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The night Hollywood wore black

  From the get-go, the 2018 Golden Globe awards wore the TV-film industry's collective heart on its sleeve--- and it was colored black. Black for cumulative mourning over past, unaddressed excesses; for firm, no-nonsense resolve to finally put a stop to the power-tripping and sexual exploitation that have claimed many victims for decades---and as a grim and "deadly" warning for predators to stop. Now. The no-nonsense tone was set early on by the very first award, for best TV actress Nicole Kidman's portrayal of a victim of domestic violence in the series, "Big Little Lies." To further underscore the pointed focus, reference and preference, the show itself won for bes...Keep on reading: The night Hollywood wore black.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJan 16th, 2018

Wade turns back the clock and 76ers in Game 2 Heat victory

By Dan Gelston, Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Dwyane Wade turned in a vintage performance, scoring 28 points to end the 76ers' 17-game winning streak and lead the Miami Heat to a 113-103 Game 2 win over Philadelphia on Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) and even the first-round playoff series. Playing without injured All-Star center Joel Embiid for the 10th straight game, the Sixers nearly pulled off an epic comeback and rallied from 16 down to just two points late in the fourth. Philly fans were going wild and suddenly the home-court edge that had made the Sixers unbeatable for a month seemed like it would perk the team back up for one more notch on the winning streak. Wade buried two big buckets down the stretch that pushed back the Sixers and tied the series as it shifts to Miami for Game 3 on Thursday (Friday, PHL time). The Sixers lost for the first time since March 13 (Mar. 14, PHL time) to Indiana. They won 16 straight to end the regular season and the first game of the playoffs. Wade's play resembled his glory days at times and he carried the Heat in a sensational second quarter that was the difference. He pump-faked his way to 15 points in the quarter — impressive enough, even moreso that he outscored the potent Sixers by two points. The 36-year-old Wade made his first seven shots of the game and passed Larry Bird for 10th on the NBA's career postseason scoring list. After a Game 1 victory where they couldn't miss, the Sixers couldn't make a big bucket in the first half. The Sixers made a team playoff-record 18 three's in Game 1 and missed a whopping 16-of-18 three's in the first half. Robert Covington missed all five and Dario Saric was 0 for 4. The Sixers made four baskets and scored 13 points in the quarter. The Heat slowed the game down — exactly the kind of style where the Sixers needed Embiid in the middle — and used a collective of defenders on Ben Simmons that rattled the rookie point guard early. The passing-and-pushing offense that got the Sixers to the No. 3 seed in the East failed them for the first time since early March. But there was life left in the fourth. Saric was fouled by Wade and sank both from the line to make it 91-82 and he followed with a three the next time down that sent the crowd into a frenzy. Saric broke up a pass on defense that led to a Simmons dunk and suddenly 18 straight wins was within reach. Ersan Ilyasova made a tip shot to close to 98-96. Wade contributed with baskets, assists and free throws over the final 4 minutes to close out the win. Simmons led the Sixers with 24 points and Saric had 23. TIP-INS Heat: Goran Dragic scored 20 points and James Johnson had 18. 76ers: Philly native and Hollywood star Kevin Hart rang the ceremonial Liberty Bell and sat courtside a few seats down from Allen Iverson. ... Team consultant Jerry Colangelo was at the game. EMBIID UPDATE Embiid wore his black mask and put on a three-point shootout in pregame that had fans going wild with each shot. Again, there was no timetable on when Embiid would return this series, if at all. "I can't wait to get him back," coach Brett Brown said. "He, to me, is the difference maker. Joel Embiid changes the dynamics in many ways of this team. There will be a reintroduction of him back into the team." LINEUP CHANGE Ilysaova got the start at center for the first time in Embiid's absence over Amir Johnson. REMEMBERING GREER The 76ers held a moment of silence for Hall of Famer Hal Greer. Greer died Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) after a brief illness. He was 81. He's the 76ers' career leader in points, field goals, field goals attempted, games and minutes played. "He was a graceful man. He was class. He was a gentleman," Brown said. UP NEXT Game 3 is Thursday (Friday, PHL time) and Game 4 is Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) in Miami......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 17th, 2018

