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Trike drivers hold strike

AROUND 70 percent of tricycle drivers in Dingle, Iloilo mounted a two-hour strike on July 2, 2018, relative to complaints on routes, permits, and ordinances. The town has 700 to 1,000 tricycle units. Sangguniang Bayan member and officer-in-charge to the Office of the Mayor Jimmy Quicoy said the drivers were complaining of route problems, special […] The post Trike drivers hold strike appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Source: Thedailyguardian ThedailyguardianCategory: NewsJul 2nd, 2018Related News

Players react to Gilas vs. Australia brawl

What was supposed to be a non-bearing FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers meeting between Gilas Pilipinas and Australia ended in infamy, as a massive brawl ultimately put a stop to the game, Monday evening at the Philippine Arena in Bulacan.  With Australia up 31 midway through the third quarter, things got physical between Gilas player RR Pogoy and Australian players Chris Goulding and Daniel Kickert, eventually erupting to a bench-clearing brawl that saw punches, kicks, water bottles, and even chairs get thrown.  Bench-clearing brawl between Gilas and Australia. pic.twitter.com/RotOFNiMgl — Camille B. Naredo (@camillenaredo) July 2, 2018 The incident, of course, became viral almost instantly.  Andrew Bogut, and Australian former NBA player and national team member obviously wasn't pleased with the events that took place.  MAN WTF!!! Disgusting — Andrew Bogut (@andrewbogut) July 2, 2018 Cameras caught a number of Gilas players, led by Marc Pingris, taking a selfie as the officials sorted things out. This didn't sit well with Bogut either.  Blokes taking a team selfie after all that. Down 31. Yep. They really just took a team selfie. — Andrew Bogut (@andrewbogut) July 2, 2018  Being the hosts, it certainly wasn't a good look on the Philippines' part, and a number of former Gilas players and current PBA players expressed their dismay as well.  Embarassing… — Jimmy Alapag (@JAlapag3) July 2, 2018 Roommate!! 😩🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️ — L.A Tenorio (@LA_Tenorio) July 2, 2018 Can’t believe some people are proud of this.... 🤦🏽‍♂️ wrong sport! — Solomon Mercado (@M3rcMyWords) July 2, 2018 Junemar tho... what a beast! And didn’t feel the need to throw one punch or throw any chairs to show his pride. #4timeMVP — Solomon Mercado (@M3rcMyWords) July 2, 2018 Embarrassing!!! — Chris Ross (@cmross6) July 2, 2018 This is unfortunate. — joe devance (@jdv_38) July 2, 2018 Aleast we won the rumble not sure about the game!! — marcus douthit (@DouthitMarcus) July 2, 2018 As a player, what would u do if u are hit or u see ur teammate get hit on the face? U cant just back down. Goes for both 🇵🇭 and 🇦🇺 players. Im not saying that the fight is a good thing. Tough situation really. #GilasPilipinas — Jai Reyes (@jaireyes5) July 2, 2018 This is embarrassing — alex cabagnot (@askcabaggie) July 2, 2018 Congrats .. yall just made shaqtin a fool — alex cabagnot (@askcabaggie) July 2, 2018 Wow man....😔 — Kel Williams (@KelWilliams21) July 2, 2018 Christian Standhardinger, a former Gilas player himself, took to Twitter to stand up for his basketball brothers.  If you attack one of us, you attack all of us! THAT WAS A CHEAP SHOT AGAINST POGOY. I hope nobody got seriously injured. — Chris Standhardinger (@cstandhardinger) July 2, 2018 Wag nalang tayo magmalinis lahat.. kung ikaw yung nasa court at nakita mo yung teammate mo na sadyang sinaktan matutuwa ka?? Isip tayo!! Wag tayo puro embarrasing!! Oo panget tignan masisira name ng bansa pero wag paagarabyado lalo na sarili natin bansa to!! — Ronald Tubid (@ront71) July 2, 2018 Other members of the Philippine basketball community also took to Twitter to share their two cents.  This is not gonna be good for our country in the long run 😕 — Thirdy (@ThirdyRavenaaa) July 2, 2018 😳 — Kib Montalbo (@kibmontalbo) July 2, 2018   It's just so difficult to keep your cool in a crazy situation like that (I probably couldn't) I've always had the highest regard for JMF and Gabe pero lalo pang tumaas ngayon. (And Baser too) — Jason Webb (@Jason_Webb_Phil) July 2, 2018 Even NBA Rookie of the Year runner-up Donovan Mitchell, who was in Manila just a few weeks ago, caught wind of the fiasco. Yo @ThonMaker14 out here tryin hit dudes wit the flying knee😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭 — Donovan Mitchell (@spidadmitchell) July 2, 2018 Thon Maker, a player for the Milwaukee Bucks and the Australian National Team, was seen on camera attempting a flying kick on Gilas guard Terrence Romeo.  Speaking of Romeo, the fan-favorite was unapologetic as he stood up for his Gilas teammates as well.  Dun sa mga kapwa namin players na nag sasabing embarassing kami wala kaming paki alam sa inyo . Kami mag kaka teammate sa loob kailangan namin mag tulungan. Hindi namin pwede pabayaan yung isat isa. Kung embarassing kami sa mata niyo bat di kayo mag convert ng australian. — Terrence Romeo (@tbvromeo) July 2, 2018 Kahit anong sabihin niyo nag lalaro kami para sa isat isa para sa kapwa natin pilipino higit sa lahat para sa bayan. Hindi niyo alam ang sacrifice namin Kung para sainyo mali tulungan namin yung kakampi namin sinasaktan problema niyo na yun basta kami walang iwanan tapos!!! — Terrence Romeo (@tbvromeo) July 2, 2018 In the end, 13 players were ejected, with nine of them coming from Gilas Pilipinas.  The game continued, with Baser Amer, Gabe Norwood, and June Mar Fajardo being the lone Gilas players not to be ejected.  The game waa called eventually, with Australia winning 89-53.  According to FIBA, disciplinary proceedings will be opened and decisions, and most likely sanctions will be handed out in the coming days.  Following the incident that occured in the third quarter of the Philippines-Australia game on Monday in the FIBA Basketball World Cup 2019 Asian Qualifiers, FIBA will now open disciplinary proceedings against both teams. The decision(s) will be communicated in the coming days. — FIBA media (@FIBA_media) July 2, 2018.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJul 2nd, 2018Related News

