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Jeson Patrombon, Marian Capadocia cop PPS Brookside Open titles

Jeson Patrombon missed slugging it out with fellow Davis Cup mainstay Johnny Arcilla but got the job done just the same, overwhelming Vicente Anasta, 6-0, 6-3, in the men’s singles finals while Marian Capadocia snared the women’s crown in the PPS-PEPP Brookside Hills Open Tennis Championships in Cainta, Rizal last Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarApr 17th, 2018

Jeson, Marian target No. 3 in PPS Pinamalayan Open

Jeson Patrombon and Marian Capadocia seek to sustain their win run as they gun for a third straight victory in the PPS-PEPP Pinamalayan Open Tennis Championships which got under way yesterday at the Bahaghari Tennis Club in Oriental Mindoro......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 6th, 2018

Patrombon, Capadocia cop Crankit crowns

Jeson Patrombon and Marian Capadocia pulled off a pair of three-set thrillers over their respective top-seeded rivals to share top honors in the PPS-PEPP MAC’s Crankit Open Tennis Championships at the PCA courts in Paco, Manila last Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 30th, 2018

Johnny Arcilla, Jeson Patrombon stay on Brookside Hills Open collision course

Johnny Arcilla and Jeson Patrombon toppled their respective rivals in straight-set fashion to roll into the semifinal round and stay on track for a title face-off in the Palawan Pawnshop-Palawan Express Pera Padala Brookside Hills Open Tennis Championships at the Brookside Hills Tennis Club in Cainta, Rizal yesterday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 14th, 2018

Patrombon, Rogan bag PPS Suarez Cup titles

MANILA, Philippines — Jeson Patrombon and Aileen Rogan came away with a pair of straight-set victories over their respective top-seeded rivals to capture the.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 21st, 2018

Jeson Patrombon, Khim Iglupas share PPS Dagitab Open honors

MANILA, Philippines — Khim Iglupas cranked up her game midway in the second set then dominated Shaira Rivera in the decider to fashion out a 2-6, 6-3, 6-2 vi.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2017

