate for the ballot to sync up with how the All-Star squads are deployed and treat the talent pool of the entire NBA as one big playground. (BTW, we’re overdue for the all-NBA selection process to sync up with the All-Star ballot and allow voters to choose “frontcourt” and “backcourt” honorees, or just go position-less entirely with top five, top 10, top 15). Shaun Powell: Love the idea, just wish it wasn't a reaction from the imbalance of stars in the West. That said, the All-Star Game is all about entertainment and the fans, as it should be, so you give them what they want. The All-NBA teams are for the players. John Schuhmann: My plan: The fans vote for five players from the East and five players from the West. The coaches then select another five from the East and five from the West, and then six more players from any conference. You would have two 13-man rosters (I have no idea why they haven't been expanded yet) with at least 10 players from each conference, but you could have as many as 16 from either. Sekou Smith: It's time for change. The conference designations for All-Star weekend don't change the fact that the bulk of the league's biggest stars now call the Western Conference home. As long we have the player-draft format, it simply doesn't matter. Might as well let the fans vote for the top 10 and then let the coaches select the reserves, regardless of conference affiliation, and make sure we get the best of the very best on the big stage for the league's mid-season showcase......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 5th, 2018

Derrick White continues strong play, Spurs top Hawks 103-81

By Steve Reed, Associated Press Things are coming a little easier this summer for Derrick White. White, the 29th pick in last year’s draft, is off to a fast start in the NBA Summer League. He scored 18 of his 21 points in the first half to lead the San Antonio Spurs to a lopsided 103-81 victory over Trae Young and the Atlanta Hawks on Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time). The 6'4" point guard, who played in 17 games last season for the Spurs, also had nine assists, six rebounds and two blocks in an impressive all-around performance. “I am just feeling more comfortable this year,” White said. “I am learning what works and what I need to do to be successful.” White continued his solid play from the night before, when he had 22 points and seven rebounds in the Spurs’ 92-76 loss to the Utah Jazz. White is vying for more playing this season, especially with Kawhi Leonard’s future with the Spurs uncertain. Young, this year’s No. 5 overall pick, continued to struggle in Utah, finishing with 12 points on 5-of-16 shooting. In two games the former Oklahoma star is just 9-of-36 from the field, including 2-of-16 from three-point range. Young had three assists and three turnovers. Young averaged 27.4 points last season for the Sooners. SPURS 103, HAWKS 81 Jeff Ledbetter had 16 points and three three-pointers, and Amida Brimah had eight points and 11 rebounds for San Antonio (1-1). The Spurs rested first-round draft pick Lonnie Walker IV. John Collins had 19 points and first-round pick Omari Spellman had 10 points and seven rebounds for the Hawks (0-2). HEAT 89, LAKERS 74 Derrick Jones Jr. had 21 points and Duncan Robinson added 19 to lead the Heat (1-1). Lakers first-round draft picks Svi Mykhailiuk had 12 points and Moritz Wagner had eight points and five turnovers. Los Angeles is 0-2. GRIZZLIES 95, JAZZ 92 Wayne Seldon and Kobi Simmons each had 20 points. No. 4 overall pick Jaren Jackson Jr. had 10 points and eight rebounds after a dominating performance the night before when he scored 29 points on eight three-pointers for Memphis (2-0). The Jazz (1-1) rested first-round pick Grayson Allen. WARRIORS 71, KINGS 54 First-round draft pick Jacob Evans had a team-high 13 points on 5-of-12 shooting, adding five rebounds and two steals for the defending NBA champions. Marvin Bagley III, the No. 2 pick in the draft, was held to seven points on 3-of-16 shooting with seven rebounds for the Kings (1-1). Justin Jackson had 20 points, but the Kings only shot 27.5 percent from the floor......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 4th, 2018

