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K-Pop time: South Korean pop stars fly to Pyongyang for rare concerts

SEOUL, South Korea — From aging crooners to bubbly K-Pop starlets, some of South Korea's biggest pop stars flew to North Korea on Saturday for rare performan.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: philstar philstarMar 31st, 2018

K-Pop time: South Korean pop stars fly to Pyongyang for rare concerts

SEOUL, South Korea — From aging crooners to bubbly K-Pop starlets, some of South Korea's biggest pop stars flew to North Korea on Saturday for rare performan.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 31st, 2018

North Korea’s Kim Attends Pyongyang K-Pop Concert

North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un and his wife attended a concert of South Korean singers, commonly called K-pop, performing at a rare event in Pyongyang on Sunday. After the concert, which lasted more than two hours, Kim met the stars and took pictures with them backstage. It was the first time in more than […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsApr 3rd, 2018

Kim Jong Un ‘deeply moved’ by K-pop concert

SEOUL — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un smiled, clapped and said he was “deeply moved” by a rare performance by South Korean K-pop stars in Pyongyang, state media reported Monday. The high profile appearance of Kim and his wife, former singer Ri Sol Ju, at the concert was unusual as his authoritarian regime typically […] The post Kim Jong Un ‘deeply moved’ by K-pop concert appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2018

K-pop concert deeply moves Kim Jong-Un

SEOUL: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un smiled, clapped and said he was “deeply moved” by a rare performance by South Korean K-pop stars in Pyongyang, state media reported on Monday. The high profile appearance of Kim and his wife, former singer Ri Sol Ju, at the concert was unusual as his authoritarian regime typically [...] The post K-pop concert deeply moves Kim Jong-Un appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2018

Kim Jong-un attends rare concert by South Korean pop stars

SEOUL, South Korea (3rd UPDATE) – North Korean leader Kim Jong-un on Sunday, April 1, attended the first concert in Pyongyang for over a decade by South Korean entertainers, including a K-pop girlband, the latest gesture of reconciliation before a rare inter-Korean summit. The visit, described by many as a cultural ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2018

Kim Jong-un deeply moved by K-pop concert – KCNA

SEOUL, South Korea – North Korean leader Kim Jong-un smiled, clapped and said he was "deeply moved" by a rare performance by South Korean K-pop stars in Pyongyang, state media reported Monday, April 2. The high profile appearance of Kim and his wife, former singer Ri Sol Ju, at the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2018

NKorean leader Kim watches performance by SKorean pop stars

SEOUL — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on yesterday watched a rare performance by South Korean pop stars visiting Pyongyang, media reports said, amid thawin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2018

Red Velvet, other South Korean musicians leave for Pyongyang performance

SEOUL, South Korea – Korean pop (K-pop) stars led a group of South Korean musicians departing for Pyongyang  on Saturday, March 31, to take part in the latest set of cross-border cultural performances ahead of next month's rare inter-Korean summit. The 120-member group, including top girlband Red Velvet, flew from Seoul's Gimpo airport aboard a ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 31st, 2018

SKorean musicians leave for Pyongyang

SEOUL: K-pop stars led a group of South Korean musicians departing for Pyongyang on Saturday to take part in the latest set of cross-border cultural performances ahead of next month’s rare inter-Korean summit. The 120-member group including top girlband Red Velvet flew from Seoul’s Gimpo airport aboard a chartered civilian flight to Pyongyang via the [...] The post SKorean musicians leave for Pyongyang appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMar 31st, 2018

South Korean songs given rare public performance in Pyongyang

SEOUL: North Korea has allowed songs from the South to be played in public for the first time in years, state media said Saturday, as a thaw in usually frosty ties gains momentum thanks to the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. A North Korean band “played several southern songs” when they performed before party officials and artists [...] The post South Korean songs given rare public performance in Pyongyang appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2018

