WATCH: Atom Araullo shares experience as first-time actor in Citizen Jake

MANILA, Philippines — Real life journalist Atom Araullo's first foray into film is to play an angrier version of himself, as "Citizen Jake." .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: philstar philstarMar 14th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

WATCH: Atom Araullo's acting debut in first 'Citizen Jake' trailer

WATCH: Atom Araullo's acting debut in first 'Citizen Jake' trailer.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 25th, 2017

De Leon’s ‘Citizen Jake’ as metaphor of an unchanging country

Award-winning filmmaker Mike de Leon's comeback movie, "Citizen Jake," finally premieres with two screenings this month at the UP Cine Adarna, University of the Philippines in Diliman, Quezon City. Broadcast journalist Atom Araullo, who makes his acting debut as the movie's titular reporter, told the Inquirer that he's "excited" about the UP screenings. "As the first public screening of 'Citizen Jake' draws near, we the filmmakers, are filled with anticipation and a great sense of relief that we have managed to bring this collaborative film to completion," De Leon told the Inquirer. The incessant buzz surrounding the film is quite understandable, considering that De Leon's l...Keep on reading: De Leon’s ‘Citizen Jake’ as metaphor of an unchanging country.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

WATCH: Atom Araullo shares lessons on love, relationships

MANILA, Philippines — How do you mend a broken heart? Can you be friends with your ex?.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2018

Rappler Talk: Atom Araullo shares 'GiftofHope to Marawi, Rohingya evacuees

Bookmark this page to watch the Rappler Talk interview on Saturday, November 25, at 7 pm. Use the hashtag #GiftofHope to join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook. MANILA, Philippines - In this season of giving, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) or the UN Refugee Agency, invites ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 24th, 2017

Max Collins shoots kissing scene with Atom Araullo for Citizen Jake

Max Collins shoots kissing scene with Atom Araullo for Citizen Jake.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  pepRelated NewsApr 4th, 2017

Myanmar’s great hope fails to live up to expectations – The Guardian

The script called for the lead actor, a Nobel prize winner, to seize control of a country, bring peace where there was conflict and prosperity where there was poverty. A nation emerging from years of military dictatorship was to become a beacon of hope not only for its cowed population but also for much of a fractured and turbulent south-east Asia. But like many political dramas – especially over the past 12 months – the script has not been followed by Myanmar and its de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. Now, a year since one of the world’s most famous prisoners of conscience came to power in the specially created position of state counsellor, the talk is not of progress. Instead, it is of drastically escalating ethnic conflicts that have simmered and sporadically exploded for decades; a new Rohingya Muslim insurgency that has prompted an army crackdown some say may amount to crimes against humanity; a rash of online defamation cases that have fostered a panic over freedom of speech; and a repressive legal framework that allowed the generals to jail so many still being in place. And all the while, Aung San Suu Kyi is accused of remaining mostly silent, doggedly avoiding the media. Many who led the campaign [to free her] were on the liberal side. I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher. Interviews by the Guardian with more than a dozen diplomats, analysts and current and former advisers reveal frustrations with a top-down government struggling to cope with immense challenges. Aung