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Venezuela military trafficking food as country goes hungry

PUERTO CABELLO — When hunger drew tens of thousands of Venezuelans to the streets last summer in protest, President Nicolas Maduro turned to the military to.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJan 1st, 2017

UNICEF chief condemns ‘carnage’ in Yemen with 2,200 children killed

The UN slammed Tuesday the devastating impact of Yemen's three-year conflict on children, with some 2,200 minors killed, and many more going hungry, forced to fight or dying from preventable diseases. "The relentless conflict in Yemen has pushed a country already on the brink deep into the abyss," warned Henrietta Fore, the executive director of the UN children's agency. Fore, who has just returned from a visit to the war-ravaged country, said in a statement she had seen "what three years of intense war after decades of underdevelopment and chronic global indifference can do to children." Nearly 10,000 people have died since a Saudi-led military coalition began fighting in Yemen...Keep on reading: UNICEF chief condemns ‘carnage’ in Yemen with 2,200 children killed.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2018

Doctors fear rise in organ trafficking as demand spikes

DAVAO CITY --- Trafficking in human organs, especially kidneys, could increase as a result of a spike in the number of people with chronic renal diseases, according to a government hospital official here. "Something must be wrong with our eating habits, the food we eat, the drugs that we take," said Dr. Ma. Teresa Bad-ang, head of human advocate and retrieval effort of Organ Procurement Organization (OPO) at Southern Philippines Medical Center (SPMC) here. Renal diseases, she said, were among the top 10 killers in the country today. At SPMC alone, the number of people with renal diseases had gone up to 32,000 over 10 years from just 6,000 in 2007, Bad-ang said. This made ...Keep on reading: Doctors fear rise in organ trafficking as demand spikes.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 26th, 2017

