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Rep. Boboy Tupas to push progress of 5th district harder

THE economic development of the 5th district of Iloilo has gained momentum during the last two-and-a-half years with a massive infrastructure program coupled with social services for constituents. And it is the intention of incumbent 5th district Rep. Raul “Boboy” Tupas to push this growth harder in the next three years with a long list […] The post Rep. Boboy Tupas to push progress of 5th district harder appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource: thedailyguardian thedailyguardianOct 11th, 2018

Brother vs brother

IT’S Tupas versus Tupas once more in the fifth congressional district once more. Yes, former congressman Niel “Jun-Jun” Tupas will challenge his younger sibling, incumbent Rep. Raul “Boboy” Tupas in May 2019. As we all know, Boboy defeated Jun-Jun’s wife Angeli Lee-Tupas in the May 2016 congressional race. In today’s (Sept 15, 2018) edition of […] The post Brother vs brother appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsSep 14th, 2018

Jordan s weight reaches farther than court in NC

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CHARLOTTE -- Unlike Mark Cuban and James Dolan, the host of the 2019 NBA All-Star Game was voted in 14 times to participate and played in 13. Quite different from Micky Arison and Glen Taylor, the team owner whose arena and city will be the center of All-Star 2019 averaged 20.2 points in those 13 All-Star appearances, was named MVP three times and posted the first triple-double in the game’s history (1997). And not at all like Steve Ballmer and Joe Lacob, the guy most often credited with making Charlotte All-Star worthy this weekend ignited the annual Slam Dunk Contest with his takeoff from the foul line in 1988. He also regularly irritated former NBA commissioner David Stern into a series of fines for golfing when he should have been sitting through mandatory Friday media sessions. With a level of celebrity as arguably the game’s greatest player ever, morphed now into an off-radar role as owner of the Charlotte Hornets, Michael Jordan remains as famous, as popular and as successful as any or all the active All-Star participants who’ll cavort at the Spectrum Center in the city’s Uptown business district. Ain’t no other NBA owner who can say that. “You think about all these wealthy, successful owners in our league,” said Hornets president Fred Whitfield, “no one knew who any of them were, really, until they bought their team. Everybody in the world knew who Michael Jordan was before he bought his team.” Jordan’s place in the All-Star galaxy in the coming days is reflective of his unique position among those who oversee the NBA’s 29 other franchises. His impact on the team, on its fans, on their city and on the state in returning to his native North Carolina -- he grew up in coastal Wilmington before attending college in Chapel Hill -- to anchor and lend stability to the Hornets will be on full display, even if he’s hard to spot this weekend. It’s all a reminder, too, of the old movie line from a remarkably blessed character, wondering “What do you do when your real life exceeds your dreams?” Most don’t dare to imagine playing in an All-Star Game, never mind hosting one as the owner of the local team. “No,” Jordan told some Charlotte reporters Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), coming forward for one of his few appearances of the week. “As a kid growing up here in North Carolina, the first thing [was] playing basketball. And then things evolved from there -- from the University of North Carolina to Chicago. Obviously you know the history from that. “[The] opportunity to represent North Carolina in an All-Star Game from a different seat is truly amazing. It tells the path that I have taken. It gives me great pleasure to give that back to the community. It’s been a long-traveled road.” The celebration of the league’s brightest stars, and the ubiquitous banners and signage devoted to it will make it even harder than usual to visibly spot signs of Jordan’s ownership of the Hornets. For a typical regular season game, you might spy a flag emblazoned with his well-known “Jumpman” logo. Occasionally he’ll watch part of the game, rarely all, from seats at the end of his team’s bench, though he’s as likely to retreat to his suite atop the arena’s lower bowl. An in-game, timeout scoreboard video meant to stoke the crowd includes shots of GM Mitch Kupchak (“Architect of Champions”) and coach James Borrego (“Elite Pedigree”) but ends right about the time you expect some dramatic silhouette of His Airness to appear. It’s as if Jordan is as protective of his brand in running the Hornets as he is in maintaining its exclusivity in the marketplace. Doesn’t matter, though. His fingerprints are all over the franchise, as a basketball team, as a business enterprise and as a member of the community. On court, Jordan trusts his team Jordan’s greatest notoriety as an owner in a basketball setting may have come in December, when he was courtside for a tense game against Detroit. Guard Jeremy Lamb drained a 22-foot jumper with 0.3 seconds left, sending reserves Malik Monk and Bismack Biyombo onto the floor in celebration of what would be a 108-107 home victory. Trouble was, that sliver of time on the clock. Too many men. The Hornets were whistled for a one-shot technical foul and Jordan impulsively smacked Monk lightly, twice, on the back of the head. Any other owner does that, the player’s agent might file a grievance with the players union. Jordan does it and, thanks to his in-the-trenches, in-the-fraternity credibility, it comes across as a goof. “A tap of endearment,” Jordan called it later in a statement. “It was like a big brother and little brother tap. No negative intent. Only love!" Said Monk: “Big, big, big brother. But it was nothing. He was just playing.” The arc of Jordan’s career and his reputation as a stone-cold competitor make it OK if he wants to vent -- or swipe -- when things don’t go the Hornets’ way. Doesn’t matter that Jordan, who will turn 56 on All-Star Sunday, is old enough to be any of his players' dad. He still carries himself like an athlete, and their frame of reference remains, “That’s Mike.” “I’ve seen kids come up through camps,” said Buzz Peterson, Charlotte’s assistant general manager under Kupchak. “You could say Julius Erving, you could say Larry Johnson, Karl Malone, whatever, and the kids’ eyes are like, ‘Who?’ But you say Michael Jordan, they’re gonna know. That’s the separation there.” Peterson is among Jordan’s closest friends -- he beat him out as North Carolina’s prep player of the year in 1981, won an NCAA title with him as a Tar Heels teammate and is described by those who know both as someone who can disagree with the boss while staying comfortably in the inner circle. For Borrego, Charlotte’s first-year coach, interviewing to run Jordan’s team could have been intimidating. “We’re all human beings -- there’s a presence that comes with ‘Michael Jordan’ when he’s around,” Borrego told NBA.com in January. “But it’s healthy. He comes with a competitive spirit that you feel. “Michael was straight with me from Day 1. When I interviewed, he said, ‘I’m going to give you space to do your job. Whatever you need, you come to me. I’ll give you the resources you need.’ He has not tried to interfere one time. I feel his full support. … We’re starting to speak each other’s language, which is pretty healthy for us now.” Jordan keeps the coach apprised of his interactions with players, Borrego said. Other coaches should have such a resource at the ready. Hornets guard and 2019 All-Star starter Kemba Walker probably has benefited most from Jordan’s counsel. They text frequently, a pinch-me arrangement to this day for Walker. “I grew up wearing Jordans, grew up wanting to be like Jordan,” Walker said recently. “So for me to get this opportunity to be on his team means the world to me. He’s the one who believed in me -- I had no idea where I was going to go on draft night and he traded up for me. I’ve always heard the story, he was the one who actually drafted me. So it’s unbelievable. “He’s such a good dude. He understands what it is to be good. His delivery is always good. Only in a positive way, honestly.” Said rookie wing Miles Bridges: “You think there’ll be a lot of pressure having MJ as an owner. I’d seen how he got on his teammates when he played. So I was nervous, thinking if I had a bad game, he’d go at me like, ‘What’re you doing?’ But after meeting him and bonding with him, I feel like he’s the coolest owner out there. I don’t feel any pressure, I feel like he wants the best for us.” Big man Frank Kaminsky typically sits at the end of the bench, which puts him cheek to cheek with Jordan when he’s courtside. “He’s talking about what he’s seeing out on the court. Talking to the refs,” Kaminsky said. “Things other players don’t necessarily see. He still thinks the game. “You see things on the court that he sees. One game, the roll, pocket-pass, skip to the corner was open. He was saying that. We made an adjustment in a timeout, but he saw it a couple plays before that. At the end of that game, we had a big play that was a roll, pocket-pass, into the corner that put the game away. It worked the way he’d seen it.” The Hornets’ struggles during Jordan’s tenure as owner wouldn’t suggest it -- the last time this organization won a playoff series (2002), Jordan still was a player -- but there is a prestige to playing for his team. It’s not unlike being welcomed onto the list of elite athletes who endorse Jordan Brand. “I’m one of the lucky ones who’s in both,” Kaminsky said. “You’re talking about the most iconic player in sports history -- I might be biased because I grew up in Chicago -- but when you have his approval, it means a lot. You have it in the back of your mind that he wants you here.” Head smack or no head smack. Jordan grows as owner, businessman Basketball is a zero-sum game and the NBA is full of stars, even if none shines quite as brightly as Jordan. But business has room for negotiation and compromise, and deals get struck daily that leave both sides happy. There, Jordan has been beyond clutch. Funnel down everything he’s accomplished -- six NBA championships, the league’s highest career scoring average (30.1), five MVP awards, six Finals MVP, 10 scoring titles, nine All-Defensive team nods -- and it invariably ends with clammy hands. The “wow” factor is real and the Hornets are extremely careful about leveraging it. “It gives our organization a certain cachet,” said Whitfield, another longtime friend who goes back more than 35 years with Jordan. “For him to be majority owner, for him to do it in his home state as a local hometown hero, and to be able to come back and not just lead the team and the rebranding from the Bobcats to the Hornets, but his commitment to the community in giving back, it’s something that’s so special.” That’s a lot to unpack. When Jordan initially signed on with the Hornets, he did so as head of its basketball operations in 2006, purchasing a small minority stake in the team. The team was bad, the business was worse and trending down. “Back in ’08-09, the economy was in the tank and I was mandated to ‘displace’ 42 of our executives here on the business side,” Whitfield said. “When Michael bought the team, we were losing $30 million a year.’ Brought back into the league in 2004 two years after the original Hornets (1988-2002) were moved to New Orleans by reviled owner George Shinn, the Charlotte expansion team was owned -- and nicknamed -- by Bob Johnson, a co-founder of the BET television network. The Bobcats excelled only at losing and were 122 games under .500 in their first five seasons. The front office was understaffed, Spectrum Center (then known as Time Warner Cable Arena) needed renovations almost from its inception and there was a real sense that, if a buyer with deep pockets and a commitment to the area weren’t found, the franchise could be moved. In March 2010, Jordan ponied up the cash to become majority owner. But it says something that the deal stands as one of the few, if ever, instances of an NBA franchise being sold at a discount. Johnson paid $300 million for the team; Jordan purchased it for $275 million. Forbes.com recently had Charlotte worth $1.25 billion -- which ranks 28th. And Jordan reportedly has one of the biggest stakes of all NBA owners, with his share estimated