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PHI rowers pocket four golds in ICF World Championships

GAINESVILLE, Georgia—The Philippines claimed two more gold medals in the 2018 ICF World Dragon Boat Championships here by winning the 10-seater and 20-seater senior mixed 200-meter races held at the Lake Lanier Olympic Park. Led by veteran paddlers Hermie Macaranas and Mark Jhon Frias, the Filipinos sprinted to the finish with a sudden burst of speed in the final 50 meters for a 50.46-second clocking in the small boat that drew admiration from their world-class rivals. France settled for the silver medal in 53.056 seconds and towed third-placer Hungary (53.158), host United States (53.463), Italy (53.9) and Germany (54.437). "On a shorter course such as the 200m, you need produce faster and powerful strokes to become successful,’’ said coach Diomedes Manalo after the Philippine Canoe Kayak Dragonboat Federation paddlers surpassed their medal tally in 2016 Moscow, Russia. The Pinoy paddlers followed exactly the game plan in capturing their fourth gold in the big boat, clocking 43.481 seconds to subdue Czech Republic (46.082) and United States (46.146).  Hungary placed fourth (46.791) followed by Germany (48.040) and Canada (50.242). Besides the four gold medals, the national team supported by the Philippine Sports Commission and Go For Gold has also pocketed two silvers in the small boat senior men’s 500m and big boat senior mixed 2000m race, respectively. "Congratulations to our dragon boat athletes for improving on their medal tally from their last world championship,’’ said Go For Gold top honcho Jeremy Go. "Despite all the struggle and adversity, our team has come out on top and continues to impress.’’ They defended the 20-seater senior mixed 500m title with aplomb after kicking off their world championship campaign with a convincing win in the 10-seater senior mixed 500m event. The Pinoy paddlers remain on track to secure another gold medal in the 10-seater senior men 200m on Sunday (Monday in Manila). Jordan De Guia, John Paul Selencio, Lee Robin Santos, Jonathan Ruz, Daniel Ortega, Reymart Nevado, John Lester Delos Santos will join hands with Christine Mae Talledo, Sharmaine Mangilit, Apple Jane Abitona, Raquel Almencion and Lealyn Baligasa in the big boat senior mixed 200m. Maribeth Caranto has been designated steersman and Patricia Ann Bustamante as drummer. During their world championship campaign two years ago, the Filipinos brought home three gold medals, one silver and a pair of bronzes. In the master division, the Philippines pocketed a pair of bronze medals in the small boat men’s and mixed 200m races.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnSep 16th, 2018

PH rowers pocket four golds in ICF World Championships

    GAINESVILLE, Georgia—The Philippines claimed two more gold medals in the 2018 ICF World Dragon Boat Championships here by winning the 10-seater and 20-seater senior mixed 200-meter races held at the Lake Lanier Olympic Park. Led by veteran paddlers Hermie Macaranas and Mark Jhon Frias, the Filipinos sprinted to the finish with a ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

PH rowers clinch 5 golds

GAINESVILLE, Georgia, United States — The Philippines accomplished a historic feat on the world stage after collecting five gold medals to seal the overall title in the 2018 ICF World Dragon Boat Championships. The national paddlers from the Philippine Canoe Kayak Dragon Boat Federation (PCKDF) capped their scintillating performance with a victory in the 10-seater […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

Pinoy rowers add 2 golds

The Philippines ruled the 10-seater and 20-seater senior mixed 200-meter races to add two more gold medals in the ICF World Dragon Boat Championships at the Lake Lanier Olympic Park in Gainesville, Georgia Saturday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