Myanmar’s great hope fails to live up to expectations – The Guardian

The script called for the lead actor, a Nobel prize winner, to seize control of a country, bring peace where there was conflict and prosperity where there was poverty. A nation emerging from years of military dictatorship was to become a beacon of hope not only for its cowed population but also for much of a fractured and turbulent south-east Asia. But like many political dramas – especially over the past 12 months – the script has not been followed by Myanmar and its de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. Now, a year since one of the world’s most famous prisoners of conscience came to power in the specially created position of state counsellor, the talk is not of progress. Instead, it is of drastically escalating ethnic conflicts that have simmered and sporadically exploded for decades; a new Rohingya Muslim insurgency that has prompted an army crackdown some say may amount to crimes against humanity; a rash of online defamation cases that have fostered a panic over freedom of speech; and a repressive legal framework that allowed the generals to jail so many still being in place. And all the while, Aung San Suu Kyi is accused of remaining mostly silent, doggedly avoiding the media. Many who led the campaign [to free her] were on the liberal side. I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher. Interviews by the Guardian with more than a dozen diplomats, analysts and current and former advisers reveal frustrations with a top-down government struggling to cope with immense challenges. Aung San Suu Kyi’s questionable leadership style, her inability or unwillingness to communicate a vision, and her reluctance to speak out against the persecution of minorities have raised the question of whether the popular narrative is misplaced. And although some defend her, saying it takes time to right the wrongs of decades, others see a fundamental misunderstanding of the woman herself. “Many of the people who led the campaign [to free Aung San Suu Kyi] … were more on the liberal side of the spectrum,” one diplomat put it. “I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher.” It’s a stark contrast to the Aung San Suu Kyi who, during 15 years of house arrest at her lakeside villa on University Avenue in Yangon, stood on rickety tables and delivered speeches about human rights over the gate. “And she was electric,” said David Mathieson, a longtime Myanmar researcher for Human Rights Watch who is now an independent consultant. “She was funny. She was informative. She was principled … And I think it’s lamentable that she’s not doing the equivalent of that now.” Five hours north by car from Yangon, Myanmar’s dystopian capital Naypyidaw stands surrounded by densely forested mountains. It is here, in the so-called Abode of Kings supposedly built to insulate Myanmar’s generals from attack, amid a landscape of deserted 20-lane highways and grandiose hotels, that Aung Sun Suu Kyi lives her life in power. The 71-year-old is a disciplined ruler. Her habit, established during imprisonment, is to wake before dawn and meditate in the house she shares with her pet dog and a small retinue of maids. She has breakfast with an adviser, often Kyaw Tint Swe, a former ambassador who spent decades defending the junta’s actions. An aide, Win Htein, says Aung San Suu Kyi eats very little. “The amount of food she is taking is like a kitten,” he said. “She doesn’t eat carbohydrates. Fruit and vegetables. No pork, or mutton, or beef. Only fish.” Her few indulgences include a vast wardrobe of luxurious silk longyis and evening film viewings, musicals being her favourite. Win Htein recently gave her a copy of La La Land. But mostly she works. And there is a lot of work. As well as state counsellor – a position created to get around the military-drafted constitution that bars her from the presidency – she is foreign minister, minister of the president’s office and chair of numerous committees. Widely described as a micromanager, she pores over documents after hours. A source close to the attorney general’s office says she asks to see a copy of every draft bill before it is submitted to parliament. Ministers routinely pass decisions upwards. “The problem is there are no policymakers in her cabinet,” said Burmese political analyst Myat Ko. People who know her say Aung San Suu Kyi inspires both devotion and fear. She is variously described as charming and charismatic, and sharp and authoritarian. “She feels like a real leader,” one diplomat said. “Intelligent, quick-witted, quite funny.” At the same time, he added: “I would say that she has appeared to be very keen to be the sole decision-maker to have no chance of establishing rival power centres.” Echelons above her subordinates in stature, the state counsellor is often depicted as living in a bubble, surrounded by a cabal of advisers who are too nervous to convey hard truths. A Yangon-based analyst working on the peace process said bad news often does not reach her. “In meetings, she is dismissive, dictatorial – in some cases, belittling,” said a senior aid worker who, like many others interviewed for this story, insisted on anonymity because he works with the administration. The government, he said, has become “so centralised, there is complete fear of her”. This is not the administration many hoped for when the National League for Democracy (NLD) took over the government [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 31st, 2017