The night Hollywood wore black

  From the get-go, the 2018 Golden Globe awards wore the TV-film industry's collective heart on its sleeve--- and it was colored black. Black for cumulative mourning over past, unaddressed excesses; for firm, no-nonsense resolve to finally put a stop to the power-tripping and sexual exploitation that have claimed many victims for decades---and as a grim and "deadly" warning for predators to stop. Now. The no-nonsense tone was set early on by the very first award, for best TV actress Nicole Kidman's portrayal of a victim of domestic violence in the series, "Big Little Lies." To further underscore the pointed focus, reference and preference, the show itself won for bes...Keep on reading: The night Hollywood wore black.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 16th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Vincent Cassel ties knot with model

Hollywood actor Vincent Cassel, 51, married 21-year-old model Tina Kunakey in a low-key ceremony in his native France on Friday. The actor, who appeared in "Black Swan" and two of the "Ocean's" series of heist films, shot to fame in the mid-1990s as the troubled young man from the Parisian suburbs in the critically acclaimed "La Haine". Cassel, wearing dark sunglasses, a cream jacket and open-necked pink shirt,tied the knot with Kunakey in front of around 100 guests in Bidart, a small coastal village near Biarritz in southwestern France. His bride wore a white tulle gown with strapless bodice, full skirt and long train, arriving for the ceremony in a black Bentley. Cassel...Keep on reading: Vincent Cassel ties knot with model.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 25th, 2018

Rich Asian style

SINGAPORE --- Upcoming Hollywood movie Crazy Rich Asians, based on the bestselling book by Singapore-born, United States-based author Kevin Kwan, is centered on the lives of the ultra-rich and famous in Singapore. So it is only fitting that the film's world premiere, held in Los Angeles on Tuesday night, reflected some of that fabulous glitz and glamour. Here are what some of the cast members wore (yes, diamonds and sequins were absolutely necessary). Constance Wu American-Chinese actress Constance Wu, who plays leading lady Rachel in the film, showed up in a strapless white sequinned dress with tasselled sleeves. The dress was so glamorous, it was only sensible that she kep...Keep on reading: Rich Asian style.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 12th, 2018

Red carpet filled with color for Oscars ceremony after tumultuous Hollywood year

After an ocean of black in previous Hollywood events, stars bring out the colors on Oscar night......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsMar 5th, 2018

Oscars at home: The mac-and-cheese recipe to be served to the stars

Get a taste of Hollywood's most glamorous night by recreating recipes which will be served to the glitterati that night. When all the awards have been handed out on Sunday night, Hollywood's best will party at the annual Governors Ball, where celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck will preside over his 24th gala dinner. Here's one of Puck's recurring dishes: baked macaroni and cheese. Servings: Serves 4 Ingredients: 8 ounces elbow macaroni 6 tablespoons unsalted butter 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 3 1/2 cups milk 3 tablespoons finely chopped black truffle (optional) 1/2 medium white onion 1 bay leaf 10 ounces sharp aged white Cheddar, shredded 3 ounces Gr...Keep on reading: Oscars at home: The mac-and-cheese recipe to be served to the stars.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 4th, 2018

LeBron wears 1 black shoe, 1 white shoe saying equality

WASHINGTON (AP) — LeBron James made a statement with his shoes. James wore one black sneaker and one white sneaker for the first half of his Cleveland Cavaliers' game at the Washington Wizards on Sunday night (Monday, PHL time) — and each had the word "equality" written in gold capital letters on the back. ⚪️ #EQUALITY ⚫️#StriveForGreatness🚀 pic.twitter.com/agCcvLty8z — Cleveland Cavaliers (@cavs) December 17, 2017 The four-time NBA MVP wore a pair of black shoes with "equality" written on them for Cleveland's opening game of the season. James changed shoes for the second half......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 18th, 2017

