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Whatever happens, Rhayyan Amsali will not play in NCAA Season 94

It’s final – Rhayyan Amsali is not eligible for San Beda High School for the upcoming NCAA Season 94 Juniors Basketball Tournament. The league’s eligibility meeting concluded on Friday and there, it was determined that with one failing grade, Amsali was unable to meet academic requirements. The 6-foot-3 forward, who had just transferred to San Beda from Nazareth School of National University, has been the talk of the town as he and his camp filed a complaint questioning his failing grade. Last Tuesday, the Amsalis, through Atty. Michelle Africa, forwarded a letter to NSNU stating that Rhayyan was belatedly informed that he had failed a subject. For their part, NSNU said that the Amsali camp, through mother Nurisa, had knowledge of the failing grade since early May. Now, the latest update in the issue is that the Department of Education is asking for clarification from NSNU about how “there was no intervention given to prevent Rhayyan from getting a failing grade before the school year ended. Furthermore, no effort was done by the people concerned to inform the parents about the child’s predicament.” (photo courtesy of DepEd) Whatever happens from this point, though, will not change the fact that the NCAA’s eligibility meeting is over and done with and there, Amsali was unable to get into San Beda’s lineup. Nonetheless, the 17-year-old said that he is set to stay in Taytay. “Kahit hindi ako maglalaro, nandito pa rin yung isip ko at yung heart ko sa team na ‘to. Susuportahan ko sila kahit anong mangyari,” he told reporters as he and the Red Cubs, serendipitously, downed the Bullpups in the semifinals of the 2018 Filoil Flying V Preseason Cup. This, even though it would mean that he now only has one playing year left in the NCAA Juniors. “Yung samahan po rito sa San Beda, iba e. Unang pagpunta ko pa lang dito, ang gaan na e,” he shared. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnJun 29th, 2018

Bullpups bump off Greenies to get back on top of NBTC Division 1

Coming off a heartbreaking loss in the UAAP Juniors Finals just 21 days ago, the Nazareth School of National University Bullpups did not allow themselves to be on the wrong end of the history books once more, surviving a late surge by Joel Cagulangan and the La Salle Greenhills Greenies, 80-78, to claim the 2018 Exped Socks SM-NBTC National Championship, on Friday at the MOA Arena. This is the Bullpups' second national championship in the last three years. Moreover, this is Goldwin Monteverde's first major championship. "Siyempre very challenging talaga yung liga, from 32 teams, mage-end up ka sa number one. Masaya talaga para sa amin," shared Monteverde as the Bullpups had to go through Bacolod Tay Tung High School, Adamson High School, FilAm Sports, and Sacred Heart School-Ateneo de Cebu to get to the championship round. But it could not have been possible if it were not for the timely stops the Bullpups made to close out the game. After leading by as much as 13 points in the contest and 11 points with 4:33 left, Joel Cagulangan single-handedly powered the Greenies to an 11-0 run. The rally was capped by a strong drive to the basket by the top high school floor general in the country with 49.5 seconds left to knot the game at 77-all. Gerry Abadiano, though, was able to overpower Makoy Marcos to the rim, drawing a foul and knocking down both free throws to put the Bullpups up 20 seconds later. "As expected naman si Gerry talaga sa ilang beses na nakasama ko siya, even in tough games makikita mo na nagde-deliver siya," Monteverde beamed about Abadiano, who was his player in Adamson two years ago. "Ang maganda both ends of the floor, nakakapag-play siya ng good defense and at the same time, sa offense din." Off a timeout, Cagulangan was able to fish a foul from Paul Manalang. After making the first free throw, however, he muffed the second one. Mark Sangco was there for the offensive rebound, but Cagulangan's attempt was swatted away by Michael Malonzo. A split on the stripe by Rhayyan Amsali still gave LSGH a shot but Sidney Mosqueda struggled to give a good inbound that led to a desperation heave by Inand Fornilos that unfortunately did not go in. "Siguro for one, sometimes may mga bitter lessons din like yung last season namin sa UAAP, it boiled down to last two possessions," Monteverde recalled about Game 3 of the UAAP Juniors Finals that saw them squander a six-point lead late that led to a 58-63 defeat. Abadiano, who was crowned the Final's Most Outstanding Player, had 24 points, six rebounds, and two steals. Cyril Gonzales and Terrence Fortea finished with 12 and 11 markers, respectively. Cagulangan, who was named as the Most Outsanding Player of the tournament, led LSGH with 25 points. Fornilos, on the other hand, filled up the stat sheet with 18 poitns on 8-of-13 shooting to go along with 14 rebounds and four blocks. BOX SCORES NU 80 — Abadiano 24, Gonzales 12, Fortea 11, Amsali 8, Quiambao 8, Coyoca 5, Minerva 4, Tamayo 4, Malonzo 2, Oczon 2, Javillonar 0, Manalang 0. LSGH 78 — Cagulangan 25, Fornilos 18, Marcos 17, Sangco 7, Mosqueda 6, Espinosa 3, Lao 2, Cruz 0, Lapalam 0, Morales 0, Natividad 0. QUARTER SCORES: 23-23, 40-35, 63-54, 80-78......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2018

