Advertisements


Snapchat takes a shot at reality TV

Snap Inc. is developing a new mini-documentary series focusing on two social media influencers. "Endless Summer" will feature 19-year-old Summer McKeen, a YouTube star and beauty and fashion vlogger, her boyfriend Dylan Jordan, also a familiar face from YouTube, and their group of friends. Like MTV's breakout hit and reality TV pioneer "Laguna Beach", the show is set in Laguna Beach, California, and will be semi-scripted, but with a scripted, serialized narrative. Snapchat Shows were first launched two years ago, inspired by how Snapchatters, the majority of whom are between 18-24 years old, talk to their friends on the app, but these previous offerings from Snapchat consisted ...Keep on reading: Snapchat takes a shot at reality TV.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJun 20th, 2018

NBA launches augmented reality app

NBA press release NEW YORK – The National Basketball Association (NBA) announced today the launch of the NBA AR app, a new augmented reality (AR) experience that allows fans to play virtual pop-a-shot from any point in the world through AR technology.  This marks the first augmented reality game by a U.S. sports league.  NBA AR for iPhone is available for free on the App Store. Using the iPhone camera and ARKit technology, the app captures a player’s surroundings, pins an authentic NBA backboard and court into the real-world environment, and then uses the accelerometer in the iPhone to flick shots at the hoop before the 30-second shot clock expires.  Players can share their shooting sessions with friends (through iMessage, email or social media) or see how they stack up globally on the overall leaderboard. Fans also have the option to select their favorite NBA team to brand their environment and receive updates on the team’s upcoming games. “We’ve always said that basketball can be played virtually anywhere – and today that takes on an expanded meaning,” said Melissa Rosenthal Brenner, NBA Senior Vice President, Digital Media.  “Augmented reality presents a variety of fascinating engagement opportunities, so we hope our fans download the app and try out their skills wherever they might be.” NBA AR is available on iPhone 6s and later running iOS11, and was developed using ARKit.  Later this season, the NBA plans to introduce additional augmented reality experiences through the app......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 16th, 2017

Ormsby takes charge at Vic Open - The Manila Times Online

GEELONG, Australia: Veteran Wade Ormsby took a two-shot lead at the Vic Open on Saturday as he searches for a second European Tour win, while American Kim Kaufman leads theREAD The post Ormsby takes c.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsFeb 11th, 2019

Gilmore has quietly made major noise in Pats Super Bowl run

By Kyle Hightower, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — In two years, Patriots linebacker Dont'a Hightower still has never heard Stephon Gilmore yell. Not in practice. Not in a game. Not ever. "He's stays quiet, it's not just because y'all are in here," Hightower said with a chuckle this week. "He doesn't talk. He's a mute." Gilmore's also — silently — assumed the role of lockdown cornerback for New England as it prepares to face two of the NFL's top two receivers in its Super Bowl matchup with the Los Angeles Rams. Being tasked to guard an opponents' top receiver won't be anything new for Gilmore, who is in his second season with the Patriots after leaving Buffalo and signing a five-year, $65 million free agent deal in 2017. There were some shortcomings this season. Notably when New England's secondary struggled in the second half of its narrow regular-season victory over Kansas City, allowing Tyreek Hill to catch three touchdown passes. But more times than not, Gilmore has lived up to the challenge. He combined with J.C. Jackson and Keion Crossen to limit Hill to one catch and no touchdowns in the Patriots' AFC championship game win over the Chiefs. And he's only allowed two catches on the 10 passes thrown in his direction during the postseason. Gilmore had a career-high 20 passes defensed during the regular season, the second most in the NFL behind Chicago's Kyle Fuller (21). His previous high was 18 with Buffalo in 2015. He's also had two or more passes defensed in four of his past five playoff games, including his first career playoff interception against the Chargers in the divisional round. "I kind of let my game do the talking," Gilmore said. "I try to play my game regardless of who I'm going against. Some people can handle it, some people can't." It helped the 28-year-old earn All-Pro honors for the first time in his career, becoming just the fourth Patriots cornerback to be named to the first team. He joins Ty Law (1998, 2003), Asante Samuel (2007) and Darrelle Revis (2014). But for a guy who tries to maintain a low profile, it's not something he's trying to put a lot of stock in right now. "That's a big accomplishment. But the one thing I wanted was a Super Bowl ring and I'm gonna try to do whatever it takes to get that done," he said. Last season Gilmore's contract was a conversation topic in New England with Malcolm Butler — star of the Patriots' Super Bowl win over Seattle in the 2014 season — not being offered the contract extension he was looking for from the Patriots. Gilmore started slowly in 2017 and appeared in only 13 games, missing two starts because of a concussion. He finished with two interceptions, but had only nine passes defensed. Butler signed with Tennessee in free agency in the offseason, making Gilmore the top cornerback in the Patriots secondary. Gilmore said he entered training camp focused on improvement. "To me it doesn't really matter what happened in the past. You just gotta learn from it and get better," he said. The Patriots will need someone to step up on Sunday, with the Rams trotting out two 1,200-yard receivers in Robert Woods and Brandin Cooks, who was traded by New England to Los Angeles last summer. Gilmore's practice battles with Cooks are fresh in his mind and he's also played with Woods in Buffalo. The practice field has been Gilmore's sanctuary this season, teammate and fellow cornerback Jason McCourty said. "He doesn't even let guys catch the ball in walkthroughs. That's kind of his mindset and his demeanor," McCourty said. "He goes out there, he takes the field and his one job is to shut whoever he's guarding down and that's something that he's done on a week-in, week-out basis for us this season." Hightower said Gilmore's work ethic is contagious across the defense. "There will be days when you want to be lackadaisical and you might not want to push yourself. Then you see Steph running from one hash to the other hash guarding a guy on a route, pushing his leverage," Hightower said. "When you see a guy work like that day in and day out, you can't help but push yourself with whatever you're going through." With a second consecutive shot at a Super Bowl ring, Gilmore said he'll be drawing on everything he's learned over the past two seasons. "I've learned a lot about myself just trying to be consistent," Gilmore said. "Just really trusting my teammates. I've learned a lot of football. I'm smarter than I was last year, just from coaches putting me in the best position to make plays. "Now I'm the Super Bowl in position to finish everything off.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 1st, 2019