Steelers lock up AFC North with 39-38 win over Ravens

By Will Graves, Associated Press PITTSBURGH (AP) — The Pittsburgh Steelers won one for injured star Ryan Shazier — and wrapped up the AFC North in the process. Chris Boswell made a 46-yard field goal with 42 seconds left and Pittsburgh’s defense overcame a sloppy night to stop one Baltimore’s last-gasp drive in the Steelers’ 39-38 victory Sunday night. The Steelers (11-2) trailed by 11 points going into the fourth quarter but capped an emotionally trying week following Shazier’s spinal injury to rally for their eighth straight victory and third division title in four years. Ben Roethlisberger threw for 506 yards and two touchdowns, becoming the first quarterback in NFL history to top 500 yards passing three times. Antonio Brown caught 11 passes for 213 yards, including two long gains in the fourth quarter that allowed the Steelers to recover after blowing an early 14-point lead. Le’Veon Bell had 125 yards of total offense and scored three touchdowns. Baltimore’s Joe Flacco threw for 269 yards passing with two touchdowns and one interception but was strip-sacked by rookie linebacker T.J. Watt on the Ravens’ final snap. Alex Collins ran for 120 yards and a touchdown for the Ravens (7-6). Javorius Allen scored two touchdowns of his own and Baltimore appeared to have things well in hand after Allen’s second touchdown run gave the Ravens a 38-29 lead with 6:44 to go. Then Roethlisberger and Brown went back to work. A 57-yard connection set up an 11-yard sprint by Bell with 3:29 to go. The Steelers forced the Ravens into a three-and-out and Roethlisberger calmly led Pittsburgh within field goal range, including a 34-yard lob down the sideline to Brown that set up Boswell’s winner. The Ravens had one last shot, but Watt chased down Flacco as Flacco scrambled to buy time. The ball rolled out of bounds and the clock expired before the Ravens could get off another play. Shazier, who remains in a Pittsburgh hospital recovering from a spinal injury suffered last week against Cincinnati, told his teammates to finish the work he helped start, and the Steelers raced to a quick 14-0 lead behind Bell. He lined up in the slot and worked free for a 20-yard touchdown reception on Pittsburgh’s first drive then bulled over from a yard out early in the second quarter to give the Steelers some breathing room. Then the adrenaline faded and the reality of replacing Shazier set in. The Ravens recovered from a slow start to get back in it, with Flacco finding Moore for a 30-yard score and Collins bouncing off a handful of defenders on his way to an 18-yard touchdown that helped Baltimore get to 20-14 at the break. HONORING SHAZIER The Steelers spent the week trying to deal with the emotional toll taken by Shazier’s injury while also trying to focus on the task at hand. Still, he remained very much a part of Pittsburgh’s division-clinching win. Linebacker James Harrison took to the field shirtless during warmups even as temperatures hovered in the low-30s, a nod to one of Shazier’s pregame rituals. Several players wore NFL-approved tributes to Shazier on their cleats. Defensive captain Cam Heyward carried Shazier’s No. 50 jersey out onto the field during introductions and when Roosevelt Nix drilled Moore on the opening kickoff, Nix lifted his jersey to show a black T-shirt with Shazier’s number on it inside a gold circle. UP NEXT Ravens: Visit winless Cleveland next Sunday. Baltimore beat the Browns 24-10 on Sept. 17. Steelers: Will try to beat Tom Brady and New England for the first time since 2011 next Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 11th, 2017