Eight breakout players who wowed in PVL s Collegiate Conference

Collegiate volleyball won’t be around until the second semester but the recently-concluded Premier Volleyball League (PVL) Collegiate Conference on ABS-CBN S+A gave us a glimpse of what the girls may be raring to give us once their tournament in their respective leagues finally open. Some girls came out of nowhere to really provide the fireworks in the conference and came away with new fans and admirers thanks to their impressive play on the floor. As the PVL’s Open Conference is about to part its curtains, let’s take a look at the eight collegiate volleybelles who totally captured our hearts thanks to their display of heart and skill.   1.) Tonnie Rose Ponce, Adamson University (Tonnie Rose Ponce (libero) made a mark in the last PVL Collegiate Conference when she bagged a Mythical Six award) Adamson head coach Air Padda is proud of Ponce, her team’s libero, for being the best cheerleader of her teammates on the floor. Even with her small stature, she plays big with a fighting spirit that has endeared her to the fans. It still came as a surprise, however, to the dimunitive Ponce, to be named as one of the Mythical Six and the conference’s Best Libero. Maybe not for Padda, who has always seen the leadership potential of her squad’s cheerleader.   2.) Rosie Rosier, University of the Philippines (The sophomore Lady Fighting Maroon was instrumental in ending the school's 36 year major title drought in the PVL Collegiate Conference) Rosier was instrumental in breaking the UP Lady Fighting Maroons’ 36-year championship drought as the sophomore carried the team on her back in a thrilling five-set Game 1 match with the FEU Lady Tamaraws. She pumped in 15 points via 13 attacks to have probably one of her best birthday celebrations to date, and followed it up with a 10-point output in Game 2 to help her squad bring home the Collegiate Conference crown.   3.) Milena Alessandrini, University of Santo Tomas (Second year Golden Tigress Milena Alessandrini powered the Thomasians in the FInal FOur ddespite nursing a shoulder injury) UST’s Fil-Italian tower introduced herself to Filipino volleyball fans when she won Rookie of the Year in UAAP Season 80. While it’s not easy to be on a different land where everyone speaks a different language, Alessandrini has been quick to adapt to what the coach wants done on the floor based on her performance in PVL. Her best game happened in the Battle for Third against Adamson where she broke out with a 31-point outing, a sign of things to come for the Golden Tigresses’ campaign in the coming UAAP wars.   4.) Celine Domingo, Far Eastern University (Celine Domingo followed up her stellar UAAP season 80 campaign with a masterful PVL Collegiate Conference under Coach George Pascua) Veteran setter Kyle Negrito is FEU’s top player and Jerrili Malabanan is their main weapon, no doubt, but Domingo is poised to take over the team as she continues to make an impact in the net in the recently-concluded PVL Collegiate Conference. The conference’s First Best Middle Blocker has been one of Coach George Pascual’s reliable players that are expected to carry the scoring duties now that super senior Bernadeth Pons’ career with the school is over. Too bad she was set back by a knee injury in Game One of the Finals against UP, which also sidelined her in Game Two.   5.) Jan Daguil, College of Saint Benilde (Jan Daguil (16) was one of the surprises for CSB in the PVL Collegiate Conference) With their MVP, Jeanette Panaga, moving on from her school career, the College of St. Benilde Lady Blazers are hard-pressed to find a replacement. So far, Marites Pablo has emerged as the biggest candidate, but not too far behind is Daguil, who has come up big for them when they needed the points the most. During their battle for a Final Four spot in the recently-concluded PVL Collegiate Conference, Daguil led her team with 15 points, all on kills, to turn back the San Sebastian College-Recoletos Lady Stags.   6.) Joyce Sta. Rita, San Sebastian College-Recoletos (Joyce Sta. Rita is the only holdover remaining for the Lady Stags but she is determined to be their main pillar) Sta. Rita is the only holdover from Coach Roger Gorayeb’s compact 7-woman squad from a year ago in NCAA Season 93, where she was named Second Best Middle Blocker. That did not stop her from being an example to her new teammates as she fought in each set and match to keep the young Lady Stags competitive even if they failed to notch a single win.   7.) Satrianni Espiritu, San Beda University (Satrianni Espiritu (10) looks to be the final piece of the puzzle for the SBU Lady Red Spikers) Everyone talks about SBU stars Cesca Racraquin and the Viray twins. But another player that should be acknowledged is Espiritu, who consistently chipped in to keep the Red Lionesses in contention with her consistent showing game in and game out. If her PVL Collegiate Conference showing translates to the incoming NCAA wars, the other ladies better be shaking in their shoes as the Red Lionesses will be a mighty force to be reckoned with. 8.) Cindy Imbo, University of Perpetual Help System Dalta (With Bianca Tripoli out of commission, Cindy Imbo stepped up in the last PVL Collegiate Conference) Bianca Tripoli is the main pillar of strength for the Lady Altas. It was a shame that she had to limp off the PVL Collegiate Conference due to a mild tear in her quadriceps. Carrying the load for her during her absence is Imbo, who displayed her scoring abilities while their captain was injured. In a crucial game against favorite FEU Lady Tamaraws, Imbo fired away 15 points to lead the team. While they did not win the match, it showed her capability to step up when needed. Watch for these ladies when the 2018 seasons of the NCAA and UAAP women’s volleyball tournaments begin. Meanwhile, stay tuned for more scintillating volleyball action once the PVL resumes with their Open Conference this Saturday (September 22) on S+A, S+A HD, and via livestream......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 19th, 2018

NCAA Season 94: Cardinals upset Blazers

Justin Seranno fueled Mapua’s pivotal run in the last five minutes of the game as the Cardinals scored their first back-to-back wins at the expense of College of St. Benilde, 86-83, Tuesday in the NCAA Season 94 seniors basketball competition at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Mapua improved to a 4-8 win-loss record and handed the Blazers their second straight defeat. Laurenz Victoria finished with 16 points, six rebounds and six assists while rookie Warren Bonifacio and Serrano chipped in with 12 points each for the Cardinals, who won their second straight win since Season 92. Mapua surpassed its number of wins last season but head coach Atoy Co wants to see more from his team. “We have to work harder,” said Co. “Dati kapag papasok kami, ‘Mapua lang yan eh’. Ngayon nakapag-back-to-back win kami siyempre ibang team na nagbabakasakaling (makapasok sa Final Four) they will not take us lightly.”       Down 73-72 in the last five and a half minutes, Serrano drilled six straight points in Mapua’s huge 8-0 run to give the Cardinals a seven-point breathing room with 2:32 left. The Blazers breathed down the necks of Cardinals, 82-80, on a completed three-point play by Clement Leutcheu with 57.6 points left. Bonifacio answered with a top of the key jumper followed by a great defensive stop by Mapua to take the fight out of CSB. Justin Gutang led the Blazers with 22 points, nine assists and six assists while James Pasturan had 16. Leutcheu finished with 15 while Unique Naboa and Rob Nayve had 10 each for CSB, which slid to 7-5 card. Naboa gave the Blazers a 73-72 lead with 5:22 left after sinking three free throws. But it was CSB’s last hold of the lead......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