at upwards of 90 percent, possibly as high as 98 percent. That’s a lot of success in nine years, despite the basketball team’s mostly middling performance. “With MJ being with the team, you got instant credibility in the marketplace,” said Pete Guelli, the chief operating officer who started on the job about 10 months before Jordan took ownership. “There had been a lot of uncertainty previously, but with his brand and his resources and his commitment, that just dissipated immediately. It was much, much easier to walk in the door and tell people about our vision for this franchise.” Rebranding the team as “Hornets” gave the franchise an existential boost -- it suddenly had a history again, complete with records, archives and true alumni. The arena got a makeover and, per Guelli, is credited for events there that generate an alleged $1 billion in revenues for local businesses. “Fortunately, we’ve been profitable pretty much since [Jordan took over],” Whitfield said. “That’s huge, especially since we haven’t gotten where we want to be on the basketball side.” Closing a new kind of game now It’s hard to overstate Jordan’s added value, not so much as some corporate or financial whiz but as a presence who brought instant motivation and energy to the staff. He imported executives with whom he had developed relationships at Nike or in other ventures and, after taking early criticism for an uncertain level of involvement, has been more diligent in recent years. “I love seeing him sitting at the end of the bench encouraging his players when he attends a game” said Charles F. Bowman, Bank of America’s market president for Charlotte and North Carolina. “And as a business person what impresses me is that he has empowered his management team to focus not only on the court but also on building bridges with the community. “He had a vision for where he was taking the team and a clear plan to get there. He has hired good people, gives them latitude to make decisions and he expects them to perform. Michael is unique -- the best player ever who is determined to keep getting better year over year as an owner.” The NBA has gotten a taste of Jordan’s growth and transition at some pivotal times. This is the legendary voice of the players who, during rancorous negotiations in the 1998 lockout, countered Washington owner Abe Pollin’s gripes about losing money by telling Pollin to sell his team. By the lockout of 2011, Jordan had moved to the other side of the table. But several members of the National Basketball Players Association’s executive committee saw him not as an opponent or turncoat but as a role model: someone who had transformed himself from employee to employer at the game’s highest level. “The players understood, he had been in their shoes,” Whitfield said. “He’s not forgetting what it meant to be a player. He was in the process of learning what it meant to be an owner.” When the current collective bargaining agreement was negotiated with commissioner Adam Silver and union director Michele Roberts leading the talks, Jordan was an active, powerful voice. He is an influential member of the NBA’s labor relations and competition committees. One Charlotte insider spoke to Jordan’s clout with his fellow owners in getting this weekend’s showcase -- jeopardized by a political squabble in 2017 -- back onto the league’s short list. “There’s no All-Star Game here in Charlotte if it’s not for MJ,” the person said. Last summer in Las Vegas, Silver lauded Jordan for his ability to straddle the basketball and business worlds. “He brings unique credibility to the table when we're having discussions [with the players],” he said, “and even just among the owners, he's able to represent a player point of view… Michael can say, 'Well, look, this is how I looked at it when I was a player, and these are the kind of issues we need to address if we're going to convince players that something is in everyone's interest.’ ” Jordan’s powers of persuasion apparently have been even more impressive in Charlotte and North Carolina. The executives are careful about relying on him too often -- Jordan’s most precious commodity, now that his net worth is estimated to be upwards of $1.7 billion -- is his time. But when they need Mariano Rivera to walk in from the bullpen, he is lights out. “We’ve had corporate sponsors at a golf outing, and he’s been there, maybe stayed at one hole to tell off with everybody,” Whitfield said. Or they’ll invite certain corporate sponsors to one of a few games each season in which “Club 23” is up and running at the Spectrum Center, a private club built for such purposes. They get a chance to visit, talk with and pick Jordan’s brain on the Hornets and much more. “We’ve closed all those deals,” Whitfield said. Then there was the time a local CEO wanted to finalize a sizeable sponsorship deal with the team, and had his No. 2 invite Jordan over to their headquarters for the meetings. Whitfield told the tale: “This guy says, 'You have to come to our office. Our CEO is the man in our business.' But we’re like, 'Nah, typically, CEOs come and meet in Michael’s office or in ‘Club 23’ over here.' He said no, that wasn’t going to work for them. “So Pete Guelli said, 'Let’s make a deal: We’ll take your CEO and drop him off in Beijing. And we’ll drop off Michael in Beijing. Then we’ll see who more people gravitate to. Whoever gets the least people, he has to come to the other guy’s office.'” Point made. Point taken. Said Whitfield: “The guy says, ‘You know what, I got it. We’ll be over 10 o’clock Friday morning.’” A community he calls home The Michael Jordan who once seemed determined to float above cultural and political frays as the most prudent way to serve commerce has not held back in recent years from making his presence felt. He has been more philanthropist than activist and, let’s face it, in times of the most dire need, cash beats talk every time. Charity and investing in the community can be good for business, sure. Making that a priority after Guelli’s arrival and Jordan’s purchase helped the Hornets build bridges with fans and merchants that Shinn and the original franchise’s departure had torched. More than that, though, giving back for Jordan and his team at this point in his life was the