N.Korea invites SKorean leader for summit in Pyongyang

  SEOUL, South Korea --- A rare invitation to Pyongyang for the South Korean president marked Day Two of the North Korean Kim dynasty's southern road tour Saturday, part of an accelerated diplomatic warming that included more handshakes, some Korean liquor over lunch and the potential shared joy of watching a "unified" Korea team play hockey at the Olympics. Nothing has been settled on any trip north by South Korean President Moon Jae-in. But the verbal message to come at a "convenient time" from dictator Kim Jong Un, delivered by his visiting little sister, Kim Yo Jong, is part of a sudden rush of improving feelings between the rivals during the Pyeongchang Olympics. The ...Keep on reading: N.Korea invites SKorean leader for summit in Pyongyang.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2018

Seoul: North Korea to send delegation to Olympics in South

By Hyung-Jin Kim, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea agreed Tuesday to send a delegation to next month's Winter Olympics in South Korea, Seoul officials said, as the bitter rivals sat for rare talks at the border to discuss how to cooperate in the Olympics and improve their long-strained ties. The Koreas' first talks in two years were arranged after North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un recently made an abrupt push for improved ties with South Korea after a year of elevated tensions with the outside world over his expanding nuclear and missile programs. Critics say Kim may be trying to divide Seoul and Washington in a bid to weaken international pressure and sanctions on the North. During the talks, the North Korean delegation said it would send an Olympic delegation, which includes officials, athletes, cheerleaders, journalists and others, South Korea's Vice Unification Minister Chun Hae-sung told reporters, according to media footage from the border village of Panmunjom, the venue for the talks. The South Korean delegation, for its part, proposed North Korea send a big delegation and conduct a joint march during the Feb. 9-25 Game's opening and closing ceremonies, Chun, one of the five South Korean negotiators, said. He said South Korea also suggested resuming temporary reunions of families separated by war and offering military talks designed to reduce animosities in frontline areas. South Korea also stressed the need to achieve denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, Chun said. North Korea responded by saying the two Koreas must try to promote peace and reconciliation through dialogue, he said. The two sides were to continue their negotiations later Tuesday at Panmunjom, the only place on the tense border where North and South Korean soldiers are just feet away from each other. A North Korean soldier late last year defected to the South across Panmunjom amid a hail of bullets fired by his comrades. He was hit five times but survived. The meeting began with an amicable atmosphere Tuesday morning, with chief North Korean delegate Ri Son Gwon saying he hopes the talks would give "a New Year's first gift — precious results (of the talks) to the Korean nation." Ri's South Korean counterpart, Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon, said he also hopes they would come up with a "good gift" for people in both Koreas. The overall prospect for the negotiations was still unclear. The two Koreas have a long history of ending key talks without any agreement and failing to follow through with rapprochement accords. An agreement on the North's Olympic participation had been widely expected before the talks began, but the Koreas remain sharply at odds over how to improve their overall ties. North Korea is expected to demand rewards in return for South Korea's offer for family reunions and military talks, like Seoul halting propaganda broadcasts and scaling back or halting military drills with the U.S., observers say. Suspension of the military drills would be unacceptable for Seoul because that would seriously undermine the alliance with its chief ally the United States, which wants to put more pressures on Pyongyang. The North views the drills as a rehearsal for a northward invasion. President Donald Trump on Saturday expressed hope for some progress from the talks and said he was open to talking with Kim himself. But U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley later said the U.S. administration isn't changing its conditions regarding talks with North Korea, saying Kim would first need to stop weapons testing for a "significant amount of time." In his New Year's Day address, Kim said there is an urgent need to improve inter-Korean ties and that he is willing to send a delegation to the Pyeongchang Games. He urged Seoul to halt the military drills with the U.S. and said he has a "nuclear button" to launch missiles at any target in the United States. South Korean liberal President Moon Jae-in, who favors dialogue as a way to defuse the North Korean nuclear standoff, welcomed Kim's outreach and proposed talks at Panmunjom. Kim quickly accepted. "As President Moon has said, the improvement of relations between North and South Korea cannot advance separately from resolving North Korea's nuclear program," Brian Hook, a chief adviser to U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, told reporters in a conference call late Monday Washington time. "And so, we remain focused on our global pressure campaign. That campaign is designed to bring Kim Jong Un to the table for meaningful negations." The Trump administration agreed last week to delay springtime military drills with South Korea until after the Games. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis insisted the delay was a practical necessity to accommodate the Olympics, not a political gesture. Trump and Kim traded bellicose warlike rhetoric and even crude insults last year, as the North conducted it sixth and most powerful nuclear detonation and three tests of intercontinental ballistic missiles. The International Olympic Committee said Monday it has "kept the door open" for North Korea to take part in the Games. IOC spokesman Mark Adams said the registration deadline has been extended and that the Switzerland-based committee supports North Korean athletes in the qualification process, while respecting U.N. sanctions against North Korea......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

