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Black tallies triple-double to tow Quezon City to maiden win in MPBL

Aaron Black gave his 100 percent and got himself a triple-double as Quezon City made quick work of Laguna, 110-85, Tuesday at Navotas Sports Complex. Black, a part of Ateneo de Manila University's back-to-back championships, made his presence felt anywhere and everywhere with 17 points, 11 rebounds, and 10 assists as well as two blocks and a steal. He definitely wasn't alone, however, as Clark Derige top-scored with 24 points while both Tonino Gonzaga and Ramon Mabayo had 17 markers in the Capitals' bounce back win following a loss to open the MPBL Lakan Cup. Still, the son of ex-Best Import and now-head coach Norman "Mr. 100 percent" Black was the shining star for Quezon City which did not trail and was never threatened. Mark Anthony Acosta fronted the effort for the Heroes with 18 points which were far from enough from preventing back-to-back losses to start the season. Meanwhile, the matchup between home team Navotas and Rizal was called off at halftime after the court was deemed dangerous to keep playing on. The Clutch were ahead of the Crusaders, 56-39, after two quarters before league officials decided to postpone the match as the floor became too moist. The second half of the game will instead be played on the last day of the elimination round. In the day's other game, General Santos rose to 2-1 after keeping Marikina winless in three games with a 96-89 decision......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: Sports15 hr. 38 min. ago Related News

LOOK: Per-team results of the 2019 NBA Draft

Check out the 2019 NBA Draft results, broken down by team: (Results include trades that have not yet been officially announced) EASTERN CONFERENCE ATLANTA HAWKS R1P4 De'Andre Hunter (from LA Lakers, via New Orleans Pelicans) R1P10 Cam Reddish (from Dallas Mavericks) R2P4 Bruno Fernando (from CHI via LAL, PHI) BOSTON CELTICS R1P14 Romeo Langford (from Sacramento Kings via Philadelphia 76ers) R1P22 Grant Williams R2P3 Carsen Edwards (from CLE via NYK, ORL, and PHI) R2P21 Tremont Waters CHICAGO BULLS R1P7 Coby White R2P8 Daniel Gafford (from MEM) CHARLOTTE HORNETS R1P12 PJ Washington Jr. R2P6 Cody Martin (from WAS via ATL, DEN and ORL) R2P22 Jalen McDaniels (from OKC) BROOKLYN NETS R2P1 Nicholas Claxton (from NYK via PHI) R2P26 Jaylen Hands (from POR via ORL, DET, and LAC) CLEVELAND CAVALIERS R1P5 Darius Garland R1P26 Dylan Windler (from Houston Rockets) R1P30 Kevin Porter Jr. (from Milwaukee Bucks, via Detroit Pistons) MIAMI HEAT R1P13 Tyler Herro R2P2 KZ Okpala (from PHO, via IND) NEW YORK KNICKS R1P3 RJ Barrett R2P17 Ignas Brazdeikis (from ORL via NYK and SAC) DETROIT PISTONS R1P15 Sekou Doumbouya R2P7 Deividas Sirvydis (from DAL) R2P27 Jordan Bone (from DEN via MIL, ATL, PHI) ORLANDO MAGIC R1P16 Chuma Okeke PHILADELPHIA 76ERS R1P20 Mattise Thybulle (from LA Clippers and Memphis Grizzlies, via Boston Celtics) R2P24 Marial Shayok INDIANA PACERS R1P18 Goga Bitadze WASHINGTON WIZARDS R1P9 Rui Hatchimura R2P12 Admiral Schofield (from SAC via MIL, BKN and PHI) TORONTO RAPTORS R2P29 Dewan Hernandez MILWAUKEE BUCKS None WESTERN CONFERENCE DALLAS MAVERICKS R2P15 Isaiah Roby (from DET via OKC and BOS) DENVER NUGGETS R2P14 Bol Bol (from CHA via ATL and MIA) GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS R1P28 Jordan Poole R2P9 Alen Smailagic (from NOP) R2P11 Eric Paschall (from LAL via IND, CLE and ATL) HOUSTON ROCKETS None MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES R1P6 Jarret Culver (via Phoenix Suns) R2P13 Jaylen Nowell (from MIA via CHA) LA CLIPPERS R1P27 Mfiondu Kabengele (from Denver Nuggets, via Brooklyn Nets) R2P18 Terrence Mann MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES R1P2 Ja Morant R1P21 Brandon Clarke (via Oklahoma City Thunder) OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER R1P23 Darius Bazely LA LAKERS R2P16 Talen Horton-Tucker (from BKN via CHA, MEM, and ORL) NEW ORLEANS PELICANS R1P1 Zion Williamson R1P8 Jaxson Hayes (via Atlanta Hawks) R1P17 Nickel Alexander-Walker (from Brooklyn Nets via Atlanta Hawks) R2P5 Marcus Louzada Silva (from ATL) PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS R1P25 Nassir Little PHOENIX SUNS R1P11 Cameron Johnson (from Minnesota Timberwolves) R1P24 Ty Jerome (from Philadelphia 76ers via Boston Celtics) SAN ANTONIO SPURS R1P19 Luka Samanic R1P29 Keldon Johnson (from Toronto Raptors) R2P19 Quinndary Weatherspoon UTAH JAZZ R2P20 Jarrell Brantley (from IND) R2P23 Justin Wright-Foreman R2P28 Miye One (from GSW) SACRAMENTO KINGS R2P10 Justin James (from MIN via CLE and POR) R2P25 Kyle Guy (from HOU via NYK) R2P30 Vanja Marinkovic (from MIL).....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 21st, 2019Related News