Duterte urged to continue peace talks with rebels

DAVAO CITY – Farmers fighting for genuine land reform have appealed on Sunday to President Rodrigo Duterte to continue the peace talks with communist rebels after he scrapped the negotiations following the spate of deadly attacks by insurgents in southern Philippines. Duterte’s decision to abandon the negotiations with communist leaders came on Saturday barely a day after he terminated the government’s unilateral ceasefire with New People’s Army rebels who also ended earlier its own truce. Since then, at least 4 soldiers had been killed by rebels in separate attacks and three more are being held prisoners in the troubled region. The rebels demanded the release of some 400 political prisoners &'' mostly NPA fighters and their leaders – languishing in jails across the country, but Duterte flatly rejected the demand, saying, a peace accord must be signed first before he could grant amnesty to political prisoners, although he had ordered the release from prison at least 21 senior rebel leaders to join the peace talks. Duterte said he cannot free all political prisoners and claimed that such action may trigger unrest in the police and military. Peace talks and land reform  But Joseph Canlas, chairman of the Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas, one of the biggest farmers’ organizations in the country, said the continuation of peace negotiations is in the best interest of farmers, who are pressing for genuine land reform, land distribution and real change under the Duterte administration. “Farmers want the peace negotiations to continue. We want the peace talks to help address the problem of land monopoly, landlessness of farmers, unemployment and to realize the equitable distribution of social wealth,” Canlas said. “The peace negotiation is a separate and distinct track of struggle to press for significant pro-people reforms. While the New People’s Army and President Duterte announced the termination of the unilateral interim ceasefires, it should not hinder the continuation of the talks that is gaining relevant developments with regard to discussions on the Comprehensive Agreement on Social and Economic Reforms, particularly agrarian reform and rural development,” he added. Canlas said based on the reported outcome of third round of the peace talks in Rome recently, the government, in principle, acquiesced to free land distribution to farmers and farm workers and that alone is a milestone with regard to pushing for socio-economic reforms and enough grounds to continue the talks. Pedro Arnado, leader of the farmers’ group in southern Mindanao, also urged Duterte not to abandon the peace talks, saying, the resumption of war with rebels may spark a series of illegal arrest and human rights violations, and even extrajudicial killings of civilians by government soldiers. “We call for the continuation of the peace talks and compliance to the Comprehensive Agreement on Respect for Human Rights and International Law to avoid rights violations of civilians,” said Arnado, who noted that at least 20 farmers and national minorities were killed during the ceasefire period. “For us farmers, a just peace means food for our families, education for our children and recognition of our right to the land we till.” Arnado said while the ultimate goal of the peace talks is to resolve the armed conflict and achieve cessation of hostilities, that wouldn’t be possible at this period when there are conflicting social classes and interests. “Big land estates, haciendas and landholdings remain intact and under the control of a few landlord families. That is in contrast with the situation of millions of tillers,” Arnado said, adding, Duterte should realize that people in the countryside are supporting and even joining the armed revolution because of the systemic and chronic crisis that is worsened by the government’s failure to address the most basic problems in rural areas. “Historically, it is the peasant masses that have made the ultimate sacrifices to achieve peace. Buhay na ang ibinuwis ng mga magsasaka para sa lupa at kapayapaan. The cost of peace is too expensive, farmers have paid it with their lives,” Arnado said. Cancel passport of communist negotiators Duterte also threatened to cancel the passports of the representatives National Democratic Front of the Philippines &'' the political wing of the Communist Party of the Philippines and the NPA &'' who make up the peace panel negotiating with the government, saying, “they are in the wanted list, so I will alert the International Police to arrest them where they are because they are in wanted list. I'll cancel their passports.” “They can return, all of them. For those released by the government, they should, on their own volition, return here and go back to prison. Or else I will be forced to, I am alerting all the intelligence community to keep track of where they are now,” Duterte said. “Iyon na-release temporarily to talk with us in Oslo, they should come back and submit themselves to the jurisdiction of the government because they are still in prison. Walang pardon, walang amnesty, wala lahat.” Blame Duterte, AFP The NPA blamed Duterte for the breakdown of the talks and accused the military of sabotaging the peace negotiations, saying, security forces encroached and attacked rebel territories in Mindanao, and murdered innocent civilians suspected of supporting the communist group. “To conceal their own ceasefire violation, the spin doctors of the Armed Forces of the Philippines concocted yet another storyline of an anti-criminality operation to assist the Philippine National Police in going after lawless elements such as their botched combat operations in Makilala and Matalam [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2017

The Philippines wants more Bourdain-like tourists

ANTHONY Bourdain inspired a generation of travelers to look beyond sanitized attractions and experience a country's culture, food and people. The Philippines wants to make sure those tourists.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated News21 hr. 24 min. ago