Matthew Slater carries proud family football tradition

By Barry Wilner, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Matthew Slater is more than halfway to his father's longevity as an NFL player. He doesn't plan to equal it. The star special teamer of the New England Patriots just completed his 11th pro season, and he's at his fifth Super Bowl, with two wins. In his dad Jackie's 20-season NFL career, he made one Super Bowl — coincidentally, with the Rams in 1980 — and lost to Pittsburgh. "That's a long time to do anything," Matthew Slater said Tuesday. As for the New England kick coverage ace lasting so long, he added with a laugh: "Absolutely not." Of course, when your team becomes a regular visitor to the Super Bowl, it lengthens the season by more than a month. No one in the NFL would want to pass on that, but in reality Slater has played nearly 12 seasons, making All-Pro in 2016 and being voted to seven Pro Bowls. Not bad for someone whose Hall of Fame father didn't necessarily want Matthew to play football. "He felt that way for two reasons," Matthew Slater says. "First, he didn't want me to feel the pressure of living up to his name. He thought the expectations could be unfair. "He also wanted me to avoid injury. He knew the toll it takes on you physically." Matthew and his brother played plenty of sports, and guess who usually was the coach. Yep, Jackie. "Sports have always been a big part of my life and have so many life lessons from being on a team, and the disciplines of preparing to compete and how you compete, and having teammates around you. I thought they were good lessons to learn," Jackie Slater said. "I discouraged them to play football. I didn't think (Matthew) would be big enough to play football. I coached in basketball, soccer, track and field, even some flag football. I didn't see football as something that he would excel. But when he played flag, he had good speed and he caught the ball and ran well." Matthew kept improving in high school and grew, though not to Jackie's offensive tackle measurements. Because Jackie was unfamiliar with the kind of skills his son possessed, he turned to teammates Ron Brown — a 1984 Olympic champion speedster, who played wideout and returned kicks — and outstanding cornerback LeRoy Irvin. Brown refined Matthew's technique and speed, and Irvin worked with him on back-pedaling and breaks for receivers. "Things I was not familiar with," says Jackie, who recalled watching Matthew leave everyone behind in a 100-meter race, only to have Brown say "he did everything wrong. "I knew I needed to get out of the way." Not really. Matthew, now 33, credits pretty much everything he has achieved in football to his father, who entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2001. "He made every effort to be present," the son says. "That's what I appreciate the most: He was a father first. So many young kids ... many black kids ... I see they don't have a presence like that. "Anytime I have success, certainly my dad is sharing in it. It all goes back to my dad; I wouldn't be playing this game without him. It's pretty unique, a son being able to do something his dad did. We are enjoying this ride together." For sure. But on Sunday, well, Jackie admits to being a bit torn when the Rams — his team — take on the Patriots — Matthew's team. You see, Jackie Slater still has plenty of millennium blue and new century gold running through his veins. "This is a win-win situation for me," the elder Slater notes. "If my son loses, it's not as if he hasn't experienced the thrill of victory in a Super Bowl, something I never did. And if he loses, it hurts, but he has a great attitude about it. It helps me live with the defeats he has. "If the Rams win, I will be happy because I have been pulling for this team for more than 40 years. My first hero in the game was Tom Mack, who I actually played with for three years. "You know, he has an unbelievable opportunity to experience things I never did. I don't know what it is like to win the Super Bowl beyond the joy my son had when he won on two occasions. That's almost as good as me winning, I felt.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 30th, 2019

Alonso turns focus to final leg of motorsports Triple Crown

By Jenna Fryer, Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Fernando Alonso raced into retirement from Formula One dedicated to winning the final leg of motorsports' version of the Triple Crown. The Indianapolis 500 is the missing piece on his resume, one he intends to add in May. But Alonso has been considering his future for quite some time, and his November retirement from F1 has opened his schedule to race in anything he wants. After anchoring Wayne Taylor Racing to a victory in the Rolex 24 at Daytona, the Spaniard was coy about his future. "The aim is to do something unprecedented in motorsport," Alonso said Sunday after picking up his new Rolex watch. Not very specific, but a clue that Alonso is open to any and all ideas in this new chapter of his career. "Right now full focus is on the Indy 500," he said. "But yeah, I'm thinking I'm trying to do something more, maybe in different disciplines. I need to think, I need to plan, I need to make sure that I'm competitive, to have the right people, the right teams, and the right preparations. "Whatever adventure is next, I will not do it if I'm not competitive or I don't have a shot for winning. I need to be very calm and clever with the decisions for the future." The plan was put in motion two years ago when the two-time F1 champion persuaded his McLaren team to let him skip the Monaco Grand Prix and instead race the Indianapolis 500. Alonso had twice won in Monte Carlo — perhaps the toughest leg of the Triple Crown — and now he wanted to kiss the bricks at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. He had never driven an Indy car before and had never raced on an oval, yet he was in contention to win his inaugural Indy 500 until a late engine failure. His sights next turned to 24 Hours of Le Mans, with a sports car racing debut in last year's Rolex 24 as the warmup. Alonso announced he would race at Le Mans the morning after he finished his first Rolex, and six months later he won in France to move closer to the Triple Crown. His attention turns now toward the Indy 500, but with the freedom to pick and choose what he wants to do, Alonso is studying every opportunity. A five-year losing streak in F1 had pushed him to the fringes of that series, and although he remains one of the most popular drivers in the world, some began to wonder if his skills had slipped at the tail of his 17-year F1 career. What he has done moonlighting in different disciplines has proven his talent has not wavered and that as he prepares to turn 38, Alonso still rates among the best drivers on the planet. "Whenever you put a guy in a different car on a different track, normally it takes four or five laps for them to get (comfortable)," said Rolex winning team owner Wayne Taylor. "I remember his first split on the first turn was as quick as everybody. I thought, 'How are we going to manage this?' He was just terrific." Alonso did the heavy lifting for Taylor at Daytona, a race stopped twice for the first time in history for rain, then called shy of the 24-hour mark because conditions were too treacherous for drivers to be on the track. Two of Alonso's three stints in the car were during the rain, in part because F1 had made him the most experienced driver on the Taylor lineup in wet conditions, and because he had the control and steadiness to manage the risks versus reward in a torrential rainstorm. Alonso found the limited visibility and standing water on the track to be the most dangerous conditions of his career, and he had had more than enough when he saw the pace car driver hydroplane and nearly crash when he was following under caution. But he didn't turn a single wheel wrong and drove the Cadillac DPi to the lead every time he was on the track to win the Rolex in his second try. He noted after that that his sports car career was exactly a year old and continued to hint at his future. Although he did a car swap with seven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson in November and ran exhibition laps in a stock car, Alonso said at Daytona that NASCAR events are not currently on his radar. He is competing this year in the World Endurance Challenge — he won in his series debut last season in the Six Hours of Spa — and quipped he has so many plans he may need to return to F1 to lessen his load. There are plenty of opportunities for Alonso all over the world, and his next big announcement could be next year's Dakar Rally in Paris. Alonso's win in Daytona made him the third F1 champion to win the Rolex, joining Phil Hill and Mario Andretti. He seemed envious of the drivers before his time who could race all over the world in any sort of formula, and proving that it can still be done might be what Alonso does next. "I think to win in different series, in different disciplines of motorsport which are quite specific, you need to probably be born with that talent and grow up with that knowledge of that series," he said. "Like oval racing, like IndyCar and things like that — to come there and try to be competitive or winning is something that I think in motorsport is quite difficult. "I think in the past it was a little bit more open, motorsport in general. But now every series became very, very professional, and you need to take full dedication to each series, each driving style and things like that. I think hopefully soon I can tell you more of the plans.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 28th, 2019

Alonsos expectations high in return to Daytona | The Manila Times Online

MIAMI: Two-time Formula One World Champion Fernando Alonso takes a second shot at the 24 Hours of Daytona on Saturday (Sunday in Manila), aiming to add the iconic US enduranceREAD The post Alonsos exp.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJan 27th, 2019