JRU takes flight in NCAA just as Amores does so too in NBTC 24

John Amores of the JRU Light Bombers has been hailed the top high school player in Week 10 the Chooks-to-Go /NBTC 24 NCAA edition. The 6-foot-2 swingman is having a heck of Juniors campaign and his exploits have not gone unnoticed. Last Thursday, his herculean effort of 13 points and 19 rebounds paved the way for a 74-73 victory over title-contenders Mapua . That victory finished off an elimination round upset for JRU over the title conteder Red Robins. Amores, who is on his second and final year with the Light Bombers, is having a breakout season. Last year, he had modest averages of 3.6 points and 3.5 rebounds in just 13.4 minutes of play. Now in, Season 94, he amped up his game and has become one of the reasons why JRU is in a position to enter the Final Four as he is currently fourth in scoring with 18.8 points per outing. After being a constant fixture in NBTC 24’s top 20, including going as high as number two twice, Amores has finally earned the coveted number one ranking. Following Amores are three LSGH Greenies after the defending champions downed the San Sebastian Staglets, 76-65, last Tuesday. Inand Fornilos’ double-double of 24 points and 17 rebounds earned him the second spot while Joshua David came in at third following his 19-point, 9-rebound, 7-assist output. Joel Cagulangan is at fourth as he chipped in with eight points, three rebounds, and six assists in the win. Mapua’s Clint Escamis, who ruled the rankings for the past three weeks, settled for the fifth spot after their upset loss. Here are the complete Week 10 rankings: 1. John Amores (JRU) (6) 2. Inand Fornilos (CSB) (3) 3. Joshua David (CSB) (10) 4. Joel Cagulangan (CSB) (2) 5. Clint Escamis (MU) (1) 6. John Delos Santos (JRU) (9) 7. John Barba (LPU) (8) 8. Dan Arches (MU) (7) 9. Aaron Fermin (AU) (11) 10. Kean Baclaan (SSCR) (15) 11. Mac Guadana (LPU) (12) 12. Jonnel Policarpio (MU) (4) 13. Milo Janao (SSCR) (19) 14. Rom Junsay (AU) (13) 15. RC Calimag (CSB) (5) 16. Ezdel Galoy (UPHSD) (18) 17. Thomas Vasquez (JRU) (N/A) 18. Paolo Hernandez (MU) (N/A) 19. JR Ilustrisimo (EAC) 14) 20. Marwin Dionisio (JRU) (N/A) 21. Penny Estacio (SBU) (N/A) 22. Marj de Leon (LPU) (N/A) 23. Andrei Romenez (CSJL) (N/A) 24. Winderlich Coyoca (SBU) (N/A) This year, there will be three separate editions of the NBTC 24 – one for the NCAA, one for the UAAP, and one for the CESAFI – to accommodate the Juniors calendar for the whole year. After all three editions have been completed, a final list composing the top 24 players nationwide will then be chosen to participate in the annual NBTC All-Star Game in March......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Player of the Week Tankoua put San Beda on his shoulders vs Letran

In what could be his final San Beda-Letran rivalry game, Donald Tankoua made sure that he and the Red Lions would come out on top. Last Tuesday, San Beda held an imposing 22-point lead, 67-45, on archrival Letran with 6:19 left in the game. The Red Lions forgot one thing, however, and let their guards down and saw the Knights storm back with a 19-0 blast. "If we lost this game, I should probably blame myself for that because I gave everybody a chance to play and the other guys who came in just simply didn’t want to really step up," lamented head coach Boyet Fernandez. "They thought it was already a won game for us." With Robert Bolick fouling out with less than a minute left, San Beda needed someone it could lean on to stop the bleeding. It was Tankoua who heeded the call, knocking down a clutch basket that eventually gave the Red Lions a 74-68 win. Because of his herculean effort that saw him finish with 19 points and nine rebounds, the 6-foot-6 Cameroonian was hailed as the Chooks-to-Go/NCAA Press Corps Player of the Week. Though getting the victory, last season's Finals MVP hopes that this serves as a wake up call for his teammates that they could never sleep on anyone the rest of the way. "What happened happened and I think that we should realize that we really have to work hard in every game," the 23-year-old big man said. Tankoua bested Lyceum's Jaycee Marcelino, Mapua's Laurenz Victoria, and San Sebastian's Michael Calisaan for the weekly citation handed out by print and online sportswriters covering the beat......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

NCAA Season 94: Cardinals snap slump in pulsating win

Laurenz Victoria buried the game-winning turnaround jumper to help Mapua University snap a six-game losing slump at the expense of Jose Rizal University, 81-79, Thursday in the NCAA Season 94 seniors basketball competition at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. With the game tied at 79 with 21 ticks left, Victoria took matters on his own hands as he drove hard to the right side before putting on the brakes and hitting the turnaround jumper over the outstretched hands of Jed Mendoza with 1.5 second left. The Cardinals breathed a sigh of relief after JR Aguilar’s bank shot jumper at the buzzer as the ball rimmed out. “Sabi ni coach kasi sa last play namin itira namin ng five seconds. ‘Pagkakita ko sa shot clock ng six seconds ginawa ko na kung ano ang makakaya ko. Inisip ko na last na ‘to. Segundo na lang eh nagka-cramps na rin rin ako. Swerte na-shoot,” said Victoria. Victoria finished with 17 points while Warren Bonifacio added 13 for Mapua, which improved to 3-8 win-loss record. Noah Lugo and Cedric Pelayo chipped in 10 each for the Cardinals. Mark Mallari tied the game at 79 after sinking the last two his 11 free throws made in the fourth quarter with just 21.5 seconds left in the ball game. But Victoria answered with his game-winner on the other end after Mapua’s timeout. JRU absorbed its fourth straight defeat for a 2-10 slate. Jed Mendoza had 22 points while Mallari posted 18 markers for the Heavy Bombers. Jun Silvarez posted 13 for JRU.   Box score: MU (81) - Victoria 17, Bonifacio 13, Lugo 10, Pelayo 10, Aguirre 7, Gamboa 6, Serrano 6, Buñag 4, Biteng 4, Jabel 4, Nieles 0. JRU (79) - Mendoza 22, Mallari 18, Silvarez 13, Estrella 9, Aguilar 5, Esguerra 4, Dela Virgen 3, Bordon 2, Miranda 2, Padua 1, Doromal 0, David 0. Quarterscores: 15-17, 36-42, 60-55, 81-79            --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 13th, 2018