Few good options on anthem protests for NFL owners

By Jimmy Golen, Associated Press The controversy over NFL players protesting during the national anthem isn't going away, despite — or perhaps because of — team owners' efforts to stop players from using the forum to speak out on political causes. The league's attempt to turn responsibility for disciplining protesters over to individual teams backfired on Thursday when the Miami Dolphins tried to categorize raising a fist or kneeling during the anthem as "conduct detrimental to the club." That gave them the right to punish a player with a fine or up to a four-game suspension — one game more than Buccaneers quarterback Jameis Winston got when he was accused of groping an Uber driver. Hours after The Associated Press reported on Miami's rules, the NFL and the players union issued a joint statement saying they were putting any anthem conduct policy on hold to see if they could come up with a compromise. But the owners aren't left with many good options to diffuse the controversy, especially with President Donald Trump eager to fan the flames. Here's a look at some of them: LEAVE IT TO THE TEAMS The Plan: The league's solution, which the NFL Players Association challenged, was to allow each team to determine whether to punish its own players for protesting during the anthem. The policy adopted in May by team owners subjected clubs to fines and required players to stand if they are on the field during "The Star-Spangled Banner," though it allowed players to stay in the locker room if they wished. This would have given hard-line owners in conservative regions a chance to clamp down while allowing teams in more liberal areas to let their players have their say. As it turned out, all it did was punt the ball down the road. The Winners: None. With players punished in some cities and protesting freely in others, there would always be plenty to complain about for those inclined to do so. And everyone seems inclined to do so these days. The Losers: NFL owners. Any punishment is destined to divide the locker room and the fandom; should a team actually suspend a significant contributor, it would only be hurting itself. And the guarantee of unequal treatment between and within teams would surely keep the issue in the news for yet another season. GO BACK TO THE OLD WAY The Plan: Ask players to stand at attention during the national anthem, and hope that they do. The Winners: Players, who would retain the ability to call attention to causes they believe in, namely racial inequality and police brutality . And President Trump, who gets applause any time he attacks the protesting players as he stumps for Republicans in the November midterm elections. The Losers: NFL owners, or at least those like Houston's Bob McNair who have chafed at the notion of the "inmates running the prison." They lose control and remain a subject of Trump's ridicule. KEEP PLAYERS IN THE LOCKER ROOM DURING THE ANTHEM The Plan: Players can't protest during the anthem if they aren't on the field during the anthem. Or so the theory goes. But the demonstrations were never about the anthem itself; it started as a way for 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick to protest racial inequality and expanded into a league-wide us-vs.-them after Trump's hollered at one rally: "Get that son of a bitch off the field." The Winners: Fans who were triggered by the sight of players kneeling during the song. And players, who could surely find another forum for their protests. The Losers: NFL owners. The president has already said this isn't patriotic enough for him, so there's little hope of him easing up on his criticism. And it would cost them the connection to the flag and country they have worked hard to cultivate. COMPROMISE The Plan: Other sports worked with their players so that they didn't have to protest to be heard. Maybe the owners make a donation to the players' pet projects, play a video on the scoreboard, or otherwise give them a forum for their concerns. The Winners: Players. It's not about the protest, it's about the cause. The Losers: NFL owners. Even if they could stomach the loss of control, the political intrusion on the sport is bound to alienate some fans. STOP PLAYING THE ANTHEM BEFORE GAMES The Plan: Join almost every other country in the world and skip the forced display of patriotism that demands players stand at attention while fans check their phones, finish their hot dogs or take the opportunity to visit the bathroom. If teams want to honor the military or local first-responders, let them do so free from marketing deals. The Winners: Fans who don't consider the anthem an integral part of the sports experience, giving them another 90 seconds in to spend in game day traffic without missing anything. The Losers. NFL owners. Concessionaires. And a whole generation of American Idol also-rans......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 21st, 2018

Dismissal of drugs case vs Espinosa, others reversed

THE Department of Justice yesterday reversed earlier findings dismissing the drugs charges against self-confessed drug lord Kerwin Espinosa and several others implicated in bigtime drug trafficking in the country. In a resolution, government prosecutors found probable cause to charge in court Espinosa, Wu Tuan Yan a.k.a. Peter Co, Lovely Impal,….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJul 19th, 2018

Five dead in South Korea military helicopter crash

Five marines were killed and one injured when a South Korean military helicopter crashed on Tuesday at a marine base in the country’s southeast, the defense ministry said. Source link link: Five dead in South Korea military helicopter crash.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 17th, 2018