The ten most intriguing NBA free agents for 2019

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com We knew that the postseason would affect free agency. But the idea was that the success or failure of certain teams would affect what their free agents' thoughts about staying or leaving. Unfortunately, the last two games of The Finals brought devastating injuries to two of the three most coveted free agents on the market. Kevin Durant, arguably the best player in the world, tore his Achilles in Game 5, just 12 minutes into his return from a calf injury. And Klay Thompson tore his ACL in Game 6. The two injuries will certainly have repercussions beyond the two players and the Golden State Warriors. Maybe they already have. With the Western Conference seemingly wide open next season, the Los Angeles Lakers have reportedly made a deal for Anthony Davis, sending a bevy of young players and future picks to New Orleans so they can team the 26-year-old star with 34-year-old LeBron James ... and maybe another star added in free agency. As always, the free agent market and the trade market are tied together. The pending Davis trade could affect the decisions of players and teams come July 1. And if teams miss out on the free agents they're seeking, they could always fill their cap space by making a trade. With all that in mind, the players listed below aren't necessarily the 10 best free agents (or potential free agents). They're the 10 (actually 12) most interesting in regard to where they're going and what kind of contract they get. For players to be on this list, there needs to be some intrigue regarding their (and/or their team's) decision this summer. That's why Thompson isn't included. 1. Kawhi Leonard, Toronto (Player option) Whether he leaves or not, trading for Leonard last summer was well worth it for the Raptors, who won their first championship, with Leonard averaging 30.5 points per game in the postseason. The Raptors' "load management" program (which limited Leonard to just 60 games in the regular season) clearly worked, and director of sports science Alex McKechnie should be seen as a major asset in the quest to keep Leonard in Toronto. There should be a "run-it-back" sentiment for the new champs, with Danny Green also a free agent and Marc Gasol holding a player option this summer. A short-term deal would make sense, unless Leonard is looking for long-term security, having missed almost all of the 2017-18 season with a leg injury. It's all up to Leonard, maybe the toughest player in the league to read. If he takes his two-way talent elsewhere, the Raptors may have to go in a new direction. Number to know: In the postseason, Leonard had a true shooting percentage of 69.1 percent, the highest mark for a player that averaged at least 30 points per game in the playoffs and won the championship. 2. Kevin Durant, Golden State (Player option) Durant's torn Achilles probably won't scare any team, including the Warriors, from paying him as much as possible. As deep and talented as this free agent class is, the top two guys on this list are in a class by themselves. Rumors have long had Durant ready to leave Golden State and even with his injury, he seems more likely than Thompson to find a new home. But an ESPN report had Thompson's father talking about "unfinished business" after overhearing a conversation between the two injured Warriors. Durant could always put free agency off for a year by exercising his player option and remaining on the Warriors' payroll through his rehab. Number to know: Durant was the first player in NBA history to average 30 points per game in at least 10 playoff games while shooting at least 50 percent from the field, 40 percent from three-point range and 90 percent from the free throw line. 3. Kyrie Irving, Boston The disappointment of the Celtics' season, along with Irving's questionable leadership with a group that underachieved, has taken some of the shine off his star. Irving's injury history also must be taken into consideration. But talent is the most important thing in this league and Irving is one of its most talented players. He's still just 27-years-old and he can still get buckets when buckets are needed. A return to Boston appears far less likely than it did six months ago (especially with Davis being traded elsewhere) and there have been a lot of signals that Irving is bound for Brooklyn. Number to know: In the regular season, Irving had an effective field goal percentage of 56.1 percent with the score within five points in the last five minutes of the fourth quarter or overtime, the second-best mark among player with at least 50 clutch field goal attempts. 4. Jimmy Butler and Tobias Harris, Philadelphia The Sixers lost to the eventual NBA champions on a Game 7 buzzer-beater that bounced on the rim four times before falling through. They're right there. But their starting lineup, which outscored its opponents by more than 21 points per 100 possessions in 334 total minutes (regular season and playoffs), includes three free agents. In regard to future assets, the Sixers didn't give up as much for Butler as they did for Harris. And of course, Butler has more baggage in regard to accepting his role. But, with his defense and his ability to get his own shot, he's is the most important of the three. Harris struggled a bit in the conference semifinals against Toronto and is the least important of the Sixers' three free-agent starters; J.J. Redick's shooting was clearly more critical in the postseason. But Harris isn't easily replaceable and he appears to be the most likely to leave, with a lot of teams looking for versatile forwards. Number to know: In the regular season, Harris shot 41.3 percent on pull-up three-pointers, the second-best mark among 69 players who attempted at least 100. 5. Kemba Walker, Charlotte Walker has expressed some level of loyalty to the Hornets. But immediately after the Davis trade was agreed to, there was a report that Walker would be a "top target" of the Lakers with their cap space. Walker would be an ideal offensive complement to James and Davis, in that he can play off the ball (though he shot less than 35 percent on catch-and-shoot three-pointers last season) and take some of the playmaking burden off of James' shoulders. The Hornets, meanwhile, would likely have a tough time upgrading their roster around Walker, with Nicolas Batum, Bismack Biyombo, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Marvin Williams and Cody Zeller all under contract next season for a total of $85 million. Number to know: Walker led the league with 126 field goal attempts with the score within five points in the last five minutes. That was 43 percent of the Hornets' total (295). His effective field goal percentage on those shots (49.6 percent) ranked 15th among 45 players with at least 50 clutch field goal attempts. 6. D'Angelo Russell, Brooklyn (Restricted) A finalist for the Most Improved award, Russell took a big step forward this season, both in regard to his production and his maturity. He earned himself an All-Star appearance and helped the Nets reach the playoffs with a 14-win increase from last season. He's only 23-years-old and is one of the league's most flammable shooters. But because he doesn't get to the basket or the free throw line very often, Russell is neither all that efficient (his true shooting percentage of 53.3 percent ranked 66th among 94 guards with at least 500 field goal attempts) nor consistent, and he struggled (shooting 36 percent) in Brooklyn's first-round loss to Philadelphia. If the Nets are targeting another ball-handler in free agency (with Caris LeVert and Spencer Dinwiddie already under contract), they'll probably let Russell head elsewhere. Number to know: In the regular season, Russell ranked second with 11.4 pick-and-roll ball-handler possessions per game. He scored 0.89 points per possession as a pick-and-roll ball-handler, the 26th best mark among 44 players that averaged at least five ball-handler possessions. 7. DeMarcus Cousins and Kevon Looney, Golden State Cousins hadn't made it back to 100 percent from his Achilles tear before he suffered a torn quad in his second career playoff game. He made it back for The Finals from that injury and showed flashes of his old self with 14 important points in the Warriors' Game 5 win and a big bucket in the final minute of Game 6. But he also struggled on both ends of the floor at times, and the Warriors were outscored with him on the floor in seven of his eight playoff games. Now he goes back on the free agent market with teams still not sure of what they're getting. Looney is an unrestricted free agent at 23-years-old, and he was the Warriors' most important center this season. The Western Conference champs have Looney's Bird rights, but they could also be spending a lot of money to retain Durant and Thompson (and possibly extend Draymond Green). Another team might have a larger role and more money for an improving young big. Number to know: In the regular season, the Warriors' lineup of Curry, Thompson, Durant, Green and Looney scored 121.5 points per 100 possessions and outscored opponents by 18.7 per 100. Those were the best marks for points scored and point differential per 100 possessions among 40 league-wide lineups that played at least 200 minutes together. 8. Malcolm Brogdon, Milwaukee (Restricted) The Milwaukee Bucks were the best team in the league through the first two games of the Eastern Conference finals. But, with four of their top eight players being free agents (or potential free agents) this summer, they have a lot of work to do if they want to keep Giannis Antetokounmpo surrounded by players who can get it done on both ends of the floor. Brogdon, Khris Middleton and Brook Lopez are the three key pieces. They're all due a pay raise and they all belong on this list. Brogdon is the restricted free agent, but he's also the youngest of the three (he'll be 27 in December) and the one that could be projected into a larger role on another team. Number to know: Brogdon shot 47.5 percent on catch-and-shoot three-pointers, the third-best mark among 223 players who attempted at least 100. 9. Julius Randle, New Orleans (Player option) After five years in the league, Randle is still just 24-years-old. So he's not necessarily a bad fit for David Griffin's plans for the future in New Orleans. But the Pelicans might not be ready to commit the money Randle is seeking (should he opt out of the final year of his contract) after averaging a career-high 21.4 points per game. Defense remains an issue, but Randle has expanded his offensive skill set; he was a respectable 34.4 percent from three-point range this season, taking 18 percent of his shots from beyond the arc (up from six percent over his three previous full seasons). Number to know: Randle averaged 13.2 points in the paint per game, seventh most in the league, and he made more three-pointers (67) than all but one of the six players in front of him. 10. Ricky Rubio, Utah According to Rubio himself, he's not Utah's top priority in free agency. He remains a good defender and one of the league's best passers, but the Jazz need to get more potent offensively if they're going to take the next step. At 31.1 percent, Rubio ranked 153rd in three-point percentage among 163 players with at least 200 attempts. There could be as many as 10 teams (not including the Jazz) in need of a starting point guard this summer, and Rubio could have more value on a team more in need of a distributor. Number to know: The Jazz were 5.8 points per 100 possessions better offensively with both Rubio and Donovan Mitchell on the floor (scoring 110.4 per 100) than they were with Mitchell on the floor without Rubio (104.6). John Schuhmann is a senior stats analyst for NBA.com. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 17th, 2019Related News