WATCH: Backstreet Boys, Jimmy Fallon’s new take on ‘I Want It That Way’ using classroom instruments

You've never heard the Backstreet Boys' "I Want It That Way" like this. Jimmy Fallon and his house band The Roots enlisted the famous boy band to take on a new spin on their classic hit. The twist? They used classroom instruments, as seen in a clip from "The Tonight Show" episode aired Thursday night. With all members---Brian Littrell, Nick Carter, Kevin Richardson, AJ McLean and Howie Dorough---on board, the latest rendition did not disappoint. The various instruments perfectly blended well with the boys' vocals, making fans nostalgic. Apart from this, the boys all had the chance to perform their new single "Don't Go Breaking My Heart," their first in five years. Fallon ...Keep on reading: WATCH: Backstreet Boys, Jimmy Fallon’s new take on ‘I Want It That Way’ using classroom instruments.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 29th, 2018Related News

WATCH: Backstreet Boys, Jimmy Fallon sing I Want It That Way with classroom instruments

MANILA, Philippines – The Backstreet Boys dropped by at the Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon to promote their new song "Don't Go Breaking My Heart," and not only did they sing one song, they also got the chance to perform one of their classics – "I Want  It That ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsJun 29th, 2018Related News

Farmer survives ambush

A FARMER survived an ambush morning of June 27, 2018, in Lambunao, Iloilo. Police identified the victim as Jimmy Patriarca of Barangay Lonoy, Calinog town. The victim said he was bound for Calinog on a motorcycle when three suspects waylaid him at Barangay Banban, a village more or less 15 kilometers from Lambunao town. Patriarca […] The post Farmer survives ambush appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Source: Thedailyguardian ThedailyguardianCategory: NewsJun 29th, 2018Related News

Orange Is the new black hole

NEW YORK--- By now we have all gotten accustomed to the president's tweets, that mostly stay on the level of the ridiculous. (My use of "mostly" may lead many to think I am being overly generous.) Very recently he tweeted a defense of his press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, denied service at a restaurant in Virginia, that included a completely irrelevant head-scratcher-of-an-observation that the restaurant needed a paint job. He also went after Jimmy Fallon, the late-show host who once mussed up the Donald's hair when the latter was a guest in 2016. Fallon was tempted to tweet back but then said he had better things to do, leading him to the obvious question: doesn't the pr...Keep on reading: Orange Is the new black hole.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 28th, 2018Related News

Guatemala asks US for migrant protections due to volcano fallout

GUATEMALA CITY — Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales on Monday said he had instructed his Foreign Ministry to petition the United States for temporary protected status for the country’s migrants, he said in a Twitter post. Source link link: Guatemala asks US for migrant protections due to volcano fallout.....»»

Source: Manilainformer ManilainformerCategory: Jun 26th, 2018Related News

‘American Vandal’ mockumentary entertains, confounds

It's part satire, part teen-drama, but "American Vandal" spoofs "true crime" docuseries like "Making a Murderer" into a school setting---and resoundingly succeeds. The eight-episode Netflix show follows a California high school dealing with a confounding mystery: Who spray-painted a phallus on each of the 27 teachers' cars? The main suspect is the class clown, Dylan Maxwell (Jimmy Tatro), who has a history of drawing them. His pranking and vandalizing ways are no secret to his schoolmates and teachers, making him an easy scapegoat. With surveillance videos of the crime missing, two students, Peter Maldonado (Tyler Alvarez) and Sam Ecklund (Griffin Gluck) investigate, hoping ...Keep on reading: ‘American Vandal’ mockumentary entertains, confounds.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 24th, 2018Related News

Landmark win as Djokovic reaches Queen s semis

LONDON (AP) — Novak Djokovic became the 10th man to register 800 victories since the Open Era began in 1968 when he beat France's Adrian Mannarino 7-5 6-1 on Friday to reach the Queen's Club semifinals. Djokovic, a 12-time Grand Slam champion, follows in the footsteps of Jimmy Connors (1,256), Roger Federer (1,156), Ivan Lendl (1,068), Guillermo Vilas (949), Rafael Nadal (903), John McEnroe (881), Andre Agassi (870), Ilie Nastase (846) and Stefan Edberg (801). "It's a great achievement," said the 31-year-old Serb. "I should be happy for it and proud of it. It's still the sport that I love with all my heart. I put in that heart every single day." Djokovic, through to the semifinals for only the second time since last year's Eastbourne International, next meets France's Jeremy Chardy after he defeated American Frances Tiafoe 6-4 6-4. Top-seeded Marin Cilic also advanced with a 7-6 (3) 6-2 win over 2010 champion Sam Querrey. Cilic now faces Nick Kyrgios, who eliminated defending champion Feliciano Lopez 7-6 (5), 7-6 (3). The Croatian player hit 10 aces and dropped only three points on his first serve against American Querrey. He didn't give him a break point chance, and broke twice. Kyrgios again served 32 aces against Lopez, as he did in beating Kyle Edmund on Thursday, matching his personal best......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 23rd, 2018Related News

