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PBA: Standhardinger calls trade rumors 'scams'

Calm down with all those trade talks. No. 1 pick Christian Standhardinger has missed a significant amount of time for defending champion San Miguel Beer in the 2018 PBA Commissioner's Cup, his very first conference in the league following a stint with Hong Kong Eastern in the ABL. And while Standhardinger has had respectable numbers, averaging 12.2 points and 7.2 rebounds, we're hardly seeing him on court due to lingering knee issues. Standhardinger missed two games for the Beermen before he suited up for Gilas Pilipinas in the 2018 FIBA 3x3 World Cup earlier this month. After the World Cup, he went scoreless for the Beermen in their loss to Globalport. He hasn't played since, missing San Miguel's twin victories over NLEX and TNT. Trade rumors have since floated around for whatever reason. But in a report by Waylon Galvez of Manila Bulletin on Wednesday, Standhardinger quickly shot the rumors down. "I'm not worried about those scams," Standhardinger said per Galvez. "I didn't even hear about me getting traded anywhere," he added. Standhardinger has been at the center of trade talks early in his PBA career. Before he was even drafted in the PBA, the Beermen engaged the then Kia Picanto in a controversial swap for the 2017 no. 1 pick. Many saw the move as San Miguel trying to get in position to take the Fil-German forward. The deal went through, leading an intense PBA Board stalemate and an eventual change of PBA Commissioners. San Miguel did end up taking Standhardinger first in the 2017 Draft. However, Standhardinger will not waste time with rumors as he deals with his recovery from knee injury. If he's indeed on the trading block though, he's confident he's the first to know. Otherwise, rumors are just rumors. "I think that San Miguel Beer organization is professional so far, and they are all professional. So I’m pretty sure that I am the first one to know that I’ll get traded or not,” Standhardinger said. San Miguel currently has no games on deck as the Commissioner's Cup is in a mini break to give way to Gilas Pilipinas. The next time the Beermen will be on court will be on July 4 against Blackwater.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnJun 27th, 2018

PRRD calls on BIMP-EAGA to band vs. drug trade, security threats

PRESIDENT RODRIGO R. Duterte has called on the Philippines’ partners in the East ASEAN Growth Area (EAGA) to band together […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 20th, 2019

LeBron calls out Mavs for trading Barnes mid-game

The three-time NBA champion took to Instagram and expressed his distaste for how the trade went down. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2019

Kevin Durant lashes at media amid Knicks rumors

Golden State Warriors star Kevin Durant lashed out at the media on Wednesday following reports linking him to a move to the New York Knicks. Speculation over Durant's future has intensified during the free agency window after the Knicks traded Kristaps Porzingis and other players to the Dallas Mavericks on February 1. Durant, who has not spoken to the media since the Porzingis trade, broke his silence on Wednesday following Golden State's rout of San Antonio. The two-time NBA champion and Finals MVP has been repeatedly linked to a move to the Knicks when he becomes a free agent at the end of the season. However, the 30-year-old insisted on Wednesday he was not thinking ab...Keep on reading: Kevin Durant lashes at media amid Knicks rumors.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2019

Lowry has big half amid trade rumors, Raptors hold off 76ers

By Dave Zeitlin, Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Kyle Lowry had a big first half amid reports that Toronto has offered him in a trade, Kawhi Leonard finished with 24 points, and the Raptors held off the Philadelphia 76ers 119-107 on Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time) in a matchup between two of the Eastern Conference's top teams. Lowry and Serge Ibaka each had 20 points to overcome the Joel Embiid-led Sixers. Embiid had 37 points and 13 rebounds for his league-leading 44th double-double, Ben Simmons scored 20 points and Jimmy Butler had 18. With the Sixers trailing by 18 early in the fourth quarter, Embiid ripped off 12 points in a three-minute stretch to slice Toronto's lead to 108-101 with 6:59 left and get the home crowd on its feet for the first time all night. But the Raptors (39-16) never let the Sixers (34-20) get closer than seven. After erupting for 40 points in the first quarter behind 11-for-11 shooting from the free-throw line, the Raptors built a 21-point advantage midway through the second quarter. Lowry, who missed Toronto's last game due to back soreness, fueled the run with three three-pointers in a two-minute stretch. Lowry seemed unfazed by a report from Sports Illustrated that Toronto had offered him to Memphis as part of a trade package for Mike Conley and Marc Gasol. He added another triple, which bounced all around the rim before dropping in, four minutes before halftime to help Toronto take a 72-55 lead into the break — the Raptors' best offensive first half of the season. The Philadelphia native and Villanova alum had 17 first-half points. The Sixers were without two starters as Wilson Chandler (quad) missed his second straight game while JJ Redick was a late scratch due to nausea. TIP-INS Raptors: Toronto is now 17-11 on the road this season, the third best mark in the league. The Raptors' next two games will also be away from home. ... Toronto won the season series with Philadelphia, 3-1, with the Sixers' only win coming on Dec. 22 (Dec. 23, PHL time) when the Raptors were missing Leonard and Ibaka, their top two scorers. 76ers: Tuesday's (Wednesday, PHL time) game marked the start of a four-game homestand after a 2-2 road swing out West. ... Some of the biggest cheers of the night came in the pregame when Sixers great Allen Iverson rang the team's ceremonial bell at midcourt. UP NEXT Raptors: At the Atlanta Hawks on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time). 76ers: Host the Denver Nuggets on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2019