Halep edges young American at Australian Open; Venus next

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Push Simona Halep to the brink, and she summons her best. The Australian Open's top-seeded woman got all she could handle from 20-year-old American Sofia Kenin in the second round before taking the last four games to emerge with a 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-4 victory that took 2½ hours Thursday. "Well, I have no idea how I won this tonight," said Halep, the reigning French Open champion. "It's so tough to explain what happened on court." A year ago at Melbourne Park, Halep was a point from being eliminated in two matches but came back each time en route to reaching the final. In the first round this year, she was down a set and a break before turning things around. And this time, against a hard-hitting Kenin, Halep trailed 4-2 in the third set and managed to not cede another game. And that was despite getting what she described as "a little bit injured" in the second set, something that seemed clear from the way she wasn't always able to run with her usual verve. "Hopefully," said Halep, whose No. 1 ranking is up for grabs during the Australian Open, "next round I play better." That third-round matchup will be quite intriguing, because it'll be against seven-time Grand Slam champion and former No. 1 Venus Williams. And the winner of that could face Williams' younger sister, 23-time major champ Serena, in the fourth round. Venus won a three-setter that finished a little before Halep's did — and in much more emphatic fashion. Pushed to that deciding set by getting broken to end the second, Venus ran away with the win down the stretch, defeating Alize Cornet 6-3, 4-6, 6-0. So what was the difference in the lopsided third set? "She was just putting more intensity than me. She was hitting harder, deeper," Cornet said. "I had a little less energy than in the second set and she took advantage of it and really raised her level." The 38-year-old Venus, unseeded at a major for the first time in five years, was the runner-up in Australia to Serena in 2003 and 2017. Serena advanced to the third round by beating 2014 Wimbledon finalist Eugenie Bouchard 6-2, 6-2 on Thursday night, reeling off the last five games and 16 of the final 20 points. That match was to be followed in Rod Laver Arena by No. 1 Novak Djokovic against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in a rematch of the 2008 final at Melbourne Park. Other winners in the women's draw Thursday included reigning U.S. Open champion Naomi Osaka, past U.S. Open runners-up Karolina Pliskova and Madison Keys, No. 27-seeded Camila Giorgi and No. 28 Hsieh Su-Wei. In men's action, Stan Wawrinka was up a set and was just two points away from taking the second against Milos Raonic. Couldn't do it. About an hour later, 2014 champion Wawrinka was a single point from grabbing the third set. Denied again. And another hour after that, Wawrinka was two points from seizing the fourth to force a fifth. Nope, not on this afternoon. Wawrinka kept coming oh-so-close, and Raonic kept hanging in there and toughing out the most important moments along the way to a 6-7 (4), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (11), 7-6 (5) victory that put the 16th-seeded Canadian into the third round. "I missed a few little points," Wawrinka said, "that could have changed the match." So true. "It feels like 4 hours passed by in about 15 minutes. ... The adrenaline takes over," said Raonic, the runner-up at Wimbledon in 2016. "I was very fortunate to stay alive in that fourth set." They were interrupted for about a half-hour while the roof at Rod Laver Arena was shut because of rain at 4-all in the third set. Raonic thought that helped him quite a bit. "I do a little bit better indoors than outdoors," he said, "so thank you for raining up there." In other men's action on Day 4, 2014 U.S. Open runner-up Kei Nishikori withstood 59 aces from 39-year-old Ivo Karlovic en route to a 6-3, 7-6 (6), 5-7, 5-7, 7-6 (7) victory, but No. 7 Dominic Thiem retired from his match in the third set after dropping the first two, and 2018 Australian Open semifinalist Hyeon Chung lost to Pierre-Hugues Herbert 6-2, 1-6, 6-2, 6-4. Raonic delivered 39 aces, part of an impressive ratio of 84 total winners to only 44 unforced errors. This was a matchup probably better suited to the second week than the second round of a Grand Slam tournament, given both men's credentials. But Wawrinka, a three-time major champion once ranked as high as No. 3, dropped out of the top 250 last season, when he had surgery on his left knee. His signature one-handed backhand is as dangerous as ever — he had a 16-2 edge in winners on that shot Thursday — and he hit 28 aces of his own. But as even as the match was in many respects — Raonic only won two more points overall, 163-161 — Wawrinka couldn't come through when he really needed to. Raonic had plenty to do with that, of course, including in the third-set tiebreaker, when he served his way out of trouble. Wawrinka's three set points there came at 6-5, when Raonic delivered a serve at 129 mph (208 kph) followed by a forehand volley winner; at 8-7, when Raonic's 125 mph (201 kph) serve drew a missed return; and at 10-9, when an ace at 132 mph (213 kph) did the trick. A 123 mph (198 kph) service winner gave Raonic that set. In the last tiebreaker, Wawrinka was up 5-4 before Raonic closed with three consecutive points to avoid heading to a fifth set. "Today, I'm sad and frustrated," Wawrinka said. "But in general, if I take some distance with it, I'm happy to see that I'm able to play again with this level, able to move that well.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2019

ONE Championship: Edward Kelly looks to settle score in rematch with Christian Lee

Edward "The Ferocious" Kelly has his sights fixed on capturing the most convincing victory of his professional career as he faces Singapore's Christian "The Warrior" Lee for the second time.   Both men are slated to lock horns at ONE: ETERNAL GLORY, which takes place at the Istora Senayan in Jakarta, Indonesia on 19 January.   Kelly and Lee initially crossed paths at ONE: BEYOND THE HORIZON in September 2018, where Kelly won by disqualification after the latter’s suplex was deemed illegal by the referee in the first round.   While a victory was added to Kelly's record, it was not exactly the kind of victory he trained and hoped for from a bout that promised fireworks.   “The Ferocious” knows that having his hand raised in the rematch will be no walk in the park, but he likes his chances against the exceptional 20-year-old from Singapore   "I learned that I should never give my back to him, and that he will come to attack every second," Kelly said.   "I think this fight could go to the judges if I am unable to catch him with a big shot. I feel he is well prepared for my style. We both do not want to lose to each other."   Kelly concedes that there is an added pressure to perform as his stable, Team Lakay, is coming off an unprecedented run in 2018.   "There is an added pressure for me to perform and open the year on a high note for Team Lakay. I am the first to fight this 2019, so I am planning to give it my all when I get inside the cage," he stated.   "The target is to start the year right for Team Lakay. I want to beat Christian Lee, and then hopefully get a crack at the ONE Featherweight World Title in the near future."   Known for his tremendous power in his strikes, Kelly stressed that if the opportunity to score a finish presents itself against Lee, he will not think twice to grab it.   "His relentlessness is his strength, but can also be his weakness. I need to pick my shots, maximize my striking and be careful with his takedowns,” he explained. “Should the opening present itself, I am definitely going for a knockout.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 7th, 2019

