The Headlines So Far in the 2017-18 NBA Season

The new NBA season is still in its early stages, but it feels like we’re already in the thick of things with so much happening already. Luck of the Irish The Celtics, despite losing Gordon Hayward to a season-ending injury, currently have the best record in the league and own the longest winning streak so far this year with 16 games won consecutively. Kyrie Irving and Al Horford have been leading the charge, with young guns Jaylen Brown and Jayson Tatum upping their game. It certainly won’t be surprising to see them secure the top seed in the East this season if their remarkable play continues. Steve Kerr even declared the Celtics as the East’s “team of the future.” International Beasts of the East Giannis Antetokounmpo is already staking his claim as the league’s MVP, averaging nearly 30 points a game at a very efficient 55% clip as of this writing. With Eric Bledsoe assisting with ball-handling duties, the young Buck’s play is only bound to get better. Remember, Antetokounmpo still hasn’t even developed an outside shot yet. Imagine what the Greek Freak can do when he finally does. Kristaps Porzingis has also been unleashed in New York after the departure of Carmelo Anthony and Phil Jackson. The Latvian big man has been on a roll, taking advantage of an increased usage rate to average 27.3 points per game. The Knicks are exceeding expectations—The Playoffs doesn’t seem to be a far-fetched reality for them if Porzingis and the rest of the team can keep this up. After playing only 31 games last season, Joel Embiid has been making up for lost time. Along with Ben Simmons, the Cameroonian standout has been leading the Philadelphia to its best start in years, averaging 22.7 points and 11 boards. Additionally, Embiid has been posting roughly 2 blocks per game, and he says that he’s going to go for the Defensive Player of the Year Award this season. It looks like the Sixers fans’ are finally being rewarded for trusting the process. The Rookies Have Been Doing Work In his first season on the floor, Ben Simmons has been averaging 18. 7 points, 9.2 rebounds, and 7.6 assists per outing. And in almost every game, he’s been flirting with a triple-double. At this rate, it looks like he’s going to be the frontrunner in the Rookie of the Year race. Another solid performer is Jayson Tatum, who is one of the primary contributors in the Celtics’ stellar start. He’s been averaging an efficient 14.2 points, 5.9 rebounds, and 1.5 assist per game in around 30 minutes of play. From deep, Tatum has been drilling 48% of his threes. With his smart play, sometimes, it feels like we’re not watching a rookie. Kyle Kuzma, perhaps the biggest steal in this year’s draft class, is currently outperforming most rookies picked ahead of him, including fellow Laker and #3 draftee Lonzo Ball. Kuzma has been averaging 16.8 points, 6.3 rebounds, and 15 assists, and he’s shooting nearly 50% from the field and 36% from deep. While he still has a bit of work to do on the defensive end, he’s shaping up to be a cornerstone in LA’s post-Kobe era. Warriors still Super Team to Beat During the offseason, several teams secured major acquisitions to reinforce their lineups. The Cavs were able to reload with future Hall of Fame guards and versatile wings on board. OKC acquired two All-Stars in Paul George and Carmelo Anthony, but are still in the process of figuring things out. Minnesota was able to add Jimmy Butler to its young core. But despite the trades and signings, the Golden State Warriors remain the most “super” of the squads with the “super team” tag. After starting the season 1-2, the Warriors have regained their dominating form and are now back with their winning ways—and it seems that they won’t be slowing down anytime soon. Kevin Durant has been on a tear, but it’s Steph Curry that currently leads the team in points per game (25.5), steals per game (1.8), and in Player Efficiency Rating (27.6). He remains the fulcrum of Golden State’s offense, the man that won’t let the Dubs down. Steph Curry continues to perform at a high level because he depends on the World’s No. 1 Deodorant to stay cool and confident. The two-time MVP only trusts Rexona Ice Cool to help him fee dry and fresh all day, so he can be his best on the court, and even off it. It’ll be interesting to see if these stories and trends continue as we go along the new season. Stay tuned, hoops fans!  .....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnDec 21st, 2017