Jackson scores 29, outshines Young in Summer League debut

By Steve Reed, Associated Press Jaren Jackson Jr.’s NBA Summer League debut couldn’t have gone much better. The same can’t be said for Trae Young. Jackson, the fourth pick in the NBA draft, outshined No. 5 overall pick Young in their first NBA action. The 6'10" Jackson had 29 points and shot 8-of-13 from three-point range to help Memphis Grizzlies defeat Young’s Atlanta Hawks 103-88 on Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) in Salt Lake City. Jackson came out hot, hitting his first two three-pointers and was 4-of-6 from beyond the arc in the first half, including a buzzer-beater from half court to give his team a 47-41 lead at the break. The 18-year-old Jackson showed the shooting stroke that made him a 40 percent three-point shooter in college and scored 12 straight points during one stretch in the fourth quarter to help the Grizzlies pull away. “I definitely felt hot at different spots during the game. If kind of felt surreal a little bit,” said Jackson, the team’s highest drafted player since Hasheem Thabeet. While Jackson was doing just about everything right, Young was having a miserable debut. Young, who averaged 27.4 points per game last season for Oklahoma, missed all nine shot attempts in the first half, including six three-pointers. The Big 12 Freshman of the Year struggled to recover after air-balling his first two shots and finished with 16 points on 4-of-20 shooting. He was 1-of-11 from beyond the arc. GRIZZLIES 103, HAWKS 88 Kobi Simmons had 19 of his 21 points in the first half and finished 8-of-13 from the field for Grizzlies, while first-round pick Jevon Carter chipped in with 10 points and five rebounds. Tyler Dorsey led the Hawks with 18 points and seven rebounds. Omari Spellman, one of Atlanta’s three first-round draft picks, had a solid showing with 11 points and six rebounds. Their other first-round pick Kevin Huerter did not play because of a wrist injury. JAZZ 92, SPURS 76 Georges Niang scored 17 points, while first-round draft pick Grayson Allen had 11 points, eight rebounds and seven assists as the Jazz defeated the Spurs 92-76 in Utah. Tony Bradley had a double-double with 11 points and 11 rebounds. The Spurs were led by Derrick White’s 22 points and seven rebounds. San Antonio’s top draft pick Lonnie Walker struggled in his debut, limited to seven points while shooting 3-of-16 from the field. WARRIORS 79, HEAT 68 Kendrick Nunn had 19 points and 11 rebounds to lead the world champions Warriors over the Heat 79-68 in a game played in Sacramento. The Warriors’ first-round draft pick Jacob Evans did not play because of a bruised toe he suffered in practice last week. Derrick Jones Jr. had a big game for Miami with 24 points and 11 rebounds, including a monster two-hand dunk after slashing down the lane. Bam Adebayo added 14 points and 14 rebounds. KINGS 98, LAKERS 93 Marvin Bagley III showed why he was the No. 2 pick, turning in a strong debut with 18 points and six rebounds on the Kings' home floor. Harry Giles made a successful debut after being held out of last season with knee injuries. Giles, the 20th overall pick in 2017, was 6 of 10 from the field and finished with 13 points and three rebounds. De'Aaron Fox had 22 points, eight rebounds and six assists. Frank Mason had 16 points, including a key three-pointer late to help seal the win. Josh Hart had 23 points for the Lakers before being ejected from the game with 1:04 left and his team trailing by four after picking up his second technical for disputing a call. Rookie Moritz Wagner had 23 points and seven rebounds......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2018

CJ Perez -- Baby Beast, or The Blur 2.0?