With trade talks heating up, young Lakers want answers

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com If it was LeBron James’ intention to change the mood in the Lakers’ locker room here in his first season in L.A., consider it a resounding success. The morale for a team that went 35-47 last season and missed the playoffs is indeed different. It’s more somber. After speaking with a number of players, their agents and other sources, the general consensus paint a picture of little joy, plenty of confusion and uncertainty, along with some anger and sense of betrayal. It’s all caused by the Lakers’ obvious and public pursuit of Anthony Davis and the players who unquestionably will be shipped out to New Orleans in exchange for the All-NBA forward if a trade happens before Thursday’s (early Friday, PHL time) deadline. None will speak on the record but it’s obvious the Davis issue is sensitive and weighing on most of the roster, especially the young core of Brandon Ingram, Josh Hart, Kyle Kuzma and Lonzo Ball. They wonder if their days in L.A. are numbered and also wonder what, if any, role LeBron has in determining who goes and who stays. Various reports have the Lakers offering up virtually everyone on the roster for Davis, along with multiple No. 1 picks. Clearly, the pace has changed for the Lakers. After saying last summer the Lakers are intent on building a team that will be a contender for years and not just in the short term, team president Magic Johnson’s timeline has accelerated if the proposed packages for Davis are true. And how can they not be? New Orleans wants a combination of young players and picks for a game-changing player such as Davis. The Lakers own no other assets. In the meantime, the Lakers, currently on a road trip, are dealing with turbulence and not necessarily while thousands of feet in the air. Michael Beasley and JaVale McGee had a verbal post-game exchange with coach Luke Walton two nights ago in Oakland after a loss to the Warriors, and although it wasn’t sparked by the Davis issue directly, the trade rumors are causing stress and perhaps pushing tempers as well. In the center of it all is LeBron. Davis has been represented since last fall by Klutch Sports, the agency created by LeBron and run by his business partner and close friend, Rich Paul. The LeBron link to a player agency has caused a degree of concern among other NBA general managers, who wonder if there’s a conflict of interest and if it’s a good look for the league. It also has rival agents suspecting that LeBron is involved in talks for Davis and at the very least serving as a sounding board for Magic and Laker executive Rob Pelinka. It wouldn’t be unreasonable for the Lakers to get LeBron’s hot take on this or any major decision involving personnel; that’s a perk enjoyed by a number of star players throughout the NBA, and has been for years. But: Following the Lakers’ victory over the Clippers last week when LeBron made his return after missing 17 games with a groin injury, he repeatedly expressed how thrilled he was to be back on the floor with "my guys” and that didn’t sit well with some of his teammates, according to their agents. Essentially, they’re not sure where they stand with LeBron in the Davis situation. And the young players appear too intimidated to confront LeBron and get clarity. There’s another issue at play here: Are the Lakers planning to surrender too much for Davis by gutting the team? If the Lakers are willing to part with their young core and at least two veterans to make the salaries match, who’s left to make them competitive with Davis and LeBron? The Pelicans, according to league sources, are insisting that any team wanting Davis must also take guard E’Twaun Moore and his contract in return. This will allow the Pelicans to get young players, multiple picks and salary cap flexibility in a single transaction. In a sense, Davis is indeed a franchise player — trading him might allow the Pelicans to remake their entire franchise. Davis reportedly gave the Pelicans other teams on a wish-list, yet those teams’ options appear limited. One is the Bucks, who lack promising young players, and given that Milwaukee is leading the East, their first-round pick won’t be attractive. Another is the Knicks, who won’t have defined assets until after the draft lottery in May when their place in the June draft will be revealed. If the Pelicans decide to wait until summer, that means they believe there’s a better deal waiting after the draft and free agency. That places urgency on the Lakers to get something done before Thursday. One way or another, whether he comes to the Lakers or stays in New Orleans at least for the next five months, Davis will bring some relief and help clear the air to a Lakers team that desperately needs it. Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2019

WATCH: Top 3 NBA plays

      MANILA, Philippines – Brandon Ingram had quite a night. Amid trade rumors, the young Lakers hotshot unleashed a career-high 36 points and added a new entry to his highlight reel by throwing down a vicious slam over the Sixers’ Corey Brewer.  Ingram’s teammates also had their own slam show ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 31st, 2019

Group backs call vs overimportation

The party-list group Abono and other stakeholders in the agriculture industry yesterday welcomed calls to stop the importation of pork, chicken and vegetables beyond the country’s commitment with the World Trade Organization (WTO)......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 28th, 2019

PBA: Uytengsu slams point that Aces will be “winning with integrity”

Alaska remains as one the strongest “indie” teams in the PBA and Wilfred Uytengsu remains as the single strongest, most defiant “indie” team owner in the league. Monday during the 25th PBA Press Corps awards night, Uytengsu delivered a strong message on the supposed problems that PBA has dealt with over the past couple of seasons. In particular, the Alaska team owner has singled out the PBA’s parity, or supreme lack thereof. “Over the years, we and the PBA have been challenged with circumstances and controversies and that could and should have been mitigated. Circumstances that led to an unleveled playing field. This started with the Fil-sham debacle, where players with Filipino-like surnames were playing in the PBA with fake birth certificates and passports. Unfortunately, the league was slow to respond to this,” Uytengsu said in his speech right after he received the first-ever Lifetime Achievement award from the Press Corps. “In more recent years, we've seen dubious trades that created an even more unleveled playing field, creating further disparity in the league,” he added. While he never went into specifics, it doesn’t take a genius to figure out that one of the “dubious trades” referred to by Uytengsu was the San Miguel-Columbian swap for the no. 1 pick of the 2017 PBA Draft. That no. 1 pick turned out to be Christian Standhardinger and the Beermen added another star to an already loaded lineup for pretty much nothing. The trade led to the PBA changing Commissioners and it caused a clear divide among the PBA Board. Fortunately, the Board has since reunited and the PBA is now under the management of one of the more likeable Commissioner’s in recent years in Willie Marcial. Still, that doesn’t stop Uytengsu on hitting out on supposedly unfair tactics and he insists that the Aces have always done it the right way and are very much proud of winning numerous titles with honor and integrity. “I can tell you that we always respected the league and honored the game by not participating in these tactics. I believe we have a greater responsibility than just winning games, and that is to set an example and show the next generation how to do things the right way,” he said. “As I look back now of more than 3 decades in the league, of course I'm proud of our 14 titles and more than 30 finals appearances, but I'm more proud of how we honored the game,” Uytengsu added. The Alaska owner maitains his stance that his Aces will continue to chase more championships with the two things his team holds dear: honor and integrity.   “Don't get me wrong, I'm still looking for that 15th championship, and the 16th and the 17th and so on. But it will always be about winning with integrity,” Uytengsu said.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 22nd, 2019

San Miguel calls out Alaska’s Alex Compton for ‘kawawa ang liga’ remark

MANILA, Philippines---San Miguel cried foul over what it called "unnecessary remarks" by Alaska Aces head coach Alex Compton regarding the Beermen's recruits over the past years. Compton, whose Aces lost three championship series to the Beermen since 2014, said San Miguel's acquisition of three-time scoring champion Terrence Romeo put all the other teams at a disadvantage. "There was San Miguel for three finals, and June Mar Fajardo was always an issue," said Compton in a previous Inquirer report. "Then they added Christian [Standhardinger] and now they added Terrence [Romeo]. Kawawa ang liga." San Miguel rebutted Compton saying that the Aces also traded away "competent play...Keep on reading: San Miguel calls out Alaska’s Alex Compton for ‘kawawa ang liga’ remark.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 18th, 2019

San Miguel slams Compton s kawawa ang liga comment on Romeo s trade

MANILA, Philippines – San Miguel called out Alex Compton for making "unnecessary remarks" he made regarding the team's latest acquisition of PBA star Terrence Romeo. In a story by Inquirer's Denison Dalupang , the Alaska head coach was quoted saying "kawawa ang liga" when he talked about Christian Standhardinger and Romeo joining ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 18th, 2019