Ayala Land Premier pioneers prestigious office development in Quezon City

Luxury developer Ayala Land Premier breaks new ground and blazes a new trail with One Vertis Plaza, their first ever office project......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsJun 13th, 2019Related News

Trail Blazers guard Lillard wins NBA Citizenship Award

    NEW YORK, USA – Portland Trail Blazers guard Damian Lillard, a seven-year NBA veteran, was named Wednesday, June 12, as this year's J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award winner by the Professional Basketball Writers Association. The media panel annually awards the honor, named for a former NBA commissioner, to an NBA player, ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsJun 13th, 2019Related News

Even being injured, Durant leads free-agent pack

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — This was already going to be a summer filled with fireworks in the NBA. Nothing has changed. Kevin Durant’s Achilles injury, the severity of which isn’t yet confirmed, means he probably won’t be able to play much — if any — next season. But this is a testament to how much he overshadows much of the NBA landscape: Durant will still likely dictate how the free-agency dominoes fall this summer. Durant could exercise his $31.5 million player option and stay with the Warriors, and that’s likely going to be his worst-case financial scenario. He could opt out and sign a longer deal to stay in the Bay. Or he could opt out, sign elsewhere and start collecting massive checks from either the New York Knicks or Brooklyn Nets or Los Angeles Clippers or someone else. Kyrie Irving’s decision could hinge on what Durant does. Kawhi Leonard’s decision could be affected by what Durant does. How the Knicks, Nets, Clippers, Dallas Mavericks, Los Angeles Lakers, Atlanta Hawks and all the other teams who have cap space will start spending their money on June 30 ... it all will be determined, at least on some level, by what Durant does. If he stays in Golden State, that’s more money for everyone else. If he hits the open market, it’ll be about what team wants to gamble. Here’s a tip to those teams that wanted Durant before he got hurt again in Game 5 of the NBA Finals. If the opportunity presents itself, sign him. Free agency usually isn’t about just one year. It’s about the long haul. Durant is only 30-years-old. He’s not a high-flyer who plays above the rim all the time. He’s not a plodding big man. He’s not someone with a lot of gray in the goatee. He’s a world-class scorer and jump-shooter in his prime. A year from now, if the recovery from the Achilles injury indeed takes that long, he’ll be far from over the hill. “This is a devastating injury for a basketball player, but Durant can return to be the same or very close,” Dr. David Chao, a longtime NFL team physician, practicing orthopedic surgeon and now a sports medical analyst with a large following wrote Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “This does not mark his downfall as an elite player.” In the short term, it just means Durant’s NBA Finals are over. Game 6 is Thursday night (Friday, PHL time), and the Warriors trail the Toronto Raptors 3-2 in the title series. In the long term, it might mean so much more — including the possibility that his time playing for Golden State is over. Achilles recoveries for basketball players have typically taken about a full year. Even if it turns out to be a partial tear, it’s still a tear. Some team was going to pay Durant a lot of money in 2019-20 and some team still will, probably without the immediate on-court services of perhaps the best player in the world in return. The first decision is the medical course of action. The financial course of action will be decided soon after. All will not be lost next season for the team that has Durant on its roster. That team will apply for, and get, a disabled player exception that will allow them to sign someone else for probably about $9 million and not have that count toward the team’s cap. That player won’t be of Durant’s caliber, because so few players are. But a year or so later, the team would have Durant. There’s risk with any signing. And signing any player that will command so much of a team’s salary cap while facing a grueling rehab would seem particularly risky. “He’s going to come back stronger though,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said. “That’s the kind of fighter he is.” The Nets swung a trade earlier this month to clear enough cap space for two max contracts this summer — and there’s no doubt that they would love Durant to take one of those spots, possibly alongside Irving. The Knicks have been mentioned as a hopeful in the Durant sweepstakes for months. The Clippers were expected to make a pitch for him as well. The Warriors surely want to keep him. The chatter about Durant’s injury indicates it’s all a mystery now, although it really shouldn’t be. Players have made comebacks off Achilles surgery, with relative levels of success. DeMarcus Cousins, Kobe Bryant, and Rudy Gay all came back; Cousins hasn’t regained past form yet. Dominique Wilkins had an Achilles tear happen to him at the peak of his career and he arguably was good as ever afterward. Elton Brand, now leading the Philadelphia 76ers’ front office, had it as a player and said he was never the same. Christian Laettner went from a star to a role player when his Achilles ripped. “I’ve been there,” 15-time golf major winner Tiger Woods said Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) at the U.S. Open. “I’ve had it to my own Achilles. I’ve had it to my own back. I know what it feels like. It’s an awful feeling. And no one can help you. That’s the hard part.” Woods fought his way back toward the top of his sport, and is the reigning Masters champion. Durant isn’t going to let an Achilles injury end his reign as one of the game’s best. Teams would be foolish to think otherwise. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 12th, 2019Related News