With a monicker such as "Baby Beast", this versatile swingman from Lyceum of the Philippines University conjures images of a young Calvin Abueva, the triple-double machine that was the heart and soul of the daunted Baste-triumvirate several years back. Abueva was an unstoppable force on both ends of the floor, chasing after loose balls and rebounds and dominating the game despite his generously listed 6’3” frame. CJ Perez, who is just a shade under 6’3”, affects the game very similarly as Abueva on both ends of the floor, but at his age, is a more polished scorer, and plays at a more controlled pace, whether it is because of the system run by Coach Topex Robinson, or because of his experience playing internationally at a younger age. His journey to Lyceum was not without its twists and turns. After suiting up for San Sebastian for two seasons in the NCAA, Perez transferred to Ateneo where he was supposed to play for the Blue Eagles in Season 79 of the UAAP. However, academic issues forced him to rekindle his playing career back in the NCAA, where, after another year of residency, he was finally able to debut for the Pirates in Season 93 of the NCAA tourney. There he made up immensely for lost time, bagging the NCAA’s season MVP award, with averages of 19.3 points on 45 percent shooting from the field, 6.5 rebounds, 3.6 assists, and 1.9 steals a contest while leading the Pirates to a stellar 18-0 sweep of the elimination round. Their 0-2 defeat in the Finals at the hands of defending champion San Beda did little to tarnish the achievements of Perez, who many now consider as the best collegiate player in the country today, and a sure top three pick in the next PBA draft. Let’s break down his attributes as a basketball player and see just how good Baby Beast (or some may even conjecture The Blur 2.0), really is. STRENGTH AND ATHLETICISM Pound for pound, CJ Perez is as good as it gets in college basketball, athletically and talent-wise. A natural scorer and slasher, he’s a tremendous leaper, and his ability to get rebounds (great positioning and leaping ability) is what allowed Lyceum to play him at the four spot in their pressing line-up. He has wiry strength and an explosive first step. This allows him to get past defenders without the need for any fancy dribbling. His solid upper body also allows him to muscle his way in traffic, create enough separation for a jumper, or more often than not, finish strong with either hand. "UMUPO SA ERE!" CJ Perez edition #NCAAStrong pic.twitter.com/Haf8oXmAqs — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) October 19, 2017   SLASHING AND SHOOTING While slashing is his primary scoring option, he’s also developed a respectable outside shot. Though he’s not a volume 3-pt shooter, he has throughout the season taken and made open threes, even of the step-back variety. And while his mechanics are not like those of a pure shooter (feet and shoulders are not perfectly square, has a habit of fading back on jumpers), his confidence and determination to make them have allowed him to shoot at a 45% clip from the field. Tough jumper for CJ Perez! #NCAASeason93 #NCAAStrong pic.twitter.com/9quJAhsazz — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) July 14, 2017 NO GO-TO MOVE? In terms of offensive moves, he has yet to show that he can regularly attack with his back to the basket, as he prefers starting from outside. We’ve not seen him regularly post up smaller defenders or use his athleticism to score on turnaround fadeaway jumpers. Another move he may have to master would be a mid-range floater, as he has not really had to play against much bigger opponents in the college ranks. This, together with a dangerous euro-step would definitely serve him well against bigger, more athletic competition. COURT VISION AND PASSING ABILITY Another positive is his willingness to make the extra pass. Because defenses are always keyed in on him, Perez has shown good court vision and an innate passing ability, many times hitting an open teammate, whether with a forward pass that leads to a fast break or an interior pass leading to an easy score under the basket. And while he is still prone to taking difficult and at times ill-advised shots because of his athleticism, his passing ability is something he can definitely capitalize on. ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT ON DEFENSE On the defensive end, CJ Perez knows how to make full use of his God-given talents. He is terrific at playing the passing lanes, in fact most of his steals are from reading the passing lanes and picking off cross court passes from their full court trap. Those are almost automatic transition baskets. His on-ball defense needs a little more improvement however, as one gets the sense that he relies more on his athleticism rather than solid defensive fundamentals, as seen when guys less athletic are still able to beat him off the dribble from time to time. Something that he’ll have to eliminate if he wants to excel in the next level. CJ Perez getting it done on both ends of the floor! #NCAASeason93 #NCAAStrong pic.twitter.com/RQVGAPnNtL — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) November 16, 2017 VERSATILITY In terms of intangibles, there is not much more to ask for. Perez has the motor of a Calvin Abueva, and his impact is felt on both ends of the floor. He can play all positions except center, bring the ball up like a point guard, slash like a wing, and rebound like a power forward. While his ballhandling still needs to be improved on (he’s shown to be vulnerable crossing over against smaller guards), there is little doubt that with his work ethic and attitude it’s only a matter of time before he tightens up those handles. Most importantly, he doesn’t showboat, but just goes about his business on the court -- a proven winner who still plays with a chip on his shoulder. #NCAASeason93 MVP CJ Perez's all-around brilliance was all the difference for the stunning Lyceum Pirates! pic.twitter.com/BH9uBYDwVl — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) December 19, 2017 An official from one PBA team thinks that if developed properly, CJ Perez could actually be the next Jayson Castro instead of a Calvin Abueva. That’s a scary thought; but what’s even scarier is that it’s actually not that farfetched to consider......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 28th, 2018

AP source: Suns won t re-sign Len, Payton; free $10 million

By Bob Baum, Associated Press PHOENIX (AP) — A person with knowledge of the situation says the Phoenix Suns have decided not to re-sign center Alex Len and point guard Elfrid Payton, clearing some $10 million in salary cap space as the team prepares to make a run at free agents. The person asked to remain anonymous because those intentions have not been made public. Free agency begins in the NBA on Sunday (Monday, PHL time). The moves were expected. The 7'1" Len, who comes from the Ukraine, was the fifth overall pick in the 2013 draft after one season at Maryland. He played in 335 games over four seasons with Phoenix, averaging 7.2 points and 6.5 rebounds per game, never becoming the dominant big man the Suns had hoped he would be. Last season, Len appeared in 69 games, averaging 8.5 points and 7.5 rebounds. Acquired from Orlando for a second-round pick at last season’s trade deadline, Payton averaged 11.8 points, 5.3 rebounds and 6.2 assists in 19 games with Phoenix but shot 44 percent from the field, 20 percent from three-point range. The Suns’ decision not to re-sign the players first was reported by azcentral (The Arizona Republic)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 28th, 2018