right thing to do. And do, and do, and do. The list of charitable and civic efforts Jordan and the Hornets have undertaken is long, with few outside the region or state aware of most of it. Among the highlights: - Donating $2 million to relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Florence, particularly meaningful because of the damage it did in Jordan’s hometown of Wilmington. - Dedicated $7 million in partnership with Novant Health to fund two Michael Jordan Family Clinics, set to open in Charlotte in 2020. - Serving as Make-A-Wish’s Chief Wish Ambassador since 2008, while donating more than $5 million to the organization. His relationship with Make-A-Wish began more than 30 years ago. - Contributing $5 million as a founding donor of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. - Addressing the issue of police shootings and community policing in 2016 by donating $1 million each to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. After the hurricane in September devastated so many homes and businesses in and near Jordan’s roots, he wanted to do more than to stroke a fat check. In a meeting covered by The Associated Press, he met with Stephanie Parker and her family, including four young children, after they lost their apartment in two feet of flooding. A call from the director of the Cape Fear chapter of the Red Cross brought them together. The meeting took place at a Lowe’s home improvement store. “I look around the corner, and it’s Michael Jordan. ‘Oh my God!’" Parker said. “I look at my kids, ‘It’s Michael Jordan!’ I’m not going to lie, some tears came in my eyes, because the first thing that went through my mind was when I was younger, his last game when he was on the Chicago Bulls team, and that flashback just came right in my mind.” Afterward, Jordan was coaxed by the Charlotte Observer to talk about why that disaster resonated so deeply for him. “You gotta take care of home,” he said. “Wilmington truly is my home. Kept thinking about all those places I grew up going to … You don’t want to see any of that anywhere, but when it’s home, that’s tough to swallow.” There’s basketball, there’s business and then there’s real life, which sometimes intrudes in the most desperate ways. “We didn’t know how many people in our community were hungry,” Whitfield said. “There are people in dire need, and it’s special to have that hometown hero have in his heart that ‘This is where I can help.’ “It gives not only him as a person but our organization a platform to really speak out. That commitment is what has made him a special owner, and why he’s even more beloved in our community.” Winning title No. 7 drives Jordan now To date, Jordan’s greatest achievements have come elsewhere, at least since his baseline shot as a freshman propelled North Carolina to the 1982 NCAA championship. Those Bulls championships, the “Dream Team” magnificence, his partnership with that sneaker company in Beaverton, Ore., his Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction, shooting “Space Jam,” all of it -- his legacy has been crafted with others, for others, mostly far from home. (For the record, Jordan, his wife Yvette and their two daughters own a mansion outside Charlotte and an estate in south Florida). “Look, this has always been home for him,” Whitfield said. “Even though he was drafted by Chicago, WGN became a very popular station. And he just continued to elevate, so people in this state were proud to say, even though he’s a Bull, we love him. When the Bulls would come here and play at the old Coliseum, these fans who were avid Hornets fans were all pulling for Michael Jordan. “He’d score, they’d cheer loudly. The Hornets would score, they’d cheer loudly. North Carolina always felt like he was their native son who went off and achieved greatness.” Coming back first to head the franchise’s basketball operations and then as owner, Jordan’s role -- in light of the modest results on the court -- has been custodial. Yes, the club’s improved financial stability is important. But for this driven winner and NBA owner unlike all others, custodial isn’t going to cut it for long. “He did an interview with Cigar Aficionado magazine a while back,” Peterson said, “and the question was asked, ‘What would you like to do?’ And he said, ‘Win a seventh championship. Win as an owner.’ So for me, every day, I’m thinking, here’s a close friend and you want to make your friends happy, right? So each day I think, do the best you can to reach this goal for him.” Said Hornets wing Nicolas Batum: “I understand. He wants to win. He wants to compete since he was born.” It hasn’t been for lack of trying, although Jordan has made sure to keep fiscal responsibility high on every agenda. The team’s payroll for 2018-19 is approximately $122.3 million, which ranks near the middle of the NBA pack. “That Michael Jordan is one cheap dude,” said an impassioned cab driver on a recent airport run. “He’s only going to spend so much and the players they get shows it.” The Hornets never have spent into the league’s luxury-tax, and if Walker is retained when he hits free agency this summer, he’ll likely become the first Charlotte player to sign a full maximum-salary contract (though the five-year, $120 million deal Batum landed in 2016 came awfully close). Injuries and dubious moves have taken a toll, a situation that Kupchak, Borrego and their staffs have been tasked with fixing. Jordan, by all accounts, is engaged yet patient, with a playoff berth and potentially a record above .500 within reach. “I’m sure he feels like,” Whitfield said, “if he were still 30 years old and could lace ‘em up and get out there, he’d help us get over the hump. I think he would cherish it as much or more than the first six. Because I think he realizes how hard it is to get it done. “But it doesn’t bother us if the fans see his frustration sitting next to our bench. It’s important to us that they see he’s not only invested, he’s vested in what our team is trying to do. They can relate to him because they’re feeling that same frustration.” Jordan is theirs again and that’s what matters. For basketball, for business, for community and in time, just maybe, in championship. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2019