Spurs rally from 19 down, beat Mavs 105-101

By Dave Jackson, Associated Press DALLAS (AP) — Davis Bertans hit a go-ahead three-pointer with 1:41 left, and the San Antonio Spurs rallied from a 19-point first-half deficit to beat the Dallas Mavericks 105-101 on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time). The Spurs blew a six-point lead in the final period, but Bertans made his third three-pointer of the quarter for a 99-96 lead and San Antonio led the rest of the way. Bertans finished with 12 points. Six Spurs scored at least 12 points, led by Marco Belinelli's 17. After Bertans' triple, LaMarcus Aldridge scored on a tip shot with 1:07 left to extend the lead to five. Wesley Matthews' three brought Dallas within two, but DeMar DeRozan hit a 20-footer at the other end and Belinelli sealed it with free throws. Luka Doncic led Dallas with 25 points, adding eight rebounds and eight assists. He became the first rookie since Stephen Curry in 2010 to score 25 or more points in five straight games. After trailing by 19 during the first half, San Antonio tied it at 80 on Belinelli's driving layup with 11:06 to play. DeRozan gave the Spurs their first lead 27 seconds later, setting up a three-minute stretch in which the lead changed hands seven times. DeRozan hit back-to-back mid-range jumpers for a 94-90 lead, and he fed Aldridge for a dunk that extended the Spurs' advantage to six. Doncic answered with two baskets and an alley-oop pass to DeAndre Jordan that tied it. Doncic's most impressive stretch came in the middle of the third quarter. Trailing by double digits from the opening minutes of the game, the Spurs opened the second half on a 12-6 run to get within 62-57. Doncic then almost single-handedly kept Dallas in the lead for the rest of the quarter, scoring or assisting on the Mavs' next 12 points to help Dallas maintain a five-point lead going into the fourth. Dallas has lost five of seven, and three of its last four at home after losing only three of its first 18 at American Airlines Center. The Mavericks are also 0-6 in games without J.J. Barea, who is out for the season after Achilles tendon surgery. The Mavericks led 23-4 early and made seven three-pointers in the first quarter. San Antonio closed within 56-45 at halftime by ending the half on a 17-9 run. SMITH OUT AGAIN Mavericks guard Dennis Smith Jr. missed his fourth consecutive game amid trade rumors, this time with coach Rick Carlisle saying Smith was sick and away from the arena. Smith missed the previous three games with what was listed as back tightness. Told of a Twitter exchange between Smith and a couple in a restaurant at lunch earlier in the day, Carlisle said, "I don't have any knowledge of that. My trainer told me he was sick and he's going to be out tonight. I've told you what I'm going to tell you about it." TIP-INS Spurs: Rudy Gay returned to the starting lineup after missing the last five games with a sprained left wrist, scoring 14 points. Belinelli came back after missing one game with a left knee contusion. Mavericks: The team sold out its 700th consecutive regular-season game, dating to Dec. 15, 2001. ... Matthews became the sixth player in Mavericks history to make 600 three-pointers when he drained one at 9:06 of the first quarter. UP NEXT Spurs: At Minnesota on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). Mavericks: At Indiana on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2019

Patrick Beverley s trademark defense getting new test

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com There was a foul, followed by a stoppage in play, a scene replayed dozens of times in NBA arenas. Except in this case, the victim was former two-time Kia MVP Stephen Curry and the punisher was the notorious Patrick Beverley. And so the situation (of course) turned snippy. Beverley has fought against better players his entire basketball life and carries an underdog gene that tends to flare in these situations. That explains why he tried to slap the ball from the Warriors guard after the whistle. Curry wasn’t having it, and so there was a gentle shove. And then a shove was returned. Then a staredown with noses just inches from each other. Then a separation of bodies. This was Beverley doing what he does by reputation: namely, irritate and push his defensive aggression and agenda to the very limit … and then some. His “crime” was restricting Curry’s movement with a forearm. Sometimes Beverley gets away with it, but in today’s NBA, no longer with any regularity. Such is the new normal. He’s a defensive-minded player with the LA Clippers and works in a league that suddenly favors scoring and shooters. He’s quite possibly, in his estimation and that of others, someone who’s forced to evolve or perish. For him, there’s no other option. “It would be very hard,” Beverley said, “to come into the league today and try to play defense like we did years ago.” Before this season, the NBA's Points of Emphasis centered in part on freedom of movement. The goal is to help players move without barriers, which creates high-scoring games, which makes games more entertaining for fans. Halfway through the season, the evidence is convincing: Scores are up, stops are down. To date, 11 teams have an offensive rating greater than 110 and 18 teams are scoring more than 110 points per game. Last season, those numbers were six and six, respectively. For players born with height, wingspan and leaping ability, these defensive rules don’t handcuff them much. But Beverley buys his clothes off the rack, so to speak. He’s a shade over six feet and is therefore a normal man trying to make a living in a big man’s world. At 30, Beverley deals with players who are often taller and even quicker. It’s his job to make their life tougher -- but here in the new age of barely-contested shots and 120-point games, the opposite is ringing true. He’s averaging a career-high 3.6 fouls per game and can’t get away with much. As Draymond Green, a defensive demon himself and teammate of Curry’s said recently: “Defense is not allowed. You can’t really play defense in this league. I guess that’s not what they want.” ‘We’re forced to adjust’ Green's words are perhaps an extreme assessment and a touch of exaggeration. Fifteen teams averaged at least 106 ppg last season; now it’s 26. Calls are less forgiving, as only 13 teams are averaging 24 free throw attempts per game (it was five last season). The ball moves and there’s less restriction, which was the intention. And there appears to be little blowback in the basketball universe from those who observe and play. It’s just … accepted. For the most part. Even Beverley offers a shoulder shrug. “Guys who make a living off defense, we’re forced to adjust,” he said. This evolution of shifting away from certain defensive tactics is decades in the making. The NBA once allowed defenders to shove a forearm into the back of a post-up player, and subtle jersey grabs were often excused. And there was the hand-check, too. All have been outlawed. The game is far less physical, which means the “Bad Boys”-era Detroit Pistons would have little chance of winning one championship today (let alone two). The NBA has sought to distance itself from that brand of ball, from Pat Riley’s New York Knicks (and their “no free layups” mentality) and from the 85-80 scores that often stifled the creativity of the game. The result is a game that sees open lanes and quicker whistles, and less of what helped players like Beverley overcome tremendous odds to reach the NBA. “There is where we’re at,” he said. “They want to see more scoring, more up-and-down, more points and all that, which is understandable. Of course, it makes it hard for me.” Relishing his ‘instigator’ role This is Beverley’s sixth year in the NBA, but his 10th in professional basketball. His journey curved through various stops overseas before he became rooted with the Houston Rockets, his first true NBA home. It speaks to Beverley’s doggedness and his value, at least initially, as a defensive specialist assigned to the grunt work. With the rise in scoring point guards across the NBA landscape, Beverley’s role became more important, and difficult as well. In a typical week, Beverley could guard Curry, Russell Westbrook, Damian Lillard and opposing shooting guards, too. He brings an edge to the job that he learned from growing up on the West Side of Chicago to a single mother as well as a grandmother who adopted a dozen kids. Daily life was a chore. He was one of the main characters in the documentary “Hoop Reality,” the sequel to the acclaimed “Hoop Dreams.” Beverley was friendly rivals with former Kia MVP winner Derrick Rose since grade school and was actually a scorer in high school, averaging a state-best 37 points as a senior. After getting kicked out of Arkansas in 2008 after two years for academic issues -- a tutor wrote a paper for him -- he played three years in Russia and Greece before filling the point guard void on the 2012-13 Rockets caused by Kyle Lowry’s trade to Toronto the summer before. “I wouldn’t change one thing about how I got here,” he said. “Sometimes you don’t get in through the front door. Sometimes you don’t get in through the back. Sometimes you got to climb through the window. That doesn’t mean the opportunity wasn’t there. There’s a way; you’ve just got to find it.” He immediately became singled out for eyeball-to-eyeball defense that teetered on the edge. The moment that earned him a name was in the first round of the 2013 playoffs against Oklahoma City. He went for a steal on Westbrook in Game 2 while Westbrook signaled for a timeout, causing his knee injury five years ago. He still answers for that, even to this day; not that the play on the ball was reckless, but was it necessary? “I don’t go out there to hurt people, I don’t even know how to attempt to hurt somebody,” Beverley said. “I play hard, bring the edge. I’m an instigator. That gets me going. I like to bump people, to feel me getting into somebody’s jersey. I’m just different. I like contact, like physical play, like pushing and holding. But I’m not dirty.” Beverley hasn’t spoken with Westbrook -- their on-court relationship is clearly frosty -- and with the exception of Rose, he doesn’t encourage any friendships beyond his teammates. “I don’t talk to anybody,” he said. “I don’t want personal battles that take away from the team. I’m trying to win games. When I come to San Francisco or Oklahoma City or Portland, I know I’m going straight to my room because there’s people I got to be ready to play the next day. And I know they do the same. There’s respect that’s not being said. When it comes to Steph, Dame, Westbrook, I make sure I get my rest. But they get their rest, too. They know what I bring to the table.” A game that won’t change Beverley was an All-Defensive first teamer two seasons ago, both a career highlight and confirmation of his devotion to studying film and learning opponents’ tendencies. He has also overcome microfracture knee injury in 2017-18 that limited him to 11 games in his debut season with the Clippers. “I worked my ass off and I’m still working,” he said. “If it’s not one thing it’s another. Me getting hurt, coming back faster and stronger. Got kicked out of school, had to go overseas, knew I was going to the NBA anyway. I didn’t know how. But I knew. “This is bigger than me. It’s for my mom, grandmom, seeing how hard the women in my life worked to raise me. It’s not easy being a single mother raising a kid in the inner city but she made it happen. She taught me to stand on my own two feet and get the best out of hard work, which becomes part of your mindset, especially when you see two women doing it every day.” And now comes another challenge for Beverley and those like him. How do you thrive in a league that’s suddenly married to offense? “Maybe after the All-Star break they’ll stop calling ticky-tack fouls,” he said. “The better defender you are, the more you’re singled out. But I’m going to go out there and be Pat. Don’t care. Won’t change.” Beverley estimates that “70 percent” of the players he guards are rattled by him, to different degrees. He said “only a few don’t,” which he refused to name (for strategic reasons). The game may not be designed to help the underdog, average-sized player who brings intensity and defense. But there’s no sense waiting for Beverley to make excuses. He’s come too far for that. “When you’re done with this game, you don’t want to go around saying, ‘Man I wish I could’ve done this, put more time into that.’” Beverley said. “Every year I go out like a person fighting for my spot, fighting for my contract. That’s the way I train. That’s how I prepare. That’s why I’m still in the league.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 10th, 2019