Bikers clean up Banat-I trails For World Environment Day

When most of the people took more time in their cozy beds on the early hours of June 5, it being a holiday, mountain bikers were already on the trails of Tagbilaran City’s cross country trail training site, spare gloves on the ready, for the World Environment Day Banat-I clean-up. While the government declared June […].....»»

Source: Boholnewsdaily BoholnewsdailyCategory: NewsJun 10th, 2019Related News

In big trouble: Warriors trail Raptors 3-1 in NBA Finals

OAKLAND, Calif.: The biggest challenge of this five-year run for the Golden State Warriors has arrived. Win three in a row, two of them on the road — or else….READ The post In big trouble: Warriors trail Raptors 3-1 in NBA Finals appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Source: Manilatimes_net Manilatimes_netCategory: NewsJun 8th, 2019Related News

In big trouble: Warriors trail Raptors 3-1 in NBA Finals

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The biggest challenge of this five-year run for the Golden State Warriors has arrived. Win three in a row, two of them on the road — or else. It is quite the predicament, and one that they’ve never faced in the NBA Finals. Golden State is on the brink of being dethroned as champions, after a 105-92 loss to the Toronto Raptors on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) put the Warriors in a 3-1 hole in this title series. Game 5 is Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) in Toronto, which will spend the next three days in delirious anticipation of seeing the Larry O’Brien Trophy getting hoisted on Canadian soil. “It’s not over,” Warriors guard Stephen Curry said. “It’s not a good feeling right now, obviously, but we have been on both sides of it. And for us it’s an opportunity for us to just flip this whole series on its head, and you got to do it one game at a time. It sounds cliché — and for us that is literally the only way we’re going to get back in this series — is give everything we got for 48 minutes, everybody that sets foot on that floor in Game 5.” They’ve been down 3-1 before, back in 2016 in the Western Conference finals against Kevin Durant and Oklahoma City. But they needed to win only once on the road to pull off that comeback. “You just try to win one game,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “That’s what we did a few years ago against OKC. Win one game, and then you move forward. So that’s our focus now. We’ll fly to Toronto (on Sunday, PHL time) and take a look at the film, see what we can do better and try to win a game. We have won a lot of games over the years, so we’ll try to win another one.” Kerr is fond of saying that the Warriors have seen everything in these five seasons. They have now, anyway. They’ve blown a 3-1 lead — the 2016 NBA Finals against Cleveland, falling twice at home in that collapse. But the Warriors’ collapse that year was due in part to Andrew Bogut getting hurt in Game 5 and Draymond Green losing his cool and earning a one-game suspension. The Raptors have no such injury concerns, no such behavioral matters to deal with right now. “They’re a great team,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said. They’ve rallied from 3-1 down. But they’re 1-5 against the Raptors this season, and now need to win three in a row against a team that has had all the answers against them. “We haven’t done anything yet,” Raptors guard Kyle Lowry said. The Raptors are as poised as can be. They were in trouble in each of the first three rounds of these playoffs — down 1-0 to Orlando, down 2-1 to Philadelphia, down 2-0 to Milwaukee. It steeled them. Toronto got better every step of the way. Golden State looked the exact opposite on Friday night. The Warriors are still without Kevin Durant, endured a night where Curry struggled, and where their biggest boosts came from Thompson returning from a balky hamstring and Kevon Looney playing through the pain of a cartilage injury in his upper body. The Warriors made a run. Curry’s three-pointer with three minutes left pulled Golden State within eight and gave the Warriors a chance. They scored three points the rest of the way. “You got to win three games in a row,” Warriors forward Draymond Green said. “We have won three games in a row before. However you got to get that done, you just got to get it done.” They may have walked off the court at Oracle Arena for the last time, with the team moving across the bay to San Francisco and the brand-new Chase Center next season. They know the stakes, they know that the roster may change in some big ways this summer and nobody knows if Durant will be ready for Game 5. Kerr said he doesn’t think of this as daunting. “We go to Toronto, and this is what we do for a living, we play basketball,” Kerr said. “So we look forward to playing another basketball game in an exciting atmosphere, and the ultimate test.”.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 8th, 2019Related News

