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Male Hollywood stars must take pay cuts – Salma Hayek

CANNES, France – Hollywood star Salma Hayek said Sunday, May 13, that male stars will have to take pay cuts if they are serious about equality for women. The Mexican-born actress, a leading voice in the #MeToo and Time's Up movements, said highly-paid male stars would have to make ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerMay 13th, 2018

Male Hollywood stars must take pay cuts – Salma Hayek

CANNES, France – Hollywood star Salma Hayek said Sunday, May 13, that male stars will have to take pay cuts if they are serious about equality for women. The Mexican-born actress, a leading voice in the #MeToo and Time's Up movements, said highly-paid male stars would have to make ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 13th, 2018

Salma Hayek calls for male stars to get pay cut

Mexican-American actress Salma Hayek, a vocal campaigner against sexual harassment in the movie industry, said on Sunday male stars should get less pay as way to even things up with chronically underpaid women. Salma Hayek calls for male stars to get pay cut CANNES, France (Reuters) – Mexican-American actress Salma Hayek, a vocal campaigner against… link: Salma Hayek calls for male stars to get pay cut.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsMay 15th, 2018

‘He was my monster’: Actress Salma Hayek alleges Harvey Weinstein misconduct

CHICAGO — Mexican-born actress Salma Hayek has joined the ranks of Hollywood women accusing movie producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct, calling him a “monster” in an article published by the New York Times on Tuesday. “For years, he was my monster,” Hayek wrote in the opinion piece in which she included descriptions of sexual […] The post ‘He was my monster’: Actress Salma Hayek alleges Harvey Weinstein misconduct appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsDec 14th, 2017

Salma Hayek details sexual agony in hands of ‘monster’ Weinstein

NEW YORK, United States --- A-lister Salma Hayek on Wednesday joined the scores of actresses to accuse Harvey Weinstein, alleging that the fallen Hollywood mogul sexually harassed her, subjected her to escalating rage and once threatened to kill her. "For years, he was my monster," the Mexican-born star wrote in an essay published in The New York Times, detailing the torturous production of the 2002 movie "Frida" that eventually earned Hayek an Oscar nomination for best actress. After reaching a deal for Weinstein to pay for the rights to the movie that would eventually catapult her to household fame, the now 51-year-old actress and producer said it became "my turn to say no." ...Keep on reading: Salma Hayek details sexual agony in hands of ‘monster’ Weinstein.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 14th, 2017

Emma Stone says male co-stars have taken pay cuts for h...

Emma Stone says male co-stars have taken pay cuts for h........»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  cnnphilippinesRelated NewsJul 13th, 2017

ABS-CBN Ball 2018: Top 10 fashion, beauty trends

Jericho Rosales and Erich Gonzales might have been named as Best Dressed Male and Female, but fans also noticed other fashion and beauty standouts in what can be considered as the biggest fashion event of the year among Kapamilya stars......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 1st, 2018

Salma Hayek joins Tiffany Haddish, Rose Byrne in ‘Limited Partners’

The comedy "Limited Patrners" will be directed by Miguel Arteta ("The Good Girl", "Chuck & Buck"). Tiffany Haddish ("Girls Trip") and Rose Byrne ("Bridesmaids") play two best friends who start a successful beauty company together. When a big buyout offer from a tech company comes their way, their relationship is put to the test as the two find themselves at war with each other. Hayek will play an executive from the tech company, who makes the buyout offer and then pits the two friends against one another. The Mexican actress most recently starred in "The Hitman's Bodyguard" (2017). Arteta recently directed the comedy "Beatriz at Dinner" with Hayek and John Lithgow. ...Keep on reading: Salma Hayek joins Tiffany Haddish, Rose Byrne in ‘Limited Partners’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 30th, 2018

Game of Thrones battles with Handmaid s Tale for Emmys glory

LOS ANGELES, USA – Hollywood's top television stars hit the red carpet Monday, September 17 (Tuesday, September 18 in the Philippines) for the glittering 70th Emmy Awards – a duel between record-breaker Game of Thrones and last year's big winner The Handmaid's Tale. Both shows have already picked up Emmys hardware: ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Adi Alsaid is a rare bird in Young Adult fiction: he’s male

YOUNG ADULT (YA) fiction is dominated by women writers, but there are some men who have established their names in the genre, such as David Levithan and John Green, whose respective books, Every Day and The Fault in Our Stars, have been made into movies. Adi Alsaid is another young and male author who joins the gang. He likes the idea of his novels being turned into films just like the others’. The post Adi Alsaid is a rare bird in Young Adult fiction: he’s male appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