U.S. fashion group calls for more diversity in model size

NEW YORK, USA – A trade group representing hundreds of America's designers has called on the fashion industry to showcase women of greater size diversity, such as plus-size models Ashley Graham and Candice Huffine. Graham, of Nebraska, in 2016 became the first plus-size model to make ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 5th, 2019

PBA 43 Revew: Columbian should let go of uncoventional ball

The PBA's 43rd season was a loooooong one. Seriously, it started December of 2017 and ended December of 2018. That's 12 months of almost non-stop basketball. But with the current PBA season finally drawing to a close, it's time we look back at how each team fared in 2018. Today, we start with the Columbian Dyip.   UNCONVENTIONAL Columbian's season was doomed before it even started pretty much. In trading away its no. 1 pick in the 2017 Draft, which to no one's suprise turned out to be a stud in Christian Standhardinger, the Dyip sent a signal to the whole country that they're not exactly going after championships. The team passed it off as "unconventional" but as we all know, unconventional simply does not work in the PBA. Sure, the Dyip ended up with a handful of players from the Standhardinger trade but it appears that only Rashawn McCarthy will be serviceable now and moving forward. To be fair, Columbian has some talent in its roster and McCarthy paired with surprise pickup Jerramy King should have the potential to be a solid backcourt rotation in the PBA. Looking at the Dyip, that explosive guard pairing is their foundation for the future. Still, their foundation for the future could have been Christian Standhardinger but that's either here nor there now. Anyway, Columbian's unconventional ways had them go through three head coaches this season, not exactly the most ideal situation for a team that's already lagging in overall talent compared to their competitors. Chris Gavina started the season for the Dyip but he quit after two games. Ricky Dandan took over from him but he quit after the Commissioner's Cup. Johnedel Cardel followed but who can tell if he's going to continue coaching next season as well. To be fair again, Columbian had a nice run in the Commissioner's Cup and they were in the playoff race until the bitter end. Coach Ricky Dandan wanted his boys to be scrappy and defensive minded and it worked for that particular tournament. Still, there's no denying that the Dyip desperately need some talent and they need continuity from their coaching staff. Then again, the franchise seem like they're not the type to display incredible amount of patience, just look at their insane number of name changes in just a couple of seasons and constant shuffling of role players and top picks. Anyway, Columbian picked first once again in the PBA Draft. Maybe this year, try and keep the pick? That's always a nice start to a proper rebuild. In all seriousness, if Columbian wants to truly compete in the PBA, they might want to start with proper team building because their past season was doomed right from the start. It's time for the Dyip to abandon their unconventional ways, it simply does not work... except against Rain or Shine.   Columbian DYIP in the 2017-2018 PBA Season Philippine Cup: 1-10 (12th place) Commissioner's Cup: 4-7 (9th place) Governors' Cup: 1-10 (12th place) Overall: 6 wins and 27 losses. Zero playoff appearances.   POST DRAFT NOTE: Columbian picked CJ Perez first and immediately locked him up with a maximum rookie deal for three years. That's a nice start for the Dyip Is Perez good for additional wins enough to take a significant jump? We'll see but at the very least, Columbian will not be an easy out this season. And that's good.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 26th, 2018

Blackwater ready to give Parks max rookie contract amid trade rumors

MANILA, Philippines – Blackwater governor Silliman Sy said the team is ready to award 2018 No. 2 overall pick Ray Parks a max rookie contract if things work out between the two sides. "We offer the max," Sy told Rappler through a phone call. "If you offer the max cap, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 18th, 2018