Pete Davidson on engagement to Ariana Grande: ‘I feel like I won a contest’

MANILA, Philippines – Saturday Night Live cast member Pete Davidson has finally confirmed his buzzed-about engagement to pop star Ariana Grande in an interview with Jimmy Fallon on The Tonight Show. “You know, you didn’t have to get engaged to Ariana Grande to come on our show,” Jimmy said, to which ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsJun 22nd, 2018Related News

Q& A: Chicago Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com A year ago, on the night of the 2017 NBA Draft, the Chicago Bulls switched gears. Jimmy Butler was traded to Minnesota, taking with him any pretense that the Bulls were a legitimate playoff team. In that moment, Chicago committed to a rebuild, which is to say, a dive into the draft lottery where coach Fred Hoiberg and his team presumably would be rewarded not for how many games they won but how many they lost. By whatever means necessary. Soon after Butler was moved to the Timberwolves, veteran point guard Rajon Rondo was waived. A few months later, Dwyane Wade was cut loose (via a handsome buyout) to bounce through Cleveland to Miami. The Bulls moved forward with three young pieces courtesy of the Wolves -- wing Zach LaVine, guard Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick in 2017, rookie forward Lauri Markkanen -- and a general acceptance that getting from there to here was going to bring a lot of pain. Some of that was literal: Bobby Portis slugged teammate Nikola Mirotic in a preseason practice, breaking two facial bones and putting Mirotic on the shelf for 23 games. Some of it was figurative: the frustration of a season that began as a 3-20 mess and ended in a 10-28 slog. In between, though, the Bulls somehow put together a 14-7 stretch that offered a glimpse of what 2018-19 might be. It also cost them precious lottery balls, eventually leaving them with the No. 7 pick (and No. 22, after dealing Mirotic in February to New Orleans) in Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Draft. Hoiberg, who went from an alleged coaching “hot seat” during two .500 seasons, wound up with more job security as a coach headed toward 50 defeats and beyond. He spoke with NBA.com about his and the Bulls’, er, challenging season. This is edited from a pair of longer conversations, one at the end of the regular season, the other within the past week. NBA.com: So you go through everything that was 2017-18, dutifully lose 55 games and wind up at No. 7 instead of in the top three for the Draft. The inevitable question is, was it worth it? Fred Hoiberg: Obviously you’re disappointed. You were hoping to move up. But we’re confident we’re going to get a good player with the No. 7 pick and we’re confident we’ll get a good player with the 22nd pick. NBA.com: C’mon, this isn’t our first rodeo. I get that people don’t like to use the word “tanking,” but the Bulls’ marching orders last season were pretty clear. FH: I don’t think you can look at it that way in the midst of your season. The players are competitive, your staff is competitive. You want to play as well as you can and put yourself in a position to win. When you look at the successful stretch that we had in December and January, you think about carrying those things forward and then adding, based on who we get, to the roster. There was some real frustration that we didn’t get a lot of wins at the end. But we developed some younger players and saw what we had with some of our guys. NBA.com: When you guys had that run before the season’s midpoint, winning seven in a row (first team in NBA history with such a long winning streak immediately after a losing streak of 10 in a row) and 10 of 12, did you and the front office ever consider a Plan B? As in, maybe, show potential free agents how good your supporting cast could be, in hopes of luring big-name help this summer? FH: I think we did. What we showed was a really good foundation and a young core that we can build around. When I look back at it, I just wish we could have had more opportunity to work with it and see what it would have looked like. When Zach LaVine came back [Jan. 13 from ACL knee surgery], the plan was for him to play about 20 minutes a night. Then his third game, Kris Dunn fell against Golden State and had that concussion [that cost him 11 games, before missing the final 14 with a toe injury]. It’s too bad we didn’t get the full look. But players like Cam Payne, Denzel [Valentine], Bobby, Robin [Lopez], Justin Holiday all had career years.   NBA.com: You had a lot of injuries down the stretch. Not to suggest that they weren’t all legit, but were you instructed at any point by VP John Paxson or GM Gar Forman to dial it back after that 14-7 success? FH: No, we weren’t. And the big thing from the very beginning of last season, the two things we wanted to see, was competing at a high level every night and the development of our players. I think we accomplished that. NBA.com: What -- in your background as a player, coach, competitor, you name it -- prepared you for this past season? FH: Part of what prepared me for this was, I had been through this as a player. I went from four really competitive teams in Indiana, playing with someone as driven and helpful as Reggie Miller, taking me under his wing. There were other great veteran players who helped me just to survive and taught me a lot. Larry Brown was the coach, then Larry Bird my last two years.   Then when I came to Chicago, I knew it would be an opportunity to play. But it was a rebuild. Eventually I got thrust into the role of captain, as the oldest player on team at 28. It really helped me with what we’re going through now. I learned how important it is to keep guys’ morale up and be positive through the ups and downs. I give our guys all the credit in the world for remaining so positive, keeping up a great work ethic and still being sponges in wanting to learn. NBA.com: What were the takeaways from the best and healthiest part of last season? FH: We got a pretty good feel for what Kris Dunn can be. He really evolved into being a closer for our team. Lauri was closing games for us, taking big shots as a 20-year-old kid. Zach had the game against Minnesota. What people fail to remember about Zach, he averaged over 22 points a game in February and really got into a pretty good rhythm. Then he had some knee soreness and wound up sitting for the rest of the year. But we had some flashes of what this can turn into. NBA.com: Niko paid for his role in sparking that hot streak. FH: Niko was great. He missed those first 23, and I thought our team handled that adverse situation about as well as anybody could, not letting it affect us in a negative way. We