Young wins point guard battle, Hawks top Thunder 142-126

By Charles Odum, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Trae Young had 24 points and 11 assists to win the showdown of past and former Atlanta point guards, leading the Hawks over the Oklahoma City Thunder 142-126 on Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time). Former Hawks point guard Dennis Schroder scored 21 points in his return to Atlanta. Schroder struggled early but had 14 points in the third period when the Thunder outscored the Hawks 41-27 to reclaim the lead. Atlanta was similarly dominant in the second period, outscoring Oklahoma City 45-30 to match its high mark for any quarter this season. After holding a big lead of 15 points, the last time at 70-55, the Hawks led 70-59 at halftime. Led by Schroder and Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City answered strong in the third period. A jumper by Westbrook tied the game at 87-all. Schroder scored the Thunder's final 11 points of the third period, the last six on free throws, for a 100-97 lead. John Collins made 12-of-14 shots from the field and led Atlanta with 26 points. Alex Len had 24 points and 11 rebounds. The Hawks were 18-of-37 on three-pointers. Westbrook led the Thunder with 31 points and 11 assists. Paul George had 24 points and Jerami Grant added 21. Young, Atlanta's rookie starter, opened the final period with a tying three-pointer. Young added a three-point play and another basket as the Hawks regained momentum. A jam by Omari Spellman pushed Atlanta's lead to 117-107, and another dunk by Spellman pushed the advantage to 121-109. George sank a three-pointer with about 90 seconds remaining to cut Atlanta's lead to 132-123, but the Hawks quickly pushed the advantage back to double figures. A steal and reverse jam by DeAndre Bembry iced the win. The Hawks had a "welcome back" video tribute for Schroder during a first-quarter timeout. Schroder raised his arm to acknowledge the fans. The Hawks wore new powder blue uniforms with red trim and numbers for the first time. The uniforms were introduced as part of the Hawks' 50-year celebration in Atlanta. TIP-INS Thunder: F Nerlens Noel (concussion protocol) "is doing a little more each day," coach Billy Donovan said before the game. ... G Alex Abrines (personal reasons) missed his eighth straight game. Hawks: G Jeremy Lin (flu-like symptoms) was not with the team. F Taurean Prince was limited in his second game back while recovering from similar symptoms. ... G Kent Bazemore (right ankle sprain) and F Dewayne Dedmon (left ankle sprain) did not play. Dedmon may return Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) against Boston. UP NEXT Thunder: Host Lakers on Thursday (Friday, PHL time). Hawks: Host Celtics on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 16th, 2019

Pinoy boxer Mike Plania wins over Mexican foe by unanimous decision

HOLLYWOOD, USA – Mike Plania lined himself among probable Filipino world title contenders following a clear victory over Mexican Juan Antonio Lopez on Sunday night, January 13, (Monday in Manila) at Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. Eager to make up for a bungled ring debut in the United States last ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 14th, 2019

Style Inspo: Check Out The Gowns That Floored Us At The 76th Golden Globes Awards!

Did you see what Saoirse Ronan, Constance Wu, and Emma Stone wore to film and TV’s biggest night?.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 10th, 2019

Musings on the Golden Globes in Technicolor the day after

LOS ANGELES---The day after the annual Golden Globe Awards is always like a movie in Technicolor, with random moments popping up in my mind. My body aches all over from working all day, my sleepy eyes trying to shut tight.   Last Sunday, Jan. 6 (Monday morning, Manila time) was the culmination of our preparations for the 76th edition of the awards, which we began as early as October last year.   The Golden Globes may be dubbed Hollywood's party of the year, but there's serious hard work involved in staging the night that honors excellence in film and television.   The day does not end with the intense, crazy red carpet scene and the show inside the In...Keep on reading: Musings on the Golden Globes in Technicolor the day after.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 9th, 2019

Pacquiao reunites with Mayweather, meets Clippers during Filipino Heritage Night

Manny Pacquiao met with Floyd Mayweather Jr. and some of the members of the Los Angeles Clippers as part of the NBA's Filipino Heritage Night celebration at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, Wednesday morning, Manila time. Photos posted by the Clippers' Twitter account showed the Filipino boxing legend as he was all smiles reuniting with Mayweather and meeting head coach Doc Rivers, breakout star Tobias Harris, and veteran guards Lou Williams and Patrick Beverley. They meet again. Only here.@mannypacquiao | @FloydMayweather | #ClipperNation pic.twitter.com/OQrezLim14 — LA Clippers (@LAClippers) January 9, 2019 🥊 x 🏀 🇵🇭 x #ClipperNation pic.twitter.com/XRBv7nBsmI — LA Clippers (@LAClippers) January 9, 2019 👋 @mannypacquiao pic.twitter.com/lQaXwk7jW0 — LA Clippers (@LAClippers) January 9, 2019 Rivers appeared to be a fan, as he gushed about owning a pair of Manny's gloves as part of his collection as he talked to the legend himself. 🏀 x 🥊@DocRivers choppin' it up with @mannypacquiao pre-game. pic.twitter.com/O4GJEggGHY — LA Clippers (@LAClippers) January 9, 2019 Manny is currently in L.A. training for his upcoming WBA Welterweight World Championship defense against Adrien Broner this January 19 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. Pacquiao was also joined by Filipino-American Black Eyed Peas member apl.de.ap, real name Allan Pineda Lindo to celebrate Pinoy culture in the NBA. .@apldeap in the 🏡 for Filipino Heritage Night! pic.twitter.com/Gv2cv4rZ9e — LA Clippers (@LAClippers) January 9, 2019 🎶 I got a feelin'...@apldeap and @itsJessicaRey perform at halftime!#ClipperNation x 🇵🇭 pic.twitter.com/2TIzjLctzN — LA Clippers (@LAClippers) January 9, 2019 Filipino NBA fans were not the only winners, however, as the Clippers took the convincing 128-109 victory against the Hornets. Lou Williams led the way for L.A. with 27 points and 10 assists to help the Clippers strengthen their hold of the Western Conference's fourth spot with a 24-16 win-loss card. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 9th, 2019