San Suu Kyi’s questionable leadership style, her inability or unwillingness to communicate a vision, and her reluctance to speak out against the persecution of minorities have raised the question of whether the popular narrative is misplaced. And although some defend her, saying it takes time to right the wrongs of decades, others see a fundamental misunderstanding of the woman herself. “Many of the people who led the campaign [to free Aung San Suu Kyi] … were more on the liberal side of the spectrum,” one diplomat put it. “I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher.” It’s a stark contrast to the Aung San Suu Kyi who, during 15 years of house arrest at her lakeside villa on University Avenue in Yangon, stood on rickety tables and delivered speeches about human rights over the gate. “And she was electric,” said David Mathieson, a longtime Myanmar researcher for Human Rights Watch who is now an independent consultant. “She was funny. She was informative. She was principled … And I think it’s lamentable that she’s not doing the equivalent of that now.” Five hours north by car from Yangon, Myanmar’s dystopian capital Naypyidaw stands surrounded by densely forested mountains. It is here, in the so-called Abode of Kings supposedly built to insulate Myanmar’s generals from attack, amid a landscape of deserted 20-lane highways and grandiose hotels, that Aung Sun Suu Kyi lives her life in power. The 71-year-old is a disciplined ruler. Her habit, established during imprisonment, is to wake before dawn and meditate in the house she shares with her pet dog and a small retinue of maids. She has breakfast with an adviser, often Kyaw Tint Swe, a former ambassador who spent decades defending the junta’s actions. An aide, Win Htein, says Aung San Suu Kyi eats very little. “The amount of food she is taking is like a kitten,” he said. “She doesn’t eat carbohydrates. Fruit and vegetables. No pork, or mutton, or beef. Only fish.” Her few indulgences include a vast wardrobe of luxurious silk longyis and evening film viewings, musicals being her favourite. Win Htein recently gave her a copy of La La Land. But mostly she works. And there is a lot of work. As well as state counsellor – a position created to get around the military-drafted constitution that bars her from the presidency – she is foreign minister, minister of the president’s office and chair of numerous committees. Widely described as a micromanager, she pores over documents after hours. A source close to the attorney general’s office says she asks to see a copy of every draft bill before it is submitted to parliament. Ministers routinely pass decisions upwards. “The problem is there are no policymakers in her cabinet,” said Burmese political analyst Myat Ko. People who know her say Aung San Suu Kyi inspires both devotion and fear. She is variously described as charming and charismatic, and sharp and authoritarian. “She feels like a real leader,” one diplomat said. “Intelligent, quick-witted, quite funny.” At the same time, he added: “I would say that she has appeared to be very keen to be the sole decision-maker to have no chance of establishing rival power centres.” Echelons above her subordinates in stature, the state counsellor is often depicted as living in a bubble, surrounded by a cabal of advisers who are too nervous to convey hard truths. A Yangon-based analyst working on the peace process said bad news often does not reach her. “In meetings, she is dismissive, dictatorial – in some cases, belittling,” said a senior aid worker who, like many others interviewed for this story, insisted on anonymity because he works with the administration. The government, he said, has become “so centralised, there is complete fear of her”. This is not the administration many hoped for when the National League for Democracy (NLD) took over the government [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 31st, 2017