Aris to D2 mayors: Update your CLUPs

By JUNE S. BLANCO REP. Erico Aristotle “Aris” Aumentado has exhorted the 2nd District mayors to update their respective Comprehensive Land Use Plans (CLUPs) – ensuring that these are aligned with the District Economic Master Plan (DEMP). Aumentado said the updated CLUPs must consider the development and progress of the towns in 10 to 20 […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  boholnewsdailyRelated NewsFeb 4th, 2019

Passion, competitiveness drive Melissa Gohing to her best

"It's the passion that drives me to push harder and harder everyday," she said in an interview with Philstar.com.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 31st, 2019

EU urges internet giants to work harder fighting fake news

BRUSSELS --- European Union authorities are urging Facebook, Google and Twitter to work harder to combat fake news ahead of upcoming bloc-wide parliamentary elections. The EU's executive commissioners said Tuesday that while the U.S. internet giants have made some progress, they need to pick up the pace of their work fighting disinformation. The Commission has been turning up the heat on tech giants ahead of the elections scheduled for May, in which of millions of people in 27 EU member countries will vote for 705 lawmakers in the bloc's parliament. The EU's digital and security commissioners said at a press briefing that they're concerned that some tools the tech companies ...Keep on reading: EU urges internet giants to work harder fighting fake news.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 29th, 2019

Afghan president calls for serious talks with Taliban

KABUL, Afghanistan – Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said Monday, January 28, the Taliban should "enter serious talks" with his government, after the insurgents and Washington both touted progress during unprecedented negotiations in Qatar last week. A months-long diplomatic push by the United States to get the Taliban to talk to ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 28th, 2019

GDP growth slows to 6.2%; Palace blames high inflation

Malacaang on Thursday blamed the economy's slower expansion in 2018 on last year's high inflation after the country's gross domestic product (GDP) posted a below-expectation 6.2-percent growth.   The Palace is not dismayed with the results, however, and said it would only push the Duterte administration to work harder to achieve its target.   "That was because of the inflation; the inflation rate was the problem. That's what our economic managers said," presidential spokesperson Salvador Panelo said at a press briefing.   "You always have a concern when you don't reach a certain target. But you work harder so that you can reach it the next time," he added...Keep on reading: GDP growth slows to 6.2%; Palace blames high inflation.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 24th, 2019

Halep edges young American at Australian Open; Venus next

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Push Simona Halep to the brink, and she summons her best. The Australian Open's top-seeded woman got all she could handle from 20-year-old American Sofia Kenin in the second round before taking the last four games to emerge with a 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-4 victory that took 2½ hours Thursday. "Well, I have no idea how I won this tonight," said Halep, the reigning French Open champion. "It's so tough to explain what happened on court." A year ago at Melbourne Park, Halep was a point from being eliminated in two matches but came back each time en route to reaching the final. In the first round this year, she was down a set and a break before turning things around. And this time, against a hard-hitting Kenin, Halep trailed 4-2 in the third set and managed to not cede another game. And that was despite getting what she described as "a little bit injured" in the second set, something that seemed clear from the way she wasn't always able to run with her usual verve. "Hopefully," said Halep, whose No. 1 ranking is up for grabs during the Australian Open, "next round I play better." That third-round matchup will be quite intriguing, because it'll be against seven-time Grand Slam champion and former No. 1 Venus Williams. And the winner of that could face Williams' younger sister, 23-time major champ Serena, in the fourth round. Venus won a three-setter that finished a little before Halep's did — and in much more emphatic fashion. Pushed to that deciding set by getting broken to end the second, Venus ran away with the win down the stretch, defeating Alize Cornet 6-3, 4-6, 6-0. So what was the difference in the lopsided third set? "She was just putting more intensity than me. She was hitting harder, deeper," Cornet said. "I had a little less energy than in the second set and she took advantage of it and really raised her level." The 38-year-old Venus, unseeded at a major for the first time in five years, was the runner-up in Australia to Serena in 2003 and 2017. Serena advanced to the third round by beating 2014 Wimbledon finalist Eugenie Bouchard 6-2, 6-2 on Thursday night, reeling off the last five games and 16 of the final 20 points. That match was to be followed in Rod Laver Arena by No. 1 Novak Djokovic against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in a rematch of the 2008 final at Melbourne Park. Other winners in the women's draw Thursday included reigning U.S. Open champion Naomi Osaka, past U.S. Open runners-up Karolina Pliskova and Madison Keys, No. 27-seeded Camila Giorgi and No. 28 Hsieh Su-Wei. In men's action, Stan Wawrinka was up a set and was just two points away from taking the second against Milos Raonic. Couldn't do it. About an hour later, 2014 champion Wawrinka was a single point from grabbing the third set. Denied again. And another hour after that, Wawrinka was two points from seizing the fourth to force a fifth. Nope, not on this afternoon. Wawrinka kept coming oh-so-close, and Raonic kept hanging in there and toughing out the most important moments along the way to a 6-7 (4), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (11), 7-6 (5) victory that put the 16th-seeded Canadian into the third round. "I missed a few little points," Wawrinka said, "that could have changed the match." So true. "It feels like 4 hours passed by in about 15 minutes. ... The adrenaline takes over," said Raonic, the runner-up at Wimbledon in 2016. "I was very fortunate to stay alive in that fourth set." They were interrupted for about a half-hour while the roof at Rod Laver Arena was shut because of rain at 4-all in the third set. Raonic thought that helped him quite a bit. "I do a little bit better indoors than outdoors," he said, "so thank you for raining up there." In other men's action on Day 4, 2014 U.S. Open runner-up Kei Nishikori withstood 59 aces from 39-year-old Ivo Karlovic en route to a 6-3, 7-6 (6), 5-7, 5-7, 7-6 (7) victory, but No. 7 Dominic Thiem retired from his match in the third set after dropping the first two, and 2018 Australian Open semifinalist Hyeon Chung lost to Pierre-Hugues Herbert 6-2, 1-6, 6-2, 6-4. Raonic delivered 39 aces, part of an impressive ratio of 84 total winners to only 44 unforced errors. This was a matchup probably better suited to the second week than the second round of a Grand Slam tournament, given both men's credentials. But Wawrinka, a three-time major champion once ranked as high as No. 3, dropped out of the top 250 last season, when he had surgery on his left knee. His signature one-handed backhand is as dangerous as ever — he had a 16-2 edge in winners on that shot Thursday — and he hit 28 aces of his own. But as even as the match was in many respects — Raonic only won two more points overall, 163-161 — Wawrinka couldn't come through when he really needed to. Raonic had plenty to do with that, of course, including in the third-set tiebreaker, when he served his way out of trouble. Wawrinka's three set points there came at 6-5, when Raonic delivered a serve at 129 mph (208 kph) followed by a forehand volley winner; at 8-7, when Raonic's 125 mph (201 kph) serve drew a missed return; and at 10-9, when an ace at 132 mph (213 kph) did the trick. A 123 mph (198 kph) service winner gave Raonic that set. In the last tiebreaker, Wawrinka was up 5-4 before Raonic closed with three consecutive points to avoid heading to a fifth set. "Today, I'm sad and frustrated," Wawrinka said. "But in general, if I take some distance with it, I'm happy to see that I'm able to play again with this level, able to move that well.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2019