Johnson and Kisner, housemates and British Open leaders

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press CARNOUSTIE, Scotland (AP) — A light rain in the morning that gave way to soft sunlight in the afternoon took some of the sting out of Carnoustie. Just not all of it. Kevin Kisner found that out with one swing that erased his two-shot lead Friday in the British Open and left him tied with housemate Zach Johnson. He hit an 8-iron that only needed to go 150 yards to clear the Barry Burn in front of the 18th green. Instead, it floated out of the yellow grass to the right, bounced off the base of the rock wall that frames the winding stream and led to a double bogey. Disappointed but not down, Kisner removed his cap behind the green and scratched his head as if he wondered what hit him. "They call it 'Car-nasty' for a reason," he said after signing for his 1-under 70. "Even when you think you've got it, it will jump up and bite you." It took a chunk out of Dustin Johnson and Justin Thomas, the Nos. 1 and 2 players in the world who won't be around for the weekend. Johnson finished with a double bogey to miss the cut by one. Thomas made three straight double bogeys on the front nine and missed by one. And it left a wide-open weekend on a course with a history of crazy finishes. Zach Johnson, whose name already is on the claret jug from his playoff victory at St. Andrews three years ago, played in the morning under an umbrella and finished with a 30-foot birdie putt for a 67. Johnson and Kisner are staying in a house of seven players — five of them major champions — and share the lead at 6-under 136. They played on different ends of a day that started gray and ended with shadows. Scotland's unusually dry summer finally got a reprieve. There wasn't enough rain to turn brown fairways green, though it at least kept shots from rolling endlessly. They head into a weekend with endless possibilities. One shot behind were Tommy Fleetwood (65), Pat Perez (68) and Xander Schauffele (66). Perez was tied for the lead until he hit into a bunker on the 18th hole and took bogey. Rory McIlroy, pledging to "go down swinging" to rid himself of a bad Masters memory this year, had another 69 and was part of a large group two shots behind. Jordan Spieth also is in the mix in his bid to take the claret jug back home to Texas. Spieth hit 8-iron through a gap in the trees for a birdie-birdie start to the back nine, and he dropped only one shot — not four like he did on Thursday — over the four closing holes at Carnoustie for a 67. He goes into the weekend just three shots back. "Very happy to be back in the tournament," Spieth said. Tiger Woods still has work to do after a rugged start, good recovery and then a mix of birdies and bogeys that left him stuck in neutral on a better day for scoring. Woods had another 71 and was six shots behind, with 28 players between him and the lead. "We've been fortunate with the conditions. It hasn't blown yet," Kisner said. "I think it will blow this weekend and make it even more difficult. Who knows what's going to happen? We're going to just keep trying to get after it." Carnoustie was a far different test from the opening round, when sunshine baked the fairways crisp and it was difficult to figure out how far the ball was going when it hit the ground. The steady, light rain made them a little slower and a lot more predictable. The greens held shots a little better. Strategies changed. Slightly softer conditions meant power players who were driving beyond the trouble hit more irons off the tee, and shorter players hit more drivers and fairway metals. Kisner hit 5-iron off the first tee Thursday. He hit 3-wood Friday. "Hit the same club as the approach," Kisner said. "That's a pretty dramatic difference in distance." Kisner is a newcomer to what amounts to an American fraternity house at golf's oldest championship the last three years. Four of them are among the top 11 on the leaderboard going into the weekend with Spieth and Rickie Fowler, who shot 69 and was at 3-under 139. As for talking shop after work? Nothing is off limits. "Everybody will tell their horror stories and good stories, and we'll laugh and eat a big old meal and sit around and watching something stupid," Kisner said. Thomas will have one of the horror stories. The PGA champion took three to get out of a pot bunker from the fairway on the par-5 sixth hole, making the first of three straight double bogeys. Johnson became the first No. 1 player to miss the cut since Luke Donald in 2011, and it was the second straight that the top two players in the world ranking missed the cut in a major. The way golf has been going, it would be reasonable to see the name "Johnson" atop the leaderboard and assume it belonged to the top-ranked player. But not necessarily at the British Open. "I've been called Dustin many times," Zach Johnson said. "I doubt he's been called Zach that many times." Johnson overcame a bogey on the opening hole with birdies on the third and fourth holes, and he never put himself under too much pressure the rest of the way. Already a two-time major champion with titles at St. Andrews and Augusta National, the 42-year-old from Iowa now has made the cut 12 straight times in the British Open, a streak that began at Carnoustie in 2007. His low ball flight, grinding nature and good putting give him the right ingredients. Kisner is no stranger to pressure at a major. He had at least a share of the lead after each of three rounds at the PGA Championship last summer until a bogey on the 70th hole ruined his chances. "Hopefully, I'll have another chance to prove that I can do it here," Kisner said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News13 hr. 59 min. ago

Abella quits Foton, might return to PVL

Rommel Abella could be making a return to the Premier Volleyball League. A league source told ABS-CBN Sports that the former Pocari Sweat head coach might get another coaching job in the PVL after parting ways with his Philippine Superliga club team Foton. Abella called it quits after two conferences with the Tornadoes. Foton Philippines president and team owner Rommel Sytin promoted assistant coach Edjet Mabbayad as interim coach. Abella was hired as a replacement for Moro Branislav late last year in time for Foton’s campaign in the 2018 Grand Prix. But the multi-titled mentor faced a tough challenge in the import-laden conference playing without ace hitters EJ Laure, who made a leave of absence because of a shoulder injury, and 6-foot-5 Jaja Santiago. Foton, which won back-to-back Grand Prix titles from 2015 to 2016, placed third in this year’s edition. The Tornadoes beefed up its lineup for the Invitational by adding former Generika-Ayala hitter Shaya Adorador, San Beda University stars Nieza and Jeziela Viray and a blue-chip recruit in Ateneo de Manila Univetsity standout Bea de Leon. But even with their new recruits that bolstered the already solid and towering core of Jaja Santiago, Dindin Santiago-Manabat, CJ Rosario, Gen Casugod Maika Ortiz, with veterans Gyzelle Sy, Ivy Perez and libero Jen Reyes, Foton failed to live up to expectations. “The team is playing at the lowest level and we feel that there’s a need for change,” said Sytin. However, the coach might just get another chance in the PVL. Under his watch the Pocari Sweat Lady Warriors led by the trio of Myla Pablo, Michele Gumabao and Mel Gohing dominated the defunct V-League in the 2016 Reinforced and Open Conferences before piloting Pocari Sweat into the Reinforced Conference throne of the PVL last year. The source declined to put on record which team will get the services of Abella.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 17th, 2018