Oladipo, Sabonis helping Pacers move forward

By Steve Aschburner, INDIANAPOLIS – Victor Oladipo has a fever and the only prescription is ... no, not more cowbell. Cowbell might make sense, if you factor in Oladipo’s love of and commitment to music (his debut R&B album has been available since Oct. 6). But the fever currently afflicting Oladipo, shooting guard for the Indiana Pacers, has nothing to do with extracurriculars and everything to do with the odes and anthems he’s been performing within the confines of 94 feet by 50 feet. If the fifth-year guard out of Indiana University, by way of the Orlando Magic and Oklahoma City Thunder, looks comfortable in his new star turn for the Pacers, well, just remember that’s your word. Not his. “You could say I’m comfortable with the people here,” says Oladipo, who spent three seasons with the Hoosiers before becoming the No. 2 pick in the 2013 NBA Draft. “I played in front of these fans, they mean a lot to me and I gave a lot to them just like they gave a lot to me while I was in college. “But I’m never comfortable in any situation I’m in. I will never be comfortable. That’s what kind of makes me get up and work every day. It’s like, never be satisfied. Because for some reason, ever since I was a little kid, I always wanted more.” Oladipo’s eyes just about glow after a weekend practice as he delves into his unflagging intensity. He doesn’t undercut it with a smile or a token laugh. This is real heat. “Maximize my talent and exhaust my potential,” he says. “In order to do that, I’ve got to come to work every day. That’s my thought process. Wake up each day and be great that day.” Each day would include tonight, when Oladipo will share center stage at Bankers Life Fieldhouse with the more decorated and once-beloved star who preceded him in the Pacers lineup. Paul George, a four-time All-Star and Olympic gold medalist during his seven seasons in Indiana, was due to face his old team for the first time since being traded to Oklahoma City in July. It was a parting necessitated by George, who had made clear his desire to sign a maximum-salary contract with the Los Angeles Lakers in the summer of 2018. But the trade was orchestrated by Kevin Pritchard, the Pacers’ president of basketball operations, and Chad Buchanan, their general manager, who surprised the NBA by swapping George to OKC for Oladipo and big man Domantas Sabonis. You want intense? The initial reaction to that deal was intensely negative, quickly reaching hysterical proportions. The Pacers immediately were mocked for having traded George for nickels on the dollar. Reports out of Boston characterized Indiana’s POBO as more of a bobo for allegedly spurning a Celtics’ offer of multiple players and draft picks. *Takes a well deserved nap for 3 hours ** Opens Twitter: — Myl3s Turn3r (@Original_Turner) July 1, 2017 The west is sick!!!! Best conference in the world!!!! — Patrick Beverley (@patbev21) July 1, 2017 Vic to the Pacers?! He might as well run for governor while he's at it! — Cody Zeller (@CodyZeller) July 1, 2017 Former Thunder star Kevin Durant called the move “shocking” and of George said “Indiana just gave him away.” Among much of the media that covers the league, there was a general feeling of “rubes” afoot -- that the Pacers had been snookered in taking back an overpaid ($21 million annually through 2020-21) second-tier talent and an overbilled guy who had disappeared in OKC’s postseason. And now? Not so much on any of those fronts. ‘He knows how good he is’ George’s stats are down in the “OK3” core he’s formed with reigning Kia MVP Russell Westbrook and aging Carmelo Anthony. The Thunder (12-13) are the NBA’s consensus disappointment, team category, with nearly a third of their season in the books. Sabonis has boosted the Pacers off the bench in a half dozen ways. And Oladipo has all but earned himself a spot on the Eastern Conference All-Star team while speeding his new team’s fans past their heartbreak over George’s jilting. Generally, the best trades in sports are win-win, but for Indiana right now, a bit of win-lose has made the start of 2017-18 downright sublime. “We happened to really like Sabonis in the draft,” former Pacers president and ongoing consultant Donnie Walsh said last week. “We wanted more of everything in the trade too. But when it came down to it, we had this offer with Oladipo, who we also liked. They’ve come in here and the more they’ve been here, the more we like ‘em. We’re happy.” The Pacers also are 16-11, two weeks ahead in the victory column over their 42-40 finish last season that was good for a playoff berth. Oladipo is the biggest reason why, averaging more points per game (24.5) than George ever has. The 6'4" guard who attended famous DeMatha High in Hyattsville, Md., spent much of last season being beaten up for his contract and negligible impact in Oklahoma City. He had taken grief earlier for his status as the second pick in 2013, a lofty status not of his doing. And here he was again in the summer, hearing it all over again for a transaction he didn’t design. “He came in with a chip [on his shoulder],” Pacers coach Nate McMillan said. “I thought he should come in with a chip.” Some would have flinched from the pressure. A few might have curled up, full blown fetal. Oladipo has gone entirely the other way. “His confidence is at an all-time high,” backup point guard Cory Joseph said. “He knows how good he is.” As Joseph spoke after the Pacers’ upset of Cleveland Friday, a game in which Oladipo scored 20 of his game-high 33 points in the third quarter, a lilting voice drifted from behind the scenes in the home dressing room. “Look at it right now, he’s singing in the shower,” Joseph said, tilting his head and laughing. “He’s confident. You guys are all in here, he’s just singing. He’s a confident guy. Everybody in this locker room, everybody in this organization definitely welcomes that.” Trade not driving Oladipo’s breakout season Don’t misunderstand. The critics still are out for Oladipo. “My mom told me yesterday I need to work on my free throws,” he said with an eye roll after practice Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). She had noticed, during her son’s run of big games in December -- 36 points at Toronto, 27 vs. Chicago, 33 against the Cavs the night before her chiding text -- that he had missed 18-of-31 foul shots. This, by a career 80 percent shooter from the line. “I’m over that,” Oladipo said. “I’m not going to miss no more. I’ll make ‘em next time. And if I miss ‘em, I’ll make ‘em the next. If that’s my problem right now, I think I can fix it.” Twenty-four hours later, Oladipo took 13 free throws against Denver and made 11. He scored 47 points in all, hitting 15-of-28 shots and half of his 12 three-pointers. The comeback victory in OT got the Pacers to 4-for-4 on their six-game homestand and continued to shrink whatever chip it was that the 25-year-old was shouldering. “In the beginning of the year, I said, ‘I don’t have a chip. I have a brick house on my back,’” Oladipo said. But not anymore, right, now that some folks are referring to it as “the Victor Oladipo trade” rather than “the Paul George trade?” “That’s what I feel like every morning, no matter what’s going on,” he said. “I don’t even think about the trade, honestly. It’s in the past for me. People’s opinions are going to be there whether you like it or not. From the outside looking in, I guess you could say [then] that was a great trade for OKC. That’s what they believed. But it wasn’t going to change the way I worked. It wasn’t going to change my approach.” This step up in status is considered perhaps the most difficult an NBA player can make. Suddenly, opposing coaches are X&O-ing him to death. The player dogging him up and down the court is the other guys’ best defender. Often, they’ll send double-teams to get the ball into one of his teammates’ hands. “He hadn’t had that,” McMillan said. “When he was in OKC, the game plan was focused on Westbrook. When he was in Orlando, he was just a young player. Now he is seeing the defenders like a LeBron [James], like a [DeMar] DeRozan, what these stars are seeing. He’s seeing the best defenders and he’s seeing teams game-plan to take him out. “Learning how to play and be consistent every night with that challenge is something he’s going through.” Oladipo’s quick success with the Pacers has kept any crowd critics at bay. They were pre-disposed to like him just as their rebound date after George, but had he underperformed, Oladipo’s service time in Bloomington wouldn’t have protected him for long from criticism. But now, it’s George who likely will get the harsh reception. Oladipo, overtly after each of the recent victories, has made it clear to the home fans via some emphatic pointing and body language that the Fieldhouse happens to be his house. “I don’t say it, they say it,” he said. “I just do the gesture and they do the rest of the work for me. I let them do all the talking. We feed off them -- when they’re into it, we play better. I don’t know why, that’s just how basketball’s always been. They’re our sixth man and we need ‘em every night.” Oladipo’s breakout season has been bolstered, too, by the Pacers’ second-through-15th men. Those who already were in Indy knew how valuable George was at both ends. Those who, like Oladipo and Sabonis, were new this season were within their rights to be as skeptical as the national headlines of the guys coming in trade. Go-to guy emerges for Pacers OKC was a specific challenge, Oladipo having to learn on the fly how to fit his own darting, ball-heavy style to only the second man in NBA history to average a triple-double. Westbrook’s usage was off the charts, rendering the other Thunder players to supporting cast whether suited to that role or not. Just like that, Oladipo had to catch and shoot as someone to get Westbrook into double digits in assists. It wasn’t his nature and it made for an individually forgettable season. “I had a role. I tried to play that role to the best of my ability. And I improved certain areas of my game in that role,” was all he’d say Saturday, stiffly, about the OKC experience. Said Walsh: “I felt like he was going to get a different opportunity here. ... When he got to Oklahoma City, he was playing wih a guy who was averaging a triple-double. And he liked Russell Westbrook. But he comes here, he’s got an opportunity to be ‘our guy.’ “I think he might have been looking for that. I never asked him. He’s a really cool guy. He knows what he wants to be, I think.” Oladipo needed this and the Pacers needed him to need it. With George gone, they were like a smile missing a front tooth. The other teeth weren’t just going to move up in the pecking order -- no matter how good young big man Myles Turner is -- and replace the one they’d lost. If they were going to have any success this season, if McMillan was going to be able to coach and adjust in his second year taking over for Frank Vogel, the players needed to fill their roles and welcome this new addition. That’s why this tale of Oladipo’s growing success is about what the Pacers have done for him, as much as it is what he’s done for them. “We didn’t really present it like that,” McMillan said, “because we were still trying to develop who our ‘go-to guy’ was. He has been slowly taking on that role through the things he’s done. I haven’t had to say anything. He’s making good decisions with the ball. And the guys are getting a feel for what we’re doing down the stretch because we’ve had some success, and we’ve had it with Victor having the ball.” Chemistry change for Pacers There might be NBA teams with chemistry as solid as the Pacers’ right now, but it’s hard to imagine there are any with better. It’s more than mere relief that someone has stepped up, easing their own loads a bit. It is a genuine eagerness for Oladipo to max out, for each of the rest of them to do the same in whatever lane they’re riding. “Vic’s been everything at this point,” Turner said. “He’s done a great job of stepping up and being that guy, being that dude. It’s amazing to have that when you’re going through a situation where it’s a brand-new team. We’re still learning each other and he’s showing that he’s ready.” Did Turner know this would happen and, if so, when? “First couple days he started texting me in the summertime,” the big man said. “I saw what his mindset was, and I loved it from the jump. He carried that right in when we started playing pickup this summer. “Vic’s been traded, what, [two] times? He finally comes back home and he has a team that’s telling him to go, telling him to be him. I don’t think he had that with his former teams. Now that he’s here and he’s doing that, I’m pretty sure he’s [enjoying it].” Said Joseph: “He’s been a beast for us and he’s going to continue to be a beast for us. ... He’s been running with that opportunity and opening eyes around the world.” Even strong-willed, uber-confident Lance Stephenson, has backed up for Oladipo. “There’s no hate, know what I mean?” he said over the weekend. “Some guys get mad about somebody doing good. This team wants its teammates to do good. That’s what’s going to make us even better.” Oladipo keeps referring to the other Pacers in a legit lubricating of the “no I in Indy” process. “Honestly I think it’s the personalities and the men that we have in this locker room,” he said. “My teammates are phenomenal people -- not just basketball players, phenomenal people. When you surround yourself with great people, people who sincerely care about you and your team, the chemistry just comes naturally.” Sabonis shows glimpses of success, too The other guy in the trade, Sabonis, has developed more organically, his maturation seemingly inevitable regardless of locale when you tote up his youth, his work ethic and his bloodlines (son of Hall of Famer Arvydas Sabonis). He has gone from that rookie who logged just six minutes in the Thunder’s five 2017 playoff games against Houston to an essential piece in McMillan’s rotation. “Once I got traded, I knew this was a great opportunity for me to show people what I can really do,” said Sabonis, the No. 11 pick in 2016. “I was a rookie last year. Everything was new. Here, I’m being used more at the 5. That’s more the position I’ve been used to playing my whole life.” Sabonis’ minutes are up from 20.1 in OKC to 24.6 off Indiana’s bench. His scoring has doubled from 5.9 ppg to 12.1. And his PIE rating has soared from 4.9 last season to 12.6, a sign of the versatility the skilled big man possesses. “I love Sabonis,” Walsh said. “His father was one of the greatest players in the world, so I don’t like that comparison -- it kills him. He [Domantas] is just more of everything you think he is. He’s stronger than you think. He can shoot the ball better. He’s got good hands, he can catch the ball. I’ve seen him make moves in game that I’ve never seen him make in practice.” Said Turner: “I played against Domas in college -- I knew what kind of player he was. I was excited when we got him. He’s gotten bigger and stronger since then, obviously, and he just didn’t have a chance to show himself last year. But he’s been big for us now, especially when I was out with the concussion. He stepped up huge in that role and we’ve played well since then.” The Pacers are playing faster this season, up from 18th in pace last season to 10th now, part of their improvement from 15th in offensive rating (106.2) to 6th (108.3). They’re doing better, too, in contesting shots and throttling opponents’ field-goal accuracy. The biggest reason why has been Oladipo’s blossoming. Whether due to the sunshine of new, happier surroundings or from that darker, more intense place, to prove cynics wrong. No one can now talk of the Pacers’ bungling of what, after all, was a deal to rent George, not to have him long-term. Fans at Bankers Life figure to boo George on his first visit back, with an inventory they haven’t needed or used on Oladipo. Some might see that as ingratitude, others as respect. It’s a little bit of love lost, too. “Look, they loved Paul when he was here,” Walsh said. “They guy is a great player. One thing I’ve always felt: These guys that play here, they always know more about what they want for their lives than we do. How you gonna argue with that? He treated us good, we treated him good. No bad blood here. I don’t know about fans.” Folks in Indy have a new crush now, one they hope lasts for a while. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 14th, 2017

Cherie Gil headlines REP’s 2017 season opener

Cherie Gil headlines REP’s 2017 season opener.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJan 28th, 2017

Cherie Gil headlines REP’s 2017 season opener ‘Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike’

Cherie Gil headlines REP’s 2017 season opener ‘Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike’.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 18th, 2017