Atom Araullo to star in Mike de Leon's 'Citizen Jake'

Atom Araullo to star in Mike de Leon's 'Citizen Jake'.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 21st, 2016

Jarvey Gayoso’s biggest critic? His dad Jayvee

In just his third season in the UAAP, Ateneo Football’s Jarvey Gayoso has already bagged three straight Best Striker nods, an MVP trophy, and a men’s championship. The star striker has come up big for his team on countless occasions and has emerged as the team’s go-to-guy, even more so now as the young Blue Eagles continue their quest for repeat titles. This year, Gayoso is on pace for another Best Striker nod with 13 goals in eleven matches played, and the defending champion Blue Eagles are second in the league, one point behind top-seeded University of the Philippines. With the way things are going, it may be hard to criticize Gayoso’s play… …that depends, of course, who you ask. Sunday afternoon, Ateneo avenged their first round loss to University of Santo Tomas with a 2-0 win, and Gayoso again had his hand on the win, scoring one of the goals. Watching from the stands was Jarvey’s dad Jayvee. In fact, it was Jayvee’s first time to see Jarvey and the Blue Eagles win a match in the UAAP live, and the younger Gayoso jokingly said that maybe his dad was a bringer of bad luck. “Honestly, this is his first game to watch na we won. I think he’s watched three games na one draw, tapos dalawang talo. After a while I was feeling na baka malas, alam mo naman mga Pinoy, superstitious,” Jarvey said with a laugh. “But then after today, of course, I’m blessed to have him here, he’s a busy guy, and my father drives all the way from Laguna to watch me, along with my mom and my siblings, it’s a nice experience to have him,” While most parents are their child’s biggest fan, Jayvee will be the first to tell you that he isn’t like that. Being a former athlete himself, the former Ateneo basketball star and PBA standout will always see areas of improvement, especially in his son. “I have every reason to be proud of what Jarvey does, but because of my knowledge on sports and how I’ve handled so many players before, Jarvey knows that I’m always tough, I’m here to criticize him, I’m always here to point out the wrong things he does, I always stress to him that without his teammates, his greatness is just 50 percent.” “I’m not the typical type of dad who will, you know, I’m more of the critic rather than, but at the end of the day, of course, my heart, I’m trying to do things to help him out even more, for his life.” Jayvee added. And for Jarvey, it becomes a source of motivation and a different perspective on his growth as a player. “Because my dad’s also an athlete, he’ll always see the things that I can improve on, which is good for me, because I’ll be able to understand what I can’t see and what he sees, and I’ll be able to know what I can further work on.” So far, it seems to be working. As for finally getting to see his son get a win in the UAAP, Jayvee was of course happy, but that doesn’t mean it’s a reason to stop working to get better. “I’m happy of course that they won, I’m happy he was able to score, ako kasi defensive player ako nung ako’y player, so I’m always…I fight him all the time, Jarv, help on defense! Pero nakikita ko nakakapagod din yung ginagawa niyang pagtatakbo ano, but of course I’ll never stop.” “Even if I’m content with what he does, at the end of the day, I am still gonna criticize, like I said, and tell him, may kulang pa din, Jarv. Never be satisfied. Never be satisfied.” Jayvee continued. The win over UST was of course a sweet one, especially for Gayoso, who was visibly down after their first round loss to the Growling Tigers. It was sweeter more so, having his dad around to see it happen. “Nakaka-kaba, siyempre, because your biggest critic is here, but at the same time I love it when he watches, I love doing well and and being able to know that he’s in a good mood because of the way I played, because it’s fulfilling.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