Krejcikova dedicates Wimbledon doubles title to Novotna

LONDON (AP) — Breaking and creating records weren't the most special parts of winning the Wimbledon women's doubles title for Barbora Krejcikova. Krejcikova and Katerina Siniakova, both 22 from the Czech Republic, won their second successive Grand Slam title with a 6-4, 4-6, 6-0 victory over Kveta Peschke and Nicole Melichar on Saturday. As well as becoming the first pairing since 2003 to win the French Open and Wimbledon back-to-back, they also became the first to claim both the girls' and women's doubles titles at the All England Club, after winning as juniors in 2013. But there was another piece of history that was more poignant for Krejcikova. Their title came exactly 20 years after her mentor and compatriot Jana Novotna won the Wimbledon singles title. Novotna died from ovarian cancer in November last year. As she did at the French Open in June, Krejcikova blew a kiss to the sky following the match. "I'm really, really proud," Krejcikova said. "I think she would be really proud, too." After winning their first major title at the French Open last month, the pair emphatically stopped a comeback attempt from fellow-Czech Peschke and Melichar, who was born in the Czech Republic but moved to Florida shortly after her birth and is a U.S. citizen. With just one point separating the teams after the opening two sets, the third-seeded Krejcikova and Siniakova raised their game against their 12th-seeded opposition to win 28 of 39 points and every game in the deciding set. It had been 15 years since Kim Clijsters and Ai Sugiyama pulled off the 'Channel Slam' of triumphs in Paris and London. "At the beginning of the tournament, I wouldn't have expected this," Siniakova said. "Now I'm here, and we have two titles. It feels just amazing." The pair also created a record of their own by repeating their 2013 junior success. "Juniors, it was also amazing, the feeling," Siniakova said. "But this stage, it's much, much bigger.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 15th, 2018