The next senior World Cup is in France, not Qatar

By Anne M. Peterson, Associated Press MOSCOW (AP) — The "next" World Cup got plenty of hype in Russia. A massive cube was alight with video images of "Qatar 2022" in Gorky Park, while the ground floor of the high-end shopping mall at Red Square was devoted to displays touting the event. But apart from a social media campaign, there was little attention on the (actual) next senior World Cup: the women's tournament next year in France. That was surprising. In the past several years since scandal enveloped soccer's governing body, FIFA has made a point of proclaiming that it aims to raise both the role of women in the organization and the profile of the women's game. President Gianni Infantino appointed Fatma Samoura as the first female secretary general of soccer's international governing body in 2016, while also announcing the creation of a women's soccer division. The men's World Cup in Russia could have provided an opportunity to address equity in the sport while also pointing to the women's tournament next year. But France 2019 wasn't promoted much at all: No signs, events or displays in tourist areas. Samoura made some appearances, but was not visible during the awards ceremony following France's victory over Croatia on Sunday. Venezuelan forward Deyna Castellanos was deemed the women's soccer ambassador in Russia and she starred in a social media campaign anchored by the hashtag #DareToShine. But while the 19-year-old is considered a rising star in the women's game, Venezuela failed to qualify for France so the selection seemed odd. Infantino acknowledged more could be done for the women's game at his wrap-up news conference in Moscow. There's no doubt that the men's World Cup every four years is FIFA's financial juggernaut. But the women are the governing body's second-biggest commercial asset. "We have to invest in women's football. We are thinking of a new women's world league, because 50 percent of the world population, the ladies, need to be treated in the right way as well in a sport which is said to be macho like football," Infantino said. "We have to invest in women's football, we have programs and we have ideas." The call for greater equity in soccer is not new. In the run-up to the last Women's World Cup in 2015, a group of international players, led by U.S. star Abby Wambach, protested because the tournament would be played on artificial turf, which is considered by many to be inferior to real grass. The men's tournament had always been played on grass. Once the point was made about the turf, the tournament in Canada turned out to be a rousing success, attracting the biggest crowds of any FIFA tournament outside of a men's World Cup. It also broke TV rating records in North America, with the final drawing more viewers than any other prior men's or women's match in the United States. Following their victory over Japan for the trophy, the U.S. women went on to bargain for, and receive, a better contract with U.S. Soccer that brought them closer to the compensation level of their male counterparts. The Americans were not alone, national teams from other countries won more equitable contracts with their federations, including Australia and Ireland. France could provide FIFA an opportunity to showcase concrete change at the highest level, and the possible messaging couldn't get more perfect: France won a World Cup, and now will host it. Two issues stand out. It remains to be seen how much prize money will be increased in 2019. The U.S. women took home $2 million in 2015. In contrast, France's men earned $38 million for their victory on Sunday. And there's no word yet whether video replay will be used just as it was for the men for the first time in Russia. U.S. women's coach Jill Ellis was in Moscow the final week of the tournament for a media session put on by FOX, which has the domestic TV rights for 2019 France. She'd like to see an increase in prize money and the use of replay. "I don't know what the ramifications were in other countries, but you look at our own team, in our own country and the viewership and the attendance — there's no difference (with the men)," Ellis said. "So I think that FIFA 100 percent should look at our game as a game, not as a women's game or a men's game." ___ AP Sports Writer Ron Blum in Moscow contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 17th, 2018

LIST: 15 rainy days comfort food

These rainy days, craving for food could be more intense. Fortunately, more and more food stores are opening in the country to satisfy one’s hunger......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

LIST: 15 rainy days comfort food

These rainy days, craving for food could be more intense. Fortunately, more and more food stores are opening in the country to satisfy one’s hunger......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

After 8 years, Filipino family in Dubai with no money, legal documents hopes for UAE amnesty

A Filipino single mother of two is banking on the United Arab Emirates' amnesty program which allows visa violators to rectify their status or return home with no fines. Michelle, 46, has lived in Dubai for 23 years, with poor decisions and misfortune leaving her family trapped as illegal residents in the country, reports Khaleej Times. When she arrived in 1995, she worked at an American fast food company for six years then moved to an advertising firm as a secretary. Organizing visa and travel documents of the firm's staff led her to form her own agency in 2006. Off to a good start, Michelle's fortune dried up when clients whose tourist visas she sponsored stayed past the visa e...Keep on reading: After 8 years, Filipino family in Dubai with no money, legal documents hopes for UAE amnesty.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