‘Surreal, surprising’: Piolo and Shaina on the Berlinale red carpet

  If you ask actors Shaina Magdayao and Piolo Pascual, collaborating with Lav Diaz in the martial law musical, "Ang Panahon ng Halimaw," was a career-defining experience. Especially for Shaina, who is a self-described "Lav newbie." "It was definitely surreal to have had the chance to finally work with the Lav Diaz," Shaina told the Inquirer. Watching the film for the first time in Berlin, where it was part of the main tilt, was just as momentous. "And we got to watch it in a prestigious festival like the Berlinale--- with audience members from all over the world." Challenging role She quipped: "All I hoped for was to play an 'extra' or a small part in a Lav Diaz film...Keep on reading: ‘Surreal, surprising’: Piolo and Shaina on the Berlinale red carpet.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

I LOVE YOU, THIS GAME: Death threats and 5-peso coins, the MBA was crazy

There was confidence in the Metropolitan Basketball Association's regional format to succeed. After all, people love it when their home gets the spotlight. At the very least, the MBA was going to be a strong league for the actual cities and provinces that were represented in it. However, even those who believed in the MBA the most probably didn't expect just how big the reception was going to be. It was crazy and someone like this writer, who was too young to experience the bliss that is the MBA, can't do it justice. Fortunately, those who actually lived through the craziness of the MBA can tell those stories now, 20 long years later. Chito Victolero, former guard of the San Juan Knights and current head coach of Magnolia in the PBA: Sometimes merong mga unruly crowd na talagang very supportive sila at merong fanatics so sometimes nakakagawa sila ng mga ‘di tama, but you know kasama ‘yun eh. Kasama ‘yung sa dapat mong paghandaan, kasi you have to include it in your scouting report, ‘yung how to be mentally tough during the game. Kasama ‘yung crowd dun. ‘Yun nga ‘yung MBA. That’s why kakaiba siya kasi kung regular crowd lang siya, parehas lang ng ibang liga ‘yan. That’s why kakaiba ‘yung MBA. The crowd was very different then. ‘Yun ‘yung maganda dun. Kasama siguro sa marketing strategy ng MBA ‘yun, how to deal sa ganung crowd. Kasi iba ‘yung crowd, iba ‘yung atmosphere, iba ‘yung spirit ng game, lahat nandun eh. Nakaka-miss nga eh. When you go to Bacolod, to Cebu, nae-excite ka agad because you know there’s a big crowd. We wonder if coach Chito has a scouting report for Ginebra fans during Manila Clasico?   Dondon Hontiveros, former guard for the Cebu Gems who went on to become a PBA legend. Current guard for Alab Pilipinas: There was a time talaga na masasabi ko na ‘yung outrageous na ginagawa ng mga fans pa… may mga batuhan. Nakita nga natin dito may nagbato ng bottled water sa referee pero it was worse then. It even came to a point na kapag nalaman ng fans kung ano ‘yung hotel ng kalaban parang inaabangan na ba. And ganun din kami if we go travel to Bacolod, ganun din ‘yung nae-experience namin. Fortunately for me, pagkakaalam ng mga taga-Bacolod, taga-doon ako because the year before, in 1997, I played there sa Negros Basketball Association for Central and maganda pinakita ko. So naalala nila na dun ako naglaro, so ‘di naman masama para sa’kin. Cebu vs. Negros was one of the premier rivalries in the MBA and Hontiveros was the star of the Gems. "Fortunately for me," might be an understatement for Dondon.   Rafi Reavis, former center for the San Juan Knights. Still plays for Magnolia in the PBA and is the winningest active player, with 10 championships: It was always one of the teams at the South, because it was always the North versus the South. Negros, we had a tough time down there. Cebu’s also a tough place to play – not only did you have do play in a hostile environment, and when I say hostile I mean coins being thrown at you, hamburgers, apples, anything you can think of, it can be coming your way. You really had to watch out if things get heated in those places. That was just how passionate the fans were. I mean, they’re the nicest people but hey, don’t come in here and try to take what we’re trying to achieve here. It was pretty cool.  I never heard any racist things but I’ve been cursed out by old ladies before. I remembered an old lady, about 80-plus year-old, she just walked by me before the game cursing me out so I was like ‘Wow!’. But I also understood these fans are just passionate, this was their home team, so I understood. I get it. And as a player, you cannot let stuff like that affect you, and that’s just the will power you had to have. You have to put yourself inside of a bubble and focus on the task at hand which is the game, win the game and get out of there, hopefully safely, and leaving everything else to the fans and the things you can’t control, you leave it alone. Rafi must have been quite the charm back in the MBA.   