Vigan City all set for Palarong Pambansa in April

Vigan City is ready to roll out the red carpet for the more than 15,000 delegates from the country’s 17 regions expected to converge in the Ilocos Sur capital for this year’s hosting of the Palarong Pambansa next month. Department of Education Undersecretary Tonisito Umali made the pronouncement on behalf of the provincial government after personally inspecting the different venues where the various sports events for the April 15-21 meet will be held. “Vigan is definitely ready. The province hosted a regional qualifier of the Batang Pinoy last year and that shows its readiness to stage such big multi-sports event such as the Palaro,” said Umali during the Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) Forum at the Tapa King Restaurant at Farmers Market in Cubao on Tuesday. “We had our final technical conference meeting a couple of weeks ago para tingnan sa huling pagkakataon yung preparation ng lalawigan. And no doubt, the facilities are of international standards. Handang-handa na sila,” said the Deped official. “Overall, I would say Vigan, Ilocos Sur is definitely ready.” Umali said DepEd expects the official athlete-delegates to be at around 12,000 competing in 21 regular sports events featured in the secondary level and 15 in the elementary side of the event for student-athletes 18-year-old-and-below. Perennial champion National Capital Region is again favored to win the overall title this year, although Umali noted the emerging rivalry between Calabarzon/Southern Tagalog and Western Visayas regions, which engaged in a close-battle for runner-up finish in the 2017 edition of the annual event held in Antique. In addition, Negros Island Region, which placed fourth last year, has now been made part of Regions 6 (Negros Occidental - Western Visayas) and 7 (Negros Oriental - Central Visayas). “So we’ll have to see ano ang effect pag ibinalik ulit as Regions 6 and 7 yung Negros Occidental and Negros Oriental,” added Umali in the session presented by San Miguel Corp., Tapa King, and the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corp. DepEd will continue to hold the demo sports of pencak silat, aero gymnastics, and dance sports, the same thing with the special Para events in aquatics, track and field, bocce, and goal ball. Being summer season, Umali said the Palaro will observe the same practice of not holding games from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. “All games to be held during that time are indoor events,” said the government official. There will also be water dispensers stationed at the different sports venues for both athletes and officials, medical ambulances, doctors, and nurses are also on standby in both the playing court and billeting quarters, as well as police personnel. Umali also said the host province will be providing transportation unit for those coming from the Visayas and Mindanao regions which will carry them all the way to Vigan. “This is the first time the host LGU will shoulder transportation means or cost by providing buses to our athletes from Mindanao and the Visayas coming from a drop-off point lang. And lahat sila dadalhin sa Vigan, Ilocos Sur ng libre,” he said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News20 hr. 37 min. ago

June Mar bags PBA Player of the Week honors

Four-time league MVP June Mar Fajardo’s size, skills and experience worked beautifully for San Miguel Beer, which went on to complete a 4-1 semifinal series win over Barangay Ginebra to march to its fourth straight Philippine Cup Finals stint Saturday night. The 6-10 Fajardo averaged 20.67 points and 12.67 rebounds to earn the PBA Press Corps Player of Week for the period of March 13-18, keying the Beermen’s victories in Games 4 and 5 to keep their All-Filipino conference “four-peat” bid alive. Stung by Ginebra’s 95-87 win in Game 3 last Tuesday, the Cebuano big man finished with a double-double stats line of 14 points and 13 rebounds, engineering SMB’s blazing start as the Beermen hammered the Gin Kings, 102-81 two days later. San Miguel, then finished off Ginebra’s Finals aspirations as the 28-year-old Fajardo barrelled his way in for 25 points on 11-of-18 shooting from the floor, along with 9 rebounds, 3 assists and a block in 100-94 win in Game 5. While Marcio Lassiter, Arwind Santos and Alex Cabagnot also dished off excellent performances in San Miguel’s sensational back-to-back wins, Fajardo earned the nod for the weekly citation. With a league-best 24 PBA titles at hand, San Miguel Beer looks to extend its domination of the Philippine Cup since reigning supreme in the season-opening conference from 2015 to 2017. The 2017 Philippine Cup conquest in fact, gave SMB the Perpetual Jun Bernardino trophy. San Miguel now awaits the winner of the other semifinal series between sister team Magnolia and NLEX. The Hotshots took Game 5 Sunday night, 87-78 to gain the driver’s seat, 3-2. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

Aldrech after Hotshots take 3-2 lead: Wala pa kami napapatunayan

ANTIPOLO CITY, Rizal --- The Hotshots take a 3-2 lead in the PBA Philippine Cup semifinals, we've seen this before. It didn't end well. Last season, the Hotshots also took a 3-2 lead over Brgy. Ginebra in the 2017 PBA Philippine Cup semifinals only to end up losing in seven games. This season, on their fourth straight semis appearance, the Hotshots are once again up 3-2, this time against NLEX. It feels awfully familiar and the team is hellbent on advancing to the championship round now. "Actually yun yung sinabi ni coach kanina sa dugout, same situation as last year [vs. Ginebra]," forward Aldrech Ramos said Sunday after Magnolia's 87-78 win over the Road Warriors at the Ynares Center here. Ramos fired 12 points in the third period and finished with a total of 15, giving Magnolia a spark on offense in a game that was a defensive struggle right from the start. "Wala pa kami napapatunayan, hindi pa namin nao-overcome yung nangyari samin last year. Wag kami makampante para makuha namin yung Game 6," he added. Following a "Grand Slam" last season in terms of semifinal appearances, Magnolia is hungry for a Finals stint. And after finally reaching this far --- they lost in the Commissioner's Cup, 1-3, and got swept in the Governors' Cup --- the ghost of the 2017 Philippine Cup still haunt the team. Now is the time to get over it and challenge San Miguel for the title. "Malaki to, ilang beses na kami nakatungtong sa semis pero hindi naman ito yung ticket para maka-pasok kami sa Finals di ba," Ramos said. "Kailangan pa rin namin mag-trabaho at hopefully next game, magawa ulit namin, ma-surpass namin yung energy nila at makuha namin," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 18th, 2018

Warriors Durant out at least 2 weeks with fractured rib

By Janie McCauley, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Kevin Durant will miss at least two weeks with a fractured rib on his right side, joining fellow All-Stars Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson on the injury list for the defending champion Golden State Warriors. An MRI exam Friday (Saturday, PHL time) for the NBA Finals MVP revealed the incomplete fracture, and the Warriors said Durant would be re-evaluated in two weeks. Durant said he got hit in the ribs at Minnesota last Sunday (Monday, PHL time) and initially thought it was just a bruise, but he was sore the next couple of days. He played Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) against the Lakers and felt it again when he hustled to close out on the wing and “felt something stretch and pull.” “It was a little sore the next couple of days but not something I was worried about,” Durant said. He worked out Thursday (Friday, PHL time) and it took him longer to loosen up. By Friday morning (late Friday, PHL time), he experienced significant discomfort. It’s an injury Durant has never had previously. “Hopefully it gets better in the next week or so and see what happens,” said Durant, who missed time down the stretch last season with a left knee injury before a dazzling postseason to capture his first career title. “Just recovery, no procedure and see how it feels. It’s a different type of pain than I’ve felt before so I didn’t really know what it was and I’m just glad I got it looked at.” Curry missed his fourth straight game Friday (Saturday, PHL time) after re-injuring his troublesome right ankle. He will be re-evaluated Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), while Thompson has a fractured right thumb and will be examined again next Thursday (next Friday, PHL time). Durant said there’s still time for the team to heal and get ready for the playoffs. He missed 18 games in 2017 before returning for the final two contests of the regular season. “No concern. I’ve got a couple weeks and I’m just trying to get healthy, and I’m just trying to make sure I’m out there being able to be me on the court,” Durant said. “That’s the most important thing. It’s not great timing-wise, obviously. It’s all about just feeling better when I’m out there playing.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 17th, 2018

Injured Warriors play short, don t have enough against Kings

By Janie McCauley, Associated PRess OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Buddy Hield made three free throws over the final 27.5 seconds, Willie Cauley-Stein had a late dunk and the Sacramento Kings won for the second time this season on Golden State's home floor, beating a Warriors team missing its top three scorers 98-93 on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). Hield finished with 22 points off the bench. He also had seven assists and seven rebounds. Quinn Cook scored a career-high 25 points on 10-for-13 shooting for Golden State, making his initial seven shots and also hitting a career-best five three-pointers after Kevin Durant was lost to a broken rib in a discouraging pregame announcement for the defending champions. Draymond Green returned from a one-game injury absence to produce 14 points, 10 rebounds, seven assists, four steals and two blocked shots. Hield made one free throw with 27.5 seconds left and then two more with 13.2 seconds remaining as the Kings withstood a frantic final minute after the teams entered the final quarter tied at 75. Sacramento also won at Oracle Arena on Nov. 27 (Nov. 28, PHL time). Before the game, NBA Finals MVP Durant became the latest Warriors star to go down. Then Golden State lost reserve Omri Casspi to an ankle injury early in the game. Durant will miss at least two weeks with a fractured rib on the right side, joining fellow All-Stars Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson on the injury list for the Warriors. An MRI exam Friday (Saturday, PHL time) revealed Durant's injury and he will be re-evaluated in two weeks. Durant said there's still time for the team to heal and get ready for the playoffs. He missed 18 games in 2017 before returning for the final two contests of the regular season. "No concern. I've got a couple weeks and I'm just trying to get healthy, and I'm just trying to make sure I'm out there being able to be me on the court," Durant said. "That's the most important thing. It's not great timing-wise, obviously. It's all about just feeling better when I'm out there playing." Cook scored 13 in the first quarter as the Warriors jumped out to a nice lead, but they held just a 59-57 edge at halftime. Both teams played the first of back-to-back games. TIP-INS Kings: The Kings shot 14-for-31 from three-point range and held a 47-40 rebounding advantage. ... Kosta Koufos, who had 12 rebounds, was hit with a technical early in the second. Warriors: Casspi limped off at the nine-minute mark of the second with a sprained right ankle. ... Curry missed his fourth straight game after re-injuring his troublesome right ankle. He will be re-evaluated Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), while Thompson has a fractured right thumb and will be examined again next Thursday (Friday, PHL time). ... Green became the eighth player in franchise history with 500 or more blocked shots. A CHAMP'S NIGHT In a sweet pregame moment, Steve Kerr brought up Champ Pederson on Warriors special needs night to help with the pregame media session before Pederson announced the starting lineups. Champ is 30 and has Down syndrome. He has worked part-time as a finance assistant for the Warriors since last fall and is the big brother of Dodgers outfielder Joc Pederson. "He could be in the lineup," Kerr joked. "I could be," Pederson said, grinning, "for Steph Curry." UP NEXT Kings: At Utah on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). Warriors: At Phoenix on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 17th, 2018