NCAA Season 94: Pirates extend win streak to 12

Lyceum of the Philippines University encountered a very game Emilio Aguinaldo College Thursday. The Pirates found the Generals a tough nut to crack as LPU had a hard time shaking off a very clingy EAC squad. But just like in their past conquests, the Pirates came up on top 95-75 to extend their winning streak 12 straight and remain unscathed in the NCAA Season 94 seniors basketball competition at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. LPU, which struggled in the first half, made life miserable for EAC as they forced a season-high 38 turnovers that the Pirates converted into 38 points. The Pirates won their 30th straight elimination round game since their amazing elims sweep last year that gave them an outright ticket to the Finals only to lose via sweep in the championship series against San Beda University.     The Generals kept the game close up until the early part of the fourth quarter before LPU stepped on the gas, forcing turnovers off choking pressure defense and turning them into easy baskets to blow the game wide open. CJ Perez led the Pirates with 19 points and grabbed five rebounds while Mike Nzeusseu posted 18 markers. Jaycee Marcelino played despite coming off a flu and finished with 15 points while Ralph Tansingco and Jayvee Marcelino added 11 and 10 markers, respectively, for the Intramuros-based squad. Despite EAC taking a six-point lead early in the opening quarter and keeping the game close the whole first half, LPU head coach Topex Robinson knew that his wards will still survive the Generals' challenge. "I think it's not really something that we're surprised with because I know the first half the energy level of the other team is still there. So we know that we're going to make some mistakes and what's important for us is how we sustain it (energy) for 40 minutes," said Robinson. "I think that's very important on the way that we have to be disciplined and the way that we play defense especially on offense," he added. "So it came as no surprise to us that the game's close in the first half."        EAC dropped to 2-9 win-loss record and absorbed its fifth straight defeat. Jerome Garcia flirted with a double-double with 30 points on 12-of-19 field goal shooting and nine rebounds for the Generals. Jess Bautista had 19 markers and 13 boards while Hamadou Laminou finished with 10 points and 10 rebounds in a lost cause for EAC.    The scores: LPU (95) - Perez 19, Nzeusseu 18, Marcelino JC. 15, Tansingco 11, Marcelino JV. 10, Pretta 5, Ayaay 4, Valdez 4, Santos 4, Yong 3, Caduyac 2, Ibañez 0, Lumbao 0, Cinco 0, Serrano 0. EAC (75) - Garcia 30, Bautista 19, Hamadou Laminou 10, Maguliano 8, Gonzales 4, Cruz 2, Neri 2, Diego 0, Corilla 0, Natividad 0, Mendoza 0, Cadua 0. Quarterscores: 20-18, 41-40, 61-53, 95-75   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles            .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 13th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Here s why Chris Webber should be in the Hall of Fame