Adi Alsaid is a rare bird in Young Adult fiction: he’s male

YOUNG ADULT (YA) fiction is dominated by women writers, but there are some men who have established their names in the genre, such as David Levithan and John Green, whose respective books, Every Day and The Fault in Our Stars, have been made into movies. Adi Alsaid is another young and male author who joins… link: Adi Alsaid is a rare bird in Young Adult fiction: he’s male.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 21st, 2018

Ethan Peck to play Spock in new Star Trek

LOS ANGELES, USA  – Actor Ethan Peck – whose grandfather was Hollywood legend Gregory Peck – has been cast as iconic half-Vulcan science officer Spock in CBS's Star Trek: Discovery. The hiring sees the relatively obscure 32-year-old boldly go where stars Zachary Quinto and – most famously – Leonard Nimoy have gone before. "Through 52 ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 15th, 2018

China’s new online cosmetics stars: Men

BEIJING: When Jiang Cheng first tried a bit of concealer during his first year of university in China it gave him self-confidence and he was instantly hooked. Now he is among hundreds of Chinese men sharing beauty tips online and cashing in on the booming male cosmetics industry. “I found that putting on make-up is [...] The post China’s new online cosmetics stars: Men appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

Constance Wu, Kris Aquino, and more: The fanciest Crazy Rich Asians premiere looks

cast are celebrating the premiere of their movie over at Hollywood and our eyes are glued at the red--or rather, jade carpet looks. And based on their fashion choices, it seemed like the stars chan.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 8th, 2018

IN PHOTOS: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ stars shine at Hollywood premiere

IN PHOTOS: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ stars shine at Hollywood premiere.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 8th, 2018

Jean Garcia cast in anti-drug film with Hollywood actor Stephen Baldwin, Mocha Uson

Actress Jean Garcia recently took to her Instagram page to share to her fans some good news. Garcia was filled with excitement when she wrote last July 27 that she is going to be a part of the film "Kaibigan" which stars Hollywood actor Stephen Baldwin. Baldwin is the brother of Alec Baldwin and the father of model Hailey Baldwin, who is the fiance of Justin Bieber. Cesar Montano, Alvin Anson, Presidential Communications Operations Office assistant secretary Mocha Uson, and musical duo and twins Jessie and Christian Perkins are also starring in the film. "Kaibigan" will be produced by Tess and Tarny Perkins, the twins' parents. "Ayieee, I'm sooo kilig dahil nabigyan po ako ng P...Keep on reading: Jean Garcia cast in anti-drug film with Hollywood actor Stephen Baldwin, Mocha Uson.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 30th, 2018

Mocha Uson to play journalist in Stephen Baldwin movie about illegal drugs

PCOO Communications Assistant Secretary Mocha Uson has announced that she will be starring in the film “Kaibigan” — an inspirational movie tackling the illegal drug problem and its adverse effects on families — which stars Hollywood actor Stephen Baldwin. Source link link: Mocha Uson to play journalist in Stephen Baldwin movie about illegal drugs.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 28th, 2018

A new film series asks: Is there a ‘female gaze’ in movies?

NEW YORK (AP) --- An upcoming film series at Lincoln Center asks a provocative question: Is there such a thing as a "female gaze" in movies? The perspective by which women are often seen, sexualized and objectified by men --- consciously or not --- in Hollywood films is known as the "male gaze," a term Laura Mulvey coined in a famous 1975 essay. Movies, where men are so often behind the camera, inevitably render women a certain way. Beginning Friday, "The Female Gaze" will flip the question around with a two-week survey featuring 36 films shot by 23 female cinematographers. The first-of-its-kind series promises to be among the most conversation-starting film retrospectives in r...Keep on reading: A new film series asks: Is there a ‘female gaze’ in movies?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 25th, 2018