Rose embraces new home, blocks out doubters

By Steve Aschburner, MINNEAPOLIS – Don’t let go of the rope. It’s one of Tom Thibodeau’s most familiar exhortations, a mantra of sorts to keep his teams locked in, digging down and generally committed through whatever grueling test they’re facing, be it a game, a road trip, a spate of injuries or the entire season. The trouble for Derrick Rose with that particular Thibs-ism is, so often, he has been the rope. On one side of an unfortunate tug o’ war, we’ve had the Rose loyalists, the fans, friends and family who believe that the 2010-11 NBA Most Valuable Player’s return from injury hell to elite status is just one more, legit opportunity away. Pulling from the other side, there is a growing group of Rose skeptics who are convinced that the Chicago kid’s best days – his most explosive, elusive, game-changing moves – are behind him, strewn on the floors of too many surgical rooms and rehab gyms. Rose, 29, knows they’re there. One group pulling for him, the other doubting him. And in an unusually candid and forceful moment Saturday (Sunday, PHL time), the normally soft-spoken Rose delivered a stark message to them all. “Yeah,” Rose said after his first full practice since signing a minimum-salary contract Thursday (Friday, PHL tie) to join the Minnesota Timberwolves. “This is how I feel about the whole perspective on it: You can have your perspective on me as far as I’m a bum, I can’t play, I can’t shoot, this and that. All right. Cool. I have no hard feelings with that. I’m cool with that. If that’s how you feel, that’s how you feel. “But at the same time, I don’t need your [bleeping] validation.” Rose’s eyes burned bright, in a direct response to the many health challenges he has endured from acquaintances and strangers both, picking at whatever good or bad is left of his basketball career. “I know who I am,” Rose continued. “I know the type of player I am. So, you respect that and I respect that, and we should be good. That’s how I feel about it.” In other words, you work your side of the street, Rose will continue to work his. If there are NBA administrators like Thibodeau, the Wolves’ head coach and president of basketball operations, willing to give him another chance, he’ll be chasing the ghost of his own self while trying to help somebody win. One more chance Rose’s latest grab at faded glory could begin in Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) matinee against the defending champion Golden State Warriors at Target Center (editor's note: Rose wound up playing just seven minutes off the bench. He finished with two points on 1-of-5 shooting with a rebound, two assists, and two turnovers). It probably is his last, best shot to salvage something from a 2017-18 season that’s been largely lost due to injury, yes, but other factors outside Rose’s control as well. What looked like a terrific opportunity back in training camp – signing with Eastern Conference power Cleveland Cavaliers and home to the game’s best player (and Rose nemesis) in LeBron James – got sideways fast. In the Cavs’ second game, on a drive to the rim, Rose got whacked across the face and neck by Milwaukee center Greg Monroe. He landed badly on the baseline, suffering a “jacked-up” left ankle that left him in a walking boot and sidelined him for 11 of Cleveland’s next 15 games. Then word got out just before Thanksgiving that Rose had left the team, reportedly to contemplate his future as an NBA player. He was gone for nearly two weeks, at least part of it back home in Chicago, during what Cavs GM Koby Altman called “a very challenging and difficult time for Derrick.” Rose didn’t play again until Cleveland’s 44th game. In nine appearances over the next three weeks, he was a shell of the three-time All-Star he’d once been, averaging 6.3 points, 1.6 assists and 13.3 minutes, while shooting 39 percent. On Feb. 8 (Feb. 9, PHL time), he was one of six Cavaliers players dealt by Altman at the NBA trade deadline, sent to Salt Lake City as a throw-in to acquire Utah’s Rodney Hood and Sacramento’s George Hill. Two days later, the Jazz waived Rose. Four weeks passed before Thibodeau got the green light from Minnesota owner Glen Taylor to sign Rose. The Oklahoma City Thunder had sniffed in his direction, only to opt for veteran backup Corey Brewer. Rose had family duties to attend to – he and Alaina Anderson had a baby girl in Chicago to start the week – but he also had spent time working out by himself in the Cavs’ facility or at Cleveland State’s gym. The end seemed near. Given Rose’s limited involvement this season, he probably would have been a long shot to land with one of the league’s 30 teams in 2018-19, had Thibodeau not reached out. The people on the dark end of Rose’s rope were winning. Now, this buys him time for a shout-out to the folks on the other end. “‘Don’t give up,’ Rose said he would tell them. Talking later at the downtown Minneapolis hotel where he’s staying, he wanted to assure people that his desire to play remains strong, his passion to keep trying still burns, and his mental fitness for this and future challenges on or away from the court is fine. “I still have faith,” Rose said, two bags of ice strapped to each leg. “No matter what happens, I still have a lot of faith in myself and my ability. It’s just about opportunity and catching a rhythm. Whenever I do catch a rhythm, I’d rather see what it is then. Than to, like, give up knowing I have so much left. Like, ‘Damn, I should have kept playing.’ “I’m going to give it my all. And once I do, then it’s like, ‘All right, cool. I gave it my all, now what’s this next phase in my life?’ “But as far as right now, I’m still in it. I’ve got two kids that can look at me now. The oldest, my boy [P.J.] is 5 years old. He’s looking at me right now. He sees everything. I’m going to tell him, ‘No excuses. Don’t come to me cryin’, this and that. Nah.’ He’ll see what I’ve had to go through. ‘Now suck it up and go out there and do what you’ve got to do.’” A career interrupted For some NBA players whose careers got waylaid by injuries – Brandon Roy, Greg Oden, Penny Hardaway – their bodies finally refused to cooperate. They went from 60-to-0, no wiggle room on whether they would continue. Rose, for all his setbacks, has worked his way back – not back to his previous form – from each and every injury. From the ACL blowout that started him down his hobbled path in April 2012 to three subsequent meniscus knee surgeries, from the left orbital fracture he suffered when he caught teammate Taj Gibson’s errant elbow in the face in the opening practice of 2015-16 to the lingering ankle sprain dealt by Monroe’s blow in October. In that sense, Rose is more like Bernard King, Sam Bowie or Grant Hill, standout players whose career trajectories were forever altered – but not ended – by injuries. Rose speaks as if he has reached some level of peace with his maladies, referring to his injuries as “part of the game” and his particular “cross” to bear. “I’ve just had five surgeries more than other people,” he said. “That’s the way I look at it. That don’t mean that I can’t play. That don’t mean that I lost my love for the game. No.” What Rose doesn’t like is the “fragile” label that’s been affixed to him. He’s less interested that he has played in only 486 of approximately 789 regular-season games so far, while proud of the 130 he logged with the Bulls (2015-16) and Knicks (2016-17) more recently. It seems clear that the reckless abandon with which Rose played – and the excruciating torque he put on his knees with his bounding, zig-zag attacks through the lane – wreaked havoc on his knees. Beyond that, though, he’s not buying any pattern business. “You see how I was injured [in October]? I was taken out of the air,” Rose said. “People are like, ‘Aw, he’s always injured.’ Are you just watching highlights, just looking at clips, like new fans are these days? Or are you watching an entire game? Are you just reading reports that come up on your phone?” Scouts say that Rose has lost both quickness and leaping ability, without developing a perimeter game to compensate. They also bundle his Cleveland hiatus with the AWOL episode last season with the Knicks, when Rose left the team without notice before a game against New Orleans, to question his reliability and commitment. Rose disputes the comments about his game, citing the circumstances in New York and Cleveland. “I could sit here and tell you, ‘I’m gonna try to change this. Do this and do that.’ Nah, I always felt, it starts with my rhythm,” he said. “[In] New York ... I was playing the triangle [offense favored by former Knicks president Phil Jackson] and still playing pretty well [18.0 ppg, 4.4 apg, 32.5 mpg]. In Cleveland, when did I really have a chance to catch a rhythm? When did I play 20 games straight? Or 10 games? Five games?” As for his reliability – or likelihood to take a powder on the Wolves the way he did on the Knicks and seemed to do on the Cavs – Rose said there is no issue there, either. In the past couple weeks, Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan (depression) and Cleveland’s Kevin Love (panic attacks) have opened up about psychological challenges they and other athletes face. But Rose shook his head as the question was asked. “Oh no, no, no,” he said. “I’m blessed, man. Beyond blessed. It’s not even ... what do I have to complain about? I don’t have anything to complain about. Of course, I wish I was on the court more. I think in time, with the right opportunity, I’ll be out there more. “I’m not depressed, even though I think everybody deals with some depression in some way. It’s about how you deal with it. We’re emotional creatures. We hold onto things. I try to meditate, try to do little things to change my mindset and try to read things to easy my nerves.” Rose admitted he did wonder if he would get another chance, once the Cavs traded him to a Jazz team that had no use for him. “Especially when you get dropped by a team like Cleveland, that needed players,” he said. “It makes other teams think, ‘Damn, if they didn’t keep him...’” Rose has not spoken with James since being dealt, he said. “The way I take it, I don’t take it as personal,” Rose said. “They didn’t need my services. That’s the way I look at it, OK? I understand. It’s business. Does that stop me from working hard? Does that stop me from still putting out goals and trying to reach my goals? No.” Familiar faces aid return Now Rose is reunited with Thibodeau, Gibson, Jimmy Butler (sidelined after his own meniscus surgery) and familiar coaches and staff making up the “TimberBulls.” He even trusts Thibodeau, often criticized for the heavy minutes he loads on his top players, not to break him. “If anything, I want him to play me,” Rose said. “I want to show to him that I can still play. I want him to see me and be like, ‘Damn, he’s still got it.’ I want him to count on me. I want to be held accountable. You know what I mean? I don’t just want to be, like, an average guy on the team riding along just to see how far they go. I really want to add.” Said Thibodeau, who ran Rose Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) through a rigorous refresher course on his playbook: “Obviously when he was at an MVP level, that was the peak. But he also, my last year in Chicago, he had a great year. ... He still has the potential to be very good. He’s young, that was the other part of it. He knows some of our guys, he knows the system. “Like all stories, there’s a beginning, there’s a middle and there’s an end,” the Wolves coach added. “I don’t think it’s a finished story.” Gibson thinks Rose can shoulder some of Butler’s late-game duties, simply because the scoring guard has strong muscle memory of such situations. He, too, hopes Rose’s story can take a happy turn. “I’ve got my fingers crossed,” the veteran forward said. “I truly believe in him. He’s got a lot left in the tank. It’s just, sometimes life doesn’t go your way and you have to push through it and keep fighting.” Thibodeau has said that Rose, like starter Jeff Teague and backup Tyus Jones, can play both backcourt spots, so he can mix-and-match based on situations. Rose anticipates no problem walking that line between asserting his game and rocking the Wolves’ boat. “My job coming here, I’m not trying to step on nobody’s toes. I’m not trying to take someone’s spot,” he said. “I’m not trying to show myself. Nah. I’m here to win. Me going out there and playing, hopefully you all see that. ‘He’s making money plays. He’s playing to win. And that’s what we wanted from him.’” Not that Rose, lest we forget from up top, needs anyone’s bleeping validation. Boosters and doubters can pull this way or that, but he said he’ll be the one who decides when his time is up. “When my love of the game is not there,” Rose said, sounding sincere near the end of his 10th season overall. “When I get tired of going to the gym. “Don’t get me wrong, we all go through that. But after a couple of days, I get antsy, I want to be in the gym. When a week or two goes by and I haven’t touched the gym, even in the summer, oh yeah, I’d know it was over.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