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst C-Webb needs to be in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. My Turner colleague Chris Webber has always brought out polarizing opinions -- first as a player, and now as a broadcaster. And I’m not objective when it comes to him, either. I love the guy. He’s a true student of the game, not afraid to speak his mind on and off the court, and is someone whose love for the game knows no equal. It’s just a matter of time before he gets his chance to run a team, either in the front office or as a part-owner. But it will and should happen. And, after his impactful career as a player, he should be enshrined in Springfield. Everyone’s criteria for the Hall is different. To me, getting in the Hall as a player requires a yes answer to two questions: 1) were you among the very best at your position for a substantial period of time during your career, and 2) did your presence and/or play change the game in a meaningful way while you played? (This is why a guy like Sixers guard Andrew Toney, in my view, is HOF-worthy, even though “The Boston Strangler” played from 1980-88 and was limited significantly by injury in two of those seasons.) Webber is a “yes” to both of those questions. In the NBA, Webber was a five-time All-Star, four times with the Kings, and was Rookie of the Year in 1993. He was first- or second-team All NBA four times. His career PER of 20.9 is the highest of any non-retired and Hall of Fame eligible player that isn’t currently in the Hall. (Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett each have higher PERs than Webber, and each is an obvious HOF lock, but they aren’t Hall of Fame eligible until 2020.) Webber’s career PER is better than those of Hall of Famers including Allen Iverson, Bob McAdoo, Ed McCauley, George McGinnis, Billy Cunningham, Steve Nash, David Thompson, Connie Hawkins, Alex English, Walt Bellamy, Cliff Hagan and many others. Yet in his fifth year of eligibility, Webber was again passed over by the Hall of Fame voters this year. That needs to change. His impact on the game, from high school to being a member of the “Fab Five” at Michigan in college and during his 15 NBA seasons, is undeniable. The Hall encompasses all of a person’s basketball achievements, and Webber’s career is Hall-worthy. At Country Day High School in Michigan, he led his team to three state championships, averaging 29 points and 13 rebounds per game his senior season, when he was a consensus national player of the year. He then decided to cap an incredible recruiting class, which had three of the top 10 players in the country, among a group of freshmen that came to be known as “The Fab Five.” (Also on that Michigan team was a junior guard who averaged 2.9 points per game, who had no future as pro player, but who carved out a place for himself nonetheless in the NBA -- Rob Pelinka, who became a high-powered agent representing the likes of Kobe Bryant before becoming the Lakers’ General Manager in 2017.) “The Fab Five”, like it or not -- and, I liked it very much -- changed basketball forever. And Webber was the lynchpin of those Michigan teams that reached consecutive NCAA championship games in 1992 and ‘93. Across the board, the Fab Five had long-lasting impact. Aesthetically, they were vanguards, wearing long, loooong shorts that became all the rage throughout basketball.  And while trash talking has been at the heart of hoops for generations, Michigan raised it to a team-wide art form. It drove traditionalists crazy, while kids watching at home loved it. They were the accelerant to the “one-and-done” era, even though none of them left Michigan after their freshman season. But seeing five freshmen start games and play the lion’s share of minutes rippled throughout the college game. Going forward, teams didn’t just recruit blue-chippers, they put them on the floor immediately. What John Calipari does annually at Kentucky now is but the logical conclusion to what Michigan started, and every Power 5 team in college basketball has had to follow suit or get left behind. Of course, “The Fab Five” era wound up being star-crossed. I’m well aware of the penalties assessed to the Michigan program because of the money that Ed Martin gave to players, including Webber. The university vacated the ‘92-93 season, including all of its NCAA Tournament games that year, and took down the banners commemorating “The Fab Five” and their two Final Four runs. (Michigan also vacated all of its games from 1995-96 because of Martin’s associations with other players on teams during those seasons, and its ‘93, ‘96 and ‘98 NCAA Tournament appearances, as well as its ‘97 NIT title and ‘98 Big 10 Tournament championship.) It’s obvious to me that if not for his involvement with Martin, Webber would have been on the 2000 U.S. Olympic team, which won the gold medal in Australia, as well -- another potential feather in his cap that would bolster his Hall of Fame credentials. I will say, as delicately as I can, that there are coaches and players in the Hall that have been accused of doing some of the very things that got Michigan and Webber in so much trouble. That, in and of itself, should not be disqualifying. Webber’s NBA career also did not include a championship. But he was just as impactful on the pro game. Beginning in Golden State and Washington, C-Webb was a category all his own -- a big man with catcher’s mitts for hands who could pulverize in transition, yet was also an incredibly deft passer, both from the post or out front. As a rookie, Webber elevated Golden State from a 34-48 record in 1992-93 to 50-32 the next season. Traded to Washington after that one season with the Warriors, having conflicted mightily with Coach Don Nelson, Webber helped get the then-Bullets to the postseason for the first time in nine years. Once there, the Bullets went toe-to-toe with the defending-champion Bulls in a tough, three-game first-round series in ’97. But it wasn’t until Webber was sent to what was then the equivalent of Siberia in the NBA -- Sacramento -- that his game reached full flower. Playing with another excellent passing big man in Vlade Divac, and a flashy savant of a point guard in Jason Williams, Webber and the Kings were the vanguard of the modern NBA game, coming to fruition years before the Suns’ Seven Seconds or Less attack led by one of last week’s Hall of Fame inductees, Steve Nash. The Kings moved the ball with flair and purpose. The Warriors have changed the game forever by stretching the floor to the breaking point for opposing defenses with their 3-point proficiency, but even they didn’t have what Sacramento possessed -- two bigs who could initiate and finish from anywhere inside the 3-point line. No one could do what the Kings could do, and with Webber, Sacramento changed almost overnight from perennial joke to perennial championship contender. The Kings made the playoffs six straight seasons, reaching the Western Conference finals in 2002 before losing in controversial fashion to the Lakers in seven games. Webber’s knee injury during the Kings’ semifinal playoff series with Dallas in 2003 marked the beginning of the end for him and the Kings. If he hadn’t gotten hurt, Sacramento probably would have beaten the Mavericks and played San Antonio in the West finals. And while San Antonio would have been favored in that series, the Kings would have had a chance, with the winner facing the Nets in The Finals that year. And a championship would also have made C-Webb’s pro career look much different. But, that didn’t happen. It doesn’t matter, though. Webb’s career stands on its own merits. At all levels, he has had impact and changed the game, and he deserves to have his moment in the sun in Springfield. Sometimes it takes players of merit a little longer, for various reasons -- think Spencer Haywood, or, this year, Mo Cheeks. Chris Webber is a Hall of Famer, and it isn’t a close call. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Team USA brings NBA players to camp for next World Cup qualifiers

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) -- The U.S. is upgrading its roster slightly to start the second round of qualifying for the Basketball World Cup, bringing 10 players who were on NBA rosters last season to training camp. The first two games of the second round are later this month. The first two windows were in November and February, when NBA players were prevented from playing, and the June-July window conflicted with free agency and summer league. The Americans used mostly G League players under coach Jeff Van Gundy for those games. But the group headed to camp in Las Vegas beginning Thursday includes players such as Frank Mason III of the Sacramento Kings, the 2017 NCAA player of the year, Dwayne Bacon, who played 53 games with Charlotte last season, and former lottery pick Henry Ellenson of the Detroit Pistons. Reggie Hearn and center Jameel Warney, who helped the Americans go 5-1 in the first round, will also be in camp. The rest of the roster: Jordan Crawford, Isaiah Hicks, Derrick White, Dakari Johnson, Bryce Alford, V.J. Beachem, Ben Moore, Chasson Randle and Travis Trice. The Americans play Uruguay on Sept. 14 in Las Vegas and visit Panama on Sept. 17......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Gilas cadet Troy Rike won’t be joining NU in Season 81

Just nearly two months after joining up with National University, Troy Rike said on Thursday that he will not be playing in the looming UAAP Season 81. “Due to factors out of my control, I will not be able to play in UAAP Season 81. The news was devastating to me and I feel great regret that I won’t be able to take the floor with my teammates this season,” the Filipino-American big man said in a statement posted in his Twitter account. It is still unclear what “factors” were “out of his control,” but he made it clear that he remains in NU and remains hopeful to return to action there sooner than later. “It always has been and will always be my dream to play basketball in the Philippines. I hope to be able to pursue that dream here at NU and get back to playing soon,” he said. Rike played for four years for Wake Forest University in the US NCAA before coming back home to the Philippines to suit up for the Gilas cadets in the recently concluded 2018 Filoil Flying V Preseason Cup. He already holds a bachelor’s degree from Wake Forest, but has enrolled for a master’s degree in NU. As per UAAP rules, a student-athlete from a non-member school who is pursuing graduate studies in a member school shall not be subject to residency. As a post-graduate student, however, the 22-year-old will only have one year of eligibility for the Bulldogs. Now, it looks like that won’t be happening – in the looming Season 81, at least. Still, Rike showed much gratitude to the Sampaloc-based school in his statement. As he put it, “I would first like to thank NU, my coaches, my teammates, and management for welcoming me with open arms into the community the past couple of months. He then continued, “Although I’ve only been at NU for a short time, it really feels like home and I will always be thankful to have been part of the NU family.” The Gilas cadet then ended his statement by saying he will be cheering on the Bulldogs in the looming Season 81 tipping off on September 8. “I’m behind my teammates 100 percent and I’ll be cheering the squad on all season – no matter where the future may take me,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2018

