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A man planting love

When I was the Korean ambassador in Manila (2001-2004), I met Wonjoo Lee, a member of the Korean community......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMay 16th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Jimmy Butler dominates as Timberwolves down Cavs at home

Minnesota Timberwolves' Jimmy Butler, left, drives around Cleveland Cavaliers' Kevin Love in the first half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Oct. 19, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated News1 hr. 48 min. ago

Love in the heart of the city

Suntrust Asmara serves as a refuge for urbanites seeking respite from the urban jungle. Love surely abounds on this side of the metro. At the heart of bustling E. Rodriguez Ave. in Quezon City is a.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated News1 hr. 48 min. ago

LOOK: Miss Earth candidates plant mangroves in Legazpi City

LEGAZPI CITY – Miss Earth 2018 candidates recently joined a mangrove-planting activity at Barangay Puro in Legazpi City.  It was a way to "give back" to the planet. Miss Earth is a pageant that focuses on environmental issues. “We cut a tree, so we have to plant a new one. This symbolize that ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated News5 hr. 48 min. ago

PH concert finds musical bliss from Sam Smith’s romantic woes

  Heartache and anguish; loneliness and longing; ruminations over love lost---these are some of the things Sam Smith had written about in the past and delved into for his second album, "The Thrill of It All." By the British crooner's own admission, his music, at times, can get "a little bit depressing."   Earlier this month, Sam brought his ongoing world tour of the same title to SM Mall of Asia Arena. And while the night's set did hew closely to such themes, never for a minute did the show feel bleak or overwrought.   Onstage, he delivered his songs---not as someone still inhabiting a space of sadness and self-pity---but as someone who can now look back...Keep on reading: PH concert finds musical bliss from Sam Smith’s romantic woes.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News8 hr. 22 min. ago

Bea Alonzo transcends ‘First Love’s’ ambiguities

  We've never seen Vancouver captured so vividly on film in a glistening montage of settings that eloquently immortalizes its stunning visual beauty, from the sun-kissed sprawl of the touristy Canadian outdoors to the quaint allure of its homey indoors.   Paul Soriano's "First Love" utilizes all that postcard-pretty perfection to frame its lead characters' smoldering emotional turmoil---a "flameless smoke" that can only be gleaned from Aga Muhlach and Bea Alonzo's anguish-beneath-the-simper portrayals.   The film plays out the way many rom-coms begin: Brooding venture capitalist Nick Gutierrez (Aga) meets quirky bookstore clerk Allison Castillo (Bea) jus...Keep on reading: Bea Alonzo transcends ‘First Love’s’ ambiguities.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News8 hr. 22 min. ago

High Hopes – Panic! At The Disco – Pray For The Wicked Tour Manila – Manila Video

#PFTWTourManila High Hopes by Panic! At The Disco live at Mall Of Asia Arena. Manila, Philippines. October 20, 2018 Thank you so much Panic! At The Disco. It’s been years since I first heard your music and I still love it until this day. Money and time well spent. Will make a vlog about this… link: High Hopes – Panic! At The Disco – Pray For The Wicked Tour Manila – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated News9 hr. 35 min. ago