La Paz declared ‘Batchoy Capital’

By: Emme Rose Santiagudo LA PAZ district in Iloilo City can now official claim the distinction as the capital of the world-famous batchoy. This, after the Sangguniang Panlungsod approved a resolution declaring the district as “La Paz Batchoy Capital” during its session on December 7, 2018. Councilor Candace Tupas, proponent of the resolution, said that […] The post La Paz declared ‘Batchoy Capital’ appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Push comes to shove | Inquirer Sports

Magnolia vows to push harder while Alaska needs to just push if it wants to contend with the Hotshots in the PBA Governors Cup title series at all. The post Push comes to shove appeared first on Inqui.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsDec 7th, 2018

PBA Finals: Alaska punched in mouth in lackadaisical effort vs Magnolia

The Alaska Aces' 2018 PBA Governors' Cup Finals start has gone off the wrong foot. From tipoff, their opponents, the Magnolia Hotshots looked like a team one step ahead and zoomed to a quick 15-0 run to start Game 1. Furthermore, the swarming defense of Magnolia prevented the Aces from scoring for over the first six minutes, their scoring drought parched by two free throws by Kevin Racal. Coach Alex Compton's squad slowly fought back and trimmed the lead to 12 at halftime, 52-40, with Mike Harris' 17 points leading the way. However, the 35-year old reinforcement just scored three markers in the second half and lost, 100-84. "They hit us in the mouth, took us too long to respond and then once we made a run, we cut the lead in the second half to eight. Two bad mistakes and it came back to 13. They just played harder than us tonight," said Harris after the game. Alaska's poor start was deja-vu all over again for the team, as they also exhibited a nightmarish start against the seventh-seeded Meralco Bolts in Game 1 of the best-of-five semifinals, 97-92. However, they bounced back and won the next three to advance to the best-of-seven championship series. With a similar start, the former NBA player knows it's not too late to respond. "They punched us, but the best thing about getting punched is if that you're strong enough, you'll get up. Punches hurt. It will hurt tonight, sleep on it, and tomorrow forget about it." About his three-point effort in the second half, Harris just laughed it off, but noted he needs to be more aggressive if they want to tie the series in Game 2 on Friday. Three-point and free throw shooting were the main culprits in Alaska's loss, Harris lamented, his team just shooting 7/28 from downtown and a sub-par 19/32 from the line. With that said, Harris knows he must play better if they do not want to dig themselves in an 0-2 hole. "I'm not here to point fingers at anybody except for myself. So, it's me. I could get more offensive rebounds, I can get defensive rebounds, push it a little more, put a little bit more pressure on. Tonight they made the right reads, we didn't."   __     Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 6th, 2018