In big trouble: Warriors trail Raptors, 3-1

OAKLAND, California  — Golden State coach Steve Kerr is fond of saying that the Warriors have seen everything in their five-year run as the best team in the NBA. They are now looking at something they haven’t faced before. They’ve successfully overcome a 3-1 deficit in the playoffs before — but never in the NBA […] The post In big trouble: Warriors trail Raptors, 3-1 appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: NewsJun 8th, 2019Related News

ONE Championship: Geje Eustaquio hopes to see teammate Danny Kingad become a champion

It wasn’t too long ago that Team Lakay’s Geje “Gravity” Eustaquio was on top of the ONE Championship flyweight  landscape.   In 2018, the Filipino striker defeated Kairat Akhmetov and Adriano Moraes - the division’s only other titleholders - on his way to becoming the ONE Flyweight World Champion.   Eustaquio’s reign came to a halt at the start of 2019 however, when he dropped the title back to Moraes in a trilogy match in Manila that saw the Brazilian grappler score a unanimous decision win after five rounds.   While many believed that Eustaquio deserved to win the bout, himself and his Team Lakay stablemate included, as the saying goes, “it is what it is.”   Now, Eustaquio is on the comeback trail and has bounced back with a unanimous decision win over South Korean newcomer Kim Kyu Sung at ONE: Enter The Dragon in Singapore and is hoping to once again regain his spot at the pinnacle of the division.   While the 30-year old is working his way back up, he is also helping his teammate and fellow flyweight contender Danny “The King” Kingad make it to the top as well.   The 22-year old Kingad is currently in the semifinals of fhe ONE Flyweight World Grand Prix and is set to face a familiar opponent in Akhmetov.   Eustaquio hopes that young stablemate can mirror what he did to defeat the Kazakh wrestler.   “For now, yung bata is hungry, and the skills we are working on, we are working with his distance right now, para if we can duplicate the things I did the last time that we fought for the interim title,” Eustaquio shared. “Hopefully magagawa din niya yun and we will have the same result.”   “So basically, ang ginagawa namin now, in terms of kay Danny is the distance and the timing,” Eustaquio added.   Kingad is two wins away from becoming the Flyweight World Grand Prix champion and is two wins away from once again challenging Moraes for the title, and fully behind him is Eustaquio and the rest of Team Lakay. Eustaquio is hopeful to see his teammate also become a champion in the in the biggest martial arts promotion in the world.   “We talk about it as a family here, and we encourage each and every one. We motivate him na don’t stop training, you have to keep grinding, you’re close to your goals or your dream to become a world champion, because I believe they’re going to give a belt to the Grand Prix, the Grand Prix Champion has a belt.”   “It’s a title, and it’s every athlete’s dream to become a World Champion, and he’s almost there. Two wins, and he’ll also be considered as a titleholder or a World Champion. Hopefully, he will work his ass off and he will have the right attitude in this competition,” Eustaquio continued.  .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 7th, 2019Related News

Raptors regain Finals lead, survive Curry flurry in Game 3

By Janie McCauley, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Kawhi Leonard, Danny Green and Kyle Lowry kept finding answers for every big shot by Stephen Curry and the beat-up Warriors, and the Toronto Raptors grabbed a pivotal road win in the NBA Finals by beating Golden State 123-109 on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) for a 2-1 series lead. Curry scored a playoff career-best 47 points to go with eight rebounds and seven assists, but couldn't do it all for the two-time defending champions, down starters Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson and key backup big man Kevon Looney because of injuries. Leonard scored 30 points, Lowry contributed 23 with five three-pointers and Green had 18 points with six triples after Pascal Siakam got the Raptors rolling early as Toronto shot 52.4% and made 17 from deep. Splash Brother Thompson missed his first career playoff game after straining his left hamstring late in Game 2, while Looney is out the rest of the series after a cartilage fracture on his right side near the collarbone that also happened Sunday (Monday, PHL time). Durant, a two-time reigning NBA Finals MVP, is still out because of a strained right calf. Golden State hopes to get healthier by Game 4 on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) back at Oracle Arena. The Warriors trailed 96-83 going into the final quarter then Curry's three free throws at 10:37 made it a seven-point game before back-to-back baskets by Serge Ibaka. Siakam scored 18 points and established the momentum for Toronto from the tip, hitting his first three shots and setting a tone for a defensive effort that stayed solid without the foul problems that plagued the Raptors in Game 2. Golden State greatly missed not only Thompson's touch from outside but also his stifling defense. Raptors coach Nick Nurse challenged his team to produce more defensive stops in order to get out in transition — "make them miss more," he said. Ibaka produced six blocked shots in the effort. "We're at a point in the series we've got to get out and guard these dudes," Nurse said. Curry shot 14-for-31 including 6-of-14 on three's while making 13-of-14 free throws in his sixth career 40-point playoff performance. Nurse pulled out a box-and-one to try to stymie Curry in Golden State's 109-104 Game 2 win, then the Raptors made Curry's short-handed supporting cast try to beat them this time — and it sure worked. TIP-INS Raptors: All five Toronto starters scored in double digits and Fred VanVleet added 11 off the bench. ... The Raptors began 10-for-14 and scored 12 early points in the paint. .. Former Warriors G Patrick McCaw, who departed after last season in contract dispute, drew boos from the crowd when he checked into the game late in the first. Warriors: Curry's 17 first-quarter points matched his most in the period for the postseason. He also did so on April 27, 2014, against the Clippers. ... In the first half, Curry was 4-of-8 from three-point range, the rest of the Warriors just 1-for-11. ... Draymond Green's streak of double-doubles ended at a career-best six games. A 12th overall this postseason would match Denver's Nikola Jokic for most in the 2019 playoffs. ... Tim Hardaway from the Warriors' "Run TMC" era attended the game. WARRIORS INJURIES Durant went through extensive workouts both Tuesday and Wednesday (Wednesday and Thursday, PHL time) at the practice facility with the hope he would do some scrimmaging Thursday (Friday, PHL time). While the Warriors weren't scheduled for a regular practice Thursday (Friday, PHL time), coach Steve Kerr said some of the coaches and younger players might be called upon to give Durant the full-speed court work he still needs before being medically cleared to return. He missed his eighth straight game since the injury May 8 (May 9, PHL time) in Game 5 of the Western Conference semifinals against the Rockets. Thompson was hurt in Game 2 on Sunday (Monday, PHL time) and was to be evaluated by the training staff before tipoff. He didn't end up warming up on the court. Thompson did some running and shooting earlier in the day but Kerr said the Warriors weren't going to play him "if there's risk" of further damage at this stage of the series. Thompson is averaging 19.5 points, 4.0 rebounds and 2.1 assists this postseason, including 23.0 points through the first two finals games. He will have another full day to recover before Game 4. ORACLE OVERDUE The home fans waited 20 days between home playoff games with the long layoff after the Western Conference finals sweep of Portland then Golden State opening the finals in Toronto. It had been since Game 2 against the Trail Blazers on May 16 (May 17, PHL time) that the Warriors hosted — the second-longest lapse between home games since the current 16-game, four-round format was established in 1983. The Warriors hosted a Game 3 in the finals for the first time since winning the 1975 title, having begun at home in each of the previous four......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 6th, 2019Related News