DeRozan, Davis named NBA Players of the Week

Toronto Raptors press release The National Basketball Association announced Monday that DeMar DeRozan has been selected as Eastern Conference Player of the Week for games played Feb. 26-Mar. 4 (Feb. 27-Mar. 5, PHL time). This marks the ninth time DeRozan has earned the honor during his nine seasons in Toronto and the fourth time this season. He was also named East Player of the Week for games played Nov. 13-18, Dec. 18-24 and Jan. 1-7 (Nov. 14,19, Dec. 19-25, and Jan. 2-8, PHL time). Eastern Conference Player of the Week @DeMar_DeRozan of the @Raptors (20.8ppg, 5.8apg, 4-0) in action! — NBA (@NBA) March 5, 2018 DeRozan averaged a team-high 20.8 points, 5.8 assists and 3.0 rebounds during four games last week. He shot .482 (27-for-56) from the field and .794 (27-for-34) at the free throw line. DeRozan led or was tied for the team lead in scoring during all four of Toronto’s victories. The Raptors were the only team in the NBA to win four games last week, and secured a winning record for a fifth consecutive season. DeRozan, a native of Compton, California, is currently tied for 13th in the NBA averaging 23.7 points through 62 games. The four-time NBA All-Star was selected ninth overall by Toronto in the 2009 NBA Draft and is the franchise’s all-time leader in career points (12,923), field goals made (4,586), free throws (3,445) made and games played (657). New Orleans Pelicans press release NEW ORLEANS – The NBA announced earlier today that Anthony Davis was named the Western Conference Player of the Week for games played from Feb. 26-Mar. 4 (Feb. 27-Mar. 5, PHL time). Davis led the Pelicans to a 3-0 week behind averages of 34.0 points (ranked first in the NBA) while shooting .507 from the floor, and .872 from the free throw line, 15.3 rebounds (ranked third in the NBA and second in the Western Conference) and 2.7 blocks (ranked third in the NBA). Additionally, Davis was the only player to average at least 30 points and 10 rebounds in the NBA over the course of the week. Davis helped propel New Orleans to two comeback wins against Phoenix (17-point comeback) and San Antonio (15-point comeback) and recorded a season-high 53 points in the Pelicans’ win on Feb. 26 (Feb. 27, PHL time) versus the Suns. The reigning KIA Western Conference Player of the Month became the first player in NBA history to register at least 53 points, 18 rebounds and five blocks in a game, while setting new franchise records for free throws made an attempted, going 21-of-26 at the line. Western Conference Player of the Week @AntDavis23 of the @PelicansNBA (34ppg, 15.3rpg, 3-0) in action! — NBA (@NBA) March 5, 2018 This marks the fourth time Davis has earned Player of the Week honors during his career, and the second time during the 2017-18 season, becoming the first player in franchise history to earn multiple Player of the Week honors in the same season since Chris Paul in 2008-09. Davis is currently averaging 28.0 points (ranked second in the NBA) on .536 shooting from the floor (ranked 15th in the NBA), 11.1 rebounds (ranked eighth in the NBA) and 2.2 blocks (ranked second in the NBA) on the season for the Pelicans......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

Cuban s tanking talk raises key issue for NBA

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst The NBA fined Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban $600,000 for being honest. Cuban told Naismith Memorial Hall of Famer Julius Erving on Erving’s podcast a couple of weeks ago that he told his players during a recent dinner that “losing is our best option. Adam (Silver) would hate hearing that…(but) we want the players to understand. As a player, you know that even though you may not agree, but at least if you respect the fact that someone took the time to talk to you, and you understood their perspective, you’re going to give me your feedback, but you’re part of the process.” But the league fined Cuban for what it called “public statements detrimental to the NBA” three days later. And Silver sent a memo to all 30 teams last week detailing the league’s position. “Throughout this period,” Silver wrote, “we have been careful to distinguish between efforts teams may make to rebuild their rosters, including through personnel changes over the course of several seasons, and circumstances in which players or coaches on the floor take steps to lose games. “The former can be a legitimate strategy to construct a successful team within the confines of league rules; the latter -- which we have not found and hope never to see in the NBA -- has no place in our game.” Yet Cuban did not in any way, nor has any evidence to the contrary emerged, state the Mavericks were losing games on purpose; that is, players were intentionally missing shots, or not putting forth effort on defense to let the other team score, or anything like that. (Even Silver acknowledged in the memo that the league has “no basis at this time to conclude that the Mavericks team is giving anything less than its best effort on the court, and Mark has assured us that this is not the case.”) So, why the fine? Was what Cuban said so incendiary? ‘’Mark knew his comments were public, so it surprised me that he was so candid, but that's who Mark is,” said one very high-ranking official from another team over the weekend. “To me his comment wasn't indicating tanking as their strategy but more about setting the expectation that playoffs were not a possibility. The only consolation of not making the playoffs is being in the lottery. You can't blame a team from trying to turn the lemon (losing) into lemonade (top 4 pick). The league needs to find a way not to reward losing.” Exactly. What Cuban said was spot on -- losing to improve the Mavericks’ Draft position was, and is, the best and quickest way for Dallas to get better and start winning games again. That doesn’t mean everyone agreed with Cuban being so blunt. “I think it was a totally inappropriate to say that to players,” said another extremely high-ranking team official for another team. “Whatever the team’s strategy may be, I firmly believe that the players should always play to win. The fine is meaningless to Mark; in fact, sometimes I think he enjoys the publicity he gets from the fines.” But. We ask people to be truthful and not lie about their intentions. We tell our kids that no lie is worth telling, and that telling the truth, no matter how painful, is always the best choice. So Cuban is honest and tells the truth, that short-term losing makes more sense for his franchise’s long-term interests, and he’s relieved of 600 large by the league. Meanwhile, the Philadelphia 76ers are lauded -- and revel in their slogan, “Trust the Process,” celebrated by the team’s most ardent supporters -- whose central tenet was to lose, and keep losing, until you could draft a player good enough to build around and win down the road. Which is, exactly, what Dallas is doing now. Indeed, increased tanking is the logical extension of an analytics-dominant league. If three is greater than two -- the reasoning behind the primacy of the 3-pointer in today’s NBA -- then doing anything you can to get more ping-pong balls in the hopper is the correct thing to do. You can’t just embrace the parts of doing it by the numbers that are pleasant. This is the flip side. Burying one’s head in the sand and pretending teams don’t do this doesn’t make sense. Everyone does it in every sport, or don’t you recall “Suck for Luck,” the chant of Indianapolis Colts’ fans before the 2012 NFL Draft? What of Major League Baseball’s Houston Astros losing 324 games from 2011-13? Were they trying to win games, or did we all imagine them going from $102 million in payroll in 2009 to $26 million by 2013? “I resist the word ‘tanking,’ but I’m very pro ‘rebuilding,’ when it’s necessary,” said Los Angeles Dodgers President Stan Kasten, who in a former life ran the Hawks as general manager in the ‘80s and ‘90s, by telephone Sunday. “And, it’s painful,” Kasten said. “You’ve got to explain it to your team, your fans, to your front office, to your coaches, to your wife, to your kids, to the country club. It’s hard. It’s painful. It’s nobody’s first choice. But if it’s necessary, it’s often the quickest way to get the team back to winning. And don’t lose sight of that.” Kasten’s Dodgers lost the World Series to the Astros, who methodically built their team the last four years around young drafted players like Series MVP George Springer, last fall in seven games. But not only is he not angry with Houston for the way management took the franchise’s foundation to the studs -- compared with his high-spending Dodgers -- he admires the speed with which they went from worst to first. “I have real feelings about what they did,” Kasten said. “Because Mark Walter (the CEO of Guggenheim Partners, the global firm that bought the Dodgers in 2012) and I, before we bought the Dodgers, we were looking at Houston. Because they were available. And truthfully, when we looked at where they were, we were going to do the same thing. It had to be done. Because they were not on a track to win. And frankly, I don’t think I could have done it as fast, or as well, as (Astros owner) Jim Crane, or (GM) Jeff Luhnow. Because doing that, to the extreme, takes real intestinal fortitude.” Kasten makes a strong distinction between a team cutting payroll and going young and that winds up losing, and one that’s actively seeking ways to lose more games. “All of these owners are hyper-competitive, and they want to win,” Kasten said. “And truthfully, the quickest way to win, at least if you look at the last three world champions, is to rebuild and get young and get prospects and do it that way. And if you don’t think that’s the better way to go, ask the fans in Houston and Chicago and Kansas City how they feel. You won’t get one fan who disagrees with what is done. It is the quickest way to win.” Please do not misunderstand. I hate tanking. I hate the idea of introducing losing into your shop, even indirectly. It’s like a virus, extremely difficult to get rid of once it gets in a franchise’s bloodstream. A ticket is, in essence, a contract between parties: I pay top dollar, you give me top-dollar product in exchange. When a team tanks, it violates that compact; I don’t recall any team that’s given fans a tanking discount. It is also very difficult to tank effectively in the NBA. The last three teams with the best odds of getting the No. 1 in the Draft going into the Lottery -- Boston (2017), Philadelphia (2016) and Minnesota (2015) -- have indeed won. But prior to that, the team with the best odds didn’t get the first pick for 10 consecutive years, and 22 times out of the last 25 years. And even the teams that did buck the odds and get the first pick often picked wrong, or did I miss Anthony Bennett Night in Cleveland, or the Andrea Bargnani statue outside of Air Canada Centre? “The Draft is often a crap shoot anyway,” the official from the second team said. “So why not give your fans the best product that you can and then draft Donovan Mitchell,” as Utah did this season. The Jazz traded for the rights to the Kia Rookie of the Year candidate, who was taken near the bottom of the Lottery (13th overall by the Denver Nuggets). This came a season after the Jazz went 51-31 and won its first-round playoff series. I agree. Tanking does not reward excellence in team building -- good drafting, good free-agent signings, good player development -- it rewards the exact opposite of that. It’s a Golden Ticket that doesn’t even require you to buy an Everlasting Gobstopper. But, tanking is reality. You can’t pretend it isn’t. And the only way to completely get tanking out of pro sports is to eliminate the Draft in all sports, including the NBA. We don’t want to have that conversation, do we? Personally, I’d love it. Can you imagine the fight that would set up between interested teams -- and who wouldn’t be interested? -- in a certain 7-foot-1 freshman center almost certain to leave school early who currently plays for a school that’s been in the news for all the wrong reasons lately? Would he help the Lakers? The Knicks? The Bulls? The NBA team in the state in which the college player currently plays, which rather desperately needs another star to pair with its one really great player (whose name, if you must know, rhymes with “Nevin Cooker”)? Would he help any team in the league that doesn’t currently employ Anthony Davis, Joel Embiid or Karl-Anthony Towns in the middle? Most assuredly. And if he could control where he wanted to go, and for how much, the process would be must-see TV. Yet, while the real-world implications would be fascinating, I’m not sure how you could eliminate the Draft without loosening the underpinnings of the entire pro basketball enterprise (and, yes, one could make a moral case for doing just that, as it does go against the whole Manifest Destiny thing to artificially bind someone to a company rather than letting them market their services to the highest bidder). If there was no Draft, why would any player with Lottery-level talent go to college? Yes, there would be the occasional Grant Hill/unicorn who wants to go to college to better themselves intellectually and/or embrace the person growth that often comes from being on your own for four years. But, while sad to say, most kids with NBA dreams go to college because that’s the path through which they can ultimately get to the pros the fastest. With no Draft, and few of the top college-age players thus needing/wanting to go to college, you’d have a very different March Madness than you have now. And as that is a multi-billion enterprise, both for the broadcast networks that air it (including Turner Sports, which runs and the colleges that reap the financial deluge it produces, the likelihood of across the board support for a new player acquisition model is slight. Not to mention, you’d have a much different salary structure in the NBA, as there would be no rookie slotting for drafted players. And if you think the game’s superstars would stand idly by and watch more of that cheddar that they helped produce go out the door to guys who haven’t yet done anything … you’d be wrong. So, the Draft isn’t going anywhere. Which means the NBA must decide whether it wants to continue to be shocked, shocked that tanking is going on in its league, or accept the reality that there is not much patience for being in the middle ground in a league where every team is now worth more than $1 billion. There is only, as Pat Riley said a long time ago, winning and misery. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