AP column: Good and bad in Ballon d Or twerking uproar

By John Leicester, AP Sports Columnist PARIS (AP) — First, the good news: In 2018, a man can no longer disrespect a trailblazing sportswoman on global TV without incurring instant opprobrium. French DJ Martin Solveig learned this to his discomfort when he asked Ada Hegerberg to twerk just after she became the first female winner of the Ballon d'Or and used her victory speech to appeal to girls everywhere to "please, believe in yourself." Immediately after the awards ceremony ended, with outrage already frothing on social media, Solveig still couldn't see why his inappropriate suggestion to the 23-year-old Norwegian was causing such upset. "It was a joke. You must have a bit of a sense of humor," he told The Associated Press as gala guests filed out of the domed Grand Palais in Paris on Monday and Hegerberg posed for photos with her heavy golden trophy. But then, as a video clip showing Solveig's interaction with Hegerberg started to rack up millions of views on Twitter, he understood. Solveig sought out Hegerberg to explain himself and tweeted "sincere apologies." "I didn't mean to offend anyone and I didn't know that this could be seen as such an offense," he said in a video message. The bad news, as the whole sorry episode showed, is that in 2018, the behavior of men is still overshadowing the achievements of women. And Hegerberg's achievements are immense. The steely forward is a three-time winner of the Women's Champions League with French club Lyon. Given her young age and current fearsome pace of 41 goals in 41 games in the tournament, she seems likely to make history like Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi on the men's side. Already, she set a tournament record with 15 Champions League goals last season — including in Lyon's 4-1 victory over Wolfsburg in the final . Hegerberg appeared visibly miffed, shaking her head, responding with a firm "Non" and then turning away after Solveig asked her on stage in French, "Do you know how to twerk?" Had Messi or Ronaldo been standing beside him, it's hard to imagine the DJ asking them to shake their backsides in the twerking dance made famous by singer Miley Cyrus rubbing against Robin Thicke at the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards. That Solveig did so with Hegerberg immediately struck many as icky. "Why do woman still have to put up with that (expletive)?" tennis player Andy Murray wrote on Instagram. "To everyone who thinks people are overreacting and it was just a joke, it wasn't. I've been involved in sport my whole life and the level of sexism is unreal." At the gala for her daughter's prize moment, Hegerberg's mother, Gerd, said the impropriety of Solveig's remark was initially lost on her. "Let him dance with the queen tonight, I was thinking," she told the AP. But when the meaning of twerk was then explained to her, she reacted with dismay, with an expletive. Hegerberg herself didn't let the uproar mar her evening. After meeting with Solveig and hearing his apology, she was determinedly cheerful by time she came to speak to waiting reporters. "I wasn't upset," she said. "I got to dance a bit and I got the Ballon d'Or." The visibility and status that comes with that trophy will give Hegerberg more power to push the cause of women's soccer. She is already putting that leverage to use. She told the AP in an interview shortly before she picked up her trophy that she won't play in the Women's World Cup in June in France because of a dispute with the Norwegian federation. Hegerberg hasn't played for the national team since last year because of what she perceives to be a general disregard for women's soccer in Norway. "It's all about how we respect women's football. I don't think the respect has been there," she told the AP. "Sometimes you have to take tough decisions to stay true to yourself." She also expressed frustration with the uneven pace of progress for women. A few hours later, Solveig's behavior made her words ring true. "Sometimes you have episodes or situations where you feel like, 'Damn, we're in such a man's world,'" she said. "That could be in a daily situation, being a woman, to be honest. Outside of the pitch as well. There's a lot of discussions to take and to bring on the table as a woman in 2018.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

Tupas: We’re capable of running SP committees’

By: Gail T. Momblan ILOILO third district board member Lorenz Defensor voiced his concern on what will happen to the two powerful committees he chaired. In an interview with Bombo Radyo-Iloilo on Wednesday, Defensor aired his sentiment on how a new chair will run the committees on ways and means and rules, privileges, ethics, and accountability. […] The post Tupas: We’re capable of running SP committees’ appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsNov 14th, 2018

Did BM Defensor take a swipe at colleague?

By: Francis Allan L. Angelo and Gail T. Momblan ILOILO third district Board Member Lorenz Defensor was befuddled when his colleague Nielo Tupas voted in favor of committee reorganization during their regular session on Nov 13, 2018. In voting for the revamp, Tupas did not mind losing the chairmanship of the powerful committee on appropriations which […] The post Did BM Defensor take a swipe at colleague? appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsNov 13th, 2018

Aris bullish with corporate farming

By JUNE S. BLANCO REP. Erico Aristotle Aumentado (Bohol, 2nd District) is set to meet with agriculture bigwigs to push for the mechanics of House Bill No. 8076 promoting corporate farming and providing incentives therefor. In his explanatory note, Aumentado said the bill aims to strengthen private participation in the agricultural sector to boost production […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  boholnewsdailyRelated NewsNov 12th, 2018

Duterte pushes harsh drive vs armed militants

Convening the National Security Council’s executive committee last Tuesday at the Ebuen military airbase in Cebu, President Duterte issued orders to push harder state actions against the Left revolutionary movement......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018

Isaac Go: Kouame makes everybody better

Game after game, Ateneo de Manila University's Angelo Kouame has been impressing UAAP fans with his all-around brilliance. In his latest performance, he dazzled with 33 points and 27 rebounds -- a showing that earned him MVP chants from a tough Ateneo crowd. With all the attention that Kouame has been getting, his mentor Isaac Go beamed with pride but at the same time deflected any possible credit that can be drawn to him. "The entire team is happy for him. He did all the work. He's the one who shows up at practice early, he's the one who puts up the extra shots. So you have to put all the credit to him. I haven't really done much to 'mentor' him. He's done everything," said Go. Go became one of the stars of Ateneo's championship run last Season 80 after his clutch baskets in the semifinals and the finals. With Kouame's impressive performances in recent games, fellow big man Go's role significantly diminished.  Despite his more subtle role this season, Go expressed that as long as it is for the betterment of the team, he is all for it. "I think it's a double-edged sword if you think about it because you are happy that he is producing. At the end of the day, it is always what is best for the team. At the end of the day also, you want to help him get better and the best way to do it is getting better as well," said the former Xavier Golden Stallion. Kouame also displayed the same mentality when asked about possibly overshadowing his mentor. "[George] really helped me for everything. Even off the court, in the court, he's my second coach. It doesn't matter who is the scorer, who is the leader or anything, it's about the team," Kouame said. Both players revealed that during practices, the presence of each other brings out the best in them. "Even in practice, George and I, we give challenges. We keep progress with that, it makes us better as a player," shared Kouame. "If you go up against him in practice, he just makes everybody better and work harder because we have to complement what he can bring to us," added Go. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @the9cruz.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 20th, 2018