North Korea adjusts time zone to match South’s as ties warm

    SEOUL, South Korea --- North Korea readjusted its time zone to match South Korea's on Saturday and described the change as an early step toward making the longtime rivals "become one" following a landmark summit. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un promised to sync his country's time zone with the South's during his April 27 talks with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. A dispatch from the North's Korean Central News Agency says that promise was fulfilled Saturday by a decree of the nation's Presidium of the Supreme People's Assembly. The Koreas used the same time zone for decades before the North in 2015 created its own "Pyongyang Time" by setting its clocks 3...Keep on reading: North Korea adjusts time zone to match South’s as ties warm.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 5th, 2018

North Korea s Kim Jong Un willing to talk to Japan any time – Seoul

SEOUL, South Korea – North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is ready for dialogue with Japan "any time", Seoul's presidential office said Sunday, April 29, as concerns grow in Tokyo that it is being sidelined from the reconciliation drive with Pyongyang. Kim met South Korean President Moon Jae-in for a historic summit on Friday, April ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 29th, 2018

Kim Jong Un deeply moved by K-pop concert — state media

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un smiled, clapped and said he was "deeply moved" by a rare performance by South Korean K-pop stars in Pyon.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2018

North Korea s Kim attends South Korea concert in latest reconciliatory move

SEOUL, South Korea (UPDATED) – North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on Sunday, April 1, attended the first concert in Pyongyang for over a decade by South Korean entertainers, including a K-pop girlband, the latest gesture of reconciliation before a rare inter-Korean summit. The visit, described by many as ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 1st, 2018

Pyongyang Style? Seoul push for Psy to play North Korea

SEOUL, South Korea –Seoul is pushing for "Gangnam Style" star Psy to perform in next week's historic concerts by South Korean artists in the North's capital, multiple reports said. A team of at least 9 South Korean pop acts are set to visit North Korea next week for ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 26th, 2018

U.S. should lower threshold for talks with North Korea – Seoul

SEOUL, South Korea – South Korean President Moon Jae-in urged the United States to "lower the threshold for talks" with the North on Monday, February 26, as his aides held rare talks with a Pyongyang general on ways to defuse tensions. Moon has sought to use the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics that ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 26th, 2018

North Korea cyber threat more aggressive than China – US firm

SEOUL, South Korea – North Korean hackers are becoming more aggressive than their Chinese counterparts, a leading US cybersecurity firm warned on Tuesday, February 20, as it identified a Pyongyang-linked group as an "advanced persistent threat". It was the first time that FireEye had used the designation for a North Korean-based ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 20th, 2018