The action-packed pilot episode of LeBron s Lakers

By Favian Pua "Let me shut up." At the 9:25 mark of the first quarter between the Los Angeles Lakers and the Portland Trail Blazers, TNT analyst Chris Webber found himself caught in mid-sentence. Webber was passionately defending JaVale McGee’s legitimacy as an NBA player when LeBron James intercepted a pass intended for Al-Farouq Aminu and saw a wide-open runway. Understanding the historical gravity of what was about to take place, Webber immediately uttered those four words and gave color commentator Marv Albert the floor as James accelerated towards the basket. “James off the steal... James with the stuff!” LeBron James THROWS IT DOWN for the @Lakers! 👑🔥 🏀: #LakeShow x #RipCity 📺: @NBAonTNT pic.twitter.com/l4VrJPpAzR — NBA (@NBA) October 19, 2018 Delirium. And with that sequence, so began the circus. It only seemed fitting that Webber called the game in Moda Center for James’ regular season debut with the Lakers. Nearly 15 years ago, he was also a spectator, or rather a witness, when James made his ballyhooed NBA debut against Webber’s Sacramento Kings. That spectacle was the first paragraph of James’ ever-growing narrative. As @KingJames embarks on a new journey with the @Lakers, #TBT to his NBA debut in 2003! 🔥 Lakers vs. Trail Blazers // 10:30pm ET on TNT! 📺 pic.twitter.com/sQfXbV95ST — NBA on TNT (@NBAonTNT) October 18, 2018 As a historian of the game, James fully understands the implications of his move to Los Angeles. Win, and he will see himself elevated among the greatest to ever wear purple and gold. Lose, and no blockbuster Hollywood film can compensate for his shortcomings, leaving the door open for critics to question yet again whether his championship resume was padded by an inferior Eastern Conference. To reach his goal of playing for another ring, he will need to rely on his youthful teammates and trust the front office to shoulder the massive burden and expectations. “Anytime you fall, stay down. Your brother (is) gonna come pick you up,” James told his teammates in a brief huddle during a deadball situation. That mindset is what a team in flux needs. Having each other’s back is high on the priority list because building trust is as important as racking up wins. "Anytime y'all fall, stay down. Your brother'll come pick you up." - @KingJames pic.twitter.com/E46MXQwDk4 — Los Angeles Lakers (@Lakers) October 19, 2018 The opening night loss to the Blazers serves as a heavy dose of reality check for the Lakers. They are not yet close to unseating the Golden State Warriors. The Lakers have emerging talent, but they do not boast of a Big Three, such as what James was flanked with during his previous stops with the Miami Heat and Cleveland Cavaliers. Brandon Ingram is the team’s de facto second option, but he is not yet in the same stratosphere as Dwyane Wade or Kyrie Irving. Kyle Kuzma is tantalizing, but asking him to fill the shoes of Chris Bosh or Kevin Love this season is a Herculean task. James arrived in Los Angeles as the elder statesman, but he might discover the fountain of youth with his new comrades. Since he came into the league, none of James’ teams finished higher than 12th in terms of pace over the course of a season. These Lakers, with an average age of 24.7, are much younger than any of the squads James has been on. They can play with unbridled energy that can reinvigorate James, and make him feel like a 16-year-old rather than someone playing in his 16th season as a pro. The 82-game grind will serve as test of endurance for the Baby Lakers. The beauty of the regular season is that this squad will undergo several iterations as they search for their most optimal rotations. One thing is for sure: the three-man unit of Lonzo Ball, Lance Stephenson, and Michael Beasley should not be on the court at the same time again under any circumstance. What exactly do you root for when you root for the Lakers? Is it the legacies and winning tradition established by the legends who came before? Is it the current roster and this collection of misfit toys? Is it the idealized #FutureLaker, the one who could alter the trajectory of this franchise and deliver it to greater heights? Or is it the simple fact that they employ the greatest player of this generation? One thing is certain: throughout the course of the season, LeBron and the new-look Los Angeles Lakers will be putting their own spin on, perhaps even reclaiming Joakim Noah's “Hollywood as Hell” utterance. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or ABS-CBN Sports......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News12 hr. 35 min. ago

LOOK: Jimmy Butler booed then showered with MVP chants

MANILA, Philippines – It has been a love-hate relationship between Jimmy Butler and the Minnesota Timberwolves. The controversial star was greeted with both disapproval and admiration as the Timberwolves played at home for the first time in the 2018-2019 NBA season on Friday, October 19 (Saturday, October 20, Manila time).  From ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated News18 hr. 9 min. ago