New era, new challenges emerge for Warriors

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst "It’s the lack of faith that makes people afraid of meeting challenges, and I believe in myself. He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life. I figured that if I said it enough, I would convince the world that I really was the greatest." -- Muhammad Ali Ali defended his heavyweight championship 20 times, during two eras: when he was young and unstoppable, after beating Sonny Liston in Miami in 1964, and when he was old and vulnerable, after beating George Foreman in Zaire in 1974. He was the fastest heavyweight ever in the first era; he was smart and could take a punch in the second. A generation later, the Golden State Warriors are defending their NBA title for a second time, in three years. But they, too, are doing so in two eras. In 2014, no one had seen anything like what Golden State did on a basketball court, and how Stephen Curry’s and Klay Thompson’s shooting range changed the geometry of NBA defenses. They stretched to the breaking point trying to get out to Curry and Thompson. They couldn’t figure out how to handle the Warriors’ five-man switching defenses. They couldn’t stand up under Golden State’s withering pace. There is no need to hold a telethon yet for the Warriors, three years later. They are 49-14 today, with four All-Stars among their five starters, including Kia MVP candidate Kevin Durant, in the prime of his career, who wasn’t there when the Warriors first beat the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2015 Finals. They are still first in the league in Offensive Rating, first in True Shooting Percentage, first in Effective Field Goal Percentage. They still are unsolvable to most opponents. But maybe not all, not anymore. The margin of separation between Golden State and the rest of the league is still there, most of the time. But there are tiny signs of slippage. Tiny. You recall what Warriors assistant coach Bruce Frasier said in the preseason, when no one is injured and everyone thinks they’re going 82-0. “Teams are starting to figure us out a little bit,” he said then. “We’re talented, so that sometimes overrides strategy. But I feel like teams are figuring certain things out to do to counter what they’ve seen. Year one, it was really hard, because it was all new. The pieces have changed a little bit, but I feel like our challenge will be to see if we can layer on some of the offense, our fluid movement, and counters, and change things up, and execute better. Defense is always big, too, so I wouldn’t go into the complacent (problem). I think it’s going to be more execution, and how smart can we really be, and can we keep that energy up through this year?” In each of their previous three seasons, the Warriors led the league in margin of victory -- 10.1 points in 2014-15, 10.8 points in 2015-16 and 11.6 points last season. This year, though, they’ve fallen to third, behind the Houston Rockets and Toronto Raptors -- and their win margin is down to 8.5 points per game. Two years ago, the Warriors were fourth in the league in Defensive Rating (100.9). Last season, Golden State was second (101.1). This season, the Warriors are fifth, at 103.4. In 2014-15, they were 14th in the league in points allowed in the paint; this year, they’re 24th (to be fair, they were 23rd last year, when they won it all anyway). Are they bored? Tired? Aging? Is their bench inconsistency this year the result of vets saving themselves for the playoffs, or guys just getting old? And will it matter against anyone other than Houston? “Once you start getting a little older, it’s harder and harder,” guard Shaun Livingston said last week. “We definitely need the youth, we definitely need the health. We’ve got to be healthy. We’ve got to be healthy. Sometimes you see teams that maybe are over the hill -- they have the experience, but maybe not (the ability). It’s human nature. Obviously, I don’t think we’re there yet. We’ve got guys that are still in their prime. It’s mental now.” In the Jean-Pierre Coopman phase of their latest title defense (oh, how one misses spectacles like Ali fighting Coopman, the “Lion of Flanders” -- with Pat Summerall and Tom Brookshier on the call!), the Warriors came to Washington last week. There was no White House visit on the docket, only time with D.C. area kids and a trip to the African-American History Museum, with owner Joe Lacob and GM Bob Myers on the trip as well. They have been in the public eye for five years now, back to Mark Jackson’s last season as coach, when the Splash Brothers exploded into the national consciousness. That’s a long time for one NBA team to have all that light and heat on it. For a minute, the Warriors tried to convince themselves that there was a backlash building against them nationally, that people had grown tired of their 3-pointers and video game point totals. It was, of course, a ridiculous posit -- Golden State and its players are more popular than ever, the love for Curry such that he felt perfectly comfortable posting a photo of the glass table he accidentally smashed in his hotel room on Instagram, any criticism surely to be muted amid America’s love for the two-time MVP.   when you feel like you’re on the @pgatour so you gotta get some swings going in the hotel room 😂😂😂 #idiot A post shared by Wardell Curry (@stephencurry30) on Mar 1, 2018 at 1:33pm PST “There was a little guy who was probably eight years old, and he came up and introduced himself,” Steve Kerr said. “His name was Ryan, and I’m talking to him, and he goes ’oh, my God, there’s Quinn Cook!’ And he ran over to Quinn Cook. Not Steph, not me -- he loved Quinn Cook. That was cool.” Throughout the Warriors’ run, they’ve faced down different challengers in the Western Conference -- the first iteration of the Rockets with Harden, a hybrid inside-out attack where Houston unhappily and unsuccessfully tried to meld Harden and Dwight Howard in the post. The Durant/Russell Westbrook one-two combo in Oklahoma City. The Spurs, morphing from the Tim Duncan/Tony Parker-led team to the Kawhi Leonard-dominant one. The “Lob City” Clippers, followed by the Chris Paul/Blake Griffin halfcourt version. But this season’s Rockets, with Paul at the point, may be the most unique and dangerous threat to the Warriors. They are much more than a team that just rains 3-pointers on you -- though they most certainly do that, and do it historically well. They’re also an outstanding defensive team, with the additions of P.J. Tucker and Luc Mbah a Moute giving them a grit they haven’t had in past seasons to pair with the shot blocking and rim presence of Clint Capela. The numbers are stark: Houston is 32-1 this season when Paul, Harden and Capela all play, including two wins over the Warriors The Rockets have no obvious weakness. They have no fear of Golden State, either, having won two of the three meetings with the Warriors this season. It’s not just that they’re good, it’s how they’re good that makes them look like the greatest challenge yet to Golden State’s hegemony in the West. “I mean, yes, because they do it a different way, I guess,” Curry said last week. “They adopted the power of the three ball and try to use it as a main weapon, and obviously with James and CP together. Honestly, we know that they’re playing well. We’re chasing that number one seed and keeping tabs on how they’re playing and whatnot. But at the end of the day, we’ve got a lot of time left before we have to face them again. We know they’re serious. But so are we.” The Warriors have had to deal with great adversity during their run, to be sure. The biggest challenge came about this time last year, when a collision between teammates -- Zaza Pachulia and Durant, in D.C., ironically -- culminated in a Grade 2 MCL sprain and bone bruise for Durant, taking him out of the lineup at the worst possible part of the season. Golden State had just ripped off wins in 23 of its previous 27 games since a lamentable Christmas Day loss to the Cavs. Curry had started to figure out how to play with KD, and vice versa. They were in the middle of a brutal stretch of seven road games in eight overall, with the one brief return home to play the Celtics. When Durant went down, the initial fear was that he’d torn his ACL and would be out for the season. The Warriors’ locker room was funeral after the Wizards game. “Obviously, we were trying to figure out if he was like ’done-done’ for the year, or whether or not there was going to be a chance he’d return,” forward David West said. “We were, at the time he got hurt, we were just starting to figure out the sort of roles, everybody was getting comfortable with roles. We basically had to reset., change some of the functions we were doing. We lost a few games  trying to literaly just figure out and recalibrate and re-balance. That was one of those periods where we were just looking at each other, trying to start this thing -- we lost this huge, huge piece.” Yet the Warriors figured it out on the fly. And how they responded then provides a big clue to how they might respond to the challenge the Rockets present to them now. “It took us, I think we needed to get home before we were able to stablize,” Kerr said. “I want to say we lost three of the last four on the trip or something  (they did lose three of four, but one of the three losses was at Oracle in that one home game with the Celtics). We got home and righted the ship and got going. But sometimes (an injury is) a galvanizing force when a guy gets hurt, and you have to do certain things. Like, for us, when Kevin got hurt, we talked about it and we said we have to be the best defensive team in the league. We don’t have that luxury of throwing the ball to Kevin and saying ’get us 30 points tonight.'” During that stretch without Durant (March 2, 2017 to April 5, 2017), who returned just before the start of the playoffs, the Warriors led the league in the league in Defensive Rating (100.0, just head of San Antonio’s 100.2), first in opponent field goal percentage (.429), tied for second in opponent 3-point percentage (.316) and fourth in opponent points allowed per game (100.9). And once Durant returned for good, the Warriors again flexed. They tore through the West, winning all but one game en route to a third straight NBA Finals. And they took the Cavaliers apart in five games for their second title in three years. “You could see Draymond, Klay, Andre, Shaun, those guys, even Loon (Kevin Looney), were like, ’we didn’t have KD last year,’ ” West said. “For someone like myself, I just followed their lead. Klay got a little more aggressive. Draymond sort of settled everybody defensively. And we started winning.” That muscle memory will come in handy this year. Durant and Curry have missed time with injuries, and Golden State hasn’t figured out things at center just yet. (Would it shock me if rookie Jordan Bell played a big role there down the stretch? No, it would not.) But the Warriors still are smoking people in the second halves of games; per, the Warriors lead the lead in third-quarter scoring margin at 5.3 points per game, more than double the margin of the second-place Denver Nuggets. Whether it’s adjustments or something else (“mainly, fiery halftime speeches, Knute Rockne style,” Kerr opines), they have again put a lot of opponents away with 12 minutes to spare. Since the All-Star break, they’re fourth in the league in opponent field goal percentage (.433) and Defensive Rating (100.3). “This year, obviously, knock on wood, we want to stay healthy,” Curry said. “We want to continue to push in the right direction. Every year’s different. That’s the fun part about this league. No matter how much success you’ve had and what your expectations are, it’s a different journey every year. We’re right in the middle of that right now. We have an amazing record, considering how we’ve played. I think we’d all say we haven’t lived up to our own expectations. That’s okay. We have an opportunity to build the right habits and the right momentum going into the playoffs this year and do it, all 15 guys.” Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