were able to move past it. You even saw the chemistry that Niko and Bobby played with when they were out there together. NBA.com: How hard was it personally downshifting from a team that had gone to the playoffs to one that didn’t put a priority on winning? FH: When the move was made on draft night, when those three kids came in, right away there was an excitement. Everyone had seen what Zach had done. He was a highlight reel and had those slam dunk championships. He plays the game with ease on the offensive end. His athletic tools and ability to get up and down the floor. Kris, everybody absolutely loved coming out of the draft [in 2016]. Then he had an up-and-down rookie season. Helping him to get that swagger back that he had coming out of Providence took some work, but he was aching to put that work in. Markkanen, I know the guys upstairs knew how good he was but I had no idea. I didn’t study him because we had the 15th pick. He comes over after a grueling summer -- summer league, Eurobasket with all that pressure in front of his home fans -- and he was exhausted. But then you saw every day, “Man, this kid is really good.” You’re thinking, we could probably put the ball in this kid’s hands. Then he goes up and dunks over a whole team and you say, “My God, this kid’s more athletic than we thought. He uses his feet, he’s got anticipation, he’s got toughness.” He showed a little more every day. NBA.com: Was it difficult asking a proud veteran like Robin Lopez to put it in idle over the final 25 games? FH: I think he understood. He’s been a part of a lot of different situations. He was great. He continued to lead. He continued to practice hard. He talked to the bigs as they came off the floor. NBA.com: Was your own health challenged at all by the stress of this season? Your past issues related to your heart are widely known, and coaching an NBA team even in the best of times is a demanding job. FH: After two open-heart surgeries, I do have to sometimes check myself. There are so many things you can over-concern yourself with in this business. Then you look back a week or two later and say, “My God, why did I put so much effort into that one stupid thing that happened?” You have to let go sometimes. My family is so important for me with that. You get some normalcy in your life. [At night, lying in bed, Hoiberg can hear a valve in his heart every time it beats. He let a visitor listen, too, and sure enough... ] If this ever affected me to the point where I had to throttle back, I would move on to something else. When I had my first surgery and they removed the diseased tissue from the aorta that had an aneurysm in it, they got rid of the problem. The valve deteriorated after they put a new valve in and they had to go in again, but the diseased tissue no longer was there. If it was a risk, I’d be doing something else. But it’s a constant reminder. You think you’re going to get used to it, but you never really do. My wife will be lying next to me and she hears it. NBA.com: When you look back on 2017-18, is it like “Casablanca” for you guys? As in, you’ll always have December? FH: It was fun to see how much the work paid off. Everyone was putting so much into it to get out of that slump. You can say, we had something to build on there. But whenever I talked to our team, before or after, it was all about competing on a nightly basis. Being consistent with their effort. I couldn’t be more proud of how they handled it. They were on time. They kept trying to get better. They worried about what they could control. I didn’t have to have even one of those conversations where I sat a guy down and said, “You’re not playing hard enough.” I did have a few conversations where I said, “You need to move the ball more.” [laughs] NBA.com: Big difference, coaching relative kids after the so-called “three alphas” of Butler, Wade and Rondo? Jimmy seemed eager to stay here to win. FH: Jimmy did so many things for this team. He was great to coach. You knew every night you were going to get an unbelievable effort. A guy who never backed down. Who never shied away from the big shot. And was going to defend at a high level every time he stepped on the floor. So Jimmy was missed in a lot of ways. But when you look at the young guys’ abilities, it’s exciting. NBA.com: What do you make of having better job security now that the losses are mounting, compared to those .500 seasons? FH: I don’t think any one of the 30 guys in our position pay attention to that. You can’t do your job if you do. You go in and try to improve as an individual, as a staff, as a team. Our first year, Derrick Rose suffered an orbital fracture in the first workout. We had 10 rotation players who missed double-digit games. Two starters missed 50 or more [Mike Dunleavy, Joakim Noah]. Niko had that botched appendix surgery. The next year was a completely different team. Nobody predicted we’d be a playoff team but we were and had a good chance to beat Boston before Rondo got hurt. NBA.com: When you’re not coaching veterans, is it a purer form, as far as installing “your” system vs. tailoring things to them? FH: You always look for the best system, the best approach. The basics don’t change, but [in 2016-17] we had a lot more isolation players, so we ran more of those types of actions. This [past] year, more ball movement, player movement fit this group better. We had longer, harder practices as opposed to a veteran group as the year went on. NBA.com: Since the end of the season, how much time have you put in on developmental activities and draft preparation? FH: We’ve had a lot of guys in and gotten a lot of work in, in the early part of the offseason. We’re looking forward to working again after the draft with some new young players as part of the roster. It’s all about moving forward. NBA.com: As you look back over the past year, with the script flipping to the point where the Bulls wanted to win by losing and maybe lost -- some draft position, anyway -- by winning, what goes through your mind? FH: What was Donovan Mitchell [the Rookie of the Year finalist chosen by Utah]? The 13th pick? You just never know with the draft. You play hard, you get the culture established the way you want it and things take care of themselves. What really would have been devastating would have been ending the season with negativity, with your team not playing hard, with your team disinterested. That’s something that would be a real cause for concern going into an offseason. But our guys felt good about themselves. Some were sacrificing in a big way and pulling for younger guys. They were playing hard, they were cheering for each other. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 19th, 2018Related News