Jordan s weight reaches farther than court in NC

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CHARLOTTE -- Unlike Mark Cuban and James Dolan, the host of the 2019 NBA All-Star Game was voted in 14 times to participate and played in 13. Quite different from Micky Arison and Glen Taylor, the team owner whose arena and city will be the center of All-Star 2019 averaged 20.2 points in those 13 All-Star appearances, was named MVP three times and posted the first triple-double in the game’s history (1997). And not at all like Steve Ballmer and Joe Lacob, the guy most often credited with making Charlotte All-Star worthy this weekend ignited the annual Slam Dunk Contest with his takeoff from the foul line in 1988. He also regularly irritated former NBA commissioner David Stern into a series of fines for golfing when he should have been sitting through mandatory Friday media sessions. With a level of celebrity as arguably the game’s greatest player ever, morphed now into an off-radar role as owner of the Charlotte Hornets, Michael Jordan remains as famous, as popular and as successful as any or all the active All-Star participants who’ll cavort at the Spectrum Center in the city’s Uptown business district. Ain’t no other NBA owner who can say that. “You think about all these wealthy, successful owners in our league,” said Hornets president Fred Whitfield, “no one knew who any of them were, really, until they bought their team. Everybody in the world knew who Michael Jordan was before he bought his team.” Jordan’s place in the All-Star galaxy in the coming days is reflective of his unique position among those who oversee the NBA’s 29 other franchises. His impact on the team, on its fans, on their city and on the state in returning to his native North Carolina -- he grew up in coastal Wilmington before attending college in Chapel Hill -- to anchor and lend stability to the Hornets will be on full display, even if he’s hard to spot this weekend. It’s all a reminder, too, of the old movie line from a remarkably blessed character, wondering “What do you do when your real life exceeds your dreams?” Most don’t dare to imagine playing in an All-Star Game, never mind hosting one as the owner of the local team. “No,” Jordan told some Charlotte reporters Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), coming forward for one of his few appearances of the week. “As a kid growing up here in North Carolina, the first thing [was] playing basketball. And then things evolved from there -- from the University of North Carolina to Chicago. Obviously you know the history from that. “[The] opportunity to represent North Carolina in an All-Star Game from a different seat is truly amazing. It tells the path that I have taken. It gives me great pleasure to give that back to the community. It’s been a long-traveled road.” The celebration of the league’s brightest stars, and the ubiquitous banners and signage devoted to it will make it even harder than usual to visibly spot signs of Jordan’s ownership of the Hornets. For a typical regular season game, you might spy a flag emblazoned with his well-known “Jumpman” logo. Occasionally he’ll watch part of the game, rarely all, from seats at the end of his team’s bench, though he’s as likely to retreat to his suite atop the arena’s lower bowl. An in-game, timeout scoreboard video meant to stoke the crowd includes shots of GM Mitch Kupchak (“Architect of Champions”) and coach James Borrego (“Elite Pedigree”) but ends right about the time you expect some dramatic silhouette of His Airness to appear. It’s as if Jordan is as protective of his brand in running the Hornets as he is in maintaining its exclusivity in the marketplace. Doesn’t matter, though. His fingerprints are all over the franchise, as a basketball team, as a business enterprise and as a member of the community. On court, Jordan trusts his team Jordan’s greatest notoriety as an owner in a basketball setting may have come in December, when he was courtside for a tense game against Detroit. Guard Jeremy Lamb drained a 22-foot jumper with 0.3 seconds left, sending reserves Malik Monk and Bismack Biyombo onto the floor in celebration of what would be a 108-107 home victory. Trouble was, that sliver of time on the clock. Too many men. The Hornets were whistled for a one-shot technical foul and Jordan impulsively smacked Monk lightly, twice, on the back of the head. Any other owner does that, the player’s agent might file a grievance with the players union. Jordan does it and, thanks to his in-the-trenches, in-the-fraternity credibility, it comes across as a goof. “A tap of endearment,” Jordan called it later in a statement. “It was like a big brother and little brother tap. No negative intent. Only love!" Said Monk: “Big, big, big brother. But it was nothing. He was just playing.” The arc of Jordan’s career and his reputation as a stone-cold competitor make it OK if he wants to vent -- or swipe -- when things don’t go the Hornets’ way. Doesn’t matter that Jordan, who will turn 56 on All-Star Sunday, is old enough to be any of his players' dad. He still carries himself like an athlete, and their frame of reference remains, “That’s Mike.” “I’ve seen kids come up through camps,” said Buzz Peterson, Charlotte’s assistant general manager under Kupchak. “You could say Julius Erving, you could say Larry Johnson, Karl Malone, whatever, and the kids’ eyes are like, ‘Who?’ But you say Michael Jordan, they’re gonna know. That’s the separation there.” Peterson is among Jordan’s closest friends -- he beat him out as North Carolina’s prep player of the year in 1981, won an NCAA title with him as a Tar Heels teammate and is described by those who know both as someone who can disagree with the boss while staying comfortably in the inner circle. For Borrego, Charlotte’s first-year coach, interviewing to run Jordan’s team could have been intimidating. “We’re all human beings -- there’s a presence that comes with ‘Michael Jordan’ when he’s around,” Borrego told NBA.com in January. “But it’s healthy. He comes with a competitive spirit that you feel. “Michael was straight with me from Day 1. When I interviewed, he said, ‘I’m going to give you space to do your job. Whatever you need, you come to me. I’ll give you the resources you need.’ He has not tried to interfere one time. I feel his full support. … We’re starting to speak each other’s language, which is pretty healthy for us now.” Jordan keeps the coach apprised of his interactions with players, Borrego said. Other coaches should have such a resource at the ready. Hornets guard and 2019 All-Star starter Kemba Walker probably has benefited most from Jordan’s counsel. They text frequently, a pinch-me arrangement to this day for Walker. “I grew up wearing Jordans, grew up wanting to be like Jordan,” Walker said recently. “So for me to get this opportunity to be on his team means the world to me. He’s the one who believed in me -- I had no idea where I was going to go on draft night and he traded up for me. I’ve always heard the story, he was the one who actually drafted me. So it’s unbelievable. “He’s such a good dude. He understands what it is to be good. His delivery is always good. Only in a positive way, honestly.” Said rookie wing Miles Bridges: “You think there’ll be a lot of pressure having MJ as an owner. I’d seen how he got on his teammates when he played. So I was nervous, thinking if I had a bad game, he’d go at me like, ‘What’re you doing?’ But after meeting him and bonding with him, I feel like he’s the coolest owner out there. I don’t feel any pressure, I feel like he wants the best for us.” Big man Frank Kaminsky typically sits at the end of the bench, which puts him cheek to cheek with Jordan when he’s courtside. “He’s talking about what he’s seeing out on the court. Talking to the refs,” Kaminsky said. “Things other players don’t necessarily see. He still thinks the game. “You see things on the court that he sees. One game, the roll, pocket-pass, skip to the corner was open. He was saying that. We made an adjustment in a timeout, but he saw it a couple plays before that. At the end of that game, we had a big play that was a roll, pocket-pass, into the corner that put the game away. It worked the way he’d seen it.” The Hornets’ struggles during Jordan’s tenure as owner wouldn’t suggest it -- the last time this organization won a playoff series (2002), Jordan still was a player -- but there is a prestige to playing for his team. It’s not unlike being welcomed onto the list of elite athletes who endorse Jordan Brand. “I’m one of the lucky ones who’s in both,” Kaminsky said. “You’re talking about the most iconic player in sports history -- I might be biased because I grew up in Chicago -- but when you have his approval, it means a lot. You have it in the back of your mind that he wants you here.” Head smack or no head smack. Jordan grows as owner, businessman Basketball is a zero-sum game and the NBA is full of stars, even if none shines quite as brightly as Jordan. But business has room for negotiation and compromise, and deals get struck daily that leave both sides happy. There, Jordan has been beyond clutch. Funnel down everything he’s accomplished -- six NBA championships, the league’s highest career scoring average (30.1), five MVP awards, six Finals MVP, 10 scoring titles, nine All-Defensive team nods -- and it invariably ends with clammy hands. The “wow” factor is real and the Hornets are extremely careful about leveraging it. “It gives our organization a certain cachet,” said Whitfield, another longtime friend who goes back more than 35 years with Jordan. “For him to be majority owner, for him to do it in his home state as a local hometown hero, and to be able to come back and not just lead the team and the rebranding from the Bobcats to the Hornets, but his commitment to the community in giving back, it’s something that’s so special.” That’s a lot to unpack. When Jordan initially signed on with the Hornets, he did so as head of its basketball operations in 2006, purchasing a small minority stake in the team. The team was bad, the business was worse and trending down. “Back in ’08-09, the economy was in the tank and I was mandated to ‘displace’ 42 of our executives here on the business side,” Whitfield said. “When Michael bought the team, we were losing $30 million a year.’ Brought back into the league in 2004 two years after the original Hornets (1988-2002) were moved to New Orleans by reviled owner George Shinn, the Charlotte expansion team was owned -- and nicknamed -- by Bob Johnson, a co-founder of the BET television network. The Bobcats excelled only at losing and were 122 games under .500 in their first five seasons. The front office was understaffed, Spectrum Center (then known as Time Warner Cable Arena) needed renovations almost from its inception and there was a real sense that, if a buyer with deep pockets and a commitment to the area weren’t found, the franchise could be moved. In March 2010, Jordan ponied up the cash to become majority owner. But it says something that the deal stands as one of the few, if ever, instances of an NBA franchise being sold at a discount. Johnson paid $300 million for the team; Jordan purchased it for $275 million. Forbes.com recently had Charlotte worth $1.25 billion -- which ranks 28th. And Jordan reportedly has one of the biggest stakes of all NBA owners, with his share estimated at upwards of 90 percent, possibly as high as 98 percent. That’s a lot of success in nine years, despite the basketball team’s mostly middling performance. “With MJ being with the team, you got instant credibility in the marketplace,” said Pete Guelli, the chief operating officer who started on the job about 10 months before Jordan took ownership. “There had been a lot of uncertainty previously, but with his brand and his resources and his commitment, that just dissipated immediately. It was much, much easier to walk in the door and tell people about our vision for this franchise.” Rebranding the team as “Hornets” gave the franchise an existential boost -- it suddenly had a history again, complete with records, archives and true alumni. The arena got a makeover and, per Guelli, is credited for events there that generate an alleged $1 billion in revenues for local businesses. “Fortunately, we’ve been profitable pretty much since [Jordan took over],” Whitfield said. “That’s huge, especially since we haven’t gotten where we want to be on the basketball side.” Closing a new kind of game now It’s hard to overstate Jordan’s added value, not so much as some corporate or financial whiz but as a presence who brought instant motivation and energy to the staff. He imported executives with whom he had developed relationships at Nike or in other ventures and, after taking early criticism for an uncertain level of involvement, has been more diligent in recent years. “I love seeing him sitting at the end of the bench encouraging his players when he attends a game” said Charles F. Bowman, Bank of America’s market president for Charlotte and North Carolina. “And as a business person what impresses me is that he has empowered his management team to focus not only on the court but also on building bridges with the community. “He had a vision for where he was taking the team and a clear plan to get there. He has hired good people, gives them latitude to make decisions and he expects them to perform. Michael is unique -- the best player ever who is determined to keep getting better year over year as an owner.” The NBA has gotten a taste of Jordan’s growth and transition at some pivotal times. This is the legendary voice of the players who, during rancorous negotiations in the 1998 lockout, countered Washington owner Abe Pollin’s gripes about losing money by telling Pollin to sell his team. By the lockout of 2011, Jordan had moved to the other side of the table. But several members of the National Basketball Players Association’s executive committee saw him not as an opponent or turncoat but as a role model: someone who had transformed himself from employee to employer at the game’s highest level. “The players understood, he had been in their shoes,” Whitfield said. “He’s not forgetting what it meant to be a player. He was in the process of learning what it meant to be an owner.” When the current collective bargaining agreement was negotiated with commissioner Adam Silver and union director Michele Roberts leading the talks, Jordan was an active, powerful voice. He is an influential member of the NBA’s labor relations and competition committees. One Charlotte insider spoke to Jordan’s clout with his fellow owners in getting this weekend’s showcase -- jeopardized by a political squabble in 2017 -- back onto the league’s short list. “There’s no All-Star Game here in Charlotte if it’s not for MJ,” the person said. Last summer in Las Vegas, Silver lauded Jordan for his ability to straddle the basketball and business worlds. “He brings unique credibility to the table when we're having discussions [with the players],” he said, “and even just among the owners, he's able to represent a player point of view… Michael can say, 'Well, look, this is how I looked at it when I was a player, and these are the kind of issues we need to address if we're going to convince players that something is in everyone's interest.’ ” Jordan’s powers of persuasion apparently have been even more impressive in Charlotte and North Carolina. The executives are careful about relying on him too often -- Jordan’s most precious commodity, now that his net worth is estimated to be upwards of $1.7 billion -- is his time. But when they need Mariano Rivera to walk in from the bullpen, he is lights out. “We’ve had corporate sponsors at a golf outing, and he’s been there, maybe stayed at one hole to tell off with everybody,” Whitfield said. Or they’ll invite certain corporate sponsors to one of a few games each season in which “Club 23” is up and running at the Spectrum Center, a private club built for such purposes. They get a chance to visit, talk with and pick Jordan’s brain on the Hornets and much more. “We’ve closed all those deals,” Whitfield said. Then there was the time a local CEO wanted to finalize a sizeable sponsorship deal with the team, and had his No. 2 invite Jordan over to their headquarters for the meetings. Whitfield told the tale: “This guy says, 'You have to come to our office. Our CEO is the man in our business.' But we’re like, 'Nah, typically, CEOs come and meet in Michael’s office or in ‘Club 23’ over here.' He said no, that wasn’t going to work for them. “So Pete Guelli said, 'Let’s make a deal: We’ll take your CEO and drop him off in Beijing. And we’ll drop off Michael in Beijing. Then we’ll see who more people gravitate to. Whoever gets the least people, he has to come to the other guy’s office.'” Point made. Point taken. Said Whitfield: “The guy says, ‘You know what, I got it. We’ll be over 10 o’clock Friday morning.’” A community he calls home The Michael Jordan who once seemed determined to float above cultural and political frays as the most prudent way to serve commerce has not held back in recent years from making his presence felt. He has been more philanthropist than activist and, let’s face it, in times of the most dire need, cash beats talk every time. Charity and investing in the community can be good for business, sure. Making that a priority after Guelli’s arrival and Jordan’s purchase helped the Hornets build bridges with fans and merchants that Shinn and the original franchise’s departure had torched. More than that, though, giving back for Jordan and his team at this point in his life was the right thing to do. And do, and do, and do. The list of charitable and civic efforts Jordan and the Hornets have undertaken is long, with few outside the region or state aware of most of it. Among the highlights: - Donating $2 million to relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Florence, particularly meaningful because of the damage it did in Jordan’s hometown of Wilmington. - Dedicated $7 million in partnership with Novant Health to fund two Michael Jordan Family Clinics, set to open in Charlotte in 2020. - Serving as Make-A-Wish’s Chief Wish Ambassador since 2008, while donating more than $5 million to the organization. His relationship with Make-A-Wish began more than 30 years ago. - Contributing $5 million as a founding donor of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. - Addressing the issue of police shootings and community policing in 2016 by donating $1 million each to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. After the hurricane in September devastated so many homes and businesses in and near Jordan’s roots, he wanted to do more than to stroke a fat check. In a meeting covered by The Associated Press, he met with Stephanie Parker and her family, including four young children, after they lost their apartment in two feet of flooding. A call from the director of the Cape Fear chapter of the Red Cross brought them together. The meeting took place at a Lowe’s home improvement store. “I look around the corner, and it’s Michael Jordan. ‘Oh my God!’" Parker said. “I look at my kids, ‘It’s Michael Jordan!’ I’m not going to lie, some tears came in my eyes, because the first thing that went through my mind was when I was younger, his last game when he was on the Chicago Bulls team, and that flashback just came right in my mind.” Afterward, Jordan was coaxed by the Charlotte Observer to talk about why that disaster resonated so deeply for him. “You gotta take care of home,” he said. “Wilmington truly is my home. Kept thinking about all those places I grew up going to … You don’t want to see any of that anywhere, but when it’s home, that’s tough to swallow.” There’s basketball, there’s business and then there’s real life, which sometimes intrudes in the most desperate ways. “We didn’t know how many people in our community were hungry,” Whitfield said. “There are people in dire need, and it’s special to have that hometown hero have in his heart that ‘This is where I can help.’ “It gives not only him as a person but our organization a platform to really speak out. That commitment is what has made him a special owner, and why he’s even more beloved in our community.” Winning title No. 7 drives Jordan now To date, Jordan’s greatest achievements have come elsewhere, at least since his baseline shot as a freshman propelled North Carolina to the 1982 NCAA championship. Those Bulls championships, the “Dream Team” magnificence, his partnership with that sneaker company in Beaverton, Ore., his Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction, shooting “Space Jam,” all of it -- his legacy has been crafted with others, for others, mostly far from home. (For the record, Jordan, his wife Yvette and their two daughters own a mansion outside Charlotte and an estate in south Florida). “Look, this has always been home for him,” Whitfield said. “Even though he was drafted by Chicago, WGN became a very popular station. And he just continued to elevate, so people in this state were proud to say, even though he’s a Bull, we love him. When the Bulls would come here and play at the old Coliseum, these fans who were avid Hornets fans were all pulling for Michael Jordan. “He’d score, they’d cheer loudly. The Hornets would score, they’d cheer loudly. North Carolina always felt like he was their native son who went off and achieved greatness.” Coming back first to head the franchise’s basketball operations and then as owner, Jordan’s role -- in light of the modest results on the court -- has been custodial. Yes, the club’s improved financial stability is important. But for this driven winner and NBA owner unlike all others, custodial isn’t going to cut it for long. “He did an interview with Cigar Aficionado magazine a while back,” Peterson said, “and the question was asked, ‘What would you like to do?’ And he said, ‘Win a seventh championship. Win as an owner.’ So for me, every day, I’m thinking, here’s a close friend and you want to make your friends happy, right? So each day I think, do the best you can to reach this goal for him.” Said Hornets wing Nicolas Batum: “I understand. He wants to win. He wants to compete since he was born.” It hasn’t been for lack of trying, although Jordan has made sure to keep fiscal responsibility high on every agenda. The team’s payroll for 2018-19 is approximately $122.3 million, which ranks near the middle of the NBA pack. “That Michael Jordan is one cheap dude,” said an impassioned cab driver on a recent airport run. “He’s only going to spend so much and the players they get shows it.” The Hornets never have spent into the league’s luxury-tax, and if Walker is retained when he hits free agency this summer, he’ll likely become the first Charlotte player to sign a full maximum-salary contract (though the five-year, $120 million deal Batum landed in 2016 came awfully close). Injuries and dubious moves have taken a toll, a situation that Kupchak, Borrego and their staffs have been tasked with fixing. Jordan, by all accounts, is engaged yet patient, with a playoff berth and potentially a record above .500 within reach. “I’m sure he feels like,” Whitfield said, “if he were still 30 years old and could lace ‘em up and get out there, he’d help us get over the hump. I think he would cherish it as much or more than the first six. Because I think he realizes how hard it is to get it done. “But it doesn’t bother us if the fans see his frustration sitting next to our bench. It’s important to us that they see he’s not only invested, he’s vested in what our team is trying to do. They can relate to him because they’re feeling that same frustration.” Jordan is theirs again and that’s what matters. For basketball, for business, for community and in time, just maybe, in championship. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2019