Clippers beat up on Suns again, win 121-111

By JACK MAGRUDER,  Associated Press PHOENIX (AP) — Marcin Gortat figures he is the beneficiary of coach Doc Rivers' New Year's resolution. Gortat had not played in the fourth quarter in the first 36 games of the season until the calendar turned, and he responded with his first double-double of the season when the Clippers extended their dominance of the Phoenix Suns with a 121-111 victory Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). "You never know with Doc," Gortat said after getting 18 points and 13 rebounds in 25 minutes. "You just have to be ready. You earn your minutes. Obviously if you play well, you might earn a few more minutes. That's all I'm trying to do, help the team to win." Danilo Gallinari and Lou Williams scored 21 points apiece and four other Clippers finished in double figures as they won their third straight against the Suns this season and their 11th straight in the series. Patrick Beverley scored 16 points for the Clippers, who led by 29 points in the second quarter. Beverley made four 3-pointers, Williams had three and Tobias Harris added two with his 16 points. Montrezl Harrell scored 15. "I loved how we started the game," Rivers said. "The way we can score, if we defend, it's hard for anyone to beat us." Devin Booker scored 23 points and T.J. Warren had 20 for the Suns, who lost their fifth straight. The Suns, down by 30 with 4 1/2 minutes remaining in the third quarter, used 22-5 run fueled by seven points from Jamal Crawford and six by Josh Jackson to close to 91-78 entering the fourth quarter. Mikal Bridges' slam on the first possession of the period brought the Suns within 11, but Williams made two 3-pointers and a three-point play as the Clippers again pulled away. "We understand (Phoenix) is a young team," Williams said. "They are putting pieces together, trying to figure out their identity. So we just come in and play hard." The Clippers shot 51 percent from the field and held a 43-25 rebounding edge. Los Angeles outrebounded the Suns by 42 in the three meetings this season. "We don't have stupid great rebounders on this team," Gortat said. "Everybody has to rebound. We have to box out, hit somebody. "Make sure we are the guys who are hitting first. Then go get the ball. We have to make them miss and get the ball. Not every game is going to look that way, but today it worked perfectly. Reserves Richaun Holmes and Crawford had 16 points apiece for the Suns. Suns center Deandre Ayton had four points, tying a season low set in the first game against the Clippers on Nov. 28. He had three field goal attempts, five rebounds, three assists and four turnovers. "You know (coach) Larry Brown used to say, 'You need the touches, you go get it,'" Suns coach Igor Kokoskov said. "(Three) touches? It's on all of us." The Suns fell behind early, a problem in their last several starts. Harris and Williams made two 3-pointers apiece in the first quarter, when the Clippers shot 71.4 percent and finished on a 23-6 run for a 38-19 edge. The Clippers led 63-34 on Gallinari's first 3-pointer with 4 minutes left in the half. It was 68-44 at halftime. Phoenix trailed Philadelphia by 22 points after 16 minutes of its 132-127 loss on Wednesday and was down by 17 at halftime of a 132-109 loss to Golden State on New Year's Eve. TIP-INS Clippers: The Clippers play six of their next seven games at home, only away for an over-night trip to Denver on Jan. 10. ... Boban Marjanovic, one of three Clippers to have a double-double against the Suns on Nov. 28, did not play. Suns: Ayton had double-doubles in nine of his previous 11 games, and he had nine rebounds in the other game in that stretch. ... The Suns are 5-16 at home. Only New York (4-12) has fewer home victories. ... Booker has seven 35-point games, tied for third in the league behind James Harden (15) and Stephen Curry (eight). BIG BENCH The Clippers' reserves had 61 points. They entered the game averaging a league-high 52.4 Williams and Harrell have not started a game this season, and Beverley flip-flopped with Avery Bradley on Nov. 20. All average at least 25 minutes a game, and Williams (18.2) and Harrell (15.7) are the Clippers' third- and fourth-leading scorers. "'Trez' could start, we know that. Lou could start," Rivers said. "The fact that they are OK coming off the bench is the first key. I do think it takes a special mindset for a guy to want to do that and then guys who accept to do that. We have that." UP NEXT Clippers: Host Orlando on Sunday. Suns: Host Charlotte on Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2019

New chapter awaits LeBron-Warriors rivalry

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com Oakland, Calif. — You cannot engage in a meaningful discussion or debate about the greatest player who ever lived without mentioning a team. They are the gate-crashers of this exclusive party and the shot-callers, the wedge that nudges the verdict away from one player and in the direction of another. They are, quite simply, a better sidekick for Michael Jordan than Scottie Pippen ever was. They are the Golden State Warriors, who ruin it for LeBron James. Or at least, so far anyway. If not for the Warriors, talk show hosts and sports bars and folks at the water cooler who discuss these things would be forced to get their neck hairs up over another touchy subject. Anything but the GOAT. That would be settled. Without the Warriors, LeBron would own more than three championships — everyone would most likely agree to that — and less competition from the immortalized player who went 6-0 in the NBA Finals. Even now, here in his first year with a new team, and astonishingly playing at MVP level just a week away from his 34th birthday, LeBron must deal with a persistent problem. For The King, the Warriors are this recurring kryptonite-mare. Christmas Day will provide LeBron and the Lakers their first shot this season at the winners of the last two NBA titles and three of the last four, all done at the expense of James when he carried the Cavaliers. New team brings the same challenge and a clear sense of reality. LeBron knows he’s up against a wall that’s bigger than the one holding up Congress right now. “We can’t measure ourselves against them,” he said, repeating the same thoughts he held on his first day as a Laker, when he said back in October: “We’ve got a long way to go to get to Golden State.” That “long way” might require the Lakers to put someone else in the shotgun seat for the journey, and that mystery player — Anthony Davis? Kawhi Leonard? Kevin Durant? — is at least a year away, if that. The future, both near and far, involves too many issues and complications and factors, and all of those revolve around LeBron’s stare-down with Father Time. A championship with a third team would weigh in LeBron’s favor against Jordan mainly because it would be accomplished in his mid-30s, at a time when the bodies of even great players begin to squeak. Such high-level consistency is juicing LeBron in the GOAT talk; right now he shows no slow-down with the exception of the occasional defense lapse, and is dropping 27.6 points, 8.2 rebounds and 7.2 assists nightly. He’s a considerable factor, for the first time in his career, beyond the 3-point line, and he still attacks the rim with the intensity of annoyed Draymond Green. Understandably, LeBron has lost three times to two other teams before in the championship round, although one comes with a disclaimer. It was to the peak-time Spurs in 2007 when LeBron was the definition of a one-man show. The next loss to the Spurs was somewhat understandable because San Antonio was solid that season against the Heat; the hiccup against Dirk-led Dallas was less forgiving. It is the Warriors who’ve squirted mustard on the legacy, not because LeBron’s teams were better, but because they’ve beaten him three times. That puts LeBron’s Finals record at 5-6, though not totally his fault, but still cannot compete with MJ’s 6-0. There’s the argument that Jordan never won a championship against anyone on the Warriors’ level; although it’s always tricky to compare eras and teams because of different rules (hand-checking, for one) and trends (three-point shooting, for another), LeBron faced Steph Curry and Kevin Durant the last two summers. Jordan had John Stockton-Karl Malone twice, Gary Payton-Shawn Kemp and Charles Barkley-Kevin Johnson once each. For what it’s worth. That’s all in the past, which is beyond LeBron’s control. Now the discussion will be fixated on the next few years and what he can or cannot do to win a sixth title, which may once again be determined by the Warriors to some degree. “He’s still LeBron James,” said Green. “He’ll boost any team he’s on and he’ll make them a contender. It’s a different look for him, more than what he’s used to, because of the makeup of the team, but they have him and so they’ll be a tough test. Any team with LeBron is a tough test for anyone.” LeBron is bringing Kyle Kuzma, Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and also a batch of veterans to the Warriors challenge. It’s a bit daunting, especially since the Lakers have suffered some bad losses lately, to the Wizards, Nets and Grizzlies. Yes, Ingram and Rajon Rondo just returned from injuries. That’s all in the Lakers’ favor. Also consider that the Lakers you see after the All-Star break could be a more accurate version should the young players keep developing and trending up. “We're a team that's trying to get better every week, better every month,” LeBron said. “We want to have championship habits.” But will that make them better than, say, the Oklahoma City Thunder in a playoff series? The Nuggets? Trail Blazers? No one has stepped forth as a solid No. 2 team in the West, assuming the Warriors, despite their record at the moment, remain the clear No. 1. That’s why LeBron’s best chance to repel the Warriors will happen with his next team, not this one. The Warriors haven’t exactly stormed through the season’s first 30 or so games; Curry was hurt, Durant and Green had a spat and even wins against the likes of Dallas, Utah, Sacramento and Orlando were a grind. But for a team like the Warriors, the regular season just gets in the way. Also, at some point they’ll welcome All-Star center DeMarcus Cousins to the mix. Coach Steve Kerr said: “I really like where we are. I don’t think we’ve played great basketball for a while. I think we started out really well, 10-1, and the last five or six weeks we’ve been through an awful lot with injuries and with just trying to find a rhythm, a chemistry and a groove with the new groups that we put on the floor. So to not be there yet, but to still have the record that we do, I think we are in a good position. I think we are going to get a lot better.” It’s a good time to get a first look at the player who only figured them out once in The Finals. "We've seen him a lot over the last four years," Curry said. Another championship for LeBron would match Jordan’s win total and would liven up the debate. Surely the Warriors will factor in one way or another: their demise at some point, or continued choke-hold. Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 25th, 2018