Frustrated Mickelson swats moving ball with putter at Open

By Barry Wilner, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Whether he ever wins a U.S. Open — and that prospect is increasingly bleak at age 48 — Phil Mickelson will be remembered for what happened on the 13th green at Shinnecock Hills on Saturday. Call it the Mickelson Meltdown. His bogey putt from above the hole ran by the cup and was headed down a slope when he ran over and swatted it back toward the hole as the ball was still moving. "Sometimes it gets a little goofy, sure," he said, "but it's all within the rules." Mickelson's shocking display in the third round earned him a 2-stroke penalty for breaking the rule against hitting a moving ball and led to a 10 on the hole, an 81 overall. He went from shooting a 69 to making the cut to falling apart so badly that playing partner Andrew Johnston called it "a moment of madness." "I've had multiple times where I've wanted to do that," Mickelson said, explaining he preferred the 2-stroke penalty to having to play the ball from off the green. "I just finally did." Saturday was Mickelson's 48th birthday, and there were good vibes everywhere early in his round. He was serenaded with "Happy Birthday" at nearly every green, and even after four consecutive bogeys the fans were supportive. "People here have been awesome, they made my birthday special," he said. Then came No. 13, where nothing was special — just outrageous. Mickelson jogged after the ball after it curled around the hole, realizing it was about to head down the other side of the green. His swat sent the ball off the hole. He then two-putted. With the 2-shot penalty, he was given a sextuple-bogey 10 that was the highest score on any hole at this U.S. Open, according to the USGA. "I've wanted to do that many times. I should have done it several times at Augusta on 15," he said. As he walked off the green, he could be seen smiling and talking to Johnston, who also was smiling. "I said, 'That is one of the strangest things I have ever seen' and started laughing, and said 'sorry' about laughing," said Johnston, a jovial Englishman with the nickname Beef. "He just laughed at me, he had no words to say. We just laughed. "It's something you might see at your club with your mates. It was strange, no one ever has those thoughts, it just happens." Mickelson's actions were reminiscent of John Daly hitting a moving ball at Pinehurst No. 2 in the 1999 U.S. Open. Daly was on No. 8 in the final round when he took an 11 on the hole and signed for an 81. He then said: "This is my last U.S. Open — ever. I've had it with the USGA and the way they run their tournaments." He was back the next year at Pebble Beach, where he pumped three shots into the Pacific Ocean on the famed 18th and hit another shot into someone's backyard. That made for a 14, a total of 83 in the first round, and a withdrawal. Another player who let things get to him was Kirk Triplett in 1998 at Olympic Club. On the 18th hole in the second round, Triplett stuck his putter in the ground as a backstop when his ball was headed back down from the hole. Mickelson, who has been a U.S. Open runner-up six times, most recently in 2013, was having a miserable time Saturday before reaching 13. He had those four consecutive bogeys before a par at the 12th. After three more pars following the meltdown, he bogeyed 17, then parred 18. Asked if people would find his actions on No. 13 disrespectful, Mickelson said: "It's meant to take advantage of the rules as best as you can. In that situation, I was just going back and forth. I would gladly take the two shots over continuing that display." As for walking off the green chuckling, he insisted: "How can you not laugh? It's funny." ___ AP Golf Writer Doug Ferguson, AP Columnist Tim Dahlberg, and Sports Writer Jimmy Golen contributed to this report......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 17th, 2018Related News

Cops arrest five people for illegal gambling in Marikina

Police arrested five people for illegal gambling in Marikina. According to a spot report from the Eastern Police District, members of Marikina Police Station 2 arrested Rheagan Aguilar, Jimmy Juano, Lyndon Lim and Rhoda Acampado on Friday night, during a Simultaneous Anti-Criminiality Law Enforcement Operation. The suspects were arrested while playing a card game called "tong-its" as an Police officers seized a deck of cards and money worth of P184.45. The suspects are facing illegal gambling chargers for violating Presidential Decree 1602....Keep on reading: Cops arrest five people for illegal gambling in Marikina.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 16th, 2018Related News