Top sports headliners in the year that was

From the FIFA World Cup to the NBA, the PBA to the UAAP and NCAA, the Asian Games to Manny Pacquiao, volleyball to MMA, the past 12 months truly was a great year for Filipino sports fans.   Here are some of the most memorable sports headliners that bannered the year that was.    San Miguel Corporation dominates PBA San Miguel Corporation owned 2018. For the first time in the history of the Asia’s first professional basketball league one company dominated all three conferences of the PBA. The San Miguel Beermen annexed their fourth straight Philippine Cup title against sister team Magnolia last May, while Ginebra rode on undersized do-it-all forward Justin Brownlee to the Commissioner's Cup title at the expense of San Miguel last August. Then it was Magnolia's time to shine in December. The Hotshots dismantled Alaska in six games to complete SMC’s domination of PBA 2018. Outside of basketball, SMC also made its presence felt in volleyball as Petron bagged the Grand Prix, Challenge Cup (beach volleyball) and the All-Filipino Conference in the Philippine Superliga.   Kai Sotto stands tall as Ateneo takes title vs NU Kai Sotto became a household name in 2018 as the 7'1" wunderkind showed off in the UAAP Season 80 juniors' basketball tournament. The eventual Finals MVP was a beast in Game 1 of the Finals against the NU Bullpups, tallying a triple-double of 22 points, 16 rebounds, and 11 blocks in the 86-70 win, the first of its kind since 2003. Ateneo finished the season almost unscathed at 16-1, with their lone loss in Game 2 of the series, a very chippy one to say the least. In Game 3, Sotto came up clutch, scoring the go-ahead basket, 60-58, with about 30 seconds left as Ateneo came away with the 63-58 win to take the title.  SJ Belangel, Joaqui Manuel, Dave Ildefonso and Jason Credo, and coach Joe Silva all appeared in their last games for the Blue Eaglets.   DLSU completes three-peat; NU dethrones Ateneo  The UAAP Season 80 volleyball tournament was filled with lasting memories that will surely be remembered for a long time. Numerous upsets in the eliminations, great games, and much more were the name of the game for the women's tournament. However, a long-time rivalry was rekindled when two-time defending champs De La Salle Lady Spikers met 29-time title holders FEU Lady Tamaraws for all the marbles last May. Kim Kianna Dy, Majoy Baron, and Dawn Macandili all ended their careers on a high note as they swept graduating Bernadeth Pons and the Lady Tamaraws in two straight games to win their third straight title. Graduating libero Macandili was named Finals MVP for the first and final time in her collegiate career.  Behind their magnificent floor defense and some stellar play from Finals MVP Bryan Bagunas, the NU Bulldogs also swept three-time defending champions Ateneo Blue Eagles to reclaim a title they last enjoyed in Season 76. Espejo, a five-time UAAP MVP, had an awesome performance for the world's record books, scoring a record-55 points to force the FEU Tamaraws to a do-or-die Final Four. The Blue Eagle legend had played his last, and has since suited up for a semi-pro team in Japan's topflight volleyball league.   Alab fends off Mono Vampire to claim ABL title San Miguel-backed Alab Pilipinas were such a glorious sight to see in the eighth season of the Asean Basketball League (ABL) last March. Coached by perennial fan favorite Jimmy Alapag in his very first season, the trio of Renaldo Balkman, Justin Brownlee, and Local and Finals MVP Bobby Ray Parks to their first title in home soil. Alab faced Thailand-based Mono Vampire, who were led by Mike Singletary, towering Sam Deguara, Fil-Am Jason Brickman and Pinoy Paul Zamar. In the very same day as the coronation of the UAAP volleyball championships, Alab took home the crown in a rousing 102-92 victory in Sta. Rosa, much to the delight of the home crowd. Balkman, the league's Defensive Player of the Year led Alab in scoring with 32, while Brownlee added 24 of his own. Parks added 13 markers. The two imports played in the PBA for the Commissioner's Cup, where Balkman (San Miguel) and Brownlee (Ginebra) would face each other in the Finals.   (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) Warriors send LeBron packing to Los Angeles The Golden St. Warriors and the Cleveland Cavaliers locked horns in the NBA Finals for the fourth straight season after the two teams were pushed to the brink in the Conference Finals. Both teams were down 3-2 and won Game 7 on the road to win their respective conferences, with both teams banking on experience to forge another bout in the championship series. Game 1 was undoubtedly the most exciting game in the series as LeBron James had an epic performance of 51 points, 8 rebounds, and 8 assists.  However, JR Smith's blunder at the end of regulation became the lasting image of that game, as he dribbled out the clock with the score tied at 107-all. The defending champions rode the surge and took the opening game, 124-114. Stephen Curry's brillant performance throughout the series was overshadowed by Kevin Durant's dagger in Game 3, a few feet away from the spot where he launched the go-ahead three in Game 3 of the 2017 NBA Finals. Durant was named as the Bill Russell Finals MVP after norming 28.8 ppg, 10.8 rpg, and 7.5 apg in the four-game sweep, demolishing the Cavs 108-85 in the series finale last June. It would also be the last game LeBron James had in a Cleveland Cavaliers uniform, as he bolted for the Los Angeles Lakers almost a month later.   (AP Photo/Martin Meissner) France rules 2018 FIFA World Cup The most-coveted title of the beautiful game returned to France after two decades. The youthful French squad celebrated their conquest soaked in a downpour in Moscow after a 4-2 victory over first-time finalist Croatia in the 2018 FIFA World Cup last July. Teenager Kylian Mbappe stood out in the French team composed of a bunch of 25 and under players. Speed, strength and youth became France’s biggest asset during the quadrennial football spectacle watched by almost 3.5 billion viewers around the world.  The 19-year-old migrant scored one of the four goals in the championship match to become the second teen to score a goal in the Finals after the legendary Pele back in 1958. France defeated Belgium in the semifinal, 1-0, while Croatia outlasted the favored Russians in penalty shootout, 4-3 (2-2). The French team also displayed diversity, with players born of migrant parents including Alphonse Areola, whose parents are both Filipinos working in France.   Pac on top, The Filipino Flash returns The most-celebrated Filipino athlete continued make the headlines this year. Manny Pacquaio stripped Lucas Matthysse of his WBA welterweight world championship belt with a seventh round technical knockout win in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in July. Pacquiao split with long-time trainer Freddie Roach during his build up for the Matthysse bout back in April but confirmed their partnership once again for the 40-year old boxer’s title defense against Adrien Broner next year. Nonito Donaire Jr. announced that he would be going back down to super bantamweight after a loss to Carl Frampton in April for the interim WBO Featherweight belt and would be taking part in the World Boxing Super Series' super bantamweight tournament.  Matched up in the quarterfinal round against Ryan Burnett back in November, Donaire scored what many consider an upset, winning via TKO after the Irishman suffered a back injury to snatch the WBA (Super) Bantamweight World Championship.  Up next for Donaire will be WBO Super Bantamweight World Champion Zolani Tete of South Africa in the semifinals.           Pinay power in the Asian Games   The Philippines participated in the 18th Asian Games held in Jakarta and Palembang, Indonesia that ran from August 18 to September 2. A total of 272 athletes that participated in 31 sports represented the country in the quadrennial meet with Jordan Clarkson of the Cleveland Cavaliers and medalist Margielyn Didal marching as flagbearers in the opening and closing ceremonies, respectively. Rio Olympian Hidilyn Diaz gave the PHI its first gold medal in women’s -53 kg. weightlifting. Five days after Diaz’s victory, the trio of Yuka Saso, Bianca Pagdanganan and Lois Kaye Go accounted for the women’s golf team mint. Saso also bagged the individual gold. In Palembang, Didal rolled her way into winning the women’s street skateboard gold. The celebrated men’s basketball team started out strong after routing Kazakhstan but lost by two-points to China in the group stage. The Gilas Pilipinas squad advanced in the quarterfinals but bowed down to South Korea by nine points eventually settling for a fifth spot in the classification phase after wins over Japan and Syria. The PHI finished with a 4-2-15 gold-silver-bronze haul and landed at 19th spot, three places higher that its 2014 finish in Incheon, South Korea.      Red Lions roar, Blue Eagles soar San Beda University continued its mastery over the NCAA as it annexed its third straight title and 22nd overall. The Red Lions grabbed its 11th crown in 13 years at the expense of Lyceum of the Philippines University. It was one-sided championship series – just like in their Finals meeting last year – with the San Beda ripping the Pirates apart in Game One with LPU playing sans its best player in CJ Perez, who was banned for one game after failing to notify the league of his intention to join the PBA Draft. Perez returned in Game 2 but even his presence didn’t stop the Red Lions from painting the NCAA red once again. In probably one of the most memorable UAAP season in recent years, Ateneo de Manila University won its second straight crown. Ivorian tower and Rookie of the Year 6-foot-11 Ange Kouame made an immediate impact for the Blue Eagles complementing the already stacked Ateneo squad led by Finals MVP Thirdy Ravena. But the glory of Ateneo was overshadowed by the Cinderalla story of the team it vanquished in the Finals. Climbing up from the cellar in the past years, University of the Philippines made history by making it in the Finals for the first time since winning it all in 1986. But before their championship stint, the Fighting Maroons ended a two-decade Final Four drought. UP then shocked twice-to-beat Adamson University with both games decided by game-winners. Ateneo came in the series as the title favorites but overwhelming support from a very hungry UP community and underdogs fans backed the Fighting Maroons. But in the end, it was the Blue Eagles championship experience that prevailed.       Pinoys make wave in MMA Fighters under Team Lakay flexed their muscles in One Championship. Flyweight star Geje Eustaquio opened the year with an interim championship win over former champion Kairat Akhmetov in Manila back in January. Eustaquio then defeated two-time champion Adriano Moraes in Macau last July to become the undisputed ONE Flyweight World Champion.  Joshua Pacio earned the ONE Strawweight World Championship last September after a unanimous decision win over two-time champion Japanese Yoshitaka Naito. Kevin Belingon dropped former world title challenger Andrew Leone with a now-famous spinning back kick in April. He followed it up with a dominating win over then-two division world champion Martin Nguyen to capture the ONE Interim Bantamweight World Champion. Belingon ended the five-year reign and seven-year winning streak of of long-time bantamweight king Brazilian Bibiano Fernandes in November via split decision.  Eduard Folayang outclassed Singaporean contender Amir Khan at ONE: Conquest of Champions in Manila in early December to bag the ONE Lightweight World Championship for the second time in his storied career.  BRAVE Combat Federation Bantamweight World Champion Stephen Loman successfully defended his title twice in 2018.  Reigning ONE Heavyweight World Champion Brandon Vera needed only 64 seconds to knockout hard-hitting Italian challenger Mauro Cerilli in Manila early December to remain the king of the ONE Championship heavyweight kingdom.    Petron, Creamline rule respective club leagues Creamline claimed its breakthrough championship in the Premier Volleyball League by sweeping PayMaya in the Reinforced Conference Finals series last July. Alyssa Valdez finally ended a two-year title drought with the Cool Smashers' victory. Creamline opposite hitter Michele Gumabao was named Miss Globe-Philippines during the Binibining Pilipinas 2018 last March. Gumabao represented the country in the 2018 Miss Globe in Albania last October and won the Miss Social Media and Dream Girl awards while landing a spot in the Top 15.     The Cool Smashers completed a sweep of the PVL’s Season 2 after claiming the Open Conference crown at the expense of Ateneo-Motolite via an emphatic series sweep this month. In the Philippine Superliga, Petron reigned supreme in the Grand Prix after taking down archrival F2 Logistics last May. Petron extended its supremacy in the sands after the tandem of Sisi Rondina and Bernadethn Pons defeated Dhannylaine Demontano and Jackielyn Estoquia of Sta. Lucia in the Challenge Cup final last May. The Cargo Movers got its revenge in the Invitational Cup, toppling the Blaze Spikers in a series sweep last July. Petron wrapped the year with the All-Filipino Conference in its pocket. The Blaze Spikers won its first 14 games before dropping Game 2 of the Finals. Petron swept F2 Logistics in Game 3......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 30th, 2018