Butler leads T-wolves with 33 points in 131-123 win vs. Cavs

By DAVE CAMPBELL ,  AP Sports Writer MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Jimmy Butler brushed off some early jeers from the jaded home crowd, scoring 33 points in 36 minutes to lead the Minnesota Timberwolves past the Cleveland Cavaliers 131-123 on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). Andrew Wiggins pitched in with 22 points and Anthony Tolliver hit three 3-pointers off the bench to bolster a vintage all-around effort by the four-time All-Star Butler, who requested a trade last month. Butler made 10 of 12 field goals and 12 of 12 free throws, with seven rebounds, four steals and three assists to help the Timberwolves (1-1) hold off a late charge by Kevin Love and the LeBron James-less Cavaliers. Love had 25 points, 19 rebounds and seven assists against his former team, but the Cavaliers (0-2) have a lot of work to do to become a contender again after James bolted for the Los Angeles Lakers. They've allowed an average of 123.5 points so far this season. Wiggins, who was taken with the first overall pick in the 2014 draft by the Cavs only to be traded to the Wolves two months later in the deal for Love, has averaged 27.2 points in nine career games against Cleveland. The Wolves led 83-62 early in the third quarter, when Love brought the Cavs to life with a 3-pointer that sparked a 24-10 spurt. Love had 13 points in the run. With a layup by Collin Sexton at the 4:02 mark, the Cavs were within 121-117, their closest since trailing 36-34 early in the second quarter. Cedi Osman's 3-pointer kept the Cavs within 125-120, but he missed his next one after a scoreless possession by the Wolves. Osman had 22 points, Jordan Clarkson added 19 points off the bench and Tristan Thompson totaled 14 points and 10 rebounds for the Cavs. BUTLER DID IT When the news of Butler's trade request broke exactly one month ago, the likelihood of him awkwardly suiting up in the home opener for the team he's seeking to leave was, well, extremely low. Yet here he was, taking the court at Target Center in the home blues with the white trim. Butler was the first starter introduced during the pregame pageantry, and boos rang out loudly as soon as the public address announcer said, "From Marquette University." They kept up each time Butler touched the ball on the first five possessions by the Wolves, until he stole a pass by Love in the backcourt and fed Taj Gibson for a dunk. The crowd immediately roared, as if the fans forgot who they were upset with because the play happened so fast. The four-time All-Star had plenty more highlight-reel dunks and steals from there. Soon enough, some "MVP! MVP! MVP!" chants even broke out. The Wolves enjoyed a 52-23 run over a 13-minute stretch until late in the second quarter, taking a 20-point lead on a three-point play by Wiggins that was launched when Karl-Anthony Towns blocked a layup attempt by Osman on the other end to start a fast break. TIP-INS: Cavaliers: Larry Nance Jr. has yet to play this season because of a sprained right ankle, though coach Tyronn Lue said he's hoping to have the center back soon. "It's a big loss," Lue said. "With the team we have, we need everybody." ... J.R. Smith played four minutes after missing the opener with a sore left elbow. Timberwolves: After scoring 27 points on 8-for-12 shooting on Wednesday, Jeff Teague went 3 for 9 for nine points. ... Towns had 12 points and nine rebounds. UP NEXT Cavaliers: Play the Atlanta Hawks on Sunday night in their home opener. Timberwolves: Travel to Dallas to play on Saturday night. They won all four games against the Mavericks last season......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 20th, 2018

Jam-Jam seals ‘contract to serve’ with misty eyes

WITH misty eyes and voice cracking, former Councilor Julienne “Jam-Jam” Baronda declared that “I am home. I am back. I will continue the great projects and will do even more.” “I was overwhelmed. I felt the love of the people who joined us from Santa Maria Parish Church to the Iloilo Terminal Market. I saw […] The post Jam-Jam seals ‘contract to serve’ with misty eyes appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsOct 20th, 2018

Why Regine ended her 20-year stint with GMA 7

To be able to work with other artists---this was the main reason for the highly publicized transfer of singer-actress Regine Velasquez from GMA 7 to ABS-CBN, according to Cacai Mitra, Regine's sister and talent manager.   "She felt limited in terms of projects (when she was still with GMA 7). If she were to appear in a soap, what kind of characters could she play? Who could she partner with? In that aspect, palaging kapos," Cacai explained during the press conference that ABS-CBN bosses organized for Regine on Wednesday night.   For her part, Regine said, "I love the people I've worked with there. They felt sad that I had to go, but they understood. After all, I...Keep on reading: Why Regine ended her 20-year stint with GMA 7.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

Destined ‘First Love’