Woods on expectations for another major win: Absolutely

By Jimmy Golen, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Hoist the anchor, and set sail the great ship Privacy on a course for Carnoustie Bay, Pebble Beach or some other future site of a golf major. Tiger Woods isn't going to win the U.S. Open this year. He still thinks he can win another major before he's done. "Absolutely," Woods said after shooting a 2-over 72 at Shinnecock Hills on Friday for a 36-hole total of 10 over that saw him miss the cut. "They're not easy," he said. "I mean, I've won a few of them over the course of my career, and they're the hardest fields and usually the hardest setups. So they're meant to be testers, and you don't win major championships by kind of slapping all around the place and missing putts. "You have to be on," he said. "You just can't fake it at a major championship." Woods couldn't even fake it for the first 34 holes in Southampton, and despite birdies on the last two holes, he needed a lot of help to avoid the cut for the fifth time in his last eight majors. That means he won't need to bunk for the weekend at the Sag Harbor Yacht Club on the 155-foot boat he jokingly calls "the dinghy." Woods also missed the cut when he brought Privacy to the 2006 U.S. Open at Winged Foot in New York City's northern suburbs. He has not played the weekend at a U.S. Open since 2013, or won one since 2008 — his last major victory. He remains stuck at 14 in his career, four short of Jack Nicklaus' record. "Our whole careers are pretty much measured as if you can win four times a year," Woods said. Woods' chances were effectively eliminated after two holes. He shot a triple bogey on Thursday on No. 1 — a 399-yard par 4 that is the fourth-easiest hole on the course — needing three tries to manage a short rise to the elevated green and then two-putting. He entered the second round nine strokes behind the leaders and thought if he could shoot in the 60s on Friday he would have a chance to get back into it. Now he won't even have a chance to play. "I couldn't chase down the leaders right away. It's going to take me probably 2½ to 3 rounds to do it," he said. "Unfortunately, I went the other way." Starting the second round on No. 10, Woods made the turn at even par and came back around to No. 1. His drive was fine, but he yanked his approach shot to the right of the green into deep rough, and then rolled his third shot over it. After pitching to about 14 feet, he missed a bogey putt. He then bogeyed No. 2 for the second straight day. "I didn't play the first and second hole very well," said Woods, who started on No. 10 for the second round. "I was kind of hanging in there until, unfortunately, first and second hole kind of derailed it." Woods said he would take the week off before playing the National and then heading to Carnoustie, Scotland, for the British Open......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 16th, 2018Related News

Rose practicing patience, perspective in the majors

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Justin Rose was coming up on 15 years as a pro and still didn't have a major. What he found was perspective. "Between 30 and 40, that's going to be my opportunity to go really out and get things done," Rose said. "That's 40 major championships. I'm going to create chances with those 40. I'm going to be on leaderboards." More than getting into weekend conditions, however, was realizing that it wasn't always going to work out. It was OK to fail. That was the secret to playing so well under pressure at Merion, where he broke through in the 2013 U.S. Open. "I think what happened to me at Merion, I also realized I'm going to win majors, and I'm also going to lose majors," he said. "You can't skip through your career without one or two slipping through the net. It's a byproduct of being on the leaderboard that those things happen. So I wasn't scared of losing, and that helped me win my first major championship. I wasn't shying away from the pressure of trying to win my first major." Rose had top 10s in the majors, but he didn't have a lot of chances in his 20s. The lone exception was 2007 at the Masters, where he started the final round one shot out of the lead, closed with a 73 and finished three shots back. Since his victory at Merion, he played in the final group at the 2015 Masters and couldn't make up any ground on Jordan Spieth's four-shot lead, and he lost a two-shot lead on the back nine in the 2017 Masters before losing in a playoff to Sergio Garcia. He also started three back on the final day at St. Andrews in 2015. "Ideally in your career, you grasp more than slip away, right?" he said. "But it's a byproduct of being a good player and being on the leaderboard that both things are going to happen." The message applies to Rickie Fowler, who finished one shot behind Patrick Reed at the Masters. Fowler also had a share of the lead on the back nine at Valhalla in the 2014 PGA Championship, and he played in the final group at two majors that same year. A year ago at the U.S. Open, Fowler started the final round two shots behind. "He's creating those opportunities," Rose said. "He played plenty well enough at the Masters that it could have been his year. He will let one or two go in the future. He's going to be on the leaderboard for a long, long time, and I'm sure things are going to line up for him more than once." ___ WEDDING BELLS Rickie Fowler was lugging around something and it was high time he got rid of it. So he asked girlfriend Allison Stokke to marry him while they were on a Long Island beach. "There was nothing planned out," Fowler said Wednesday, four days after he and Stokke, a former track and field athlete at Cal, got engaged. "I just really didn't want to carry the ring around any longer." That comment drew hearty laughter at a news conference for the U.S. Open. "So it worked out perfectly," he added. "We kept things very, very casual. And like I said, I didn't have anything planned out. ... I didn't want to have to keep toting that thing around for that long." Fowler got traditional, getting down on his knees to ask for her hand in marriage. Waves broke against the shore just behind the couple as Fowler's friend and PGA Championship winner Justin Thomas snapped photos. ___ PEBBLES IN THE SAND The USGA has a local rule for Shinnecock Hills in this U.S. Open that allows players to remove stones and pebbles from bunkers without penalty. Phil Mickelson could have used that 14 years ago. Tied for the lead with two holes to play, Mickelson made double bogey from the bunker on the 17th hole and finished two behind Retief Goosen. Mickelson never talked about the bunker shot after his round, but Fred Funk revealed what happened in a 2014 interview. There was a small rock under his ball. "We didn't know the rock was there, but you could hear it," said Funk, who played with Mickelson in the final round. "Phil showed me his pitching wedge. But he never said anything about it (to the media)." Mickelson's shot ran out about 5 or 6 feet above the hole. The bigger problem was running the putt by 4 feet and missing the comebacker. Funk thought small rocks could be removed as long as the player could see it, though the USGA confirmed the local rule was not in effect in 2004. ___ ALL-AMERICAN This year's U.S. Open will be a chance to celebrate the state of golf in the country. Americans hold all four of golf's major trophies for the first time since 2004. Patrick Reed won the Masters this year, joining PGA champion Justin Thomas, British Open champion Jordan Spieth and last year's U.S. Open winner, Brooks Koepka. The last time that happened was 2004, when Phil Mickelson won his first major. At the time, Jim Furyk (U.S. Open), Ben Curtis (British) and Shaun Micheel were the reigning champions. But it's not just the majors. The United States also won the most recent Ryder Cup, Presidents Cup, Solheim Cup and Walker Cup. Rory McIlroy, who hopes to end the streak, attributed it to golf going in cycles. And he said some of the credit goes to Tiger Woods. "European golf was very healthy a few years ago for a long time," he said. "It seemed every major, someone from the island of Ireland turned up to, we were winning it. It doesn't seem that long ago. But the great young players from this country, they're playing well. They have probably a couple of guys, but one in particular that they try to emulate who's back out here playing, and he's become a friend of theirs. "I think that's been a huge part of all this," he said. "A lot of these guys have gotten to know Tiger. And being able to say, 'OK, this is what he does, and we might not be able to achieve everything that he has, but you can at least try to do that.' I think that's been a huge thing for Ryder Cups and Presidents Cups, and them as individuals." ___ AP Sports Writers Barry Wilner and Jimmy Golen contributed to this report......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 14th, 2018Related News