Curry s heroics not enough to save Warriors in Game 3

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Stephen Curry did all he could to lead the injury-depleted Golden State Warriors. It wasn't enough. Curry scored 47 points — a playoff career-high for the three-time champion — but the Warriors still find themselves in some postseason trouble. Missing Klay Thompson, Kevin Durant and Kevon Looney with injuries, the Warriors fell 123-109 to the Toronto Raptors on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) and now trail these NBA Finals 2-1. "Steph was incredible," Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. "The stuff he does is, he does things that honestly I don't think anybody has ever done before. The way he plays the game, the way he shoots it and the combination of his ball handling and shooting skills, it's incredible to watch. He was amazing." Though it's no consolation to Curry, his 47 points were the second-most ever by a player in a finals game loss. The only time someone scored more and wasn't on the winning team that night was LeBron James, who scored 51 points on this same Oracle Arena floor in Game 1 of last year's title series. Golden State wound up sweeping Cleveland. Thompson didn't play because of his strained left hamstring, Looney's season is over because of an upper-body injury sustained in Game 2 and Durant sat out for the eighth consecutive game with a calf injury. Game 4 of this series is Friday (Saturday, PHL time), and it wouldn't be surprising to see both Durant and Thompson back in the lineup for the two-time defending NBA champions. Thompson was lobbying to play Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), and Durant has been ramping up toward a return. The Warriors need them. Or else their reign might end, no matter how great Curry is the rest of the way. "The moment is now," Curry said. "You've got to try to have a next-man-up mentality, like we always say, and just go out and fight. We did that tonight. We can play better, obviously better on the defensive end. But I liked the competitiveness that we had, understanding that we're missing 50 points pretty much between KD and Klay." It was evident from the outset that if the Warriors were going to somehow win without both Thompson and Durant in the lineup, it would be Curry carrying the load. He darn near made it happen. "Not that he's not amazing pretty often," Warriors forward Draymond Green said, "but tonight was a special performance by him." Curry scored Golden State's first five field goals. He had 25 points and eight rebounds by halftime, the first time in his 803-game career that he put up those numbers in the first 24 minutes of a game. Midway through the third quarter, he was outscoring all of his teammates combined. He had his entire arsenal working — three-pointers, layups, free throws. He was diving for loose balls. He even won a jump ball. He conceded nothing. Curry just didn't have enough help. Or, maybe more accurately, the Raptors had too many answers. "We tried to up our presence on him a little bit with some double teams, but it doesn't really matter," Raptors coach Nick Nurse said. "All that matters is ... my dad used to tell me the stats don't matter, just the final score. So we'll just take the win and be thankful for that." All five Toronto starters scored somewhere between 17 and 30 points. The Raptors made 17 three-pointers, Fred VanVleet's desperation triple with just under 2 minutes left put Toronto up by 13, and that's when Kerr decided to empty the bench. Curry's night ended there, with the eighth-highest single-game scoring performance in NBA Finals history. He also had eight rebounds and seven assists, ending with a stat line that only James has done in a finals game. "We fought, but we lost," Curry said. "So we've got to go back to the drawing board and just recalibrate for Game 4.".....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 6th, 2019Related News

CBM 2019 to incorporate paperless system in Entrepreneur’s Summit

  CEBU CITY, Philippines — Living to its mission of supporting Innovation in Action, the Cebu Business Month (CBM) 2019 plans to reduce its paper trail in an effort to embrace digital innovation and transformation among its activities. Kaz Onozawa, Cebu Innovation Expo co-chair, explained that during their Entrepreneurs’ summit and Cebu innovation Expo, a […] The post CBM 2019 to incorporate paperless system in Entrepreneur’s Summit appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: NewsJun 4th, 2019Related News