2018 PBA Draft Baller Breakdown: Javee Mocon

At the age of 23, Javee Mocon has one of the biggest collection of trophies among all draftees. In the last seven years, Mocon has won two Juniors titles and four Seniors titles. Why wouldn’t you pass up an opportunity to acquire a certified winner for your ball club?   STRENGTHS When you’re so used to winning, it becomes second nature. Mocon is the type of player who is easy to coach because he is willing to do whatever it takes to win. His attitude and work ethic is admirable. He will willingly take on any role given to him and make sure that no matter what it is, his presence will be felt. In his first two seasons with the Red Lions, he came off the bench to back up Art dela Cruz and provided much-needed energy and swagger to sustain the efforts of the first group. As a starter for San Beda in the last three years, Mocon became the premier power forward in the NCAA. At 6’4”, Mocon was at his best operating inside the arc. He possesses a reliable mid-range jumper and can finish in the paint effectively as well. In Game 2 of the Season 94 Finals, Mocon’s last collegiate game ever, he unveiled a new weapon that he will surely need in the next level: the three-point shot. Mocon shot four out of eight from beyond the arc, letting the world know that he has been working on his game in preparation for the PBA. AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT Although he looked confident taking threes in his final game for San Beda, will he still be that confident letting it fly in the pros? That remains to be seen. One thing we never saw from Mocon as a student-athlete was dribbling ability. Right now, his skill when it comes to handling the basketball is very basic. I have never seen Mocon dribble the ball coast-to-coast all the way to the basket. But, then again, he never had to because he was so obedient and strictly played within the boundaries of his position. Perhaps another thing he should work on his passing. Not that he didn’t pass the ball in college (2.3 assists per game), it’s just something he wasn’t known for and an aspect of his game he could unlock. Imagine Mocon pump-faking from the three-point line before making a move towards the basket with the option to kick the ball out to shooters or making a drop pass to the big men in the paint? That’s a tough cover.      .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 15th, 2018

K-dramas to binge-watch on this month

The holiday break is upon us. Bless all streaming sites available in the country for blessing us with ongoing K-dramas that we could binge-watch on. We've shortlisted a few titles to keep you warm this coming days. Memories of the Alhambra Watch the first episode and discoverwhy we are hooked with this drama. It is fast-paced, thrilling and exciting. It tells the story of how Ji-woo (Hyunbin) invests on an augmented reality game that takes the players to different spots of Granada, Spain. At the center of all this magic realism is hostel owner Hee-joo. She is unaware of the storm brought about by her brother's invention, but her life will surely change in the next few episodes....Keep on reading: K-dramas to binge-watch on this month.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 12th, 2018

Kazakhstan defies odds in stunning win over Gilas Pilipinas

Not every team can push through perilous situations and Kazakhstan showed it has what it takes in a 92-88 victory over the Philippines in the second round of the Fiba World Cup Asian Qualifiers. The Kazakhs were holding onto a 90-88 lead with less than half a minute remaining and they had a hard time setting up a shot as the Filipinos hounded their passing lanes in front of a rabid Philippine audience at Mall of Asia Arena. But Kazakh captain Alexandr Zhigulin knew how his team remained composed during that pressure-packed situation---just be totally stoic. "Of course, there was pressure but we stayed calm and we did our job without any emotions," said Zhigulin as his team i...Keep on reading: Kazakhstan defies odds in stunning win over Gilas Pilipinas.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 1st, 2018

CHAMPIONS AT LONG LAST: Reliving UP’s successful 1986 UAAP revolt

It was the year of People Power, a revolution like no other. And, who would think that such an “uprising” has spilled onto collegiate basketball the same year as the stronghold of the UE Red Warriors was overran? What other ball club can best depict this EDSA Spirit than the 1986 UP Fighting Maroons? Its putsch in the UAAP was carefully plotted since legendary coach Joe Lipa took over the coaching reigns in 1981. This began fierce onslaught only a year later when the Maroons made a rare march into the UAAP Finals against the UE, which boasted a fearsome shooter named Allan Caidic. Title contender Led by the high leaper, Vincent Albino, the Maroons made that shocking feat, yet succumbed to the Warriors’ fiery offensive and lost. But, UP showed nevertheless they had what it takes to be a title contender. And the rebuilding continued in 1983 when UP successfully recruited two big names in the NCAA--Ronnie Magsanoc and Eric Altamirano, stalwarts of the 1982 juniors champs San Beda Red Cubs. With Magsanoc directing plays and Altamirano scorching hot from all angles, UP further advanced in its ferocious plan of taking over the UAAP. But Glenn Capacio and Harmon Codinera of FEU frustrated the upstarts and dealt UP a painful loss in the Finals after being so close to winning the championship. Missing link Their frustration became deeply rooted as the Maroons stumbled the next couple of years finding that “missing link” to glory. And months after a dictatorship was toppled, UP’s powerful missing piece to its years of rebuilding came walking into the Maroon bench—the sensational 6’4” center Benjie Paras, also a hotshot alumnus of San Beda. Paras became the answered prayer since the Maroons had players with an average height of 6’1” at the time, surely a no-match against the burly inside operators of other UAAP teams. Now with a dominating center manning the paint, UP was set to finally chase that dream. And also they had an answer to the best big man of that era, Jerry Codinera, who had puzzled opponents with his shiftiness, defensive prowess (called the Defense Minister in the PBA), exceptional perimeter shooting, and versatility. Best starting five Also, UP has the best starting five in the league, all of them from that sensational Red Cubs basketball program concocted by coach Ato Badolato—Paras, Magsanoc, Altamirano, Joey Mendoza and Duane Salvatierra—with the sweet-shooting sixth man Joey Guanio, a rookie from La Salle Greenhills, providing added artillery and standout Ramil Cruz bringing in his outstanding all-around play. Despite this, however, their title shot wasn’t smooth sailing. Codinera and the Warriors defeated them twice in the eliminations and UE came close to a sweep that would automatically serve them the trophy. But a loss to rival FEU in the last game in the eliminations paved the way for UP, who landed second place after winning a knockout match against the Tamaraws, for that hard-earned slot in the finals. They were however saddled with a twice-to-win disadvantage. Title hungry This didn’t matter to the Maroons, as their hunger for the title brought out the best in them. With thousands of UP supporters trooping to the ULTRA in October 1986, the Maroons were unstoppable. Using a merciless zone, the Maroons were able to stifle Codinera from doing his thing in the paint. This led to UP’s emphatic decisive win in Game 1, 86-75, that arranged a winner take-all championship match three days later. And, in that rubber match, with the whole venue filled with UP students and alumni, from students, faculty, administrators to virtually the entire political spectrum to even former Diliman Commune leaders in the 1970s all coming in droves to cheer them on, how can the Maroons fail them? Altamirano’s true worth From the first time the buzzer sounded, the Maroons never allowed the Warriors to even move an inch, with its prolific scorer Altamirano showing his true worth. After subbing for a fouled out Magsanoc with a good four minutes left to play in the match, Altamirano shone with his playmaking skills and blazing marksmanship with his 27 points leaving the Warriors with no room to breathe. He ended up the tournament MVP that year. Paras likewise prevailed in his giant duel with Codinera with 19 points and 10 rebounds. With an insurmountable lead going into the final seconds, and coach Lipa reaching to the sky in triumph, the buzzer sounded with UP winning by nine points, 98-89. More than a dream come true And their first UAAP title in 47 years is now in their hands, more than a dream come true for the national cage mentor and the UP community he served. It brought a startling “revolution” into fruition, with UP taking over the reigns of the UAAP. Unfortunately, however, the celebration was short-lived, with the Ateneo, La Salle, and UST dynastic runs succeeding their memorable feat. Now 32 seasons later, UP has a chance to finally taste that sweet, scintillating victory again......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 29th, 2018