Serena voted AP Female Athlete of the Year for 5th time

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press She showed up in Paris wearing a black catsuit, a reminder that nobody can command the Grand Slam stage quite like Serena Williams. She reached the finals at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, proving again how well she can play no matter how little she practices. Williams didn't win those or any other tournaments, which in every other situation might have made for a forgettable year. In 2018, it was a remarkable one. Her rapid return to tennis after a health scare following childbirth was a victory in itself, and for that, Williams was voted The Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year for the fifth time. Williams received 93 points in balloting by U.S. editors and news directors announced Wednesday, while gymnast Simone Biles was second with 68. Notre Dame basketball player Arike Ogunbowale was third, while Olympic snowboarder Chloe Kim and swimmer Katie Ledecky, the 2017 winner, rounded out the top five. All of those players won a title or titles in 2018, while Williams had to settle for just coming close a couple of times. Now 37 and a new mother facing some players who weren't even born when she turned pro in 1995, Williams isn't the same person who ruthlessly ran her way to 23 Grand Slam singles titles — the last of which came at the 2017 Australian Open when she was pregnant. "I'm still waiting to get to be the Serena that I was, and I don't know if I'll ever be that, physically, emotionally, mentally. But I'm on my way," Williams said on the eve of the U.S. Open final. "I feel like I still have a ways to go. Once I get there, I'll be able to play even hopefully better." The Male Athlete of the Year will be announced Thursday. The women's award has been won more only by Babe Didrikson Zaharias, whose six wins included one for track and five for golf. Williams' previous times winning the AP honor, in 2002, 2009, 2013 and 2015, were because of her dominance. This one was about her perseverance. Williams developed blood clots after giving birth to daughter Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr. on Sept. 1, 2017, and four surgeries would follow. She returned to the WTA Tour in March and played in just a pair of events before the French Open, where she competed in a skin-tight, full-length black catsuit . She said the outfit — worn partly for health reasons because of the clots — made her feel like a superhero, but her game was rarely in superstar shape. She had to withdraw in Paris because of a right pectoral injury and didn't play again until Wimbledon, where she lost to Angelique Kerber in the final. Williams came up short again in New York, where her loss to Naomi Osaka in the final will be remembered best for her outburst toward chair umpire Carlos Ramos, who had penalized Williams for receiving coaching and later penalized her an entire game for calling him a "thief" while arguing. That loss leaves her one major title shy of Margaret Court's record as she starts play next year in a WTA Tour that will look different in part because of new rules coming about after issues involving Williams. Players returning to the tour may use a "special ranking" for up to three years from the birth of a child, and the exemption can be used for seedings at big events. Also, the tour says players can wear leggings or compression shorts at its tournaments without a skirt over them. Williams insists she is still driven to play and win as much if not more than before she was a mother. That drive is the focus of a Nike ad showing her in action. "Getting this far, crazy," it says. "Stopping now, crazier." Williams won't. "I'm still on the way up," she said. "There's still much more that I plan on doing." The rest of the top five: Simone Biles, gymnastics. The American won four golds and six medals overall in the world championships in Qatar, giving her 20 in her career to tie Russia's Svetlana Khorkina for the most by a female gymnast. Arike Ogunbowale, women's basketball. She hit one jumper to knock off previously unbeaten Connecticut in the Final Four, then a 3-pointer in the championship game to lift Notre Dame over Mississippi State. Chloe Kim, snowboarding. At 17, the Californian won the halfpipe Olympic gold medal in South Korea, where her parents were from before they immigrated to the United States. Katie Ledecky, swimming. The 21-year-old U.S. Olympian tuned up for the 2020 Games in Tokyo by winning five medals in the city at the Pan Pacific Championships......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 27th, 2018

Gallant silver for PH rowers

Filipino rowers paddle furiously during the World Championships in Georgia, where Team Philippines settled for two silver medals. --JUNE NAVARRO GAINESVILLE, Georgia-- The Philippines nearly brough.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

Pinoy paddlers bag 2 golds in world tilt

The Philippines made its presence felt early as it captured two gold medals in record-setting fashion in the opener of the ICF World Dragon Boat Championships at the Lake Lanier Olympic Park here Thursday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

PH karatekas scoop 10 golds in Singapore

The Philippines bagged 10 gold, seven silver and seven bronze medals to pocket the overall championship crown in the 38th Karatedo Gojukai Singapore International Championships held at the Singapore Badminton Hall in Singapore. Xavier School Greenhills standout Adam Bondoc led the charge of the Philippine squad after claiming the gold medal in the juniors 16-17 [...] The post PH karatekas scoop 10 golds in Singapore appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

ASIAN GAMES: Wushu s Divine Wally earns Philippines fifth bronze

JAKARTA — Divine Wally salvaged a bronze from wushu’s women’s -52 kgs of sanda late Wednesday night to prevent what could have been a first medal-less day for the Philippines in the 18th Asian Games. A day after the entire country celebrated Hidilyn Diaz’s success in weightlifting, no other Filipino athlete from the 272-member delegation came so close to winning another gold medal with China bagged its 35th gold medal to widen its gap over second running Japan with 18 golds and Japan with 10. The one-gold and five-bronze haul put the Philippines at No. 16 on the medal tally board—behind Southeast Asian rivals No. 4 Indonesia (six golds) and No. 8 Thailand (four golds) and ahead of No. 17 Singapore (one gold and two silvers), No. 20 Vietnam (three silvers and six bronzes) and No. 23 Myanmar (two bronzes). The veteran internationalist Wally lost to a taller and more aggressive Samiroumi Elaheh Mansoryan of Iran, 1-2, in their quarterfinal match to settle for the bronze at the Jakarta International Expo. The five-foot flat Wally tried her best to connect with her strikes, but the 5-foot-6 two-time world champion Mansoryan evaded them, while connecting on her attacks to advance to the championship round on Thursday and possibly finally win the gold that eluded her in Incheon 2014, where she was a silver medalist. Mansoryan, the world champion in Kuala Lumpur (2013) and Kazan, Russia (2017), will dispute the gold with China’s Li Yueyao at 10 a.m. Also the Asian champion in 2016 in the 56kg class, Mansoryan was simply too much against Wally as she aggressively dominated the Filipina in the final two rounds after trailing the first, 0-1. The 24-year-old Wally, though, improved on her fifth-place finish in the Asian Games as she contributed to the Philippines’ medal haul with its fifth bronze and the second from wushu, counting Agatha Wong’s own medal in the women’s taolu. Wally, the 2016 48 kgs champion of the Asian Championships in Taoyuan, was assured of the bronze after beating Petriwi Selviah of Indonesia, 2-0. She earlier subdued Mimi Yoysaykham of Laos, 2-0. She took up the sport in 2013 at age 18. The Blu Girls, meanwhile, blanked Indonesia, 4-0, also on Wednesday to boost their chances for a podium finish in women’s softball at the Gelura Bung Karno diamond. Mary Ann Antolihao started for the Blu Girls, allowing only four hits and striking out Indonesians before turning over the pitching job to Royevel Palma who struck out four, as the Philippines took its fourth win in five outings. Indonesia virtually bowed out with no win to show after give games. The PH lady batters were coming off a disappointing 1-11 loss to the Japanese late Tuesday. The defending champions bombarded Pinay pitchers Mia Macapagal and Antolihao with 11 hits, nine of them coming at the top of the 4th inning for the abbreviated win. The Philippines has yet to beat the Japanese in their international matches. With the lone setback, the Blu Girls tied previous victim China at second place. The Blu Girls were to take on Chinese-Taipei at 9 p.m. (Philippine time), aiming for a victory that would assure them of a bronze medal in this seven-nation tournament. A win over the Taiwanese would put the Filipinas at no. 2 position after the round-robin elimination and assured them of a bronze medal via the page-system semifinal. The top four teams will advance to a page system semifinal to determine the protagonists for the gold medal. Japan, which blanked Korea earlier in the day is poised to top the chart with clean 5-0 card. In Palembang, top Philippine troika of Liza del Rosario, Lara Posadas and Alexis Sy were derailed by the morning lane conditions and could  muster only seventh place at the start of the bowling championships at the ultra-modern Jakabaring Sports City Bowling Center. Unable to find their lines and adjust in time with the use of the long-oil pattern in the first three games, the Filipina keglers pooled 4026, 300 pinfalls behind the sizzling Malaysian trio of Hamidi Afifah Badrul, Rahman Siti Abdul and Mei Lan Chea, who took the gold with combined tally of 4255. Chinese-Taipeh (4255) settled for silver while Singapore got bronze (4250) in a day of soaring scores with the new scoring system in play, exemplified by Malaysian Badrul’s eye-popping six-game average of 242.83, and with teammates Abdul (238.33) and Cheah just as hot (239.83). The other triumvirate of Maria Lourdes Arles, Rachelle Leon and Dyan Coronacion placed 10th with a combined output of 3923......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