PBA: Standhardinger calls trade rumors 'scams'

Calm down with all those trade talks. No. 1 pick Christian Standhardinger has missed a significant amount of time for defending champion San Miguel Beer in the 2018 PBA Commissioner's Cup, his very first conference in the league following a stint with Hong Kong Eastern in the ABL. And while Standhardinger has had respectable numbers, averaging 12.2 points and 7.2 rebounds, we're hardly seeing him on court due to lingering knee issues. Standhardinger missed two games for the Beermen before he suited up for Gilas Pilipinas in the 2018 FIBA 3x3 World Cup earlier this month. After the World Cup, he went scoreless for the Beermen in their loss to Globalport. He hasn't played since, missing San Miguel's twin victories over NLEX and TNT. Trade rumors have since floated around for whatever reason. But in a report by Waylon Galvez of Manila Bulletin on Wednesday, Standhardinger quickly shot the rumors down. "I'm not worried about those scams," Standhardinger said per Galvez. "I didn't even hear about me getting traded anywhere," he added. Standhardinger has been at the center of trade talks early in his PBA career. Before he was even drafted in the PBA, the Beermen engaged the then Kia Picanto in a controversial swap for the 2017 no. 1 pick. Many saw the move as San Miguel trying to get in position to take the Fil-German forward. The deal went through, leading an intense PBA Board stalemate and an eventual change of PBA Commissioners. San Miguel did end up taking Standhardinger first in the 2017 Draft. However, Standhardinger will not waste time with rumors as he deals with his recovery from knee injury. If he's indeed on the trading block though, he's confident he's the first to know. Otherwise, rumors are just rumors. "I think that San Miguel Beer organization is professional so far, and they are all professional. So I’m pretty sure that I am the first one to know that I’ll get traded or not,” Standhardinger said. San Miguel currently has no games on deck as the Commissioner's Cup is in a mini break to give way to Gilas Pilipinas. The next time the Beermen will be on court will be on July 4 against Blackwater.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 27th, 2018

Wendell Carter Jr. brings all-around package to Bulls

NBA.com staff report Wendell Carter Jr. had his plan in place from a young age, as early as the third grade. His hoop dreams always centered on fulfilling a destiny his father, a professional player overseas, never did. So when NBA Commissioner Adam Silver called his name early during Thursday's draft (Friday, PHL time), it was the culmination of a family project years in the making. Carter, who joins an up and coming young cast in Chicago, arrives with a focus and attention to detail that puts the emphasis on professional in professional ballplayer. As Malika Andrews of the Chicago Tribune points out, Carter has spent his young life preparing for the opportunity that is being presented to him now with the Bulls: At Pace Academy, Carter was also one of the highest-ranked basketball prospects in the country. He scored 30 points and grabbed 20 rebounds to lead Pace to the Georgia Class AA state championship in 2016. Pace coach Demetrius Smith made sure to tune in to the draft after a staff meeting Thursday night. “As far as a big man, he’s probably the best from Georgia since Dwight Howard,” Smith said. ”There never has been another guy like him at our school.” Carter sacrificed some of his own offense on a Duke team that also had Marvin Bagley III and Grayson Allen — two other first-round picks. Carter averaged 13.5 points and 9.1 rebounds for the Blue Devils, serving as a more physical complement to the sinewy Bagley, whom the Kings selected at No. 2. “The beautiful thing about Wendell is that he doesn’t have to be the featured guy to have an impact,” Carter’s performance coach, Sekou Walton, said. “Wendell can actually help you out defensively, he can get your rebounds. His assist ratio is pretty high as well. He can work well with someone who has to have touches. Wendell is that perfect support guy, and the NBA needs more people like Wendell.” Indeed, Carter’s potential lies not only in his physical gifts and scoring ability but also his unselfishness and commitment to team play. Kylia describes her son as “unselfish to a fault.” Sommerville called him the “quarterback that makes everybody’s life easier.” Throughout high school, Carter kept a comprehensive training program that reflects his attention to detail: He practiced, lifted weights, stuck to a healthy diet and even carried a water jug everywhere he went to ensure he was properly hydrated. One of Smith’s favorite memories took place immediately after Carter’s sensational championship game performance in 2016. After Pace beat Manchester High 65-43 in the state final, the team celebrated with burgers, fries and milkshakes from Chick-fil-A on the bus ride back from Macon to Atlanta. When the bus pulled up at the school and Carter’s teammates rushed to go celebrate, Carter stayed behind to pick up the napkins, bags and cups. “We always say, ‘Leave it better than you found it,’ ” Smith said in a phone interview from his Atlanta home. “I have seen him do it after games too — picking up Gatorade cups and stuff like that. You just don’t find too many kids that are that humble and are willing to do all the dirty work, the little stuff.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