DOH cautions against health risks during Traslacion

MANILA, Philippines --- The Department of Health (DOH) urged devotees of the Black Nazarene to be "mindful" of their health during the Traslacion procession. "We appeal to devotees joining the Traslacion to prioritize their health. Should any one of them feel any symptom of sickness or suffer an injury, immediately consult our medical teams posted in strategic areas," Health Chief Francisco Duque III said in a statement on Monday night. Duque added that all DOH hospitals in Metro Manila are on "Code White" alert from January 7 to 10, which means that state health facilities are ready to respond to situations. General and orthopedic surgeons, anesthesiologists, internists, operating...Keep on reading: DOH cautions against health risks during Traslacion.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 8th, 2019

Azkals show they belong in Asian Cup

THE Philippine men’s national football team made history on Monday night as it played in its first-ever AFC Asian Cup game. And it gallantly performed well, hanging on to just a 1-0 defeat against tournament favorite Korea Republic when many thought they would be beaten black and blue......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJan 8th, 2019

LOOK: Thousands of Black Nazarene devotees line up for ‘Pahalik’

  MANILA, Philippines --- Thousands of devotees of the Black Nazarene waited in line on Tuesday morning for the annual "Pahalik" at the Quirino Grandstand in Manila.   Devotees were seen lining up to wipe their towels and kiss the feet of the image of the Black Nazarene.   The Black Nazarene image was brought to the Quirino Grandstand at around 4:30 a.m. and the Pahalik started at around 6 a.m.   Devotees started coming to Quirino Grandstand as early as Monday night but started lining up at around 5 a.m. the following day.   The annual Pahalik of the Black Nazarene image is usually attended by thousands of devotees from acros...Keep on reading: LOOK: Thousands of Black Nazarene devotees line up for ‘Pahalik’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 8th, 2019

Alfonso Cuaron and his film ‘Roma’ win at Golden Globes

Alfonso Cuaron's "Roma" won the best foreign language film and best director honors at the Golden Globes, giving the Netflix film some added awards season momentum. Cuaron based the film on a nanny who raised him in the 1970s in Mexico and he said during his acceptance speech on Sunday night that he was in awe of the film's two lead actresses, Marina de Tavira and Yalitza Aparicio. The black-and-white period piece set in Mexico City likely would have been a favorite for the best drama picture, but the awards' rules made it ineligible. "Roma" beat out the other nominees including the Japanese film "Shoplifters", the Lebanese film "Capernaum", the Belgium film "Girl", and the Ger...Keep on reading: Alfonso Cuaron and his film ‘Roma’ win at Golden Globes.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 7th, 2019

Gaga favorite to win GGA

NEW YORK — When the 76th annual Golden Globe Awards get underway Sunday night, who takes home statuettes is only a small part of the intrigue. What the Hollywood Foreign Press Association’s Beverly Hills, California, ceremony lacks in gravitas it usually makes up for in freewheeling frivolity and fun. The free-flowing booze helps. This year’s […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJan 6th, 2019