Reynel Hugnatan, former forward for the Negros Slashers and current forward for the Meralco Bolts with at least 5,000 career points in the PBA: Naalala ko nun naglaro kami sa Cebu, may dala na kamig mga payong sa ilalim ng upuan namin. Kasi alam namin, pag konting ano lang, magbabatuhan na naman. Pag nagbatuhan, ready na kami, may payong na kami. Always bring an umbrella folks.   Nash Racela, former head coach for the Batangas Blades and current head coach for TNT KaTropa: If you watch the MBA ang daming hecklers di ba, talagang sinisigawan ka the whole game. I'm thinking one game in Davao, and there was another game in Negros na parang the whole game, may isang tao nasa likod ko na sigaw lang ng sigaw sa akin. Ganun talaga eh, it just shows the passion of the Filipino basketball fans. That's understandable, it really made the game more interesting nung mga panahon na yun. We think coach Nash would prefer this set up than having to bring his own umbrella to the bench.   Alex Compton, former guard for the Manila Metrostars and current head coach for the Alaska Aces: It hurts if a five-peso coin comes flying from the upper deck and hits you in the head. That leaves a bump and that happened a few times in a few different places. In the MBA that was almost expected because everybody was so intense. You should have brought an umbrella coach.   Peter Musngi, the one and only "Voice of ABS-CBN," he was one of the key people for ABS-CBN in the MBA from the league's inception to its untimely demise: One of the things that I remember, and kapag inaalala ko nga lang kinakabahan pa ko eh, I think I was seated beyond Commissioner Ogie Narvasa then sa official’s table and noong nagbatuhan… we were warned already kasi it was Negros vs. Cebu, sabi baka magkagulo. Noong may questionable call daw ng referee, biglang nagliparan ‘yung mga coins. Nakita ko talaga tumatama kay Commissioner Ogie Narvasa, but he looked at the back and stayed. Ako naman, tatakbo na sana ako (laughs) kasi nagkakagulo na pero ‘nung nakita ko si Ogie, ‘Ay nakakahiya, sige na nga bahala na matamaan sa ulo’ (laughs). So that’s one. The others are from the coverage standpoint, dahil we were always moving around, and it came to a point paggising mo ‘di mo alam kung nasaan ka. It takes a few minutes to think ‘Oh, saan kami nanggaling? Saan na kami ngayon?’ Or the fact that we were eating Jollibee for breakfast, lunch and dinner (laughs) because ‘yun ang sponsor eh. That wasn’t bad, but we had to be creative and say, I mean kasi umuulan, umaaraw, ‘di mo alam tapos, sabi naming ‘At least man lang arroz caldo, mainit.’ Jollibee all day, everyday? Now that's crazy.   Ramon Fernandez, the "El President" and four-time PBA Most Valuable Player served as the MBA's very first Commissioner: The biggest problem of the Commissioner's Office at the time were the fans, the rowdy fans. Masyadong fanatic sa mga teams nila. I remember distinctly one game in Negros, it was the Cebu Gems and the Negros Slashers, nagkagulo yung players. The fans just started throwing things and I had to stop the game. Mabuti na lang nandoon yung bishop, sitting beside me. So pinakiusapan ko siya na, 'Bishop baka pwede mo naman kausapinyung crowd na let's just enjoy and have fun' pumayag naman siya. Natuloy yung game, laro ulit. Eh nagkaroon na naman ng gulo, ganun na naman nangyaro so I said, 'Bishop baka one more time,' sabi niya, 'Mon leave it all to God.' Sometimes all you can do is just pray and ask for Divine Intervention.   Ramon Tuason, CEO of MetroBall, Inc., the mother company of the Metropolitan Basketball Association: It was a Cebu-Davao game and Ramon Fernandez was able to gather 14 large garbage cans of debris [from the game]. From rocks, to plastic bottles, to bottles with green liquid inside, anything. Marbles, socks with marbles inside, they were throwing everything inside. As a matter of fact, we had to ban plastic drinking water from entering the stadium after like the fourth or fifth game. We had to go through the Army, the PNP, and everybody to have support in the stadiums because of the fans' passion. We call it the passion of the nation but sometimes, they become too passionate, too emotional. Very difficult to control the crowds. In Bacolod, there was a situation where a bomb exploded inside a garbage can. Players, coaches, and including us got death threats especially during the inauguration game, because as you remember, the PBA, who was I guess threatened, decided to move their opening day to our same opening day and made it a Robert Jaworski birthday bash. I guess Jaworski fans were a bit pissed off that we were in the same day but actually, they moved their opening day to ours, as a matter of fact, ABS-CBN had a countdown. The PBA was threatened? Interesting... (to be continued)   *I Love You, This Game is a series celebrating the Metropolitan Basketball Association's 20th anniversary. Stay tuned for more! READ PART 1: I LOVE YOU, THIS GAME: The logo that started a basketball revolution READ PART 2: I LOVE YOU, THIS GAME: The Passion of the Nation READ PART 3: I LOVE YOU, THIS GAME: Trouble from Lakerland --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