Drama, the long ball center of early season NBA intrigue

By Kyle Hightower, Associated Press There has been some early tinkering to lineups, a few hiccups and lots of drama to start the NBA season. None of the league’s final four teams from last season — Boston, Cleveland, Houston, Golden State — look like locks to hoist the Larry O’Brien Trophy this time. The addition of Carmelo Anthony to the Rockets’ roster produced more thorns than fruit, and now he is out. In Boston, the Celtics are having early trouble trying to figure out how best to use their overflowing mix of young and veteran talent following the return of Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward from injuries. And Cleveland has gotten off to a predictable slow start to the post-LeBron James’ era, but few expected the total collapse by the Cavaliers. However, there is no drama like championship drama and the defending champion Warriors suddenly look more like the cast of a reality series than a harmonious lineup rolling along and vying for a third straight championship. Draymond’s Green public outburst at Kevin Durant during the Warriors’ overtime loss to the Clippers on Nov. 12 lingers. Now there is tension on a team that has managed to remain mostly drama-free during its run. Durant’s impending free agency, Green’s lack of an apology, and Steph Curry’s injury has opened a window for teams. Some of the NBA’s most recent mini-dynasties have dissipated because of infighting. Squabbling between Michael Jordan and Chicago Bulls management at least contributed to their decline after Jordan’s second three-peat and subsequent second retirement in 1999. Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal couldn’t coexist long enough to extend the Los Angeles Lakers’ run of three straight titles from 2000 to 2002. Green has vowed the Warriors will still be there in the end. That remains to be seen. 3'S COMPANY Little guys doing work outside and big men camped out close to the basket is an old-school approach to basketball that’s starting to look as old as James Naismith’s original peach baskets. The NBA needs to send out thank-you cards to the ABA. Everyone digs the long ball. Next year will mark the 40th anniversary of the adoption of the 3-point shot in the league. Over those four decades it’s gone from being one of the handful of innovations carried over from the ABA to a necessity for any player — from guards to seven-footers — wanting to have longevity in the league. During the 2012-13 season, 33 NBA players listed at 6'8" or taller averaged at least one three-point attempt. That number grew to 124 last season. The 2018-19 season is barely two months old, but two teams (Boston and Golden State) have already logged 24 made three-pointers in a game. The record of 25 was set late last season by Cleveland. And in case anyone needed a reminder of the shot’s increased popularity, look no further than Milwaukee’s Brook Lopez. He became the third seven-footer in NBA history to hit eight three-pointers in a game when he did it against Denver last week. “You see the way the game’s trending, it’s definitely moving in that direction,” Lopez said. “I’m just trying to be professional, do my job, try to get my work in. I want to be as good as I can in every possible area of the game.” Lopez said Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer has been supportive of him stepping out beyond the arc. “Regardless if I miss, if I have off-games where I don’t shoot as well, they just tell me” to keep shooting, Lopez said. Other veteran big men around the league are hearing similar refrains. THE WEEK AHEAD — San Antonio at New Orleans, Monday (Tuesday, PHL time): DeMar DeRozan had 26 points and LaMarcus Aldridge added 22 points and 12 rebounds during the Spurs’ win in San Antonio earlier this month. The Pelicans look to return the favor after recovering nicely from a six-game losing skid. — Los Angeles Lakers at Cleveland, Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time): In a pre-Turkey Day appetizer, LeBron James returns to face Cleveland for the first time this season following his free agency departure to L.A. — New Orleans at Philadelphia, Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time): The Pelicans get their first crack at the new-look 76ers following their acquisition of Jimmy Butler. — Portland at Golden State, Friday (Saturday, PHL time): The Warriors get a look at one of their chief challengers in the West when they meet the Blazers for the first time this season. ___ AP Sports Writer Genaro Armas in Milwaukee contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