PVL: Ang Benilde lalakas yan knowing coach Jerry -- Molde

Coming from a player molded into a star under the tutelage of seasoned coach Jerry Yee, University of the Philippines standout Isa Molde knows that College of St. Benilde will go a long way under his watch. The incoming fourth year Lady Maroon saw the familiar system of her former mentor Wednesday when UP faced Yee’s Lady Blazers in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Molde and the rest of the Lady Maroons crossed paths with Yee for the first time since the mentor stepped down from his position a year ago and was replaced by Kenyan coach Godfrey Okumu. UP emerged the victor in the meeting, 26-24, 27-25, 29-27, but not before a very tight battle. Experiencing firsthand the level of play displayed by CSB, Molde was convinced that the Lady Blazers are in good hands coming into the NCAA season.          “Happy ako for him kasi syempre may Benilde na siya and for sure Benilde lalakas ‘yan knowing coach Jerry,” said Molde, who played under Yee since her high school days with Hope Christian School and in her first two years with the Lady Maroons. CSB has been giving big teams especially UAAP squads in the tournament a hard time although still dropping those matches in the end. The Lady Blazers gave Far Eastern University a scare in five sets, Adamson in four and unbeaten University of Sto. Tomas in a challenging three-set duel.      But for Yee, he would rather see real results.  “Ayaw na natin ng morale victory you can look at it that way. Pero ‘yun nga working hard naman ‘yung girls so buti pinapahirapan namin sila pero yun nga morale victory pa rin yun eh. So they would have got a win pero wala e di na bale, go lang,” he said. Asked about his experience steering a team against his former players, Yee just took it professionally. “Okay lang, normal. Kumbaga players mo sila dati, friends pa rin naman tayo so wala lang,” said Yee.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 15th, 2018

LSGH champion guard foregoes basketball for studies in Ateneo

Joel Cagulangan and Inand Fornilos are still main men while Joshua David and Ladis Lepalam remain as key contributors for College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills in its title defense. One starter from that championship-winning team, though, is no longer suiting up – as a player, at least. Starting off-guard Jacob Lao is now part of the coaching staff for the Junior Blazers – just a year after graduating high school. Last year, he averaged 4.7 points including one triple and 2.8 rebounds. He also chipped in eight points and four rebounds in their title-clinching Game 3 win. Now, in the ongoing NCAA Season 94, he can be seen huddling with the coaches and handing out advice to the players. Along with wearing a different uniform inside the court, apparently Lao is now also wearing a different uniform outside the court. – and not just a different uniform, but the total opposite of that which he has been used to wearing. Asked where he has taken his talents to next, he told reporters with a grin, “Ateneo.” Yes, the CSB-LSGH champion guard is now studying BS Management in Ateneo de Manila University. He hasn’t turned into a Blue Eagle just yet, though. “I chose studies this time over basketball because this time, I want to focus on studies muna,” he said. For Lao, it’s about time that he prioritizes the student aspect of being a student-athlete. “Ang thinking ko kasi talaga is that basketball is not forever. Gusto ko munang i-prioritize yung studies kasi I can adjust naman (if ever) I want to play,” he said. After all, the son of Frank Lao who owns the Choi Garden line of restaurants will have to be involved in the family business sooner rather than later. Lao’s decision has the full support of both his family and his former team. “I made the decision (last May), but before I made it, I consulted with everyone from [CSB-LSGH head] coach Marvin [Bienvenida] to my parents. Sabi nila, if tama sa akin, then go,” he said. And apparently, this decision has been in the works for a long time. “When we won the championship, naisip kong kahit anong mangyari sa Seniors, studies muna ako,” he said. While he’s walking away from basketball, for now at least, the former Junior Blazers will always have the memories of that first-ever championship they brought home to Ortigas. “More than the championship, it was the brotherhood. Kaya nga I asked coach Marvin kung pwede akong maging assistant kasi ang hirap iwan yung samahan namin,” he said. And when that time comes that basketball comes knocking on his door anew, Lao said he’s only winning to entertain it. As he put it, “If ever maglaro ako ulit, nandun lang naman yung basketball.” Perhaps, a visit from Ateneo head coach Tab Baldwin just might do the trick? --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 13th, 2018

NCAA: Prince Eze wins game, then Player of the Week for Perpetual

Not wanting to get embarassed by the San Sebastian Golden Stags on their own home floor last Thursday, Prince Eze made sure to not let the Perpetual Help Altas and the Perpetualites in attendance down. "At halftime, I got mad actually," admitted first-year Perpetual head coach Frankie Lim as the Altas fell behind by as much as 21 points against their visitors. "I told them, guys, it's not about the Xs and Os. It's about your desire to win." Prince Eze and the Altas responded with a huge third quarter-outing to give themselves a chance to stun the Golden Stags. In the final frame, Perpetual and San Sebastian figured in a nip and tuck affair that saw the tilt go down to the final possession. With 3.3 ticks left, the two proud squads were knotted at 76-all. Burning his last timeout, Lim crafted a play for his main man Prince Eze, who had anchored his defense all game long. After the timeout, Eze received a well-time lob from AJ Coronel, perfectly angling his hands in the air to lay-in the game-winner with .5 seconds to spare. Disaster averted. "I don't want to lose whatever it takes," the 21-year-old Nigerian student-athlete said. "I know if I tap the ball, I'm still gonna catch it back. So I went inside." For his heroics, Eze, who finished the game with 22 points, 18 rebounds, and six blocks, was crowned as the Chooks-to-Go NCAA Press Corps Player of the Week. Though Eze says that luck has been on their side so far that has led them to solo fourth in the standings, their current mindset is something that they must sustain the rest of the way. "I mean, a win is a win. And we have to live with that," last season's Defensive Player of the Year shared. Eze bested CJ Perez of Lyceum, Robert Bolick of San Beda, Bong Quinto of Letran, and Alvin Capobres of San Sebastian for the weekly honor handed out by print and online writers covering the league......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 12th, 2018