With flags, song, pride, French celebrate unifying victory

By Elaine Ganley, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — It was a victory for all of France and the home crowd did it justice, pouring into Paris' Champs-Elysees Avenue by the tens of thousands to celebrate in an explosion of joy. France's 4-2 win over Croatia in the World Cup final in Moscow on Sunday marked the second time in 20 years that France has won the World Cup, and came at a time when the people feel needy. "It represents enormous things," said Goffrey Hamsik, dressed in a hat resembling a rooster — the French national symbol — and a shirt with the No. 10 for Kylian Mpappe, the 19-year-old breakout star who hails from the Paris suburb of Bondy. "We've had lots of problems in France these past years," he said, recalling deadly terror attacks. "This is good for the morale ... Here, we are all united. We mix. There is no religion, there is nothing, and that's what feels good." Troublemakers marred some of the festivities at the top of the Champs-Elysees, breaking the window of a major store, throwing bottles, temporary barriers and even a bicycle at riot police as the celebrations wound down close to midnight. Police responded with water cannon and tear gas. BFM-TV reported that the store was pillaged. Earlier, people wrapped in flags and dressed in crazy hats, and one man spotted totally nude except for the Tricolor, marched down the avenue where France displayed its military might a day earlier for Bastille Day. Revelers set off smoke bombs in the national colors — blue, white and red — obscuring Napoleon's triumphal arch. People climbed atop every newspaper kiosk and bus stop in the area to wave flags and lead the crowds below in cheers. The national anthem, the Marseillaise, rang out, cars honked horns and cherry bombs cracks. A young man sprayed a fire extinguisher on the crowd on a late hot afternoon. Hundreds of police in riot gear were discretely lined up on side streets to monitor revelers. Typically, celebrations in France end up with some broken shop windows and other destruction, and Sunday was no exception. Tear gas was lobbed at one point on the Champs-Elysees. About 4,000 police watched over the fan zone — packed to its 90,000 capacity — during the match, then moved to the Champs-Elysees and neighboring streets. As night fell, The Eiffel Tower flashed 1998-2018 to mark France's two World Cup titles. The Arc de Triomph was awash in the national colors, lit with the rooster, the faces of the winning team and the words "Proud to be Blue," or French. The celebrations were spread across the nation. For all the crazy antics — and some revelers who got out of control — a sense of patriotism and unity was almost visceral. Antoine Griezmann, the France striker who scored one of the goal's Sunday, told a news conference two days before the final, televised on BFM TV, that pride in country is in short supply. "We say it so little ... We should be proud to be French," Griezmann said. Mahmoud Bourassi was among those taking a longer-term view and he had some sobering thoughts about France's run to the title and the festivities it has sparked. Bourassi runs a youth center in Bondy — Mbappe's home that was among those scarred by riots in 2005 that exposed the fissures of France that have yet to heal — and he knows the teenage star of the tournament. "All this euphoria and effervescence, it's positive but it's emotional and ephemeral," he said ahead of France's win. Bourassi said sports is a "catalyst to bring people and nations together." But, he added, it must be built on. "What we're seeing is magic, exceptional. But what are we going to do with it tomorrow?" That is a question for President Emmanuel Macron, who was in Moscow celebrating with the team on victory night, and will receive the squad more formally on Monday at the presidential Elysee Palace. Revelers celebrated the moment. "We're happy. It took 20 years ... It's the pride of the nation. It unites everyone. It federates," Frederique Pourquet said as she and her friend left the Champs-Elysees. The win "shows that the French people are consolidated and the work of all France," said Omar Bzi. Hajar Maghnaoui, of Asnieres, north of Paris, said "It's a way to bring the French people together, and also the world." ___ John Leicester in Moscow contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