Curry injured, Bucks snap Warriors 8-game win streak

By Janie McCauley, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Stephen Curry left with an injury and the Golden State Warriors were unable to recover in a 134-111 loss to the Milwaukee Bucks that snapped their eight-game winning streak Thursday night (Friday, PHL time). Eric Bledsoe scored seven straight points during Milwaukee's big third quarter and finished with 26. Giannis Antetokounmpo added 24 points, nine rebounds and four assists as the Bucks handed the Warriors their first defeat at home this season. The two-time defending NBA champions were already missing All-Star Draymond Green and then lost Curry midway through the third. The two-time NBA MVP strained the adductor muscle in his left leg and went to the locker room shortly thereafter. He did not return. Curry grabbed at his inner thigh after trying to contest Bledsoe's shot in transition at the 6:50 mark of the third. He is expected to have an MRI on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). Klay Thompson led the Warriors with 24 points and Kevin Durant had 17 points, nine assists and seven rebounds. Curry, limited to 51 regular-season games last season because of injuries, scored 10 points in his second straight game below 20 after getting at least 23 points in every game previously — including five 30-point performances and a 51-point outing in three quarters. He dished out six assists in 26 minutes. Malcolm Brogdon scored 20 points and Khris Middleton had 17 and six assists as Milwaukee (9-2) won for the second straight time at Oracle Arena after a 116-107 victory on March 29 (Mar. 30, PHL time). The Bucks outscored the Warriors 41-28 in the third and shot 65 percent inside the arc (43 of 66) overall. Antetokounmpo had 19 points, seven rebounds, three assists, a steal and a block by halftime as the Bucks led 64-51 at the break. Bledsoe hit back-to-back layups to put the Bucks ahead 84-64 midway through the third then answered Curry's jumper with a three-pointer the next time down. Donte DiVincenzo's basket at the 4:06 mark made it 93-69 and coach Steve Kerr called a timeout. Jordan Bell had four points and five rebounds for the Warriors while moving into the starting lineup in place of Green, sidelined after spraining his right foot and toe in the first half of Monday's win over the Grizzlies. Golden State (10-2) is still tied for the second-best start in franchise history behind the 2015-16 team that began 24-0. The Warriors dropped to 6-1 at home. TIP-INS Bucks: Held a 46-38 rebounding advantage. ... Milwaukee made it to the free throw line 19 times and made 15 of those in the first half to a 7-of-8 showing at the stripe by Golden State. ... The Bucks shot 5-of-20 from three-point range in the first half. Warriors: Golden State shot 4-for-15 from deep in the first half and Thompson was the lone player to score in double figures. ... Bell made his 14th career start and first of the season. ... G Shaun Livingston missed his sixth straight game and eighth in the last 10 with a sore right foot. ... Andre Iguodala returned after sitting out Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) against Memphis as a rest day, checking into the game for the first time late in the opening quarter. ... Baron Davis of the 2007 "We Believe" Warriors received a roaring ovation when introduced and shown on the big screen 4:39 before halftime. MOMENT OF SILENCE A moment of silence was held for victims of the mass shooting in Thousand Oaks. Kerr said he is "devastated" for the victims and families in a "horrifying" shooting he read up on Thursday (Friday, PHL time). Of taking time before the game to remember the victims, Kerr is becoming accustomed to doing so. "We had one last week and we're probably going to have one next week," he said. "That's the reality until we do something about it. It's beyond sad." UP NEXT Bucks: At the Los Angeles Clippers on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) trying to end a two-game losing streak in the series. Warriors: Host Brooklyn on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) seeking an eighth straight victory against the Nets and seventh in a row at home......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 9th, 2018

Iba ang ambience and level -- Espejo on playing in Japan

Marck Espejo is having the best time of his volleyball career playing for Oita Miyoshi in the Japan V. Premier League. Despite falling short in his first two outings, the Ateneo de Manila University product made his presence felt in the top tier league in one of Asia’s volleyball giants.  “Sobrang saya siyempre pero mahirap din, first international club league ko,” said Espejo in an interview coursed through Virtual Playground volleyball talent head Mark Salamat. The five-time UAAP Most Valuable Player and three-time UAAP champion welcomes the big challenge of playing against the best players and teams in Japan.   “Sobrang iba yung ambience and level nu’ng league if i-compare sa Philippines,” said Espejo, who was feted as the first-ever Philippine Sportswriters Association’s Mr. Volleyball. Espejo debuted with 16 points off 12 kills and four kill blocks in the Weisse Adler’s 15-25, 20-25, 19-25, to Toray Arrows last Saturday. Oita Miyoshi dropped its second game the following day to the Nagano Tridents, 25-21, 25-23, 25-21. Playing for a full season abroad, Espejo admitted that it takes a little time for him to fully adjust not only in the level of play but also with the culture. “Sa pag-adjust naman siyempre mahirap sa start pero kung gusto mo naman ginagawa mo makaka-adjust ka naman kaagad di ba?” he said. “Masaya and very approachable ang team.” Back in the Philippines, his former Ateneo head coach Oliver Almadro has nothing but praises to his protégé from Marikina.  “Dumating man sa kanya ‘to, we’re very proud of him. Goosebumps kami sa ginagawa niya,” he said. “Inspiration ng women’s team ko si Marck Espejo,” added Almadro, who is now calling the shot for the Lady Eagles. “We’re watching his highlights, we’re watching his videos.” “Marck you’re doing a good job and we’re proud of you.” Espejo and Oita Miyoshi will march into action on Saturday against the Toyota Gosei Trefuerza, on the same day sisters Jaja Santiago and Dindin Santiago-Manabat will make their debut in the women’s division for Ageo Medics and Toray Arrows, respectively.     ---  Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 30th, 2018