THROWBACK: Top PBA rookie draft picks through the years

After 33 years, the tradition of PBA teams selecting promising players from the amateur ranks, patterned after the NBA draft process, heralded a balanced influx of talent to even out the league’s competitiveness. But what makes the draft process interesting is the choice of the number 1 pick, who is considered the most in-demand player seen to bolster the chances of the worst performing or a newly established team in the PBA. With Columbian Dyip’s selection of Lyceum stalwart CJ Perez as the number one pick in the 2018 PBA Draft,  let’s look back at the top draft picks through the years, from its beginnings in 1985 to the controversial selection last year, and how they made their mark in the league. 1985 – Sonny Cabatu Sonny Cabatu was the PBA’s first-ever number one draft pick, selected by the expansion club Shell Azodrin Bugbusters, which took over the Crispa Redmanizers franchise. An intense bruiser inside the paint, Cabatu was Shell’s starting center known as “Mr. Quality Minutes.” He would then play for Great Taste, Purefoods, Sarsi, and Ginebra in a respectable career. 1986 – Rey Cuenco A member of the guest Northern Cement Corp. (NCC) team coached by Ron Jacobs that played in the pro league’s 1984 season, Rey Cuenco was picked in the 1986 draft by another new, expansion ballclub Alaska Milkmen to lead their charge.  His pro playing career blossomed from 1989 to 1992 under the tutelage of Ginebra playing coach Robert Jaworski. In 1990, he was adjudged the Most Improved Player and part of the Mythical Second Team. He also became a member of the Big J-coached, first all-Filipino, all-professional “Dream Team” in the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing that won a silver medal for the country with Allan Caidic, Samboy Lim, Benjie Paras and Ramon Fernandez among others. 1987 – Allan Caidic Considered the greatest Filipino basketball marksman ever, Allan Caidic was already a big name before he strutted into the PBA. Having won titles for the UE Red Warriors and among the top players of the Ron Jacobs-mentored national team, the Triggerman was definitely one big prized addition for any team. And Great Taste, having the privilege of selecting first in 1987, made Caidic a hands-down choice. He would later suit up for San Miguel Beer and Ginebra San Miguel in a storied career. He had since become a PBA Hall of Famer and among the Top 25 Greatest Players of All Time. 1988 – Jack Tanuan A vital cog of the FEU Tamaraws and a member of the 1986 Seoul Asian Games squad that took home the bronze, Jack Tanuan was a feared scorer who made a living with his inside game. It was no surprise that new franchise Purefoods selected him as their top pick in 1988, in addition to other direct hires from the amateur ranks that formed their strong core—Alvin Patrimonio, Jerry Codinera, Jojo Lastimosa and Glenn Capacio—on top of having the Franchise, Mon Fernandez, as playing coach. He would later play for the Sarsi, Swift and Pop Cola teams under the RFM franchise, and later on for Sta. Lucia, Mobiline, and Alaska. 1989 – Benjie Paras It was the year of Benjie Paras, a valiant, hardworking center called “The Tower of Power,” who led the UP Maroons to its historic 1986 UAAP title. After being selected by Shell as the number one pick in the 1989 draft, Paras would achieve the impossible of being both the league MVP and Rookie of the Year, while being named to the Mythical Five. Paras along with fellow Hall of Famers Ronnie Magsanoc and long-time import Bobby Ray Parks Sr. became the triumvirate that led Shell to the First Conference championships in 1990 and 1992. And, even with the onset of Fil-foreign players in the PBA, Paras remained dominant and won his second MVP plum in 1999. 1990 – Peter Jao Peter Jao was the first Cebuano player to be drafted as a rookie top pick in the league, selected by Presto Tivoli. He would then become a member of Presto’s champion team in the 1990 All-Filipino conference with Allan Caidic and Gerry Esplana. 1991 – Alex Araneta The former Ateneo Blue Eagle suited up for Alaska Air Force/Milkmen until 1995, after which he was hired in the company as a management trainee, eventually becoming one of Alaska Milk Corp.’s sales managers. Of Alaska’s 14 championships in the league, Araneta was a veteran of 2 of them (1991 Third Conference and 1994 Governors’ Cup). 1992 – Vergel Meneses An ex-seminarian who became among the PBA’s Top 40 Greatest Players, the “Aerial Voyager” was known for his show-stopping moves and is considered among the best one-on-one players. The former JRU Heavy Bomber and 1995 PBA MVP was also a member of the all-pro Centennial Team coached by Tim Cone that won the William Jones Cup in Taipei and placed 3rd in the 1998 Asian Games in Bangkok. 1993 – Zandro Limpot After his years as a King Archer for De La Salle, Zandro Limpot entered the 1993 draft and was chosen first overall by the expansion ballclub Sta. Lucia Realtors.  Limpot was named Rookie Of The Year that season as well as reaping All-Star, Mythical Second Team and All-Defensive Team honors. Limpot won his first and only PBA championship (2006 Philippine Cup) with the Purefoods Chunkee Giants. 1994 – Noli Locsin Another former Green Archer, Noli Locsin was picked by Tondeña 65 as the league’s top draft pick in 1994. He became a 4-time PBA All-Star (1994, 1995, 1996, 1999) in a high-flying career with Ginebra. Bacolod-born Locsin was famous for his barrelling game before the arrival of Filipino-Americans in the PBA. Spent 6 seasons with the Ginebra San Miguel franchise; won the 1997 Commissioner’s Cup with Jaworski as coach. He later suited up for Pop Cola, Tanduay, Red Bull, Talk ‘N Text and Sta. Lucia. 1995 – Dennis Espino After leading the UST Growling Tigers to their monumental four-peat, Dennis Espino would later bring his winning ways to the PBA. Sta. Lucia got the first crack at the 1995 draft and picked him first overall to form a menacing one-two punch with Zandro Limpot, and later with Marlou Aquino. He had a sterling career with Sta. Lucia for 15 years and yielded the following achievements:  4-time PBA All-Star, 2-time All-Defensive Team, 2-time Mythical First Team, 2004-05 Defensive Player of the Year and 2007-08 Philippine Cup Finals MVP. He won the 2001 Governors’ Cup and the 2007-08 Philippine Cup for Sta. Lucia. 1996 – Marlou Aquino Picked by Gordon’s Gin as first overall in the 1996 draft, Marlou Aquino had an exceptional maiden year gave him Rookie of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year, Best Player of the Conference (1996 Governors’ Cup), Mythical First Team, All-Star and All-Defensive Team honors. He also became the second Ginebra player (after Dondon Ampalayo in 1986) to win the Rookie of the Year award.  Aquino then was part of Gordon Gin’s 1997 Commissioner’s Cup and Sta. Lucia Realty’s 2001 Governors’ Cup championship teams.  1997 – Andy Seigle The first Fil-Am top pick, chosen by Mobiline in 1997, Andy Seigle won Rookie of the Year and was part of the 1999 All-Star Game. The Scranton, Pennsylvania native was twice a member of the National Team in the 1998 and 2002 Asian Games and was one of the most dominant and best defensive players in the 1990’s era. 1998 – Danny Ildefonso  Danny Ildefonso was picked by San Miguel Beer first overall in 1998, the year he also won Rookie of the Year. One of only four pro players to win back-to-back MVP awards (2000 and 2001), Ildefonso had a prolific 15-year career with the San Miguel ballclub with 8 championships (1999 and 2000 Commissioner’s Cups;  1999, 2000 and 2011 Governors’ Cups; 2001 All-Filipino; 2005 and 2009 Fiesta Cups). He is among the PBA’s Top 40 Greatest Players. 1999 – Sonny Alvarado Selected by Tanduay as its top pick in the 1999 Draft, Sonny Alvarado was poised to dominate the league as a gritty Fil-Am all-around player. He was however embroiled in the “Fil-Sham” controversy, that revealed that he had filed two alleged birth certificates of his mother when he applied for the draft. This prompted immigration officials to initiate deportation measures against Alvarado because of such failure to directly prove his Filipino parental links. 2000 – Paolo Mendoza Paolo Mendoza was a hot-shooting guard who led the UP Fighting Maroons to two Final Four appearances from 1996-1997. He then applied for the 2000 draft and was chosen the overall first pick by Sta. Lucia Realty. Together with Dennis Espino and Marlou Aquino, Mendoza was one of the main factors behind the 2001 Governor’s Cup title win of the Realtors. 