Next step for NBA is hiring women in positions of power

By Teresa M. Walker, Associated Press MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich sees one simple way for both the NBA and women to mark real progress in the league. Hire more women in positions of power. "I think there just has to be more, more of the same," said Popovich, who during the offseason promoted assistant coach Becky Hammon, moving her one step closer to a head coaching seat. "There are more Beckys out there, they just have to be noticed and given the opportunity by people who are wise enough and courageous enough to do it and not just sit in the old paradigm." And not just on the bench, but on the business side of the NBA as well. The NBA routinely gets high marks for its diversity efforts and is widely viewed as a leader on social issues. Still, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver believes the league needs to be better, and he made his feelings known in a memo to teams in the wake of the Dallas Mavericks' embarrassing scandal. Several NBA teams tout statistics about women in their workforce, but beyond a handful — including Lakers controlling owner Jeanie Buss and Pelicans owner Gayle Benson — the next step for the league seems to be more women in positions of power such as CEOs and COOs. Memphis guard Mike Conley said it's important for basketball, business and society itself to have women in positions of authority. "We welcome it, and we do want to see more of that," Conley said, "and I think that will help bridge that gray area and all the things that have been happening with the Mavs and situations like that and hopefully it will never occur" again. The NBA earned an A+ for racial hiring practices but a B for its gender hiring practices this summer from The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports . That puts the NBA "significantly above" other professional sports, even as the number of women hired at the team level dropped for a third straight year with the percentage of women in team vice presidents and professional staff dipping as well, according to the report's author, Richard Lapchick. When the NBA began investigating a report of sexual harassment and improper workplace conduct involving the former team president, the Mavericks did not have one woman at the executive level. Owner Mark Cubanhired former AT&T senior executive Cynthia Marshall as CEO and president in February , promoted four women to executive roles and now has eight women among 18 leadership roles. A memo obtained by The Associated Press last month shows the NBA plans workshops in Atlanta and Los Angeles in mid-November on the diversity and inclusion efforts. The NBA also set up an anonymous tip line after the Mavs' story broke. NBA teams surveyed by The Associated Press say they've already been holding seminars on workplace conduct and putting women in leadership roles. Irina Pavlova represented the Nets on the Board of Governors before leaving last year and was replaced by a woman as president of the company that runs the Nets, Barclays Center and Nassau Coliseum. The Toronto Raptors have Teresa Resch as vice president of basketball operations and player development, and Dr. Lisa Callahan is chief medical officer for both the Knicks and the WNBA's Liberty. The Miami Heat recently hired Ruth Riley Hunter as its newest television and radio analyst, a move in motion before Silver talked about wanting more women in the NBA. Grizzlies general manager Chris Wallace has seen the number of women in the NBA jump dramatically since he joined the league in 1986 and believes its heading in the right direction. Chantal Hassard has been with the Grizzlies since the franchise was in Vancouver and is entering her third season as VP of team operations and player programs. Memphis also just brought back Nicki Gross as a basketball analyst after she was the D-League's only woman assistant in 2015 with Iowa. "I think it adds a viewpoint, a skillset that is very beneficial for the teams," Wallace said. Silver wants teams hiring more women, including jobs with power, so the NBA is going to help. The NBA plans an event at the All-Star break in Charlotte, North Carolina, in February to grow the "pipeline of female talent in basketball operations roles." Lapchick said hiring more women has to be a combination of efforts by both the NBA and its teams. "Teams saw the results in Dallas with no women in leadership to stop/confront bad behavior, which I believe is not uncommon toward women in the workplace in and out of sport," Lapchick told the AP. "Adam has the respect to push and I am impressed by the NBA's actions after the decline in gender grade when the Report Card was published followed by the post investigation in Dallas." Ethan Casson, CEO of the Minnesota Timberwolves and the WNBA's Lynx, said it can't be a quota approach — and believes there are qualified women in the candidate pools. About 40 percent of Minnesota's full-time employees are women with 35 percent of department heads and above women. He noted how transparent the NBA and its teams have been on this issue. "It's constantly challenging your organization's thinking and creating what that environment is, and that's what makes the diversity inclusion so important," Casson said. "You're a better organization when you're built that way from the ground up." ___ AP Basketball Writers Tim Reynolds and Brian Mahoney and AP Sports Writers Dave Campbell, Andrew Seligman, Janie McCauley, Anne M. Peterson, Schuyler Dixon, Pat Graham, Tom Withers, Howard Fendrich, Brett Martel, Kyle Hightower and AP freelance writers Raul Dominguez, Clay Bailey and Ian Harrison contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 9th, 2018

DPWH-Biliran DEO hastens project implementation for on-going projects

DPWH Biliran District Engineering Office (DEO) continues to show progress on its 2018 project implementation with an increase of 13.11 percent accomplishment from the previous month......»»

Category: newsSource:  samarnewsRelated NewsSep 30th, 2018

P3.4 million rainwater collection system in progress

A total of P3.4 million worth of 17 units of Rainwater Collection System (RWCS) are now in progress through the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) Leyte Second District Engineering Office......»»

Category: newsSource:  samarnewsRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2018