Q& A: Hornets Walker starts season in scoring groove

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com With the new season underway, and with his game as hot as almost anyone to start, Charlotte Hornets guard Kemba Walker was asked what impressed or surprised him about the first 10 days or so of 2018-19. “Nothing besides my own play,” Walker said, laughing after a shootaround Friday (Saturday, PHL time). “Nothing besides seeing my name near the top of the NBA scoring, which is pretty weird.” Eh, maybe not so weird. Walker, a two-time All-Star, is the Hornets’ all-time leading scorer. At 28, the former ninth overall pick in the 2011 Draft is in his prime as a player. The 41 points he dropped on Milwaukee on opening night and the fact he’s gone for at least 23 every game since (with three more games of 30 or more) seems like the next logical step. It earned him the season’s first Eastern Conference Player of the Week honor and as Week 2 ended, his 31.7 ppg trailed only Golden State’s Stephen Curry (33.9) and Portland’s Damian Lillard (33.8). “It was [gratifying]. Who wouldn’t want it to keep going?” Walker told NBA.com. “I know teams will be gearing up on me and double-teaming me. But I just want to win, man. I want to get back to the playoffs any way possible. I don’t care what I average the rest of the year.” Walker, in the final year of a four-year, $48 million deal he signed in 2014, never has shot the ball so well -- 40.5 percent from the arc, 46.6 percent overall. Neither has he shot it so often and from such range. Walker is averaging 23 shots, including more than 11 3-point attempts. His usage rate of 33.5 trails only Milwaukee’s Giannis Antetokounmpo (35.1) and his 29.4 PER puts him ahead of Kevin Durant and LeBron James. Is it sustainable? That was one of multiple topics Walker talked about with NBA.com’s Steve Aschburner: *** Steve Aschburner: On Media Day, you made it sound as if you would hit this season hard from the start, and that’s exactly what we’ve seen. How do you explain it? Kemba Walker: I knew I had a good summer. I put in the work and the time and the effort to get better. And I’m healthy -- I haven’t felt healthy like this in a long time. Over the last three summers, I wasn’t healthy, having knee surgeries and ‘scopes. So I was rehabbing. This summer, I had a chance to work on my game. Being able to work on my shooting over a long period of time really helped as well. SA: You took as many 3FGAs last season as you shot your first two seasons combined. Now you’re launching them at a pace (11.3 per game) to break Steph Curry’s single season record (886). Is this a conscious change by you or a reaction to the league’s preferred style? KW: Both. The league definitely has changed from the time I first came in. Everybody’s shooting more threes, no matter their position. Me, I’ve just become more confident. I worked on my shot tremendously to get to this point. I’m comfortable now shooting it, whenever I can get to my spots. SA: What’s your preference -- pull-up threes, spot-up threes or those halfcourt threes like Steph takes? KW: Not at all [laughing]. Steph is a different type of shooter, maybe the best to ever shoot the basketball. But I’m comfortable shooting them however. It doesn’t matter. If I can get ‘em up, I try to make ‘em. But I do love for my teammates to create for me and get me some easy ones. It does take some stress, some pressure, off of me. SA: Your coach, James Borrego, has talked of using you more off the ball. Does that suit you? KW: It really helps. It gets me a little bit of rest, and it opens up a different dynamic in my game. As well as giving other guys a chance to have the ball in their hands and create for others. But the main thing is, it just keeps me fresher, which is huge for me. SA: What’s your take on the Charlotte rookies? KW: Oh, I’m a huge fan. Devonte’ [Graham] really hasn’t gotten a chance to play yet, but I’ve always been a huge fan, even when he was at Kansas. Just love his game, love his poise. And that’s skill -- I don’t think people understand how much of a skill it is to be poised, especially at a young age. It’s something that I didn’t have, something that took me a very long time to get. Miles [Bridges], he’s a hard-playing kid. Smart, always in the right spot on both ends of the floor. I can see him getting more minutes as the season progresses. SA: Malik Monk is a second-year guy who didn’t have the most satisfying rookie season. What do you see from him, and can he become a reliable backcourt mate? KW: Oh yeah, he’s growing. Every single day. His efficiency will come. He needs time to learn, needs time to develop, to figure out where his shots are going to come. He’s getting better already. He’s passing the ball really well, getting other guys involved. He needs to know we need him every night, with him coming off the bench for us. SA: Your rookie season was about as challenging as could be -- delayed by a lockout, rushed through training camp and a quickie preseason, and then a 7-59 experience. Did that set you back as a player? KW: Nah, it wasn’t a setback. It was humbling. I took it as a point in my career where I was going through adversity. It was tough -- nobody likes to lose -- and through my basketball career I felt I had been a winner. But I just stuck to it, just kept working hard. SA: You said you don’t want to talk anymore about your free agency next summer -- and your general manager, Mitch Kupchak, is on record saying, “Our intention is for him to end his career in a Hornet uniform.” Some people wonder what the market might be, though, given how many terrific point guards are out there. So let’s address that another way: what is it like competing with all those rivals? KW: It’s unbelievable, man. Every night. Every single night, somebody is there to … I can’t even explain it. Every team, there’s so many great point guards out there who are just ready to showcase their talents. There are young guys ready to show how good they are. Yeah, it’s a point guard league. SA: We’re seeing more and more teams switching everything defensively. How hard is that on a 6-foot-1 point guard? KW: It’s … tough sometimes. Some matchups, you don’t want to get. But I rely on my teammates to help out as much as possible. The most challenging part probably is boxing guys out. But I’m always up for the challenge. SA: Some players talk or at least play like defense is optional. Your thoughts? KW: Not at all. I’m paid to do it all. It’s not even about being paid -- I’m just competitive. I want to play defense. I want to score. I want to do it all. SA: I’ve often wondered what it’s like to play for the team that Michael Jordan owns. Other teams, the owners aren’t basketball experts. But that’s not the case for the Hornets. Is it intimidating? KW: I wouldn’t say intimidating. I love it. I want my owner to have played. He knows what’s going on, he knows how it feels after losses, after wins. Traveling. Being tired. He’s been through it. He knows what it takes to win games in this league. Even though basketball’s a bit different now from when he played, but still, he knows. I feel like I’m at an advantage because I can go to him, I can ask him things. Or he can just come to me, or text me or call me to let me know things. And let me know how to get past things. No, it’s an honor for us, it’s an honor for me to have him as an owner. SA: How is basketball different from when Jordan played? KW: For me, just the threes. A lot of bigs shooting threes. The bigs are different in general, you know? Back with MJ, I feel like the shooting guards and the forwards were dominant, and it was more of a post-up league. Now it’s a point guard’s league for the most part. And it’s not a post-up league much anymore. There are so many threes up in the air. SA: Do you little guys resent the stretch-fours and stretch-fives coming out onto your turf these days? KW: Yeah, man, it’s crazy. But it’s fun. Just seeing the development and the change. Even from when I first got in the league it wasn’t like that. But guys are so talented nowadays, it’s unbelievable. SA: Tell me about the Big Brothers Big Sisters work you do, mentoring four kids -- two boys and two girls -- in the Charlotte area. KW: Just to be in their lives. I take ‘em out to eat, take ‘em to Dave & Buster’s every now and then. It’s fun. I try to avoid the cameras. It’s not for social media. It’s not for anything but them. The kids are doing great in school. That’s the biggest progress, that’s what you want. They’ve really started to love basketball now -- they come to games sometimes. It’s been fun to see them grow, each and every time I see them. One of the kids, his mom passed away. I know it’s been a struggle for him. For me to be able to help get his mind off of that for a time, just be there for him, that’s definitely rewarding for me but I hope it’s more rewarding for him. SA: You’re in your eighth season, and you’ve played a total of 11 playoff games. What stands out for you about the postseason? KW: I remember every game. We played Miami twice. The first year [2014] was when they had LeBron, Dwayne Wade and Chris Bosh. They swept us, but I thought we played really well. Obviously it wasn’t enough -- they had three Hall of Famers. I remember the level of intensity those guys played with. I remember telling myself, the next time I get to the playoffs, I’m going to try my best to play like that. The next time [2016], that’s what I did. People thought we might get swept again, but we went to seven games. It was really fun. The whole atmosphere was so intense. I loved it. You have to take your game to a whole ‘nother level. You have to play hard every possession, every second of those games. The competitiveness, the toughness, everything goes up. SA: A problem that team had, it still has -- you’re carrying such a big load offensively. Do you need a second reliable scorer, and is that guy on the roster now? KW: Of course. We need it. I’m not going to have huge games every night. It’s on one of these guys to step up. I think guys are still searching for their roles at this point, especially with a new coach, new system. We’re still learning. But as the season progresses, I think they will. We have guys who are capable of putting points up for us. SA: The All-Star Game this season is in Charlotte. You’ve been selected twice. What would you think of playing in that game in your market? KW: That’d be amazing. To be in Charlotte, the team that drafted me, the team I’ve played with for eight years now, it would be a really special moment. Hopefully I can get there. It’d be fun. A really important and fun moment in my career. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 30th, 2018

Peralta takes shot at chief justice post anew

Supreme Court Associate Justice Diosdado Peralta has accepted his automatic nomination to the post recently held by retired Chief Justice Teresita Leonardo-De Castro. Source link link: Peralta takes shot at chief justice post anew.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

PBA: Ginebra meets struggling Meralco in Govs Cup

The latest Ginebra-Meralco showdown sure looks different. Reigning two-time champion and current league-leader Brgy. Ginebra meets Meralco for the first time in the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup Sunday. The Gin Kings are no. 1 with a near-perfect 6-1 record while the Bolts are not exactly sharp as they would have liked at this time of the year, stumbling to a 1-4 mark with four straight losses. Of course, despite their respective record, Ginebra-Meralco games in the Governors' Cup are always expected to pack some fireworks thanks to all the history. The two teams met in the last two Finals, with Ginebra winning in six games in 2016 thanks to "The Shot." The Gin Kings won again in 2017 after seven grueling games. Tip off for the latest installment will be at 6:45 p.m. at the Sta. Rosa Multi-purpose Complex in Laguna. In the first game at 4:30 p.m., Blackwater (5-1) takes on winless Rain or Shine (0-3).     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 6th, 2018