LOOK: Gretchen Ho enjoys All-Star Weekend with NBA personalities

Woman in Action Gretchen Ho had the the privilege of covering the NBA All-Star Weekend festivities at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, and what a sight it must have been. The former Lady Eagle had a chance to interact with numerous NBA players and legends in the three-day affair. Ho got a chance to interview Utah Jazz rookie and 2018 Slam Dunk Champion Donovan Mitchell, as they talked about the latter's chances of winning the Rookie of the Year award. Hello there, Slam Dunk Champion :) Donovan Mitchell comes from New York, but he says his idols are Lebron James & Russell Westbrook. Watch out for this exclusive interview with @spidadmitchel as he talks about possibly winning Rookie of the Year on ABS-CBN!!! @abscbnsports — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 18, 2018 The ABS-CBN host of course reported the festivities back to the Philippines, as she did so in front of the Staples Center. Reporting LIVE from Los Angeles, California. Can’t believe I just did my first LIVE report for @ANCALERTS & @ukgdos !!! #nbaallstar game in a few!!! #nbaallstargretchen @NBA_Philippines #NBAsaABSCBN #NBAsabaDOS — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018 The Umagang Kay Ganda host also had an opportunity to talk to two-time champion Chris Bosh, who has not played in the league since 2016 due to a life-threatening condition.  The former Raptor and Heat player however is positive about his setbacks, and aims for an NBA return some day. Chris Bosh in the house!!! What a humble guy!! Been sidelined for almost 2 yrs bec of blood clots, but he says he’s still hoping to come back to the hard court. He’s asking for our prayers & help in keeping him positive! Watch out for this exclusive on ABS-CBN 😊 #nbaallstar — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018 Ho also saw some notable fans in the vicinity of the Staples Center, an example being Korean model and actor Nam Joo-Hyuk, who is a big Stephen Curry fan. Guess who’s a @StephenCurry30 fan too??? :p #nbaallstar #nbaallstargretchen #nbasabados #nbasaabscbn #TeamStephen — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018 Of course, the fun of whole All-Star Weekend would not be complete if one did not watch the main event, the NBA All-Star Game. The 67th edition of the annual event had a different format this year, with the players not representing their respective conferences, but the top vote-getters in the East and West, LeBron James, and Stephen Curry, respectively.  Videos aren’t uploading. But check out my IG stories LIVE to see what’s happening here at the #NBAAllStar Game! My eyes can’t believe I’m seeing the best of the best @NBA players LIVE and up close!!! 😳 — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018  The reporter surely was not disappointed as she saw members of Curry's family, sharpshooter Dell, wife Ayesha, and even the two-time MVP's daughter, Riley.  Riley Curry in the house!!! Supporting daddy 😍😍😍 #TeamStephen #NBAAllStar #nbaallstargretchen #NBAsaABSCBN #nbasabaDOS — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018 Dell Curry!!!!!! 😭 #nbaallstar #nbaallstargretchen #nbaallstar2018 #nbasabaDOS #nbasaABSCBN — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018 Mission accomplished. Thank you @ayeshacurry ❤️❤️❤️ #TeamStephen #NBAAllStar — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018 Luckily, the former Charlotte Hornet was gracious enough to give a short message to his adoring fans back here in the Philippines. Hindi ko alam kung bakit ko siya cinongratulate, eh talo #TeamStephen. Congratulations for raising a wonderful kid!!! 😂 #DellCurry @abscbnsports @NBA_Philippines @NBAPremium @BTVHoops — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018 Ho's biggest part of the night though was not the game, nor meeting other NBA personalities. The reporter, who all we knows enjoys an extensive social media following, was left starstruck in seeing the greatest player of all time, Michael Jordan, on hand at the Staples Center floor to accept his city's hosting of the 2019 NBA All-Star Game in Charlotte.  The former Ateneo star was all giddy like a little girl, beaming at the sight of His Airness. Guys. Pagbigyan niyo na ako. Kahit anong pangit ko dito ipopost ko talaga ito 😭😭😭 MICHAEL JORDAN in the HOUSE!!!!! 😭😭😭😭😭 #childhoodhero I love you, @nba Philippines!!! #NBAAllStar #NBAAllStarGretchen #NBAsabaDOS #NBAsaABSCBN — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018 The Woman in Action's weekend must be capped off with a great photograph outside the Staples Center, successfully covering the event. You’ve been great, LA. You’ve been amazing, Lord. #beyondgrateful 🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻#NBAAllStar #NBAAllStarGretchen — Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) February 19, 2018 Congratulations, Gretchen!  Catch Gretchen Ho's exclusive reports from the 2018 NBA All-Star Weekend soon on ABS-CBN and ABS-CBN S+A......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 20th, 2018

Crowdsourced travel

IT USES a crowdsourced itinerary — that’s the main idea behind AXN Philippines’ newest travel show, Adventure Your Way, which started airing on Feb. 8 on the Sony Network channel. Hosted by Atom Araullo, every week the show poses two Philippine destinations on its dedicated Facebook page and asks visitors to vote on which experience […] The post Crowdsourced travel appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2018