FEU charges through UAAP rival Adamson in Filoil Preseason

Far Eastern University climbed out of .500 in the standings of the 2019 Filoil Flying V Preseason Tournament with a 66-63 triumph over UAAP rival Adamson University, Monday at Filoil Flying V Centre. Cameroonian big man Patrick Tchuente fueled the fire with 14 points while Ken Tuffin and Hubert Cani chimed in 12 and 11 markers, respectively, for the Tamaraws who got a third consecutive victory following back-to-back losses to begin the preseason. That was more than enough to overcome an off game from rising star L-Jay Gonzales who only had two points from his name in this one. For the Soaring Falcons, Congolese bruiser Lenda Douanga topped the scoring column with 17 points. With Jerrick Ahanmisi misfiring, however, they fell for the fourth time in five games. Meanwhile, Lyceum of the Philippines University unleashed its new secret weapon on an unsuspecting Jose Rizal University for an 86-79 decision. Transferee Jayson David made his presence felt with 16 points while Jaycee Marcelino brought the backup with 13 markers of his own as the Pirates sailed to a 5-1 record. In other results, Emilio Aguinaldo College came out on top of College of St. Benilde, 78-69, for its second win in seven starts. With their respective losses, the Blazers fell to 1-4 and the Heavy Bombers fell to 1-5. FIRST GAME EAC 78 - Maguliano 20, Taywan 14, Mendoza 11, Gurtiza 8, Carlos 8, Dayrit 5, De Guzman 4, Martin 4, Tampoc 2, Cadua 2, Gonzales 0, Estacio 0, Corilla 0, Boffa 0. CSB 69 - Gutang 22, Dixon 15, Flores 7, Pasturan 5, Lim 5, Carlos 4, Javillonar 4, Nayve 4, Naboa 3, Lepalam 0, Young 0. QUARTER SCORES: 13-18, 40-37, 60-51, 78-69 SECOND GAME FEU 66 - Tchuente 14, Tuffin 12, Cani 11, Eboña 6, Torres 6, Nunag 4, Bienes 4, Comboy 3, Dulatre 3, Gonzales 2, Stockton 1, Tempra 0, Celzo 0. ADAMSON 63 - Douanga 17, Lastimosa 10, Fermin 10, Ahanmisi 9, Camacho 6, Manlapaz 5, Bernardo 4, Magbuhos 2, Maata 0, Sabandal 0, Yerro 0, Doria 0, Albason 0. QUARTER SCORES: 13-14, 30-30, 53-45, 66-63 THIRD GAME LPU 86 - David 16, Marcelino JV. 13, Navarro 9, Remulla 9, Marcelino JC. 8, Valdez 7, Guinto 6, Laurente 6, Ibañez 4, Baetiong 4, Santos 2, Tansingco 2. JRU 79 - Dela Virgen 20, Amores 18, Miranda 11, Vasquez 8, Jungco 7, Dionisio 6, Bordon 5, Aguilar 2, Dulalia 2, Delos Santos 0, Arenal 0, Steinl 0, Dela Rosa 0. QUARTER SCORES: 14-25, 37-46, 62-62, 86-79 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 3rd, 2019Related News

EAC bows out of Filoil with huge win over CSB

The Emilio Aguinaldo College Generals ended their Filoil Flying v Preseason Cup stint with a huge 78-69 win over the College of St. Benilde Blazers at the Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsJun 3rd, 2019Related News

Report: Kemba Walker calls Charlotte his first priority

NBA.com staff report Kemba Walker, the heart and soul of the Charlotte Hornets for eight seasons, is expected to receive interest from several teams as he enters free agency this summer. At the moment, Walker does not appear interested in leaving Charlotte. In a recent interview with Jared Weiss of The Athletic, Walker expressed a desire to reach a new deal with the Hornets. “Oh no question, Charlotte’s definitely my first priority,” Walker said. “That’s where I’ve been for eight years and that’s all I know. Not many people get a chance to play for one NBA team throughout their career.” Walker qualified for the supermax extension from the Hornets after making the third-team All-NBA this season, which could pay him more than $220 million over five years. Walker averaged a career-high 25.6 points and 5.9 assists for the Hornets this season while earning his third straight All-Star selection.   Zeller starts lemonade fundraiser One of Walker's teammates, Cody Zeller, is going the extra mile to keep Walker in a Hornets uniform. Zeller posted a picture to his Twitter account of a lemonade stand he set up, one through which he hopes he’ll be able to raise funds to make bringing Walker back more feasible. Only one month until free agency starts in the NBA! Fundraising has already begun though! pic.twitter.com/W0R6KFnXT2 — Cody Zeller (@CodyZeller) June 1, 2019.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 2nd, 2019Related News