"First Love" follows the destined encounter of two "opposites."   A pair of strangers accidentally meets and shares something special: Nick (Aga Muhlach) is a composed and calculated businessman, while Ali (Bea Alonzo) is an optimistic photographer who believes in destiny and carpe diem, or seizing the day.   Catch Paul Soriano's latest film in SM Cinema branches nationwide. Moviegoers may book tickets through SMcinema.com.  ...Keep on reading: Destined ‘First Love’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

Despite Columbian’s frustrating losses, Akeem Wright wants to return to PBA

ANTIPOLO---Even with its first victory in the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup, Columbian has no chance anymore of entering the quarterfinals. This miserable standing, however, hasn't stoppedimport Akeem Wright from wanting to return to the PBA for another go around Wright said he'd be happy to return to the Philippines be it with Columbian or any other team that wants him. "The losing has been frustrating, but overall my experience has been great," said Wright after the Dyip's 100-84 win over playoff hopeful Rain or Shine on Friday. "Just the way you guys have been with the media coverage, how all the fans love the basketball over here." "Everyone's been so nice to me. My experie...Keep on reading: Despite Columbian’s frustrating losses, Akeem Wright wants to return to PBA.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

The restlessness of love

THERE’S an undeniable restlessness when we are truly in love. With love, we cannot afford to remain idle and passive. Love will always set us on fire, making us fervent, passionate, driven, zealous. No difficulty or problem can stop it. Boredom has no place in love. Love will always find a way around obstacles. Love […] The post The restlessness of love appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

PBA: Despite frustrations, Wright would love to come Philippines another shot

ANTIPOLO CITY, Rizal --- Akeem Wright has never experienced a long losing skid in his basketball career and if you ask him, his maiden PBA stint shouldn't have started with nine straight losses. Wright and the Columbian Dyip finally scored a win in the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup, beating Rain or Shine Friday at the Ynares Center here. The victory pushed Columbian to 1-9 in the season-ending conference but Wright argues that the Dyip could have done better if some early games had gone their way and not resulted in some very close losses. "0-9? No. Never. This is my first time," Wright said when asked if he's in this situation before in his career. "But there's a lot of young guys you know, you can go to the games we lost earlier. We were up 15 against Meralco, we up nine on NLEX in the third quarter, it's stuff like that you can look back on and say we were there. My personal feeling is we should have broke that streak [earlier]. There's a lot of games that I wish we have back but we can't. Even though we lost a lot of games I felt we continued to play hard," he added. Despite a rough outing in the PBA, Wright says he would love to come back. If Columbian wants him back for next season, Akeem is there. If not, he's fine with joining another team as long as he gets to have another shot in the Philippines. "The losing has been frustrating but overall my experience has been great," he said. "My experience has been great, if Columbian would want me back, I would love to come back. If not maybe another team, we'll see but I would love to come back," Wright added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

Aga Muhlach’s love advice to kids: ‘Don’t look at whether a person is rich or poor’

Aga Muhlach advised his children to not look at wealth and social status when choosing the person they'll love. Fresh from his latest romantic film "First Love," which earned P6.4 million on its first day, the actor and father of three was asked about his opinions when it came to the love life of his children in the Sept. 18 episode of "Tonight with Boy Abunda." Specifically, host Abunda asked how Muhlach would react if his daughter Atasha finally fell in love. The actor confidently replied, "I'm okay. Na-practice ko na yan. Life has a way of teaching you these things." Muchlach also shared the advice he gave Atasha and son Andres when it came to choosing their future mates:...Keep on reading: Aga Muhlach’s love advice to kids: ‘Don’t look at whether a person is rich or poor’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