Jimmy Fallon to Florida shooting survivors: ‘Don’t let anything stop you’

Sunrise, Florida --- Graduating seniors at the Florida high school where a gunman killed 17 people in February received diplomas Sunday and heard from surprise commencement speaker Jimmy Fallon, who urged them to move forward and "don't let anything stop you." Four families received diplomas on behalf of loved ones slain in the attack that gave rise to a campaign by teens for gun control. Principal Ty Thompson underscored the honors for the dead students in a tweet. "Remember those not with us, and celebrate all the successes the Class of 2018 has brought to the community and the world!" Thompson tweeted. The "Tonight Show" host offered similar praise, saying, "You are not just ...Keep on reading: Jimmy Fallon to Florida shooting survivors: ‘Don’t let anything stop you’.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 4th, 2018Related News

LeBron, back in Boston, for another Cavs farewell

By Jimmy Golen, Associated Press BOSTON (AP) — LeBron James and the depleted Cleveland Cavaliers won’t get any sympathy from the Celtics when they return to Boston for Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals. Already laboring to reach his eighth straight NBA Finals with a supporting crew made mostly of cast-offs and throw-ins, James lost the only other All-Star on the roster on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) when Kevin Love was declared out for the series finale with a concussion. Now, in what could be his final game in a Cleveland uniform — again — James will have to do it largely on his own. In Boston, where the Celtics are perfect so far this postseason. And in a series where the road team hasn’t really even come close. “There’s something different about LeBron, period,” Cleveland forward Larry Nance Jr. said after James scored 46 with 11 rebounds and nine assists on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) to send the series to a decisive seventh game. “I think [coach Tyronn Lue] said it best: ‘We’re going into a Game 7 with the baddest dude on the planet on our team.’ I like our chances.” James is having what could be the best postseason of his career, averaging 33.9 points and just under nine assists and rebounds, with seven 40-point games, two buzzer beaters, and a sweep of top-seeded Toronto. But he’s played in every game this season — Sunday (Monday, PHL time) will be his 100th — and it showed in the Game 5 loss to the Celtics. He admitted to fatigue afterward, and then played all but two minutes in Game 6 despite a sore knee from a collision with Nance. Still, the four-time MVP carried his team even after Love banged heads with Boston’s Jayson Tatum in the first half and left the game. “I can’t say enough good things about him,” Celtics coach Brad Stevens said. “Every time we watch. Every time you’re standing out there. Every time you watch him on film. Best player in the game.” James will probably have to do it again in Game 7 to reach the NBA Finals for the eighth straight year, something accomplished only by Bill Russell and some of his Celtics teammates in the 1960s. Lue said he wasn’t concerned about James’ leg. Or about the team’s history in the TD Garden, where the Cavaliers lost the first three games by an average of 17 points. “We throw it all out,” Lue said on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). “It’s one game left to go to the NBA Finals.” The Celtics have had their own injury problems, starting in the first quarter of the season opener — at Cleveland — when top free agent Gordon Hayward went out for the year with a broken leg. Five-time All-Star Kyrie Irving, acquired from the Cavaliers in an offseason roster overhaul, needed knee surgery and was lost in March. But they caught a break when Tatum was cleared to play on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). Stevens said the team doctors checked on him “and he’s great.” “So nothing there as far as to be concerned about,” Stevens said. Well, there’s one thing to be concerned about. “We know LeBron is different than a lot of other guys, but we’ve got to get the job done,” Celtics guard Terry Rozier said. “That’s no excuse, so we’re looking forward to it.” For James, it’s an opportunity to extend the season for his hometown team and put off another summer of questions about his future. Eight years ago, he came to Boston for the conference semifinals and had a triple-double — 27 points, 19 rebounds and 10 assists — but shot 8-for-21 with nine turnovers and the Celtics eliminated the Cavs from the playoffs. As he left the court, James stripped off his Cleveland jersey; then came “The Decision” and the move to Miami. James is again able to become a free agent this season, with the Lakers, 76ers and Rockets among the most-mentioned destinations. Having led Cleveland to the city’s first major sports title in half a century in 2016, there is less pulling at him to stay home this time. But another title would ease the pain even more. And with the injury bug hitting the Western Conference finalists — Chris Paul was the latest ruled out for a game — the East champion might not be as big an underdog as expected. James will be ready. “You’ve got to be poised. You’ve got to be able to handle a punch or two,” he said. “We know it’s challenging. They’re 10-0 on their home floor, and they’ve been very successful against us, obviously, at home. But if you love challenges, then this is a great opportunity.”.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMay 27th, 2018Related News