Koreas combined women s hockey team debuts in friendly

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press INCHEON, South Korea (AP) — Wearing a powder-blue logo of a map symbolizing peace between the Koreas, the most talked-about team at this year's Olympics finally saw game action Sunday in a friendly that drew thousands of spectators in a country that never previously showed much passion for ice hockey. The North and South Korean women's hockey players, who only began practicing together about a week ago as a combined team, showed plenty of fight in their first competitive test, crashing the boards and throwing their bodies to stop pucks and opponents, but never really threatened in a 3-1 loss to world No. 5 Sweden in Incheon, South Korea. The Koreans will play Sweden again on Feb. 12 during the Olympic tournament. But the outcome didn't seem to matter to the capacity crowd of 3,000 at the Seonhak International Ice Rink. Fans waved miniature white-and-blue flags showing a unified Korean Peninsula — the same mark on the players' uniforms — and chanted "We are one" while screaming whenever the Koreans got on the break. The arena thunderously erupted when South Korean forward Park Jong-ah cut the deficit to 2-1 during the first period. The Korean players stood to the Korean traditional tune of "Arirang" at the start of the game, instead of their respective national anthems, and received warm applause as they left the arena after the contest. "I think that the North Korean players played really well — this is one of the biggest crowds they played in front of," said Sarah Murray, the joint team's Canadian head coach. "Being added 12 days ago and not getting to practice together all that much, they played our system pretty well, so I am proud of them." The team's North Korean coach, Pak Chol Ho, said the Koreas "can do anything if they do things as one." He left the postgame news conference without taking questions. The joint Koreas team highlights a series of conciliatory measures the war-separated rivals took for the Pyeongchang games, which South Korea sees as an opportunity to revive meaningful communication with North Korea following an extended period of animosity and diplomatic stalemate over the North's nuclear program. The Olympics begin Friday, with Pyeongchang, a relatively small South Korean ski resort town, hosting the skiing, snowboarding and sliding events, and Gangneung, a coastal city about an hour's drive away, hosting the hockey, skating and curling events. North Korea plans to send hundreds of people to the games, including athletes, officials, artists and a 230-member cheering group. Skeptics think the country is trying to use the games to weaken U.S.-led sanctions and pressure and buy more time to advance its nuclear weapons and missiles arsenal. The decision to create the joint hockey team, which wasn't reached until January, triggered heated debate in South Korea, where many people thought the South Korean players were being unfairly asked to sacrifice playing time to their North Korean teammates, who are seen as less skilled and experienced. Murray, who coached South Korea before taking over the combined team, had also expressed concerns over team chemistry. Sunday's friendly was Murray's only opportunity to experiment with potential lineups in game situations before the start of the Olympics. She previously said the North Koreans' hard-hitting style would be suited for her fourth line, a group of players asked to provide physical play in short bursts while giving their teammates with greater scoring responsibilities a chance to rest. But after seeing them in practice and now in game action, she sees potentially bigger roles for some of the North Koreans, including Jong Su Hyon, a forward who Murray says has broken onto her second line. "They are eager to learn and get better," Murray said about the North Koreans. "We have been having team meetings with them and they ask so many questions. The meeting's supposed to be 15 minutes, and an hour later we are still talking and we are still watching video." The Korean players, at least on the surface, appear to be getting along. They arrived at the arena Sunday relaxed and playful, stretching and jumping in the hallway to get loose before gathering in a scrum and shouting "Team Korea!" Seven of the players later formed a circle and started kicking around a rubber ball, giggling whenever the ball bounced away from them. Amid a heavy police presence, hundreds of supporters began gathering outside the stadium hours before the game despite the icy weather, including dozens who danced to music in matching white parkas and hoodies with the peninsula logo and shouted "Win, Korea!" "I don't even care about the results, I just want to cheer for them and see them work together and help each other out on the ice," said Kim Hye-ryeon, 42, who brought her two children, 8 and 6, to the game. Kim Won-jin, a 33-year-old who made a several-hour trip to the game with his wife and 3 1/2-year-old son from the city of Daejeon, hoped the Korean players had overcome any uneasiness they may have had over the distribution of playing time. "If we ever get unified again, these young players of the South and North will be able to look back and be proud that what they did contributed to a historic change," he said. Not everyone was happy. Across the street from the arena, dozens of anti-Pyongyang activists glumly waved South Korean and U.S. flags to denounce what they said had become the "Pyongyang Olympics." They roared as one of the protesters ripped the banner of the peninsula logo atop a van......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2018