Olynyk s putback off Wade s miss lifts Heat past Wiz 113-112

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Kelly Olynyk’s putback of Dwyane Wade’s missed jumper produced the go-ahead basket with 0.2 seconds left Thursday night (Friday, PHL time), lifting the Miami Heat to a ragged 113-112 comeback victory over the Washington Wizards, who were without new center Dwight Howard for their season opener. 🚨GAME WINNER ALERT🚨@KellyOlynyk puts the Wizards away! pic.twitter.com/Euoik9BCIq — Miami HEAT (@MiamiHEAT) October 19, 2018 Olynyk was booed every time he touched the ball, on account of a past playoff fracas with the Wizards back when he was with the Boston Celtics. But he certainly got to enjoy the way this game ended, after Miami trailed by as many as nine points. Josh Richardson led Miami with 28 points, Rodney McGruder added 20, and the Heat hit consecutive three's late in the fourth quarter. With Howard sidelined by a sore backside, the Wizards were led by old standby John Wall, who delivered 26 points and nine assists. He and fellow All-Star guard Bradley Beal, who scored 20 points, accounted for Washington’s last eight points. But with a 112-111 lead, Wall missed a 26-foot pull-up jumper, giving Miami a chance. Wade’s shot with about three seconds left was off the mark, but Olynyk grabbed the rebound and his layup won it. The Heat were playing on the second night of a back-to-back — they lost at Orlando on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) — and Wade appeared in both games, scoring nine each night. He shot a combined 7 for 24. Wizards coach Scott Brooks put an emphasis on pleading with his players to shoot more three's this season. Didn’t work. At least not in Game 1. Washington was only 7-for-26 from beyond the arc. Wall led the way with 18 points as Washington went into halftime ahead 59-58. And after Miami briefly went up in the third quarter, the Wizards used a 10-point run midway through the period to enter the fourth with an 89-85 edge. They couldn’t hold on. TIP-INS Heat: Coach Eric Spoelstra was asked about Wade, 36, appearing in both ends of a back-to-back to open the season. “Right now, it’s Game 2. He wants to play. We want him to play,” Spoelstra said. “And he’s in great shape, he feels good, so he’s able to go.” ... G Wayne Ellington (ankle) was active but did not play. Wizards: Ian Mahnimi started for Howard, but picked up his fourth foul 15 seconds into the third quarter. By quarter’s end, four Wizards — three starters — each had four personal fouls. ... F Kelly Oubre Jr. was the first substitute used by Washington, entering for Otto Porter Jr. midway through the first quarter. TOLIVER’S DEBUT WNBA All-Star Kristi Toliver made her regular-season debut as an assistant coach on Scott Brooks’ staff. “I love her. Our staff loves her. Our players feel the same way,” Brooks said. “She adds value to our program. She’s very talented. She loves the game. She’s passionate. And she wants to learn. She has this incredible desire to get better.” NO HOWARD This was the first game Howard missed for a health reason since the 2016-17 season. He appeared in 81 of 82 games last season with Charlotte, missing one because of a suspension. “He’s getting close,” Brooks said. “We just don’t feel like he’s quite there yet. Like I said a few weeks ago, we’re in no rush. We just want to make sure that he’s comfortable — we’re comfortable — going forward.” UP NEXT Heat: Host Charlotte on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) in their home opener. Wizards: Host Toronto on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) in a rematch from last season’s playoffs. The Raptors eliminated the Wizards in the first round......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

How Andi has found the ‘best version’ of herself

It's fun to fall in love on an island," a sun-kissed Andi Eigenmann gushed about her "unexpected" romance with Siargao-based surfing champ Philmar Alipayo. "It's paradise!"   The 28-year-old actress, who has been dividing her time between Manila and the scenic Siargao Island, related that one of the things she admired most about her boyfriend was that he inspired her to be the "best version" of herself.   "That was what really captured my heart. He showed me that I could live my life, be young and free and, at the same time, nurture my relationship with my daughter (Ellie). I'm with someone who supports me," she told reporters at a recent press conference for th...Keep on reading: How Andi has found the ‘best version’ of herself.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018

Rami Malek rocks as Freddie Mercury in ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’

LOS ANGELES---Rami Malek did it. The Freddie Mercury role he passionately pursued is done. And the verdict? He absolutely rocks as the Queen's flamboyant lead singer in "Bohemian Rhapsody."   Onstage and off, but especially when he's performing the Queen's rock anthems, Rami succeeds in capturing the dynamism and stage presence of Freddie. Especially in the film's recreation of the band's rousing performance in "Live Aid." The film begins and ends with that 1985 benefit concert at the Wembley Stadium.   Chronicling the years from the Queen's formation to "Live Aid," "Bohemian Rhapsody" also dramatizes Freddie's relationship with his family, bisexuality (his love...Keep on reading: Rami Malek rocks as Freddie Mercury in ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018