Cavs having ‘good dialogue’ with LeBron’s management team

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio --- With one deadline looming on his future in Cleveland, LeBron James has been in contact with the Cavaliers through his representatives. Following the NBA draft on Thursday night, Cavs general manager Koby Altman said he has had positive discussions with the three-time champion's group. James has until June 29 to tell the team if he will pick up his $35.6 million option for next season or become a free agent. "We continue to have good dialogue with his management team," Altman said. "I think LeBron has more than earned the right to approach his contracts the way he does. He's done that before, so this is nothing new for us. We want to respect his space du...Keep on reading: Cavs having ‘good dialogue’ with LeBron’s management team.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 23rd, 2018

Ayton arrives as symbol that Suns are on the rise

By Bob Baum, Associated Press PHOENIX (AP) — Since the heady days of Steve Nash came to an end, there have been few signs of joy from a dwindling fan base that watched the Phoenix Suns tumble to the bottom of the NBA standings and miss the playoffs for the eighth year in a row. Then came the announcement that Deandre Ayton would go to the Suns with the first overall pick. A huge cheer went up from the several thousand fans at Talking Stick Resort Arena on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) for the draft party. General manager Ryan McDonough, owner Robert Sarver and coach Igor Kokoskov came out of their meeting room to watch and bask in that rare moment of sheer joy from the fans. “It was a pretty special moment for our franchise,” McDonough said. Not only that, but McDonough engineered a last-minute trade for swingman Mikal Bridges of Villanova, the 10th pick. It was a spendy move because Philadelphia demanded and got Miami’s unprotected 2021 first-round pick. But the Suns are weary of stockpiling assets. It’s time to cash in, they figured, and did it with that trade. “We weighed the pros and cons of trading it heavily and carefully,” McDonough said. “We were only going to put it in play if we had a chance to get a special player and that’s how we feel about McKell.” All four of the Suns’ picks showed up on a crowded dais in Phoenix on Friday (Saturday, PHL time) — Ayton, Bridges, French point guard Elie Okobo (chosen 31st) and forward George King of Colorado (the 59th selection). The 7'1" Ayton towered over the others, in a white unbuttoned collared shirt and a sharp blue suit, but he looked and sounded a bit weary from the whirlwind of being the No. 1 draft pick. His only sleep lately, he said, was a couple of hours on the plane ride from New York on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “I’m just excited to finally get a jersey on and be able to play five-on-five again,” Ayton said. Ayton had been the frontrunner for the No. 1 pick ever since the draft lottery and any doubts were erased when he went through an individual workout with the Suns, the only team which he did so. McDonough said that Ayton’s workout “in and of itself was as impressive as I’ve ever seen in my 16 drafts in the NBA.” Ayton is seen as strictly a center, so how does he fit in the modern style of the NBA, when center plays is diminished and players are essentially interchangeable, is a question. Ayton replied that he’s no ordinary center. “I don’t like it when people think I’m just a guy down low,” he said. “They haven’t watched me shoot the basketball.” Ayton and Bridges say they got to know each other well at the college awards ceremony in Los Angeles but never figured they’d be on the same team. “It’s like I’ve known him my whole life,” Bridges said. Now comes the hard work, molding a team with Ayton, Devin Booker and Josh Jackson. A billboard of those three already has been erected downtown. The Suns, so bad for so long, seem on the brink of being relevant. “We’re very hungry,” Ayton said. “I think the great team chemistry and the work ethic that we have, especially us guys coming in, we’re going to bring it to the next level. We’ve got young lets. We can run all day. ... We can really start a winning legacy.” And Ayton is the reason for the sudden leap in optimism, even though he won’t turn 20 until next month. “I embrace it a lot,” he said of the expectations placed upon him. “Through my career I’ve always had that on my shoulder, the expectations. I represent a whole nation [Bahamas] I just do that the best that I can and just help this community start over and be the best player I can possibly be. I just want to be the best great player.” Kokoskov says Ayton possesses “a unique talent for the decades.” Ayton said he wants “to be the best person on and off the court.” Now the Suns move on to the next phase. Free agency starts July 1 (July 2, PHL time) and McDonough wants some veteran players to add to this very young core. He said the team should have $15 million to $20 million to spend. “We were aggressive last night with the picks and the trade up to get Mikal,” McDonough said. “We’re going to continue to be aggressive for the next couple of weeks in free agency. We’ve got some money to spend and we’re looking to spend it on the best players we can get.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 23rd, 2018