PH Weightlifters Pocket 18 Medals in S. Korea

The Philippines bagged 18 medals, including three golds, in the Asian Cup and Asian Inter-Club Weightlifting Championships held from October 29 to November 2 in Yanggu County, Gangwon Province, South Korea. In an interview on... The post PH Weightlifters Pocket 18 Medals in S. Korea appeared first on MetroCebu News......»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsNov 6th, 2017

Taekwondo, pool bets add three silvers to PHI haul in AIMAG

ASHGABAT—Poomsae artists Rodolfo Reyes Jr. and Jocel Lyn Ninobla settled for silver medals with pool player Chezka Centeno to keep the medal streak of the Philippines going in the 5th Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games. Centeno’s hasty shot on the fourth marble in the 10th frame was a costly mistake that China’s Han Yu exploited for a 7-4 victory in the women’s 9-ball finale. Han launched a powerful break on the deciding set and finished off the 18-year-old Zamboanga City native with a combination of the third and ninth balls on the left corner pocket. Delivering what seemed like a spotless routine, Reyes scored 8.310 points from the judges before Pongporn Suvittayarak of Thailand erased his lead with 8.550 points for the gold in men’s individual poomsae. The 22-year-old from Dasmarinas City was proud of the silver, his best performance in international tournaments after bringing home bronze medals from the recent Kuala Lumpur Southeast Asian Games and the 2016 world championships in Lima, Peru. ``It’s nice to have the gold but it wasn’t meant for me. I’m thankful for the opportunity to contribute a silver medal for our country,’’ said Reyes. Jocel Lyn Ninobla also got the silver with 8.000 points after Marjan Salahshouri of Iran scored 8.120 points in the women’s individual poomsae finals. The Philippines jacked up its medal collection of two gold, 10 silver and 10 bronze medals, which included the third-place performance of Kristel Macrohon in women’s weightlifting. Macrohon combined a total lift of 209kg for the bronze behind gold medalist Assem Sadykova of Kazakhstan (222kg) and silver finisher Apolonia Vaivai of Fiji (221kg). Chef de mission Monsour Del Rosario was happy on the turnout where Filipino athletes kept on delivering medals everyday since the Games began last week. It shadowed some of the few setbacks for the day after Anna Patrimonio and Khim Iglupas failed to advance in the semifinals of women’s tennis doubles. Ankita Raina and Prarthan Thombare of India defeated pushed the Filipina netters to the exits with a 6-3, 6-3 victory at the Tennis Center. In bowling, Tannya Roumimper of Indonesia eliminated Maria Liza Del Rosario, 204-194, in their quarterfinal showdown .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2017

Phelps has 'no desire' to return to swimming

em>By Paul Newberry, Associated Press /em> Michael Phelps wondered if watching others compete at the world championships would pique his desire for another comeback. Nope. Phelps said Tuesday he has 'no desire' to return to competitive swimming, but he is eager to stay involved with the sport and cheer on those who follow in his enormous wake. In an interview with The Associated Press while promoting a healthy pet food campaign, Phelps said he is excited about having his second child and building a life beyond swimming. 'For me, it's about being happy where I am and happy where my family is,' Phelps said. 'We have more goals we want to accomplish outside the sport.' It was around this time four years ago when Phelps got serious about ending his first retirement, but he now seems content with his decision to step away again after the Rio Olympics. His wife, Nicole, is about four months pregnant. The couple already have a 16-month-old son, Boomer. 'I've got no desire — no desire — to come back,' the 32-year-old Phelps said flatly. Phelps has attended a handful of swimming meets since the Rio Games, where the winningest athlete in Olympic history added to his already massive career haul by claiming five gold medals plus a silver . A few months ago, he conceded to the AP that he wasn't sure how he would feel about a possible comeback after watching the worlds in Budapest, Hungary. 'We'll see if I get that itch,' he said in April . Turns out, it had no impact. Phelps said the second-biggest meet after the Olympics 'truly didn't kick anything off or spike any more interest in coming out of retirement again.' He is excited to follow the development of his heir apparent, Caeleb Dressel, who emerged as the sport's newest star by winning seven gold medals at Budapest . The 21-year-old Floridian joined Phelps and Mark Spitz as the only swimmers to accomplish that feat at a major international meet. 'I'm happy Caeleb decided to go off this year instead of last year,' quipped Phelps, who won 23 golds and 28 medals overall in his Olympic career. 'I'm kind of happy to see him swimming so well when I'm not there.' While he still travels extensively for his many sponsors, Phelps said he's much more involved in his wife's second pregnancy than he was before Boomer's birth, when he was consumed by full-scale training for the Olympics. 'It's definitely different going through it again,' he said. Boomer, meanwhile, is a chip off the old block. 'He skipped the walking part and went right to running,' Phelps said, chuckling. 'He just scoots around the house. It's funny when we get him in the pool. He basically just splashes around the whole time. He's literally nonstop. As soon as he wakes up from a nap or his night's sleep, he's just go, go, go. There's no time for slow moving in our family. He likes to go fast. I guess that's a good thing.' Boomer is even starting to show some good form in the pool. His mom and Phelps' longtime coach, Bob Bowman, have detected a bit of the stroke that was his father's strongest. 'Nicole and Bob both say he's got a good butterfly technique that he's working on,' Phelps said. 'I guess he's seen his dad doing it a couple of times and kind of picks it up. He's also now in a stage where it's like all five senses are coming together. He feels everything, recognizes everything. It's really fun to watch, as a dad, just watching these transitions in his life.' In his latest business endeavor, Phelps is spearheading a marketing campaign for Nulo Pet Food , which he describes as a healthy alternative for dogs and cats. He's an investor in the company and accompanied in ads by his French bulldogs, Juno and Legend. 'Our bodies are like a high-performance car. You have to make sure you're putting the correct fuel in your body,' Phelps said. 'We obviously treat our pets like human beings. I'd like my animals to be fed in the right way, with good nutrition and healthy foods. If we can do that with a company that's putting good, natural ingredients into a pet food, it makes sense for me with what I'm doing in my own life. It's something that goes hand in hand.' With Dressel and Katie Ledecky now leading the American team, the U.S. is expected to remain the world's dominant swimming country heading into the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Even without Phelps. 'It's time to kind of move on,' he said, 'and watch other people come into their own.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2017

PHL wins 3 golds, 5 bronzes in World Taekwondo Poomsae Championships

The Philippines captured three golds and five bronzes in the 10th World Taekwondo Poomsae Championships held on Sept. 29 to Oct. 4 in Lima, Peru......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 6th, 2016