S. Korea probes army plan for troops to control protesters

SEOUL, South Korea --- A group of army generals rolling tanks and troops into Seoul to seize power. Paratroopers firing at large crowds calling for democracy. Tanks and armored vehicles stationed at universities to intimidate student protesters. Such scenes of military intervention in South Korea have been nonexistent since the country achieved democracy in the late 1980s. But revelations this past week of a document showing the military drafted plans to mobilize troops to suppress protests last year have struck a nerve among people in one of Asia's most vibrant and wealthiest democracies. Some allege the plans even included a scenario for a coup. The memories of brutal, mil...Keep on reading: S. Korea probes army plan for troops to control protesters.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 15th, 2018

Israel fires missile at second drone from Syria this week

Israel's military says that for the second time this week it has fired a Patriot missile at an unmanned aircraft that approached the country's border from Syria......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 13th, 2018

‘Time to reset the thinking of Philippine military’

      Amid growing concerns over the territorial disputes in the South China Sea, it's a fine time for the top brass of the Armed Forces of the Philippines to go back to the drawing board and rethink their mindset in dealing with the country's security problems.   "It's about time to reset the thinking of the leadership in the military and look at the Navy and give it more importance," said Marites Vitug, author of Rock Solid: How the Philippines Won Its Maritime Case Against China.   The author said she was able to interview Navy officers and former Navy chiefs for her upcoming book, which details the developments that led to the lan...Keep on reading: ‘Time to reset the thinking of Philippine military’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 13th, 2018

NFA wants to import another 500,000 MT of rice to boost inventory

The National Food Authority (NFA) is planning to import another 500,000 metric tons of rice to boost its record-low inventory. In a press conference, NFA Administrator Jason Aquino---who heads the management body of NFA---said they would ask the NFA Council in a meeting next Tuesday (July 17) to allow the importation of 500,000 MT of rice as early as possible. If approved, this would bring the agency's imports for 2018 to 1 million MT. It got clearance for two tranches of rice importation at 250,000 MT each tranche earlier. The first tranche is currently being distributed to markets across the country while the second tranche is expected to arrive in August. As more subsidize...Keep on reading: NFA wants to import another 500,000 MT of rice to boost inventory.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

 Minority senators seek probe of Chinese military planes’ ‘technical stops’ in Davao

The Senate minority bloc has called for an inquiry intothesuccessive "technical stops" of Chinese military aircraft at the Davao City International Airport to establish whether the incidents have violated the constitutionalprohibition ofthe presence offoreign troopsin the country. Theminority group, composed of Senate Minority Leader Franklin Drilon, Senators Leila de Lima,BamAquino, Risa Hontiveros, Francis "Kiko" Pangilinan, and Antonio "Sonny" Trillanes IV, filed their resolutionon Monday. "The successive occurrence of Chinese military planes making technical stops in Davao City raises the question of whether the Constitution's proscription against the presence of foreign troops...Keep on reading:  Minority senators seek probe of Chinese military planes’ ‘technical stops’ in Davao.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018

Off to Europe: Trump to meet worried NATO heads, then Putin

WASHINGTON --- Donald Trump's weeklong trip to Europe will test already strained bonds with some of the United States' closest allies. And it will put him face to face with the leader of the country whose electoral interference was meant to help put him in office. Trump departs Tuesday on a four-nation tour amid simmering disputes over trade and military spending with fellow Western democracies and speculation about whether he will rebuke or embrace Russian President Vladimir Putin. He meets the Russian leader in Helsinki at the finale of a trip with earlier stops in Belgium, England and Scotland. On this trip, after meeting with NATO leaders in Brussels, he'll travel to th...Keep on reading: Off to Europe: Trump to meet worried NATO heads, then Putin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 8th, 2018

Philippines’ top agriculture imports

By Lourdes O. Pilar, Researcher In the first quarter of 2018, the country’s agriculture imports totalled $2.994 billion, 4.2% higher compared to $2.874 billion logged in same period a year ago. Cereals accounted nearly a fifth of the total value of imported farm products during the January to March period. Residues and waste from food… link: Philippines’ top agriculture imports.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 8th, 2018