Celtics pick Texas A& M’s Robert Williams in NBA draft

BOSTON --- Power forward Robert Williams was projected to be a lottery pick --- and that was last year, after his freshman year at Texas A&M. But there he was, sliding down to the Boston Celtics at the 27th overall pick in the NBA draft Thursday night. "It's not my job to know what the other 26 teams are thinking," Celtics coach Brad Stevens said after adding the two-time Southeastern Conference defensive player of the year. "We thought that he was the right pick for us, and we felt very fortunate to be able to get him." A 6-foot-10, 237-pound Oil City, Louisiana, native, Williams was considered a certain first-round pick as a freshman --- maybe in the top 10. But he ...Keep on reading: Celtics pick Texas A&M’s Robert Williams in NBA draft.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2018

Modern bigs to dominate 2018 Draft

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com NEW YORK – There was a ballroom full of NBA centers in midtown Manhattan Wednesday – not one of them eager to follow in the sizeable footsteps of Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Moses Malone, Shaquille O’Neal or Dwight Howard. In fact, on the very day that the top prospects for the 2018 Draft were made available to the media – a talent pool particularly long on length this year – Howard was on the move again, in a reported deal from Charlotte to Brooklyn that will land the eight-time All-Star with his fourth team in four seasons and sixth overall. That bit of news – of an old-school NBA big man being shuffled off again,  primarily for salary-cap purposes, into what looks to be basketball irrelevancy – served as a counterpoint to the young giants just starting out. There will be plenty of guards and forwards selected in the first round Thursday at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, including Michael Porter Jr., Trae Young, Collin Sexton, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Mikal Bridges, Kevin Knox and Lonnie Walker. But the lottery will be top-heavy with big men, with Deandre Ayton, Marvin Bagley III, Mo Bamba, Jaren Jackson Jr., Wendell Carter Jr., and Robert Williams all hearing their names called. All six are listed at 6'10" or taller, though they’ll bear little resemblance in style or production to the Hall of Famers cited above or even to Howard. The last time last time six players that size were drafted in the top 10 was 2007, when Greg Oden, Al Horford, Yi Jianlian, Brandan Wright, Joakim Noah and Spencer Hawes all went early. Much has changed in 11 years. These young guys represent basketball’s new-age pivot men, er, which means we’d better drop the “pivot men” nomenclature. Rather, the word that got tossed around most often Wednesday during conversations about these guys’ fit – with specific teams and in the league generally – was modern. Modern centers for a modern NBA. “Modern-day 5,” is how Mamba put it. “Defend multiple positions, can shoot it, handle it a little. Can do a little bit of everything,” the 20-year-old from Harlem, by way of Pennsylvania and Texas. Said Jaren Jackson, Jr., fresh from one season at Michigan State: “At times, I’ve heard that I’m right on time for the way the game is going. A lot of bigs can handle the ball and be versatile and they’re able to make plays.” If you want to feel old, consider the NBA’s prevailing definition of “modern.” With major league baseball, for example, what’s known as the “modern era” historically is thought to have begun in the year 1900. By contrast, the NBA’s modern era dates back to about a week ago last Tuesday. That’s how quickly the contributions from the center position have changed. After ruling the NBA landscape for most of the league’s first 50 years, traditional big men looked at now as dinosaurs, both in form and function. Plodding isn’t allowed. Posting up, back to the basket, and backing into the paint seems as dated in this league as helmetless players in the NHL. There have been noticeable markers along the way. In the ‘90s, players who naturally would have been trained and used as centers – Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett, Rasheed Wallace, Amare Stoudemire, Antonio McDyess – demanded to face the basket and be referred to as power forwards. Then in 2012, the league joined them, eradicating “center” from its All-Star ballot and opting for “frontcourt” as a catch-all category for