Meet the 2018 World Cup All-Pogi Starting XI

The members of the World Cup All-Pogi Starting XI are not necessarily the starters in their respective teams.  This is a different kind of Starting XI. The kind that makes viewers want to stay plastered to their screens not just for the goals, but for those brief moments of close-ups that make the wait worth it. Our Pogi Starting XI follows the classic 4-4-2 formation. These fine fellas bring the “beautiful” to the beautiful game. Here we go.   GOALKEEPER Alphonse Areola, FRA   🇫🇷🆚🇵🇪 📍Ekaterinburg Arena 🕔 17h @equipedefrance #FRAPER #fiersdetrebleus A post shared by Alphonse Areola (@areolaofficiel) on Jun 21, 2018 at 12:19am PDT He may be the third choice keeper for Les Bleus but this 25-year-old, 6’3” Frenchman born to Filipino parents is definitely first in our hearts.   DEFENDER Gerard Pique, ESP   Focus A post shared by Gerard Piqué (@3gerardpique) on Dec 4, 2017 at 10:45am PST If Shakira thinks he’s hot, who are we to say otherwise?   William Ekong, NGA   End of a good camp with the @ng_supereagles. We keep working and improving. Thanks everyone for your support 🇳🇬🦅🙏🏽 A post shared by William Troost-Ekong (@wtroostekong) on Mar 28, 2018 at 8:32am PDT Ekong has Dutch and Nigerian ancestry and the 6’3” centre back’s fine mix of physical attributes from both sides of his family tree is more than evident.   Ramin Rezaeaian, IRN   ٨٠ ميليون نفر،يك ملت،يك ضربان قلب.. همه براي تيم ملي ايران ❤️🇮🇷🇮🇷🙏 80 milion people, One Nation, One Heart Beat.. Iran ❤️🇮🇷🙏i A post shared by Ramin Rezaeian (@raminrezaeian) on Jun 11, 2018 at 11:07am PDT Mr Rezaeaian owns the Derek Zoolander-approved Blue Steel 100%, and then some.    Gotoku Sakai, JPN   新しいスパイクを履いていいトレーニングできてます👍 #HereToCreate #X18 #スプリントスパイク #createdwithadidas A post shared by GotokuSakai_official (@sakai_go1123) on Jun 6, 2018 at 5:31am PDT Describing Gotoku-san as kawaii doesn’t even cut it. He’s an American-born Japanese right back and he definitely stands out among the Blue Samurai.   MIDFIELDER Isco, ESP   2️⃣2️⃣🇪🇸😍 A post shared by Isco Alarcon Suarez (@iscoalarcon) on Jun 8, 2018 at 11:07am PDT Isco, full name Francisco Roman Alarcón Suárez, rocks the millennial beard like it’s nobody’s business.    James Rodriguez, COL   El mejor café del mundo 🇨🇴✌🏼 A post shared by James Rodríguez (@jamesrodriguez10) on May 24, 2018 at 3:39pm PDT James Rodriguez? More like James Reid. James is your college crush that never seems to age. Andre Silva, POR   É sempre uma honra ter a oportunidade de representar @portugal! Unidos lutaremos pelo nosso objectivo #ConquistaOSonho A post shared by André Silva (@andresilva9) on May 17, 2018 at 1:32pm PDT Boyish good looks? Check. Eyebrows to die for? Check. Until you see his pool-side photos on Instagram. Who you calling a boy?   Makoto Hasebe, JPN   MHSC (Makoto Hasebe Sports Club) 一昨日は藤枝校と浜松校の交流戦を行いました。開校以来、子どもたちの成長するスピードに驚いています。そして子どもたちが楽しんでいる姿が何よりも嬉しいです。特別講義を傾聴する子どもたちのキラキラした目をみて改めて頑張ろうと思えた素晴らしい時間でした。 #mhsc #fujieda #hamamatsu #藤枝 #浜松 #藤枝総合運動公園サッカー場 #素晴らしい環境 #来年度の新しい校舎開校に向けて生徒もコーチングスタッフも募集しています #puma #長谷部誠 A post shared by 長谷部誠 Makoto Hasebe (@makoto_hasebe_official) on Dec 25, 2017 at 2:14pm PST That smile alone can net him a starring role in a Japanese telenovela   FORWARD Cristiano Ronaldo, POR   Parabéns meu querido filho! Estas a ficar um homem!👏🏽8️⃣🎂❤️ A post shared by Cristiano Ronaldo (@cristiano) on Jun 17, 2018 at 2:38am PDT A virtual lock not only for the Pogi Starting XI but also for the Pogi Hall of Fame.   Radamel Falcao, COL   Vamos a defender esta camiseta con el 💯 % de nuestras fuerzas, energías y capacidad. 🇨🇴 // we are going to fight for this colors with all our energy, strength and ability. A post shared by Falcao (@falcao) on Jun 13, 2018 at 2:40pm PDT He chopped off his lustrous locks for a trendy ‘short at the sides and longer at the top’ cut and the transformation is akin to Jon Bon Jovi shedding the glam-rock hair in the 90’s. Or long hair, short hair, we don’t care.   MANAGER Herve Renard - MAR Monsieur cuts a dashing figure in the touchline with his sun-kissed locks and striking blue gaze. Reminds one of an old-school Hollywood movie star, a classic European playboy or a striking yet dangerous Bond villain. Catch the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ on S+A, S+A HD, LIGA, LIGA HD and via livestream......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018