Five things we learned from Game 1 of the 2019 Finals

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com TORONTO – Five things we learned from the Toronto Raptors’ 118-109 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 1 of The Finals Thursday (Friday, PHL time) at Scotiabank Arena ... 1. So much for ‘glad to be here’ If we thought we had learned one thing about the Toronto Raptors when it comes to the NBA playoffs, it was this: They back their way into most series. Losing the opener was a tradition for this franchise -- they were 3-15 in Game 1s prior to Thursday (Friday, PHL time), dating back to their inaugural playoff run in 2000. Nothing shoves a team closer to elimination in a best-of-seven showdown than a lousy start. That’s why grabbing the opener against Golden State was so essential. Had the Raptors squandered their home-court advantage on the first night, we all would be assuming the worst for these Finals in competitive, stylistic and entertainment terms. Only by rocking the Warriors in Game 1 -- and most impressively, by refusing to cough up all of their 12-point lead in the second half -- could the Raptors generate legitimate excitement for Game 2 and beyond. Had we all been honest (and able to pull this off), we would have begun this series by spotting Toronto to a 1-0 lead -- just to handicap the defending champions and force them to show us something they haven’t in their four previous Finals trips. But such a move would have been demeaning, of course, to the Raptors. Instead, coach Nick Nurse and his affable newbies seized early control themselves. How Portland looked in the Western Conference finals, as if the Trail Blazers had maxed out and were just happy to still be involved? Toronto wanted none of that. It found a way to win when Kawhi Leonard and Kyle Lowry were ordinary at best. And now we have a series worthy of the Larry O’Brien Trophy. 2. Triple-doubles continue to decline in value It’s fun as a game progresses to track stats, whether it’s Pascal Siakam’s absurd 11 consecutive field goals or Stephen Curry’s refusal to miss a free throw. We’re always aware of the leading scorer and his growing point total, particularly as it passes the big round numbers (30, 40, 50…). But Draymond Green’s latest triple-double was a reminder that the bar has been set too low for that stat from its inception. Green finished with 10 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists, which makes it a minimalist’s triple-double at best and more of a statistical fluke than an achievement. Ten assists? That’s strong any night. Ten rebounds? Solid, and necessary if no one else on your roster is claiming more than six. Ten points, though? Come on now. Green had a Jason Kidd triple-double, which isn’t mean to disparage the Hall of Fame point guard but speaks to Kidd’s limitations as a scorer for most of his career. Heck, the Warriors’ versatile forward had six turnovers, inspiring the bad “quadruple-double watch” that Kidd sparked on occasion. What Green didn’t do was put the ball through the net effectively, shooting 2-for-9 overall and 0-for-2 on three-pointers. Yes, his value to Golden State usually doesn’t rise or fall on his scoring, but he could have been more helpful in that area Thursday. When Oscar Robertson averaged a triple-double in 1961-62 (and cumulatively did it over his first six NBA seasons), he was scoring 30 points per game. When Russell Westbrook matched what had been a rare feat two years ago, he too was up above 30 points nightly. But Westbrook has done it the past two seasons as well, with his scoring average dipping below 23 this season. That would seem to be near the minimum -- say, 20 points -- to gush over a player’s triple-double on a given night. We get it, double figures means 10 or more. But 10 points is no big deal at all in the NBA, so it seems silly to celebrate it when it’s the free rider on the triple-double quirk. 3. Don’t double-dawg dare an NBA player Warriors coach Steve Kerr admitted after Game 1 that, by mistake more than by design, his team didn’t defensively do its job well in the early minutes against center Marc Gasol. “Gasol we left a couple times early in the game and didn't rotate, we just gave him a couple of dare shots and he knocked them down,” Kerr said. Daring is not defending, and the Warriors would be well-advised not to do that again to a player as proud and as accomplished as Gasol. He’s struggled at times as a shooter in these playoffs, shooting 34 percent in the Eastern Conference finals while going 2-for-9 on three-pointers in Games 1 and 2 of that series (both losses). It was embarrassing at times to see the affable 7'1" Spaniard miss shots badly, whether he felt that way or not. But Gasol was 10-for-20 on three-pointers entering The Finals, all during the Raptors’ four consecutive victories to eliminate the Bucks. He went 2-for-4 in Game 1 of The Finals, scoring a playoff-high 20 points to help compensate for Leonard’s and Lowry’s muted firepower. Asked about it afterward, on taking such a “dare” personally, the big man shrugged. “If you're open, you got to shoot them. Dare, no dare,” he said. “And then we go from there. If they go in, great. If not you keep taking them with confidence.” That’s speaking truth to a dare. 4. The ratings for Game 1 will soar… … if they can somehow count the number of times the Warriors and the Raptors watch and re-watch the video tape. A big theme heading into this series was the relative lack of familiarity the teams had with each other. Now, that’s a common aspect of The Finals, pitting the champs of opposite conferences and all. But given Golden State’s knowledge of the Cleveland Cavaliers after four consecutive Finals, Toronto is a relative stranger. Beyond that, key players from both sides were absent in the two regular-season meetings. But now they have a whole 48 minutes to dissect, digest and learn from. For the Warriors, who spoke about it the most, they saw things they might not have expected and things they definitely did not like. Such as? Try Siakam’s attacks on the basket (in transition and otherwise), their own inability to be the team that pushes pace and Fred VanVleet as the game’s essential reserve (15 points on a night when his three-point shot was MIA). Green, in particular, sounded as if he was going to binge-watch Siakam’s romp and figure a way to thwart the unorthodox flip shots the forward from Cameroon deployed. “He's become ‘a guy,’” Green said phrasing that as a nod of respect. “He put a lot of work into get there and I respect that. But like I said, I got to take him out of the series and that's on me.” Toronto can make use of the video for as long as the Warriors roster stays the way it is, which means sans Kevin Durant. Which leads into … 5. Who's here (and who isn't)? (And no, we don’t mean LeBron James.) Durant’s continued absence with a calf injury since Game 5 of the Western Conference semifinals became an official problem in Game 1 of The Finals (the team’s first loss without him). Questions that had been bottled up for a couple weeks -- What did you miss most without Durant? How might he have changed your offense or defense? -- came spilling out from the large media crew that covers the NBA’s glamour team. Neither Kerr nor his players took the bait, which was smart. Not only would it look like excuse-making (considering how they hadn’t needed those before), it might have opened a crack of vulnerability into something wider and more troublesome. Durant is out for Game 2, but per a Yahoo Sports report is expected back at the series’ midway point (read: Game 3 or Game 4).  “KD's an all-time great player on both ends of the floor,” Curry said, “so I could sit here and talk for days about what he adds to our roster.  We obviously have proven that when he's out we can have guys step up, and that's going to be the case until he gets back.” Rushing him back would seem desperate, something the Warriors aren’t and shouldn’t be. Plus, it is early in a long series. And it really is irrelevant: NBA players and teams’ medical staffs don’t “rush back” anyone these days. Then again, once they’re ready to play -- as Golden State showed in using DeMarcus Cousins in Game 1 -- there’s no sense in letting talent help languish in street clothes. No time too, either. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 1st, 2019Related News

TIBT Year 3: The Grand Trail Reunion – Onifa, Apolinario’s potential unleash by joining this race

By: Cara Uy 120 participant runners from all over the region and parts of Luzon will join Tracing Iraynon Bukidnon Trails (TIBT) at Laua-an-Bugasong boundaries in Antique on June 1-2, 2019 starting 12 a.m. The theme of this race will be “Mountain in Motion: The Reunion,” which endeavors to gather outdoor enthusiasts-mountaineers, road/trail runners and […] The post TIBT Year 3: The Grand Trail Reunion – Onifa, Apolinario’s potential unleash by joining this race appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Source: Thedailyguardian ThedailyguardianCategory: NewsJun 1st, 2019Related News

Ardina, Saso card 71s, trail leader by 6

Dottie Ardina and Yuka Saso bucked the changing wind conditions and matched par 71s in a decent start by the Filipina bets in the US Women’s Open paced by Japanese Mamiko Higa at the Country Club of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina Thursday (yesterday in Manila)......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsMay 31st, 2019Related News