everyone from 6'5" wings to seven-foot shot swatters. This latest era dates back just a few years, if you go by a few key analytics. A recent ESPN.com story tracked the minutes played by seven-footers in the playoffs, compared to the regular season, and identified the tipping point as the 2016 postseason. Even if you back it up by a year to include Golden State’s heavy use of small ball in winning its championship in 2015, that’s still barely more than a heartbeat. But the full embrace of the three-point shot and the type of pace favored by a majority of current NBA coaches has put a premium on centers – we’re taking liberties in even calling them that anymore – who are mobile, who can switch defensively, challenge perimeter shooters, do some of that shooting of their own and still crash the boards and protect the rim. The next Shaq or Kareem? Now the model is Houston’s efficient Clint Capela, Boston’s savvy Al Horford or Minnesota’s ridiculously skilled Karl-Anthony Towns. Big guys such as DeMarcus Cousins and Anthony Davis have added range to their shots. Some – Andre Drummond, Jonas Valanciunas, a few more – have status or contracts assure them minutes. Yet other old-style bigs are out of the league (Roy Hibbert, Andrew Bogut) or logging long stretches on the bench (Greg Monroe, Al Jefferson, Hassan Whiteside). Just two years ago, Jahlil Okafor was the No. 3 pick in the 2016 Draft. These days, he’s an afterthought with little market value. Teams don’t want to play the way Okafor and others like him need to play. So the challenge for a fellow such as Ayton, projected to be the near-consensus No. 1 pick this year, is to make sure no one confuses him or his game with DeAndre Jordan. Asked about the trend Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), Ayton at one point sounded a little defiant. “I’m not changing my way of play in the NBA,” he told reporters. “I’m still an inside-out type of player. I’m going to start inside and establish myself down low until I have to stretch the floor.” It helps, of course, to have that option. Ayton already is built like an NBA veteran, but he has sufficient quickness to cover ground defensively and to keep up with a faster offensive pace. And for those who haven’t been paying attention to him since the NCAA tournament ended – or in Arizona’s case, barely got started with that opening loss to Buffalo – Ayton has a surprise: a more reliable three-point shot he’s willing to unleash. “The NBA three-ball is way farther than the college three-ball,” he said. “I’ve really put on some range and put on some muscle. When I’m fatigued in games, I really can [still] get my shot off in a perfect arc.” Bagley, depending where he lands, might end up playing more out on the floor than the other bigs in this draft. That’s his experience, having had Carter next to him at Duke to handle the basics. Williams will likely benefit from shifting in the opposite direction. He played a lot at power forward for Texas A&M but is rated highly for how his game translates to, you guessed it, modern center play. Bamba has drawn comparisons to Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid, as much for his charisma as for any play similarities. He allegedly has overhauled his shot this spring, and also was eager to tout his three-point range Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Then there is Jackson, who has been rated as the best two-way player of the bunch. That includes not just his defense against fellow bigs but his ability to keep up with and guard nearly any position. Jackson seemed to speak for all the big men among the future pros in New York Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Unlike a previous generation of centers, many of whom got caught in the NBA’s transition to a smaller, faster, position-less style, the young centers of 2018 grew up watching it. And preparing for it. Nothing frustrating about it, Jackson said, though it’s a far cry from the league in which his father, Jaren Sr., (1989-2002) played. “No. Whatever helps each team do their best is what lineup they’re going to put out,” Jackson said. “They’re going to put the best players on the floor every time. You look at a team like the Warriors, they switch everything. They can play all different positions. That’s what they’re good at.” That’s what these guys, given their size, are remarkably good at too. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