2001 – Willie Miller The diminutive Willie Miller is considered the first player from the PBA’s rival league, Metropolitan Basketball Association, to become the top overall pick in a PBA Rookie Draft, in which he was selected by the Batang Red Bull Thunder. He was part of three teams that copped PBA titles—Red Bull (2001 and 2002 Commissioner’s Cup), Alaska (2007 Fiesta Cup), and Talk ‘N Text (2015 Commissioner’s Cup). His career highlights in his 15 years in the PBA were 2-time MVP (2002 and 2007), 2-time Finals MVP, 9-time All-Star,  3-time Mythical First Team member, and 2014 Sportsmanship Awardee. 2002 – Yancy de Ocampo The “Post-Man” as he is called, Yancy de Ocampo is a shifty, reliable center who delivers the goods at crunch time. He was the number one draft pick in 2002 by the FedEx Express. He was part of several champion teams, namely Talk ‘N Text, BMeg Llamados, San Mig Coffee and eventually San Miguel Beer. 2003 – Mike Cortez The “Cool Cat” Mike Cortez, a former La Salle standout, brought his court savviness to the PBA after Alaska picked him first overall in the 2003 draft by and immediately went to work. Cortez helped the Aces win the Reinforced Conference that year. He would then move on to San Miguel Beer, and was part of a hefty push to win the 2007 and 2009 Fiesta Conferences. A journeyman in his 15-year PNA career, Cortez currently plays for the Blackwater Elite. 2004 – Rich Alvarez The Japan-born and U.S.-raised Rich Alvarez had a blast on his maiden year with Shell, which selected him first overall in the 2004 draft, collecting Rookie of the Year, All-Star, All-Defensive Team and All-Rookie Team honors. Played for 13 seasons in 8 different teams, Rich was successful in winning 4 championships with the TNT Tropang Texters (2010-11, 2011-12, 2012-13 Philippine Cups and 2011 Commissioner’s Cup) 2005 – Anthony "Jay" Washington This Zambales-born journeyman was first chosen by Air21 in the 2005 draft then traded to Talk ‘N Text. But his stint with San Miguel Beer made him flourish with two titles in the 2009 Fiesta Conference and the 2011 Governors Cup. He would return to the TNT Tropang Texters and help the, win the 2015 Commissioner’s Cup. He currently plays for the Rain or Shine Elastopainters. 2006 – Kelly Williams Picked first overall by Sta. Lucia Realty in 2006, Kelly Williams immediately made his presence felt that year bagging Rookie of the Year and All-Rookie Team honors. He first won a championship with Sta. Lucia in the 2007-08 Philippine Cup and would then lead his present ballclub, the TNT Tropang Texters to five championships, notably the three-peat Philippine Cups from 2010 to 2012, and the 2011 and 2015 Commissioners’ Cups. 2007 – Joe Devance While it was Welcoat that originally drafted Joe Devance as the first pick overall in the 2007 draft, he would earn the distinction of being the league’s winningest coach Tim Cone’s most trusted trooper. Devance has won nine championships with Cone as his coach, starting with Alaska (2010 Fiesta Cup), B-Meg/San Mig Coffee (2012 and 2014 Commissioner’s Cup, 2013 and 2014 Governors’ Cup and Philippine Cup); and currently, Ginebra San Miguel (2016 and 2017 Governors’ Cup, and 2018 Commissioners’ Cup).  2008 – Gabe Norwood Chosen by the only team has played for up to now, the Rain or Shine Elastopainters, as its number one draft pick in 2008, Gabe Norwood would then etch a rich career with his ballclub, having won 2 championships (2012 Governors’ Cup, 2016 Commissioner’s Cup). He had also notched numerous awards, including Rookie of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year, and was part of the All Star Game nine times, and the All-Defensive Team six times.  2009 – Japeth Aguilar   “Jumpin’ Japeth” starred for the Ateneo Blue Eagles for two years then moved to the Western Kentucky University Hilltoppers during his university years.  In 2009, Aguilar was selected by Burger King and only played one game with the Whoppers, after which he was traded to Talk `N Text.  Japeth has become a Team Gilas mainstay since the beginning of his pro career, of which the Philippines’ participation in the 2014 FIBA World Cup in Spain became one of his national team career highlights. 2010 – Nonoy Baclao   “Mr. Swat” was among the vital cogs of the Ateneo Blue Eagles’ back-to-back UAAP men’s basketball championships in 2008 and 2009. After college, Baclao led the Philippine Patriots as the inaugural champion of the 2009-10 Asean Basketball League (ABL) season prior to entering the PBA rookie draft. In 2010, Nonoy was selected by Air21 then he was traded to Petron (San Miguel) where he had one championship in his sophomore year in the league.  2011 – JVee Casio  The former De La Salle Green Archer playmaker who was Rookie of the Year (2003), Finals Co-MVP (2007) and Mythical Five member (2007 & 2008) in the UAAP was a Gilas pioneer before deciding to turn pro in 2011. By far Casio “G-Shock” is the shortest among the active PBA players to have been picked first overall by the Powerade Tigers. JVee was traded to Alaska Aces in 2012 and has since then became a mainstay in the team which he helped win the Commissioner’s Cup title in 2013. 2012 – June Mar Fajardo  The burly Cebuano was star center at the University of Cebu of which he steered to back-to-back titles in 2010 and 2011 at the CESAFI league. “The Kraken” has played for only one team throughout his pro career in the Asean Basketball League (ABL) and the PBA – San Miguel. As one big reason to “Fear the Beer,” Fajardo gave San Miguel six championships to date and became the first and only PBA player to win the MVP award in four straight seasons (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017).  2013 – Greg Slaughter  “GregZilla” stomped rivals with his huge presence when he helped lead the Ateneo Blue Eagles to two consecutive UAAP championships in 2011 and 2012 -- completing a five-peat for the Loyola Heights squad. Picked by Barangay Ginebra in 2013, Slaughter got his pro career to a fast start with ROY and All-Rookie Team honors. He won 3 championships under coach Tim Cone (2016 and 2017 Governors’ Cups; 2018 Commissioner’s Cup). He also saw action for the first time with Gilas this year in the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers. 2014 – Stanley Pringle  Drafted by NorthPort Batang Pier, “The Beard” exploded into the local basketball scene with Rookie of the Year and All-Rookie team honors, after stints with Belgium, Poland, Ukraine and Indonesia ballclubs.  A 4-time All-Star (2015, 2016, 2017, 2018), Pringle is considered among the best guards and high scorers in the play-for-pay league, gaining raves from other coaches and close followers of the sport.   2015 – Moala Tautuaa  He applied and went undrafted in the 2012 NBA draft, then moved to Asia to resume his basketball career by playing as an import for the Westsports Malaysia Dragons in the ABL.  After which, the Fil-Tongan made the “Big Mo(ve)” to the Philippines and spent a fruitful season with the D-League, ending up as its 2015 Foundation Cup MVP.  Talk N` Text selected Tautuaa as overall pick of the first round but traded him later on to NorthPort Batang Pier in 2018. 2016 – Raphael Banal  Since the first round of the 2016 PBA draft was dedicated to PBA teams choosing Gilas Pilipinas players to join their ranks, the regular draft started in the second round. Here, the Blackwater Elite chose as its first pick Raphael Banal, a contemporary of Kiefer Ravena and Von Pessumal in the Ateneo Blue Eaglets juniors team who went to the Hope International University-California for college.  His surname rings a bell, being the youngest child of former PBA player and TNT coach (2003 All-Filipino Conference champion) Joel Banal.  Yet “Ael” held his own in the PBA D-League for two conferences with Racal Motors.  2017 – Christian Standhardinger  The American-schooled Fil-German played in the ProA and Basketball Bundesliga tournaments in Germany as well with Hong Kong Eastern in the ABL.  Although he was selected by San Miguel Beer in the overall draft of 2017 in a controversial trade with Kia Picanto, the rightful owner of the number one pick, Standhardinger joined the Beermen in the 2018 Commissioner’s Cup after completing his ABL tour of duty.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 18th, 2018