NCAA: Frankie Lim designs the play, Prince Eze executes it

The NCAA on Tour for Season 94 is over, capped off by a great ending at the University of Perpetual Help gym in Las Piñas. The Altas had just clawed back from a 21-point deficit in the first half, 18-39, and were tied with the San Sebastian Stags at 76 with 3.3 seconds left.  Coach Frankie Lim had designed a very unusual play, but an effective one. Jielo Razon was supposed to inbound to scorer Edgar Charcos. But somehow, the ball was passed to the open AJ Coronel, who lobbed it to Prince Eze, who tipped the ball in with 0.5 left.  AJ Coronel NO! Prince Eze YESSSS! FOR THE WIN! #NCAASeason94 #GalingNCAA pic.twitter.com/XwAe8FndZw — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) August 9, 2018 Game over. Perpetual wins, 78-76, in front of a very supportive crowd. Students up in the hallway of the UPHSD Gym witness Prince Eze's game-winner •#NCAASeason94 #GalingNCAA @abscbnsports pic.twitter.com/OOVfUL2aV7 — Philip Martin Matel (@philipptionary) August 9, 2018 Thought it was a broken play? Nope, it was exactly how the experienced Lim wanted it to be.  "It was designed that way. Inexpect ko kasi i-dedeny nila si Charcos. Sabi ko kay AJ, you have to be available for the pass, which happened. If ever, if you have that shot, itira mo. Taas mo kay Eze. Ganoon lang yan. It made me look good," the former San Beda coach said after the game. It was not supposed to happen this way as the now 3-2 Altas dug themselves a very deep hole, because the team, Lim says, had been too aggressive to put up a show in front of the adoring fans. "Feeling ko they froze. Hindi na natin kailangan magkaroon ng ganyan. Do just like what you do in practice. That's all I ask. Do what you do in practice and you'll be all right." For Eze, who made the game-winner, he never wanted to disappoint the home crowd, who filled the building to the rafters. "I don't want to lose whatever it takes. Because I know if I tap the ball, I'm still gonna catch it back. So I went inside. I guess, he knows me very, very well. We've been lucky, I mean, a win is a win. And we have to live with that.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

NCAA: A new tower is on the rise for Red Robins

Mapua High School lost its biggest advantage last year when both Season MVP Will Gozum and Mythical selection moved on up to the Seniors. That twin tower pairing powered the Red Robins to a runner-up finish a season ago. Now, the team is being fronted by versatile swingman Clint Escamis as well as fellow guards Dan Arches and Karl Mariano. That doesn’t mean, however, that Mapua has a donut hole in the middle. In fact, slowly but surely, the void left behind by Gozum and Bonifacio is getting filled by rookie Jonnel Policarpio. The 16-year-old forward is giving his all to make sure the Red Robins do not get outworked and outhustled inside. He turned in his best game yet on Tuesday, posting a 23-point, 16-rebound double-double in their 85-77 victory versus San Sebastian College-Recoletos. For Policarpio, it was all just part of the job. “Ginawa ko lang yung sinasabi ni coach [Randy Alcantara] – rebound, depensa. Yun ako inaasahan ni coach,” he said afterward. For Mapua, though, that is exactly what it needs to be able to match up with the frontlines of fellow contenders College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills (Inand Fornilos, Mark Sangco) and Arellano High School (Aaron Fermin, Resty Fornis). Good thing then that their 6-foot-4 talented rookie is taking inspiration from the non-stop motor that Bonifacio, his fellow Kapampangan, had. “Sabi ni coach lagi na dapat, idolo ko si Warren – masipag, rebound lang nang rebound. Wag ko raw isipin na gagawa ng points, basta rebound nang rebound,” he shared. Even better is he has a good friend, and another kababayan, whose footsteps he could follow. “Katropa ko si Serrano,” he said, referring to now De La Salle University prized ward Encho Serrano. Like Serrano, Policarpio hails from Pampanga. Like Serrano, Policarpio plays with heart and hustle each and every second he’s on the floor. Like Serrano, Policarpio needs to play bigger than his size. And like Serrano, Policarpio is relishing his golden opportunity to see action in the big leagues after years of playing in ligang labas. “Nung 13-years-old ako, nag-ligang labas na ako para makatulong sa pamilya. Ibang-iba yung laro rito,” he said. He then continued, “Masayang-masaya akong makapaglaro rito.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 7th, 2018

NCAA: Charging Knights take on middling Chiefs

WINNERS of their last three games, the Letran Knights seek to continue their impressive run early in Season 94 of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) when they take on the Arellano Chiefs in the last game of the scheduled triple-header in seniors play today at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan City......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 6th, 2018

NCAA: St. Benilde dumps JRU for 2nd win

Putting a premium on consistency after an up and down first three games, College of St. Benilde sustained its play from start to finish to pound Jose Rizal University, 81-66, in the NCAA Season 94 men's basketball tournament Tuesday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Cameroonian center Clement Leutcheu posted 20 points and 14 rebounds while Yankie Haruna added 15 points, including nine in the third quarter for the Blazers, who evened their record to 2-2. "Before the game, what I told the guys was about consistency," said CSB head coach TY Tang, whose squad came off a sorry loss to defending champion San Beda in a game the Blazers blew. "We're a young team and we haven't rea...Keep on reading: NCAA: St. Benilde dumps JRU for 2nd win.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