Just in case you forgot that books exist, here’s what you can start reading

The other day, I was scrolling through Instagram and came across a video that was both sad and funny. It was a series of clips posted on Jimmy Kimmel Live's account. It was part of the show's segment called "Pedestrian Question." Here, they go to the streets and ask random people questions. For this episode, they decided to ask people to name a book, any book. And to my surprise, almost everyone struggled to give a title. The question was met with nervous laughs, "uhm," "no," and "I don't read books." From the ones who did answer, they said Dr. Seuss, which isn't even a book. Dr. Seuss is an author. As funny as it was initially, I found it quite sad that most people don't rea...Keep on reading: Just in case you forgot that books exist, here’s what you can start reading.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: May 25th, 2018Related News

Hall of fame to redo soccer star Brandi Chastain’s unflattering plaque

SAN FRANCISCO --- A bronze plaque honoring soccer star Brandi Chastain got a red card Tuesday after a social media outcry over its unflattering portrayal of the athlete. The Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in San Francisco said Tuesday it will redo the plaque, which was unveiled a day earlier and quickly panned by the public. Fans on Twitter compared the likeness to former President Jimmy Carter, actors Gary Busey and Mickey Rooney, baseball player Babe Ruth, New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick and movie character Mrs. Doubtfire, played by Robin Williams. Chastain is often remembered for ripping off her jersey in celebration of her game-winning penalty kick in the 1999 Wo...Keep on reading: Hall of fame to redo soccer star Brandi Chastain’s unflattering plaque.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: May 23rd, 2018Related News

Knock, knock: Browns there; team set for HBO s Hard Knocks

By Tom Withers, Associated Press CLEVELAND (AP) — Ready or not, the Cleveland Browns are getting their close-up. Coming off a historic, dismal 0-16 season, the Browns have been chosen to appear on HBO's popular "Hard Knocks" series that gives NFL fans a behind-the-scenes look at training camp. The Browns have turned down previous opportunities to be on the award-winning series. But with renewed optimism around Cleveland following the recent draft, and the selection of quarterback Baker Mayfield, the team is granting HBO unlimited access to its upcoming camp. Cleveland is the 13th franchise to participate in "Hard Knocks," which began in 2001 with the Baltimore Ravens. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were featured last summer. Although they've won only one game the past two seasons under coach Hue Jackson, the Browns see the show as a possibility to highlight some of their younger players and put a positive spin on their rebuild. And for HBO, Mayfield's quest to win the starting job is just one of several juicy story lines. "NFL Films has always been exceptional at bringing fans closer to the game and they do an outstanding job with every show they produce, including HBO's Hard Knocks," Browns owners Dee and Jimmy Haslam said. "We have been asked multiple times about being featured on Hard Knocks, and we really felt like it was our turn this year and the timing was right. We want to be great partners in this league, and we also recognize Hard Knocks gives fans a special opportunity to learn more about our team and players." HBO's cameras are certain to focus on Mayfield, the brash Heisman Trophy winner from Oklahoma the Browns chose over other quarterbacks. Mayfield is expected to back up Tyrod Taylor this season, but their competition could make for the kind compelling TV that has made the series a must-watch for football junkies. A 30-person film crew will be at the team's training facility in Berea to record more than 2,000 hours of footage for the five-segment series that will debut Aug. 7. The Browns have some good young players who are not well known outside Cleveland. But "Hard Knocks" will give national exposure to budding stars like defensive end Myles Garrett, Mayfield and safety Jabrill Peppers and give the network a chance to tell the well-documented story of former Pro Bowl wide receiver Josh Gordon, who has missed most of the past three seasons because of drug suspensions. Mayfield has experience in front of the cameras. He was recently featured in a recent documentary series as he prepared for the draft, and feels the Browns can make "Hard Knocks" a positive experience. "For me looking at it, and us as a team, I'd say it can be good if you handle it right. I'll just say that," he said on SiriusXM NFL Radio. "If you think about it as a way to get on camera and try to show off and do certain things and handle it the wrong way then that can be very negative, it can be a distraction. But if you use it as a sense of, 'OK, I got to block out everything else and just focus on playing ball,' then that can be a great thing for us." Jackson and Browns defensive coordinator Gregg Williams have both been on "Hard Knocks" — Jackson with the Cincinnati Bengals in 2013 and Williams with the Los Angeles Rams in 2016. "Being able to bring our fans in so they can get to know our players and our organization in a different way will be a huge positive for us," Jackson said. "I want people to see how much our players and coaches care, how hard they work and how badly they want to win for Cleveland. This will be a great opportunity for our team." Browns general manager John Dorsey had reservations about the series, but feels the team is equipped to handle the added scrutiny. "Once we sat down and talked about it as an organization, I feel a lot better and understand why the time is right," said Dorsey, who has been overhauling the team since being hired in December. "Hue and I both feel like this team is in a good place and that we are in the process of building something that will lead to success.".....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMay 18th, 2018Related News