Paddlers cop 2 more golds in World meet

MANILA, Philippines - The Philippines clinched two more gold medals at the ICF Dragon Boat World Championships in Moscow, Russia, hiking its haul to three-go.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 12th, 2016

Giants manager Bruce Bochy to retire after this season

By Janie McCauley, Associated Press SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Bruce Bochy has always managed with his gut. Those same instincts told him it's nearly time to retire. Bochy announced Monday this will be his last season managing the San Francisco Giants, his 25th in all as a big league manager. He told the team before Monday's spring training workout at Scottsdale Stadium. "In my mind it's time," he said. Bochy, who turns 64 on April 16, had offseason hip replacement surgery that has him moving more swiftly and he insists "the health's great" and didn't factor into the choice. He begins his 13th season with the Giants. He led the club to World Series championships in 2010, '12 and '14. "I've managed with my gut. I came up here in 2007 on my gut. So it's a gut feeling it's time," Bochy said. "It's been an unbelievable ride. There's so much in there to be grateful for, with the players, the city, the fans, my ride here. It's time. I'll stay in baseball and do something. ... I'm not going too far, trust me. I love this game. It's been in my blood, so sure I'll be doing something in another capacity and I look forward to it." Bochy came to San Francisco from the San Diego Padres before the 2007 season, in time to watch Barry Bonds break Hank Aaron's career home run record that August. He managed Matt Cain's perfect game in 2012 and a pair of no-hitters by Tim Lincecum against the Padres in July 2013 and June '14. "This will give me time to go back and reflect and even watch some games and think about some of these great achievements and milestones these players have reached," Bochy said. "I've always had a deep appreciation for the gifts and talents of these players. I consider myself fortunate to have managed players like a Bonds and Lincecum." Every other manager with three or more titles has been inducted into the Hall of Fame. "I haven't even thought about that," Bochy said. Giants CEO Larry Baer already envisions a place in Cooperstown for Bochy, "Words cannot adequately express the amount of admiration, gratitude and respect the Giants family has for Bruce Bochy," Baer said in a statement. "His honesty, integrity, passion and brilliance led to the most successful period of Giants baseball in the history of our franchise. He will always be a Giant and we look forward to honoring him and all of his achievements throughout his final season in San Francisco and inevitably in Cooperstown." Giants Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford considers himself fortunate to have played for the same manager his entire career. "That's definitely special. I don't think many guys have one manager throughout their entire career," Crawford said. "Obviously we have this year to take care of first. Hopefully we make it a memorable one for him. A part of what's made him such a good manager over the years is just being able to work with the players he has, whether that's the bullpen or the bench, he always seemed to plug the right pieces at the right times." Bochy has faced daily questions about his future, and he wanted to address his plans now and avoid distractions later in the season when he hopes to have a contender again following two years out of the playoffs. He intends to stay in baseball. "It's something I put a lot of thought in it," Bochy said. "There's a lot of things that I look forward to doing, but right now my head's at this moment, hey, I'm going to focus on getting this team ready. I look forward to one more shot, trust me, and us having a big year. I'm all in." He spent his first 12 seasons as a manager with the Padres from 1995-2006, guiding San Diego to the NL pennant in 1998. Bochy came to the decision over the winter, but had all but realized this would be his last year at the end of the 2018 season. He discussed it with family and the front office. Executive Brian Sabean was hardly surprised by his dear friend's decision, saying "that's a pretty elite and, as we all know, fast treadmill to now do this for 25 years." "Two different organizations, four trips to the World Series, you win three, that's pretty elite company," Sabean said. Once he's through, Bochy will stick to his simple life of fishing excursions and family. "I'm not going anywhere. I don't have any cruises planned, trust me, I don't plan on going up Mount Everest. Baseball, that's my life. I'll be around," Bochy said. "I don't have a bucket list. There's no hidden agenda in all this, trust me.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News3 hr. 58 min. ago

Boxing: Aston Palicte and camp waiting for title rematch with Donnie Nietes

After starching previously-undefeated Puerto Rican Jose Martinez in just two rounds back in late January, Filipino super flyweight contener Aston "Mighty" Palicte is back in the title picture.  The 28-year olf native of Bago, Negros earned a mandatory challenger spot after knocking out Martinez in the second round of their WBO super flyweight title eliminator, and now he's ready to challenge for the belt once more.  Fittingly, the man holding the WBO's 115-pound title is a familiar face in four-division titleholder Donnie "Ahas" Nietes, who Palicte already faced back in 2018 for the then-vacant WBO title.  Of course, the bout ended in a controversial split draw. Nietes would fight for and caputure the title just months later, defeatign Japan's Kazuto Ioka via split decision in Macau on New Year's Eve.  For Palicte, the prospect of once again challenging his fellow Negrense is all about doing his job and achieving his ultimate goal of becoming a world champion. "Sa akin naman, unang-una, ayaw ko din sana na Pinoy yung kalaban ko, kasi dalawang Pinoy, pero sabi ko nga, wala eh, trabaho ‘to eh," Palicte told ABS-CBN Sports. "Eto yung trabaho ko, alam din naman nila Donnie yun eh. Siyempre, sports lang, trabaho lang." In a perfect world, Palicte would rather find a way to capture a world championship without having to challenge Nietes, which could mean even more world championships for the Philippines.  "Kung may ibang paraan na hindi kami mag-lalaban [pero makakapag-champion ako], mas maganda yun," he explained. "Para yung may isa na Pinoy na champion, tapos kung manalo yung isa pang Pinoy na, kunyari ako, sa iba, world championship sa iba, at least dadagdag na naman yung Pinoy [na world champion] diba?" How it stands however, Palicte is the next in line for the WBO title, which means that to become a champion himself, he'll have to go through Nietes. For the Roy Jones Jr-promoted talent, he's just waiting to see what materializes in the next few days or weeks.  "Ang sakin, gaya ng sinasabi ko sa kanila, hindi ko iniisip kumbaga, sana kaming dalawa ni Nietes [yung maglaban], una hindi ko gusto yun, pero kung mangyari yun, kung gusto talaga ng promoter ko at promoter niya, manager niya at manager ko, wala naman ako magagawa kasi boxer ako. Kailangan ko sundin kung ano yung desisyon nila, nung promoter ko at ng manager ko." "Talagang nag-hihintay lang ako sa kung ano gusto nila," he continued.  While the WBO has ordered a rematch between the two Negros-born pugilists, Dennis Gasgonia of ABS-CBN News reports that Nietes' promoter ALA Promotions will be looking at the options, which could include a unification bout with the other 115-pound titleholders.  Palicte's long-time manager Jason Soong knows full well that a do-over with Nietes is far from set in stone, and he says that he understands the Cebu-based stable's desire to go after the division's bigger stars.  "I understand where they’re coming from, especially with Donnie being an older boxer, I guess he’s going towards the later part of his career, so I understand where they’re coming from, but walang personalan, it’s boxing, but there’s a reason why we’re the mandatory challenger," Soong elaborated. "If they don’t want to fight us, they’ll have to probably vacate the belt, because I don’t think the WBO is going…just the way the WBO is addressing this, the fact that they’re coming out with statements right away, and then the official letters are being circulated, I think the WBO is very serious that when it’s a mandatory, it’s a mandatory." "I don’t think they’re playing around with that," he added. Much like Palicte, Soong reiterated that the desire to go after Nietes stems from the simple fact that he is the one holding the belt.  "I understand them, but kami, we’re happy because we feel like we earned it, bottomline. It’s not like we chose him as an opponent, nagkataon lang na he holds the belt. Even that for me, them fighting for that belt, for me it’s also, that’s what I’m questioning, because [Donnie and Aston are] one and two, and they leapfrog us and then they fight for the belt and we’re left with the eliminator, but for me, sige, we took it. We took it and we’re here now." While the next step for Palicte remains unclear at this point, Soong is confident that his ward's next fight will be one for a major world championship.  "I’m excited, because I think no matter what happens, Aston’s next fight will be for a world championship, whether it’s with Donnie or with someone else. I’m excited." Should Nietes end up vacating the WBO title, Soong sees a scenario wherein Palicte could end up facing Mexican star Juan Francisco Estrada for the title in what he considers a 'dream fight'.  "Well, if he vacates it and we’re in the championship, the one next ranked is Estrada," Soong said. "That would be, ever since Aston was a contender, [Estrada] was actually our dream match, and I think their styles, Estrada was the main event in the last SuperFly 3, and it was always our dream matchup, one because he’s a big name and we think it would be a very good, very entertaining fight, and I think we would do well against a fighter like that.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2019