UAAP Volleyball: Atin to speech helps down UST for second time

The UP community surely must file copyright for the phrase "Atin 'to!" For the second time this season, a UP team huddled during a timeout and uttered the words "Atin 'to" against a UST team, with the Maroons on the verge of a momentum swing that will favor the Diliman-based team. Just as the Golden Tigresses were slowly creeping up on the Lady Maroons late in the second set, 24-23, coach Godfrey Okumu huddled up his girls in order to avoid the deuce. Suddenly, somebody uttered the two-word phrase, before UP claimed the set as Ayel Estrañero denied Carla Sandoval to win the second set, 25-23. UP Lady Maroons channel Paul Desiderio with an #AtinTo during the timeout before claiming the second set! #UAAPSeason80Volleyball — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) February 28, 2018 UP then went on a rampage to claim the next two sets, led by Tots Carlos' 32 points. When asked who uttered the phrase, the UP skipper said that it was probably Marianne Buitre who said the magical words, which helped spark the run. On why Buitre said it, Carlos said that they were inspired by the heroics their basketball counterparts did in the very first day of the UAAP basketball season back in September. "Syempre, napanood naman natin si Paul Desiderio, so buong puso niya ibinigay kung anong meron siya. Yun yung gusto ng teammates namin." For those who can't remember how the #AtinTo phenomenon started, here's a refresher: "Atin to, papasok to!" -- Paul Desiderio during the timeout. Moments later...#UAAPSeason80 — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 10, 2017 Isa Molde then added that their desire to win fueled the speech, thus redeeming themselves after a four-game slump to notch their second victory of the season. Thomasians must now be dreading when they hear the six-letter phrase. -- Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018

NBA viewing guide: Feb. 27 - March 5, 2018

Don’t miss a moment of the thrilling 2017-18 NBA season. Catch your favorite teams or the biggest matchups with the help of our viewing guide for Week 20, February 27 - March 5, PHL time. TUESDAY, Feb. 27 8:30AM - GSW @ NYK - NBA Premium (delayed - 1:30PM) 8:30AM - MEM @ BOS - NBA Premium 9:00AM - ORL @ OKC - NBA Premium (delayed - 4:00PM) 10:00AM - HOU @ UTA - BTV 11:00AM - MIN @ SAC - NBA Premium League Pass only 8:30AM - LAL @ ATL 8:30AM - CHI @ BKN 8:30AM - DET @ TOR 9:00AM - PHO @ NOP 9:30AM - IND @ DAL WEDNESDAY, Feb. 28 9:00AM - WAS @ MIL - NBA Premium 11:00AM - SAC @ POR - BTV 11:30AM - LAC @ DEN - NBA Premium League Pass only 8:00AM - CHI @ CHA 8:00AM - BKN @ CLE 8:30AM - PHI @ MIA THURSDAY, Mar. 1 8:00AM - MIL @ DET - NBA Premium 9:00AM - GSW @ WAS - NBA Premium (cut to live) 9:30AM - NOP @ SAS - BTV 11:30AM - HOU @ LAC - FOX Sports League Pass only 8:00AM - TOR @ ORL 8:30AM - IND @ ATL 8:30AM - CHA @ BOS 9:00AM - PHO @ MEM 9:30AM - OKC @ DAL FRIDAY, Mar. 2 9:00AM - PHI @ CLE - BTV, NBA Premium 11:00AM - BKN @ SAC - BTV (delayed - 11:30AM) 11:30AM - MIN @ POR - NBA Premium, S+A League Pass only 8:30AM - LAL @ MIA SATURDAY, Mar. 3 8:00AM - DET @ ORL - ABS-CBN ch. 2 (delayed - 8:30AM) 8:00AM - CHA @ PHI - NBA Premium 9:00AM - TOR @ WAS - FOX Sports 10:00AM - OKC @ PHO - BTV 11:30AM - MIN @ UTA - NBA Premium League Pass only 8:30AM - GSW @ ATL 9:00AM - DAL @ CHI 9:00AM - DEN @ MEM 9:00AM - IND @ MIL 11:30AM - NYK @ LAC SUNDAY, Mar. 4 8:30AM - DET @ MIA - BTV 9:30AM - BOS @ HOU - NBA Premium, S+A 11:00AM - OKC @ POR - BTV 11:00AM - UTA @ SAC - NBA Premium League Pass only 8:00AM - MEM @ ORL 8:30AM - DEN @ CLE 10:00AM - LAL @ SAS MONDAY, Mar. 5 7:00AM - CHA @ TOR - NBA Premium 7:00AM - IND @ WAS - BTV 9:00AM - PHI @ MIL - NBA Premium (cut to live), S+A League Pass only 4:30AM - PHO @ ATL 8:00AM - NOP @ DAL 10:00AM - BKN @ LAC 10:00AM - NYK @ SAC.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 26th, 2018