Desiderio raring to play amid trade rumors: Kahit saan mapunta

      MANILA, Philippines – The 2018 PBA Rookie Draft was going as expected for the first 3 picks. That is, until NLEX coach Yeng Guiao took to the mic and uttered some familiar words: "Amin na 'to." (This is ours.) With the 4th pick, the Road Warriors rode the hype train and snagged UP folk ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 16th, 2018

Mitchell, Jazz roll over short-handed Heat 111-84

By Matthew Coles, Associated Press SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Donovan Mitchell scored 21 points and Derrick Favors had 17 to help the Utah Jazz romp over the short-handed Miami Heat 111-84 on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time). "It started from the tip," Mitchell said after the Jazz led by as many as 42. "We came out strong and didn't let up." Playing against one of his basketball idols probably for the final time, Mitchell unleashed a variety of moves — the crossovers and misdirection dribbles that have prompted comparisons to a young Dwyane Wade. Mitchell has acknowledged he studies film of Wade to develop his own offensive repertoire. On Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time), Mitchell took Wade to dinner in downtown Salt Lake City and gifted him a rocking chair. Then, the second-year guard, who said he calls Wade on the phone often and picks his brain, matched up and scored on the 12-time All-Star at least a few times in the blowout. Rodney McGruder paced the Heat with 16 points and Kelly Olynyk had 14 as Miami played without Hassan Whiteside and Goran Dragic. Wade, set to retire after the season, scored six points. Less than two weeks ago, the Jazz also went up big in the first quarter against the Heat, leading by as many as 19 before allowing a 20-0 run and watching Wade sink two free throws to win it in Miami, 102-100. This time, there was no such drama. The Jazz sprinted out to a 34-10 lead on hot shooting and tenacious defense that denied the Heat any easy looks early. Favors went 7-of-8 and had eight boards in 19 minutes, while Rudy Gobert had 10 points and 11 rebounds. Kyle Korver, who has opened up the floor for the Jazz since arriving via trade from Cleveland, made four more three-pointers and scored 16 points. The Jazz have had an up-and-down year by any measure. This win marked Utah's second by 27 points or more in eight days, but the Jazz have also lost games by 33 and 50 points and have yet to reach the .500 mark at home (now 5-6). Even within the same game, the Jazz were nearly unstoppable in the first quarter — shooting 70 percent — but went through long stretches later in the game when they couldn't generate any offense and had a spate of turnovers. They ended up shooting 52.6 percent, including 16-of-32 from three-point range, with 17 turnovers. The Heat have been riding their own rollercoaster. They led by 31 in the second quarter of a win against New Orleans on Nov. 30 (Dec. 1, PHL time) and then trailed by 31 — and more — in the second quarter to the Jazz less than two weeks later. MISSING YOU Whiteside, who left the court for the locker room during the fourth quarter of a home loss to Orlando last week, is still not with the team for personal reasons. He later said he just needed to go to the bathroom, but Miami coach Erik Spoelstra was upset and said the Heat "handled it as a team." Whiteside is expected back with the club on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). Dragic, who has battled a sore right knee for the last six weeks and had it drained in mid-November, missed the game — his 12th scratch of the season. Fellow guard Dion Waiters hasn't played at all since having ankle surgery in January. TIP-INS Heat: Wade, making his last regular-season appearance in Salt Lake City, got a standing ovation when he checked in midway through the first quarter and another when exited the court after the game. ... The Heat's 15 points were a season low in the first quarter for a Jazz opponent. Jazz: Raul Neto missed the game with a sore right leg. ... The win snapped a four-game skid against Miami. UP NEXT Heat: Visit the Memphis Grizzlies on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). Jazz: At the Orlando Magic on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 13th, 2018