FULL CIRCLE: Once a student of the arts, Pinoy Taekwondo star Japoy Lizardo is now a teacher

Japoy Lizardo could not help but smile as he recounted his sports journey during the official launch of the 2019 Milo Summer Sports Clinic, Thursday morning at the Milo Stadium in KidZania, Bonifacio Global City.  Japoy Lizardo and his son Jace on the stage now. Lizardo says he also wants his son to experience what he did in the Milo Summer Sports Clinics as well. | @abscbnsports pic.twitter.com/S3XuAx6co7 — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) February 7, 2019 Lizardo shared that he began as a swimmer, before trying out basketball, and then eventually finding his calling in the martial art of Taekwondo.  From there, the rest was history, as they say.  Lizardo went on to win two gold medals in the Southeast Asian Games, and loads more in the Asian Championships.  But more than the personal accolades, Lizardo shares that it's the values that he's picked up from being an athlete that will stick with him forever.  Now, the 32-year old, while no longer competing on a National level, remains involved with the martial art as a mentor, and he shares the very same lesson to his students as well.  "Sobrang laking naitulong sa akin ng sports, kumbaga sobrang naging malaking part ng buhay ko, actually until now, I’m still doing Taekwondo, I teach kids," he shared. "Sa sports naman, more than the skills, siyempre number one yung skills, kasama na din yung values na matututunan mo sa sports na, lagi ko nga sinasabi sa mga students ko, yung skills, yung pagiging athlete mo, hindi naman permanent yan, pero yung mga matututunan mo through sports, yan yung pang-habang buhay mo na dadalhin." Lizardo was present during the yearly summer program's launch because he serves as an advocate for it, having also gone through the Milo Summer Sports Clinics before. Lizardo, in fact, swears by it.  "Sobrang naging effective nung program for me kasi ito yung nag-establish ng foundation for me, yung basics, yung sports," he explained. "Pagka-nakapasok ka ng MILO Sports Clinics, dun mo malalaman na there’s a technique pala kuing paano maging effective yung isang sipa or yung isang bagay." "Yung MILO Sports Clinic, nakatulong din sa akin, sa guidance, hindi lang sa sports kundi pati dun sa mga values na natututunan ko, I think more than the skills nga, yun yung isa sa mga parang kung bakit ako nandito parin sa taekwondo. Marami tayong mga challenges na mararanasan sa sports na minsan gusto na natin mag-quit, pero dahil dito, na-mold ka, na-train ka kung paano mag-handle ng ganung klaseng challenges," he added.  Now a father himself, Lizardo wants nothing more than to see his two-year old son Jace follow in his and his wife's footsteps. Japoy's wife Janice Lagman is also a decorated Taekwondo practitioner.  Should little Jace decide to be an athlete in other sports however, daddy Japoy knows exaclty who he wants to help mold and develop his son's talents.  "Yung MILO Sports Clinic, isa yan sa known sa Philippines na nagpo-produce ng mga world class athletes, and ako naman, si Jace, siyempre gusto ko rin na yung mag-hahandle sa kanya, hindi man taekwondo, ibang sports man, MILO Summer Sports Clinic parin kasi alam ko na ma-hahandle siya mabuti, ma-gguide siya ng mabuti." Japoy Lizardo and his son Jace on the stage now. Lizardo says he also wants his son to experience what he did in the Milo Summer Sports Clinics as well. | @abscbnsports pic.twitter.com/S3XuAx6co7 — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) February 7, 2019 From being a once participant, Lizardo is now one of the program's hand-picked instructors, and has been for the last three years.  With his journey coming full circle, Lizardo shares that he's nothing but happy to be able to share his experiences and his learnings with the stars of tomorrow.  "Ako naman very blessed din ako, and very happy na right now, I’m coaching yung mga bata. Yung mga natutunan ko before pwede ko ngayon i-apply sa mga students ko ngayon."  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2019

Her knees broken beyond repair, Vonn retiring after worlds

By Pat Graham and Andrew Dampf, Associated Press Lindsey Vonn transcended her sport in a way only a handful of Olympic athletes could even imagine. She was about more than skiing. She was about more than medals. She was about more than winning. She was often in the spotlight, appearing in the pages of mainstream and sports magazines, walking the red carpets, mingling with A-list celebrities and dating high-profile sports figures. The record-setting racer who grew up in Minnesota, then relocated to Colorado, became a household name in mountain towns and big cities — to people who knew a lot about racing and those who only tuned in every four years. But now, conceding her body is "broken beyond repair," Vonn is nearing the finish line for the final time. The woman who won more World Cup races than any other female is calling it quits at 34. On Friday, she said she'll retire after the world championships this month. "She's accomplished so many things and has overcome so much adversity in her life, with her injuries, and comebacks, and setbacks and comebacks," U.S. Ski and Snowboard CEO Tiger Shaw said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press. "Very few people can focus and train as hard as she does. We're all in awe of what she's accomplished in her career." Vonn's original plan was to step away in December, after one final charge down the course in Lake Louise, Alberta — a course she won on so often it's now named in her honor. She was forced to move up her retirement due to persistent pain in both knees, which she fully realized after failing to finish a race in Cortina d'Ampezzo , Italy, last month. Now, she's down to two races: The women's super-G on Tuesday in the Swedish resort of Are, and the downhill scheduled for Feb. 10. That's it. That's all her knees have left. "My body is broken beyond repair and it isn't letting me have the final season I dreamed of," Vonn wrote on Instagram . "My body is screaming at me to STOP and it's time for me to listen. "It's been an emotional 2 weeks making the hardest decision of my life," she wrote, "but I have accepted that I cannot continue ski racing." Vonn's impressive resume: three Olympic medals, including downhill gold at the 2010 Vancouver Games. Four overall World Cup titles. And 82 World Cup wins, leaving her four behind the all-time mark held by Ingemar Stenmark of Sweden. Her off-the-slopes portfolio includes: Appearing in the pages of everything from Vogue to the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, earning sponsorship deals with companies such as Red Bull, meeting actors like Dwayne Johnson and even being an extra on one of her favorite shows, "Law & Order." The spotlight only increased when she dated golfer Tiger Woods. She's now seeing Nashville Predators defenseman P.K. Subban . She's big on social media, with 1.6 million Instagram followers. A recent post from Vonn was cryptic in nature and yet all-too-insightful as she quoted the French philosopher Voltaire: "Each player must accept the cards life deals him or her: but once they are in hand, he or she alone must decide how to play the cards in order to win the game." Translation: She simply had no more cards to play. Her aching knees and beat-up body finally applied the brakes to her hard-charging ways. Vonn's right knee is permanently damaged from previous crashes. She has torn ACLs, suffered fractures near her left knee, broke her ankle, sliced her right thumb and had several concussions — to name a few. She's limited to about three runs per day, and her body just can't handle the workload of other skiers. "Honestly, retiring isn't what upsets me. Retiring without reaching my goal is what will stay with me forever," Vonn said. "However, I can look back at 82 World Cup wins, 20 World Cup titles, 3 Olympic medals, 7 World Championship medals and say that I have accomplished something that no other woman in HISTORY has ever done, and that is something that I will be proud of FOREVER!" Her first World Cup start was Nov. 18, 2000, in a slalom race in Park City, Utah, and she didn't qualify for the second run. She was Lindsey Kildow then, before changing her name to Vonn after marrying her now ex-husband and ex-coach, Thomas. Her first World Cup win came four years later, in a downhill event at Lake Louise. Retiring in Sweden brings Vonn full circle. She won her first two major championship medals — two silvers — at the 2007 worlds in Are. As for how she will be remembered, that's simple for U.S. coach Paul Kristofic: Her comebacks. "That never-give-up attitude is something that everyone can take away from," Kristofic said. "She has created that character and lived it. Those are life lessons that everybody can take. Give it your all and never give up. That's a very strong legacy." ___ Associated Press writer Eric Willemsen in Maribor, Slovenia, contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 2nd, 2019

PH skater Julian Macaraeg qualifies for 2020 Winter Youth Olympics

MANILA, Philippines – Julian Macaraeg broke barriers as he became the first Filipino to qualify for the Winter Youth Olympics following an impressive showing in the 2019 ISU Junior World Short Track Championships in Montreal, Canada.  The 14-year-old short track speed skater met the qualifying standard of the 2020 Winter Youth ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 31st, 2019