NBA viewing guide: Feb. 23-26, 2018

Hope you're feeling refreshed and relaxed from the All-Star break! We're now closing in on the Playoffs, so don't miss a moment of the remainder of the 2017-18 NBA season. Catch your favorite teams or the biggest matchups with the help of our viewing guide for Week 19, February 23-26, PHL time. FRIDAY, Feb. 23 8:00AM - BKN @ CHA 8:00AM - NYK @ ORL 9:00AM - WAS @ CLE - BTV, NBA Premium, S+A 9:00AM - PHI @ CHI 11:00AM - OKC @ SAC - BTV (delayed - 11:30AM) 11:30AM - LAC @ GSW - NBA Premium SATURDAY, Feb. 24 8:00AM - BOS @ DET - ABS-CBN ch. 2 (delayed - 8:30AM) 8:00AM - ATL @ IND 8:00AM - CHA @ WAS 8:30AM - MIL @ TOR - NBA Premium 9:00AM - MIN @ HOU - FOX Sports 9:00AM - CLE @ MEM 9:00AM - MIA @ NOP 10:00AM - SAS @ DEN - BTV 10:00AM - LAC @ PHX 10:00AM - POR @ UTA - NBA Premium (cut to live) 11:30AM - DAL @ LAL SUNDAY, Feb. 25 6:00AM - ORL @ PHI 8:30AM - MEM @ MIA 8:30AM - BOS @ NYK 9:30AM - OKC @ GSW - NBA Premium, S+A 10:00AM - CHI @ MIN - BTV 10:00AM - POR @ PHX 10:00AM - DAL @ UTA 11:00AM - LAL @ SAC - NBA Premium (cut to live) MONDAY, Feb. 26 2:00AM - DET @ CHA 4:00AM - NOP @ MIL 4:30AM - SAS @ CLE - NBA Premium 9:00AM - PHI @ WAS - NBA Premium, S+A 9:00AM - HOU @ DEN.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2018

Fajardo to receive fourth straight PSA Mr. Basketball award

June Mar Fajardo is expected to cast a giant shadow over next week’s staging of the SMC-PSA (Philippine Sportswriters Association) Awards Night at the Maynila Hall of the Manila Hotel. The San Miguel big man will be bestowed the Mighty Sports Mr. Basketball award during the Feb. 27 rites presented by MILO and Cignal TV for another dominant PBA season last year which saw the 6-foot-10 Cebuano pride romp off with an unprecedented fourth straight MVP trophy.  Fajardo became the first-ever player to win the league’s highest individual award four consecutive seasons - and only the third in history to emerge a four-time MVP after legends Ramon Fernandez and Alvin Patrimonio. This will also be the fourth straight time the oldest media organization in the country is honoring the 28-year-old center for excellence in basketball. Last year, Fajardo further established his claim as the biggest name in Philippine basketball today after steering the Beermen to a record-tying three straight Philippine Cup championships that allowed the fable franchise to become only the second team in PBA annals to bring home the June Bernardino Perpetual trophy after TnT Katropa.  The former no. 1 pick out of University of Cebu also proved his worth by leading Gilas Pilipinas to a sweep of the Southeast Asian Basketball Association (SEABA) Championship, and then suited up for the national team in its FIBA Asia Cup campaign despite suffering a strained calf muscle prior to the ballclub’s departure for Beirut, Lebanon. Previous players hailed as Mr. Basketball include Calvin Abueva and Terrence Romeo.  Volleyball players Dawn Macandili and Marck Espejo as well as well as golfer Clyde Mondilla are also recipients of special awards during the affair that has the Philippine Sports Commission (PSC) as major sponsor and backers in the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA), Mighty Sports, Globalport, Rain or Shine, and Smart.  Macandili, adjudged second Best Libero during the 2017 Asian Women’s Volleyball Championships here, will be handed the Ms. Volleyball title, while Espejo is Mr. Volleyball on account of him winning a fourth UAAP MVP trophy after steering Ateneo to a third straight championship.  For topping the Philippine Golf Tour Order of Merit (OOM), Mondilla is Mr. Golf of the year. The four special awardees are part of the total 105 personalities and entities which make up the season’s honor roll list, topped by PSA-Tapa King Athlete of the Year Jerwin Ancajas, Carlo Biado, and Krizziah Lyn Tabora. Agriculture Secretary Manny Pinol, a former sportswriter, columnist, and boxing analyst, will be the special guest of honor of this year’s event......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 21st, 2018

Luck tells Indy fans he feels better, rules out more surgery

By Michael Marot, Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Andrew Luck says he's feeling better and has ruled out needing any additional surgery. The Colts quarterback made the comments in a pre-taped interview with Peter King during the team's second annual season-ticket holder town hall. He told Indianapolis fans that more surgery is "not an option." Luck missed the entire 2017 season after having surgery to repair a partially torn labrum in his throwing shoulder. There were other good signs, too. New coach Frank Reich expressed hope about having Luck on the field when offseason workouts begin in April. Reich says he's not "demanding an answer" about it but that he is optimistic. Luck also said he has been throwing a little bit, but he wasn't specific about what he was throwing. General manager Chris Ballard said last week that Luck had not yet started flinging footballs......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 21st, 2018

AP source: Hosmer, Padres reach preliminary eight-year deal

By Janie McCauley, Associated Press PEORIA, Ariz. (AP) — Just the thought of free agent first baseman Eric Hosmer joining the downtrodden, youthful San Diego Padres sent a morning jolt through the spring training clubhouse. The on-field vibe seemed equally cheery, as country music blared as players went to work under sunny skies in the Arizona desert. Hosmer reached a preliminary agreement on an eight-year contract with the Padres, pending a physical. A person with direct knowledge of the deal confirmed the tentative deal, speaking on the condition of anonymity Sunday because there had been no formal announcement of Hosmer's potential signing. It would become official once he passes a physical early in the week. While the final position players reported Sunday — most were already in spring camp — ahead of Monday's first full-squad workout, Hosmer wasn't expected in the desert until at least Monday. Hosmer, who spent his first seven major league seasons with Kansas City, would receive a reported $144 million. Padres manager Andy Green could only discuss the acquisition of Hosmer in generalities since it isn't final, but was hopeful of having his full team together Monday. "I can't replicate the magic of the first day twice, so, yeah, you want him or anyone to be there when you're talking," Green said. "... Not that there is any real magic on the first day, but it's always nice to have your camp settled as early as possible." The 28-year-old Hosmer batted a career-high .318 in 2017 and matched his best from the previous season with 25 home runs. A four-time Gold Glover and All-Star in '16, he drove in 94 runs and scored 98 for the Royals last season. He also had a career-best .385 on-base percentage. Veteran right-hander Chris Young also came to the Padres this offseason after most recently pitching three seasons for the Royals, calling Hosmer "one of my all-time favorite teammates" who brings "a competitive fire" that will be much-welcomed. He hadn't been in touch with Hosmer in recent days but they did communicate earlier in the winter when Young chose San Diego and discussed that it was among Hosmer's top choices, too. Young said he didn't want to add any pressure to Hosmer making a decision. "Hos is a legitimate All-Star," Young said. "I think he brings a veteran experience, he's a winner, he's a champion and a great mentor for young guys. So I think he fits all the categories I think you're looking in terms of a teammate, a leader, a competitor. I think he makes any clubhouse better, much less this one." While most every club feels a sense of optimism this time of year with a fresh slate as spring training begins, the Padres were especially upbeat as they got going early Sunday at the idea of the power-hitting Hosmer in their lineup and at first base. San Diego went 71-91 last season for fourth in the NL West above only the San Francisco Giants, and the Padres haven't been to the playoffs since losing in the 2006 NL Division Series. Green knows what someone such as Hosmer could mean to a club's chances of turning it around. "It was always time to start contending for me," said Green, beginning his third season as San Diego skipper. "It was always go out and win opening day and go out and win every game. I haven't been very good at that, I have to acknowledge that. At this point in time, opening day has been cruel to me so far. "But I think we show up with the expectation of winning the first game of the season and don't waver from that no matter who's in that clubhouse. Does it get easier if certain people are in that clubhouse? Yeah, it sure does." Wil Myers, who played 154 games at first for San Diego last season, was ready to move positions as needed. He can play elsewhere in the infield and all three outfield spots and Green said he would be "magically" taking fly balls in right field Sunday. "Wil's been great with everything that's ever been asked of him," Green said. Myers said the Padres communicated with him during the offseason about the possibility of adding Hosmer, saying: "When I saw that possibility I was very excited. To be able to add a player like that I think is very cool." Myers played in 2010 with Hosmer in the minors with the Royals. "I know nothing's definite right now but just to be able to hopefully add a guy like that is pretty special," Myers said. "He's a great guy. He's going to be a guy that fits really well in this clubhouse. ... You've heard a lot of great things about him, what he does in the clubhouse and who he is as a person.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2018

Meralco spoils Devance’s return with win over Ginebra

BOCAUE --- Joe Devance would have liked to mark his return from a foot injury with a victory. After all, his first game this season was interestingly at Philippine Arena, the site of Ginebra's 2017 Governors' Cup triumph last October, and against their Finals foes in Meralco. But the Bolts had other plans as they came away with an 84-82 win on Sunday night. "I'm just disappointed that we lost, especially since it's my first game back," Devance said. The most important thing is that Devance is slowly but surely getting himself back to his old form. "I'm okay. I still have quite a bit to go," he said after playing for 18 minutes and finishing with four points, three rebo...Keep on reading: Meralco spoils Devance’s return with win over Ginebra.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2018

Kiefer making the Philippine Arena his own personal playground

BOCAUE, Bulacan --- It could be safe to say that Kiefer Ravena likes playing at the Philippine Arena. The Phenom has only played two games at the massive INC-owned facility and those two are some of his better performances so far in his rookie season. His first time at the Philippine Arena in Christmas of 2017, he scored 20 points, dunked for the first time in the PBA, and got a win. The second time on Sunday, he scored 23 points, punched his ticket to his first PBA playoff appearance and oh yes, he got another win. Not too bad. "It's not so often you play in this kind of atmosphere. Bihira lang maglaro PBA dito so make the most of the opportunity here," Ravena said. Sunday at the Philippine Arena also gave the league a glimples of what the "K and K" backcourt could do. While Ravena had 23 points, it was actually Kevin Alas that led NLEX in scoring with 25, a new PBA career-high. If the duo ends up being a powerful combination for the Road Warriors, this game against Blackwater would be a nice origin story. However, there's more important business for NLEX to handle right now and that's taking care of its playoff bid. "Even though we're secured of the quarterfinals, we want to continue the momentum and finish as high as we can," Ravena said.   --- Follow this writer on  Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2018