Jordan will still have input on Hornets draft day decisions

By Steve Reed, Associated Press CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Michael Jordan hired proven general manager Mitch Kupchak this offseason to help turn around a franchise mired in mediocrity since he became the Charlotte Hornets’ majority owner eight years ago. But that doesn’t mean the highly competitive Jordan won’t have input on personnel decisions, beginning with the NBA draft on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time). Kupchak said in a pre-draft news conference Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) that he’ll have final say in who the Hornets select before quickly adding, “well, with the exception of one person — and obviously that’s ownership.” Kupchak has won 10 NBA championships, including seven as an executive with the Los Angeles Lakers — so he knows a thing or two about building a winning roster. But he’s quickly learning that Jordan, who many consider the best NBA player ever, is still very much a hands-on owner when it comes to the players he employs. And Kupchak understands that. “There is a huge business component to our relationship,” Kupchak said. Kupchak said he has communicated with Jordan on the phone and via text throughout the draft evaluation process. The 55-year-old Jordan arrived in Charlotte, North Carolina on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) and the two have been studying tape on potential draft picks since. The Hornets, who have failed to make the playoffs three of the past four seasons, have the 11th overall pick in the draft. Kupchak has known Jordan since he was a freshman at the University of North Carolina. However, Kupchak said that while they both are former Tar Heels, he never had considered Jordan a friend prior to being hired this past offseason to replace Rich Cho as Hornets general manager. Since then they have had dinner together and gotten to know each other a little more. He said the relationship has changed for the better. “Hopefully when all is said and done, our other relationship, which is our friend relationship continues to grow and is not altered in any way,” Kupchak said. “There are no favors being done here. We’re friends and I think we’ll remain friends, but the bottom line in this business is success and winning games.” Kupchak was rather forthcoming in the team’s pre-draft press conference Tuesday, (Wednesday, PHL time) saying the does not expect to trade the 11th overall pick. He also said he expects that the handful of top-notch big men will be off the board by the time the Hornets make their selection. “Right now I think the best player on the board is the player we are going to go after — and I’d expect that player to be a guard or a wing,” Kupchak said. “... I think we expect that we will be looking at guards and wings, but we will see.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

Hawks could turn deep supply of picks into draft-day trade

By Charles Odum, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — As the only general manager holding three first-round picks in Thursday night’s (Friday, PHL time) NBA draft, including No. 3 overall, Atlanta’s Travis Schlenk has been a popular target for trade talk. Overall, the Hawks have four picks in the top 34. That’s more than enough depth to attract interest, but the rebuilding Hawks are even more attractive trade targets because they also have about $20 million in salary cap space. That creates more attractive options for a team needing to unload a contract in a trade. Schlenk says he is answering every call and considering all options — including the possibility of trading up or down from the No. 3 spot. It’s an exciting time for Schlenk, who never held such a high draft pick in his previous job as assistant GM with the Golden State Warriors. “This is the highest pick that I’ve been a part of,” Schlenk said last week. “At Golden State, the highest pick we had was six. So it’s exciting. Having the four picks, along with the third pick, we get a lot of phone calls, which is exciting as well, and we’re going to go through all the options that are presented to us and make the best decision, hopefully.” He says he’s comfortable with the idea of opening the 2018-19 season with four rookies. Schlenk is planning the Hawks’ future with a new coach. Former Philadelphia assistant Lloyd Pierce was hired on May 11 to replace Mike Budenholzer, now the Bucks coach. Schlenk might use his first pick to select a forward-center to pair with 2017-18 rookie John Collins. Among players who could be available are Duke’s Marvin Bagley III, Michigan State’s Jaren Jackson and Mo Bamba of Texas. Guards Luka Doncic of Slovenia, Trae Young of Oklahoma and forward Michael Porter of Missouri could be alternatives for Schlenk. Pierce stressed defense in his first news conference in Atlanta. Schlenk said it’s important to land players with balanced offensive and defensive skills. “Obviously when you look at the best teams in the league, the majority of the time they’re good defensive teams,” Schlenk said. “But at the end of the day, if you’re not scoring 100 points you’re probably not winning, so we’re going to look for guys that are two-way players, who can play defensively, but also we’ve got to be able to score the ball on the other end.” Bagley qualifies as that two-way talent, but he could be drafted at the No. 2 spot by Sacramento. “I put a lot of work into this and I think I’m the best player in the draft,” Bagley said after his draft workout in Atlanta last week. “I mean that in the most humble way possible, not to be cocky.” Phoenix is projected to select Arizona center Deandre Ayton with the top pick. Jackson is an accomplished shot blocker with less polish on the offensive end. He is regarded by many to have the potential shooting skills to develop into a well-rounded NBA big man. With point guard Dennis Schroder’s future in Atlanta uncertain, the Hawks can look for talent at any position. Their wealth of picks could make it easier to take a chance on Doncic, who has the skills to play multiple positions even though his ability to create space in the NBA has been questioned by some critics. “I’ve maintained all along, and I honestly believe this, we’re going to take the best player,” Schlenk said. “We’re in a situation where we’re looking to add the most talent we can, and we’re going to get a good player at the third pick.” The No. 3 spot is the Hawks’ highest since 2007, when they selected Al Horford at No. 3. Atlanta also has the No. 19 and No. 30 picks in the first round and No. 34 early in the second round. Those selections give Schlenk a wealth of options, including a deal for a higher pick next year. Schlenk said he has considered if the possibility to “trade back to collect more assets would be advantageous.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018