52-year-old Filipina Ironman finisher aims to replicate feat in home soil

At 52 years old, Filipina triathlete Chang Hitalia powered through the grueling test of endurance that is the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii. The Ironman entails for triathletes to accomplish the following: Swim 3.86 km, ride a bike for 180.25 km, and run 42.2 km. It’s so tough that only 1 out of 10,000 people actually finish it.  For Hitalia, who only started doing triathlons at the age of 46, it was by no means an easy feat.  Hitalia may have a tiny physique but she’s powered by a strong desire to achieve her fitness goals—a must for anyone who wishes to be an Ironman.  Hitalia was like most people wanting to be a better version of themselves. Her journey began eight years ago when she joined a running group with the goal of shedding a few pounds.  Regular running gave her a high and soon, she joined races. In 2010, she started yearning for a tougher challenge. She added swimming and biking to her routine and soon, Hitalia was a full-fledged triathlete.  Unlike her running pursuits, Triathlon is much more demanding in terms of training time, cost, and motivation. Hitalia needed to make major adjustments to her daily routine to ensure she gets to train for all three sports and still have ample time for other things.  Soon, Hitalia aimed at loftier goals in the sport and in 2014, she finished strong in the Langkawi Ironman, bagging second place for her age group despite it being her first crack at an Ironman race.  Hitalia continued her swim, bike, run lifestyle, competing in two Ironman 70.3 races in Hefei and Xiamen, China in 2016. The latter earned her a coveted slot to compete in the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii.  “It was always a goal to qualify since I embraced triathlon as part of my life,” Hitalia shares. After qualifying, she knew the sacrifices she needed to make in order to finish strong in Kona.  Hitalia spent seven months reinforcing her stamina to endure the Ironman grueling leg. In between, she joined a number of races to check her progress. She also underwent training in different conditions—hot weather, strong winds, and uphill routes—essentially what the Kona race was infamous for.   Despite being prepared, Hitalia says that “you have to come in and fight” as far as Ironman races go. During the swim leg of her race in Kona, water conditions were not ideal to swim in. “Starting off with more than 600 female age groupers was really a struggle. I kept my calm and stuck with my rhythm,” she recalls. The bike part was equally brutal, too. “The hills were punishing, the heat and humidity were harsh, and it was crazy windy,” she describes.  Hitalia made up for lost time during the 42.2 km run. However, as with the tough nature of Ironman races, fatigue soon set in.  Thoughts of giving-up creeped up in her mind. With her dream almost within reach, Hitalia decided to soldier on.  As she crossed the finish line, she describes the experience as nothing but amazing. “The cheers from the crowd, the festive mood, and the red carpet made it an overwhelming experience. Suddenly all the pain subsided and all my hard work became reality. The happiness when you finally hear your name being called out is surreal,” Hitalia shares.  Having accomplished her goal of crossing the finish line in Kona, Hitalia’s next target is to finish strong on home soil. She’s focused to achieve this in June at the Philippine leg of Ironman.  Knowing what it takes to finish the grueling race and the elation that takes over, Hitalia wishes for her fellow Pinoy triathletes to experience this.  Her advice for those looking to join: Respect the distance.  “Train right, work with a certified coach, and come in adequately prepared. When race day comes, enjoy the experience,” Hitalia says.  With the Ironman Philippines posing a challenge for Filipino triathletes in June, Hitalia’s story of perseverance and success rings even truer now as she hopes to inspire more Pinoys to pursue fitness and be part of making the Philippines a healthier and fitter nation. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2018

WATCH: Atom Araullo chooses career over love

MANILA, Philippines — According to a recent Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey,.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2018

WATCH: Atom Araullo suggests 5 travel adventures to try

MANILA, Philippines — Looking for new adventures for summer? Here are five recommendations by well-traveled broadcast journalist Atom Araullo......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2018

WATCH: Atom Araullo’s top 5 'TravelGoals

MANILA, Philippines — Want to fill your 2018 travel bucket list? Here are five recommendations by well-traveled broadcast journalist Atom Araullo......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2018

Atom Araullo speaks up on press freedom

MANILA, Philippines – In an interview during the press event for his latest show,  journalist, TV host, and now film actor Atom Araullo admitted that while he enjoys exploring new facets of his career, news is still his core. Atom was asked about his views on press freedom during the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 3rd, 2018

Atom Araullo gears up for his new “adventure”

After taking a break from hard-hitting news and in-depth features on the country’s current affairs, host Atom Araullo is set to embark in a new adventure.  This time, driven andThe post Atom Araullo gears up for his new “adventure” appeared first on DZRH News......»»

Category: newsSource:  dzrhnewsRelated NewsFeb 3rd, 2018

WATCH: Atom Araullo answers awkward questions about romance

MANILA, Philippines — asked widely-followed broadcast personality Atom Araullo some inconvenient questions about the topic of t.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 2nd, 2018