HOF preview: Moss went deep to ignite Vikes, transform NFL

By Dave Campbell, Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The ball was flying down the field often for Minnesota during that drizzly night in Green Bay, and Randy Moss kept going over and past the defense to get it. Five games into his NFL career, Moss was a star. He was a revolutionary, too. There was no moment that better defined his arrival as the league's premier deep threat than that breakout prime-time performance against the two-time reigning NFC champion and bitter rival Packers. "Seeing Randall Cunningham smile, seeing him energetic," Moss said, reflecting on his five-catch, 190-yard, two-touchdown connection with Cunningham that carried the Vikings to a 37-24 victory. "It was just a great feeling." When the Vikings landed in Minnesota, his half-brother, Eric Moss, who was briefly his teammate, wondered about celebrating the big win. "I said, 'Going out? No, I want to go home,'" Moss said. Then defensive tackle John Randle tapped him on the shoulder. "Man, we're going to party tonight!" Moss said, recalling Randle's pronouncement to the rookie. "That's when I finally understood what it really meant to the guys for us to go into Lambeau and win." Twenty years later, with Moss set to enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame this weekend after being elected in his first year of eligibility, the swift, sleek and sometimes-sassy wide receiver has finally understood the depth of his impact on the game and the privilege of opportunity to serve as a celebrant of the sport. "I came into the league with, I guess, my head not really screwed on my shoulders properly," Moss said recently on a conference call with reporters. Over time, the "homebody-type guy" from tiny Rand, West Virginia, who ranks second in NFL history in touchdown receptions (156) and fourth in receiving yards (15,292), learned how to soften some of the edges he's carried since he was a kid. "I've been able to open myself up and meet more people, be able to travel the world," said Moss, who's in his third season as an ESPN analyst. "Football here in America is a very powerful sport, and just being in that gold jacket, hopefully I can just be able to continue to reach people and continue to do great things." Moss will become the 14th inductee from the Vikings, joining former teammates Cris Carter, Chris Doleman, Randall McDaniel and Randle. He'll be the 27th wide receiver enshrined at the museum in Canton, Ohio. That's a three-hour drive from his hometown, but it's sure a long way from poverty-ridden Rand where Moss and his sports-loving friends played football as frequently as they could in the heart of coal country next to the Allegheny Mountains just south of the capital city, Charleston. "It was something that just felt good. I loved to compete. I just loved going out there just doing what kids do, just getting dirty," Moss said. He landed at Marshall University after some off-the-field trouble kept him out of Florida State and Notre Dame, and he took the Thundering Herd to what was then the NCAA Division I-AA national championship in 1996. Several NFL teams remained wary of his past, but Vikings head coach Dennis Green didn't flinch when Moss was still on the board in the 1998 draft with the 21st overall pick. Moss never forgot the teams that passed on him, with especially punishing performances against Dallas, Detroit and Green Bay. "I just carried a certain chip on my shoulder because the way I grew up playing was just basically having a tough mentality," Moss said. "Crying, hurting, in pain? So what? Get up, and let's go." The Vikings finished 15-1 in 1998, infamously missing the Super Bowl by a field goal. The next draft, the Packers took cornerbacks with their first three picks. Moss never escaped his reputation as a moody player whose behavior and effort were often questioned. That led to his first departure from Minnesota, via trade to Oakland in 2005. The Raiders dealt him to New England in 2007, when the Patriots became the first 16-0 team before losing in the Super Bowl, to the New York Giants. After a rocky 2010 for Moss, including being traded by the Patriots and released by the Vikings, he took a year off. He returned in 2012 to reach one more Super Bowl with the San Francisco 49ers. Moss was not a particularly physical player, but for his lanky frame he had plenty of strength. His combination of height and speed was exceptional, and his instincts for the game were too. Carter taught him how to watch the video board at the Metrodome to find the ball in the air, and he had a knack for keeping his hands close enough to his body that if the defensive back in coverage had his back to the quarterback he couldn't tell when the ball was about to arrive. In an NFL Films clip that captured a sideline conversation between him and Cunningham during one game, Moss yelled, "Throw it up above his head! They can't jump with me! Golly!" For Vikings wide receiver Adam Thielen, who has lived his entire life in Minnesota, was a sports-loving 8-year-old in 1998 when Moss helped lead the Vikings to what was then the NFL season scoring record with 556 points. The first team to break it was New England in 2007 with, again, Moss as the premier pass-catcher who set the all-time record that year with 23 touchdown catches. "It's fun to look back at his career and watch his old film. I love when that stuff pops up on Instagram, to be able to watch some of those old Randy plays that made me want to play this game," Thielen said. "I try to emulate him as much as I can.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

NCAA: Dela Cruz game-winner caps off Arellano upset of Baste

Levi Dela Cruz would not be fazed whenever it matters most in the NCAA 94 Men’s Basketball Tournament. With Arellano University down by two with 14 ticks to go, Dela Cruz took charge and took the three that took down favored San Sebastian College-Recoletos in overtime, 82-81, on Friday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. The Chiefs were in control for majority of the matchup before the Golden Stags came charging right back. “We’re so thankful na umabot pa kami sa overtime. Good thing the boys stuck to our game plan,” head coach Jerry Codinera said post-game. Baste was up, 81-79, in the dying moments of the extra period until Arellano’s lead guard got the ball and decided to launch a triple try over the outstretched arms of both Arjan Dela Cruz and Michael Are. The ball proceeded to graze the back of the rim before falling to the bottom of the net. The Golden Stags still had 4.2 seconds to make something happen, but Dela Cruz intercepted the inbound pass to finish off Arellano’s return to the win column now at 2-1. Dela Cruz wound up with 10 points, all coming in the final frame and overtime, to go along with nine assists, five rebounds, and four assists. “He has a big heart. He doesn’t back down from an opportunity,” coach Jerry said of him. Forwards Maui Serajosef and Rence Alcoriza also did their part, combining for 23 points and five rebounds. Still, it was the two-way play of their second-year guard that proved to be the difference for the Chiefs – much like in their first win of the season when he scored his team’s last seven points. The same nerves of steel were missing for San Sebastian whose roller-coaster ride continues now at 2-3. Michael Calisaan fronted their effort with a 28-point, 17-rebound double-double, but also muffed on two free throws that would have ended the game in regulation. In all, the Golden Stags didn’t help their cause by going 12-of-28 from the charity stripe. BOX SCORES ARELLANO 82 – Alban 18, Alcoriza 15, Dela Cruz 10, Sera Josef 8, Villoria 8, Concepcion 7, Canete 6, Santos 5, Dela Torre 3, Sacramento 2, Bayla 0, Ongolo Ongolo 0, Codinera 0, Segura 0, Abdurasad 0 SAN SEBASTIAN 81 – Calisaan 28, Calma 15, Capobres 12, Dela Cruz 10, Are 8, Ilagan 4, Valdez 2, Sumoda 2, Villapando 0, Baytan 0, Desoyo 0, Isidro 0 QUARTER SCORES: 17-12, 31-25, 43-53, 72-72, 82-81 (OT) --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 27th, 2018