Longtime friends James, Wade prepare for last meeting as opponents

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com LOS ANGELES — Friendships are never formed totally by choice, because fate demands a say-so in the process by creating the time and the place and in the curious case of LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, the basketball court. It was in Chicago, June of 2003, site of the NBA’s annual draft combine, the meet market for young players gathered to someday change the game, when Wade and LeBron had each other at wassup. In some ways, it was an unlikely pairing: Teenaged phenom from Akron, Ohio, fresh from the cover of Sports Illustrated and the high school prom who already had a national following; and an overlooked underdog from the Chicago suburbs who only became an acquired basketball taste weeks earlier after a searing run through the NCAA tournament. That day, Wade and LeBron went through the checkup lines for height and weight, vertical leap and whatever else the combines put rookies through and then during a break came the only measurement that counted, when one future Hall of Famer sized up the other. LeBron said: “Some things you can’t explain. Sometimes it’s just chemistry.” Wade said: “When you’re young and coming into the league, you find guys you have something in common with, then you continue to link and that’s what we did. It’s organic how we built this friendship.” Some 15 years later, the bond will endure, likely forever. The basketball part, however, ends Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) after the game when Wade, who’s calling it a career after this season, peels off his sweat-soaked Heat jersey and swaps it for a Laker top belonging to LeBron. It might qualify as the best trade of the NBA season, or at least the most emotional. "It's sweet and sour,” said LeBron, anticipating the moment at Staples Center. “The sweet part about it is I've always loved being on the same floor with my brother. And the sour part about it is that this is our last time sharing the same court.” Brother? How many folks with different blood can call each other that? True friendship is answering the phone at 3 a.m. instead of letting it ring, and reaching for the tab with longer arms, and above all, becoming a mattress when the other guy falls. Those tests were aced throughout the LeBron-Wade bromance that stretched through two Olympic teams, four years in Miami, two NBA championships and even 46 games in Cleveland together but of course was always put on hold whenever they were on opposite benches. This is best placed into proper context by Gabrielle Union, the actress and wife of Wade, who says ever so delicately about her husband in those friend vs. friend moments: “He wants to kill him. Drop three-balls on him.” Perhaps so, because as Wade says, “you always want to beat your best friend,” yet their competitive spirit is confined within the baselines and between the jump ball and buzzer. Then the teasing and bragging rights begin by text or call, almost instantly. This arrangement irked the old-school basketball culture, long cringing at the chummy ways of a new generation, believing that most if not all interaction should cease until the offseason, or even better, when careers are done. Wade and LeBron then turned up the volume on that subject when they linked up as teammates with the Heat in 2010, angering the purists and creating, at least initially, a team to be despised as well as respected. Not that Wade and LeBron regret that experience at all, or the noise that followed; this was, as Union observed, “far bigger than basketball.” The chance to be neighbors and watch their kids grow up together and celebrate championships on South Beach until well past sunrise was a priceless part of the bonding process, something neither will be able to duplicate as they begin a new phase of their relationship. The chance to let their hair down (well, Wade anyway) and loosen up, away from the crowds and the media, is something they could keep to themselves. Although: Mrs.Wade spilled a few friendship secrets the other day, with an ohmigod and a roll of the eyes. “They laugh a lot,” she said. “LeBron is silly. Dwyane is silly. They’re silly and goofy together. When they’re around each other it’s like a never-ending sleepover. That’s what it feels like when you’re in their orbit. They have an unspoken language and jokes and it’s like a show and everyone’s watching.” It helped that, in addition to being in the same sport, both LeBron and Wade became all-time greats, because like-minded and like-talented people tend to magnetize. It was LeBron who collected MVP awards and a huge social media flock at first, then Wade followed up by winning a championship first, and this created a mutual respect for each other’s abilities. It also allowed them to walk through the same exclusive doors together, for example, making a pair of Olympic teams and a batch of All-Star Games, therefore putting them in close company even before the Heat experience. From those moments, a relationship tightened. And when life threw airballs in their direction, one was there to help the other. “When I was going through the custody of my kids and that battle, he was someone I talked to constantly and told him what I was going through,” said Wade. “And vice versa, when he was going through things family-wise, I could talk to him and try to relate. You lean on guys who have similar stories and have gone through similar things in their lives to help with advice or just be there to listen.” Curiously, one of their few awkward moments happened when they became teammates in Miami initially. The transition, Wade admitted, was friction-free but not totally smooth. Superstars have egos. Adjustments were needed and were done and this was made possible by LeBron’s game, which is built on unselfish play. “It would’ve been easier if we went to a neutral site,” Wade said. “But because he came to Miami, it was my team before he got there. It was a little hard because of that, but once we got through the first year it was easy. He can play with anybody. He can go out and score or he can get 17 points and 20 assists. He knows if a guy hasn’t shot the ball in a while and how to get him going.” Their on-court chemistry was astonishing to witness at times, the best entertainment in basketball back then. They knew each other’s tendencies, spots on the floor and how to mesh. How many times did Wade toss a lob to a streaking LeBron for a dunk, or vice-versa? Along with Chris Bosh, this was one of the most productive link-ups in NBA history. Four years and four trips to the NBA Finals don’t lie. And true friendship is following your pal to Cleveland in winter, as Wade did last year in an awkward attempt to re-create the past. To this, Wade shook his head and laughed: “Yeah, yeah, you right about that.” While Wade is putting a bow on this retirement season, he marvels at his friend’s staying power and salutes LeBron’s decision to sign up with the Lakers and take on Los Angeles. “I think it’s great, something he wanted to do,” Wade said. “For a player to be able to map out his career the way he has been able to do, he’s doing it his way. This is the way he wanted, to end it here in L.A., on and off the court. His career is not over, but this is the last layer of his career.” And LeBron, reflecting on Wade’s NBA imprint, said: “D-Wade has definitely had a helluva career, obviously. A first-ballot Hall of Famer, a three-time champion and so on and so on. I mean, it speaks for itself. But what he's done for that franchise and what he's done for that community since he's been drafted has been a pretty good story.” This is curious timing, how the NBA schedule has Wade making his last trip to Los Angeles and against LeBron not long after Wade and Union, who have a home in L.A., recently welcomed a newborn daughter. The families spent Sunday (Monday, PHL time) together at the baby shower, then the farewell game tips 24 hours later. Union calls it the “end of a basketball brotherhood but the beginning of a real friendship with basketball gone” and Wade agrees. “When we first came into the league people couldn’t understand how we could be friends during the season," Wade said. "When I was in Cleveland for a game I’d go to his house the night before, we’d go to the movies and hang out and then we’d go at each other in the game. We’d laugh about that. We enjoy having a different relationship than what was done before us, but then going out and playing against him, I’d always want to whup his you-know-what. And vice versa. Just the times we shared. The moments when it’s not all been great, but to be able to have somebody to talk to and run things by. A lot of people don’t have a LeBron James to call up and say, 'Hey, I’m thinking about this, what do you think about it?’ That’s special.” What will also be special Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) is when Wade, as has been his routine after every game this season, swaps jerseys with an opposing player; this will be the 1,001st game of Wade’s dwindling NBA career. “Obviously this is something I wanted to do in my last year,” Wade said. “But of all the players in the league, LeBron is one of my closest friends so this one will mean a little more, because of the paths that we both went down as competitors against each other and as teammates. We’ll be linked together forever.” And what might be said between friends and competitors caught up in that moment? Wade offers this: “We’ll look at each other and say, 'Yo, this is it.’ It’s crazy that it happened so fast. We remember the night we got drafted like yesterday. But it comes fast. Just an ending of a chapter in both of our lives.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Abe calls on Trump to ease trade row with China

BUENOS AIRES -- Prime Minister Shinzo Abe called on U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping to ease the two countries' disputes over the bilateral trade row, Japanese officials said. The prime minister held talks with the U.S. and Chinese leaders separately in Buenos Aires on Friday on the sidelines of summit talks of the Group of 20 economies. Abe also held a trilateral summit meeting with Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi for the first such trilateral summit talks. The Abe-Trump meeting lasted for about 35 minutes, and Deputy Prime Minister Taro Aso; Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Hiroshige Seko; U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and nationa...Keep on reading: Abe calls on Trump to ease trade row with China.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2018