Anderson tops Isner 26-24 at Wimbledon; other SF suspended

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — To say that Kevin Anderson won this interminable Wimbledon semifinal, and that John Isner lost it, didn't really seem fair. To Anderson, anyway. They had played on and on, through 6 1/2 hours of ho-hum hold after ho-hum hold, during the second-longest match in the history of a tournament that began in 1877, all the way until the never-ending serving marathon did, finally, end at 26-24 in the fifth set Friday, with Anderson claiming the most important of the 569 points — the last. So when Anderson left Centre Court, well aware that his 7-6 (6), 6-7 (5), 6-7 (9), 6-4, 26-24 victory earned him the chance to win his first Grand Slam title at age 32, the South African said: "At the end, you feel like this is a draw between the two of us." He continued: "John's such a great guy, and I really feel for him, because if I'd been on the opposite side, I don't know how you can take that, playing for so long and coming up short." Only one match at Wimbledon ever lasted longer: Isner's 2010 first-round victory over Nicolas Mahut, the longest match in tennis history. It went more than 11 hours over three days and finished 70-68 in the fifth on Court 18, which now bears a plaque commemorating it. Friday's contest lasted so long, the day's second semifinal didn't finish. Novak Djokovic was leading Rafael Nadal 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (9) in a compelling showdown filled with entertaining points that was suspended as soon as the third set concluded at just past 11 p.m., the curfew at the All England Club. Some people in the stands booed the decision to halt the match after a fantastic tiebreaker in which Nadal wasted three set points at 6-5, 7-6 and 8-7. Djokovic cashed in on his second when Nadal's backhand found the net after an 18-stroke exchange. Because Nadal and Djokovic didn't begin playing until after 8 p.m., the retractable roof above the main stadium was shut between the matches and the arena's artificial lights were turned on. Now they'll come back Saturday to figure out who will face Anderson in the final, resuming at 1 p.m. local time, under the roof. The women's final between Serena Williams and Angelique Kerber will then follow. That creates an unusual situation: Instead of a standard 2 p.m. start, Williams and Kerber won't know exactly when their match will begin. Anderson will certainly appreciate the chance to put his feet up ahead of Sunday's final, while Nadal and Djokovic — who have a combined 29 Grand Slam titles between them, five at Wimbledon — push each other some more. Anderson's fifth set alone lasted nearly 3 hours as his semifinal became a test of endurance more than skill. "He stayed the course incredibly well," said the No. 9 seed Isner, a 33-year-old American playing in his first major semifinal. "Just disappointed to lose. I was pretty close to making a Grand Slam final and it didn't happen." Anderson finally earned the must-have, go-ahead service break with the help of a point in which the right-hander tumbled to his backside, scrambled back to his feet and hit a shot lefty. "That definitely brings a smile to my face," said Anderson, the runner-up to Nadal at last year's U.S. Open. "At that stage, you're just trying to fight in every single moment, and I was like, 'Just get up!'" The No. 8 seed Anderson eliminated eight-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer in a 13-11 fifth set in the quarterfinals Wednesday. Between that and the energy-sapper against Isner, it's hard to imagine how Anderson will have much left for his second Slam final. Wimbledon doesn't use tiebreakers in the fifth set for men, or third set for women, so there's nothing to prevent a match from continuing ad infinitum. Both Isner and Anderson said they'd like to see that change. At one point in the fifth set, a spectator shouted, "Come on, guys! We want to see Rafa!" The 6-foot-8 Anderson and 6-10 Isner go way back, to their college days, Isner at Georgia, Anderson at Illinois. In the pros, Isner had won eight of 11 previous matchups. But this one was as close as can be. There wasn't a whole lot of intrigue, or momentum shifts. The serving, though, was something else. Isner pounded his at up to 142 mph; Anderson reached 136 mph. They combined for 102 aces: 53 by Isner, 49 by Anderson. "The effort they both put in and the performance and the guts, the way they competed — a lot to be proud of," said Justin Gimelstob, one of Isner's coaches. Both failed to seize early opportunities. Isner wasted a set point in the opener. Anderson served for the third at 5-3, got broken, and then had a pair of set points in that tiebreaker, double-faulting one away. By the latter stages, with break chances so rare, murmurs would spread through the Centre Court stands whenever a game's returner got to love-15 or love-30. Could we be about to see the sixth and last break of a match that would end up with 90 holds? Repeatedly, the answer was, of course, "No," even when Anderson held break points at 7-all, 10-all and 17-all. The 10-all game ended with Isner hitting a forehand passing winner on the run to hold, then letting his momentum carry him directly to his sideline chair, where he plopped himself down. By the end, he was looking exhausted, leaning over to rest a hand on a knee between points. "I feel pretty terrible," Isner said afterward. "My left heel is killing me and I have an awful blister on my right foot." He never got a break point in the fifth set. Anderson finally came through on his sixth for a 25-24 lead, when Isner wearily put a backhand into the net. Then Anderson served out the victory, with Isner sailing a forehand wide on match point. Soon, they were meeting for an embrace......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 14th, 2018

Watch me

KUALA LUMPUR—Step right up, boxing fans. Manny Pacquiao has promised to “put up a good show,” that is guaranteed to entertain faithful followers of the fight game. The only boxer to win titles in eight weight divisions, Pacquiao, generally considered as one of the sport’s all-time greats, started his open workout on Wednesday by calling… link: Watch me.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

A look back at Roger Federer s record 8 Wimbledon titles

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — Roger Federer's paths to his record eight Wimbledon championships were each different, of course. Different opponents. Different degrees of difficulty. Same old Federer. A year ago, for example, he did not drop a set the entire way, becoming the first man since Bjorn Borg in 1976 to claim the title at the All England Club in that unblemished manner. In 2009, in contrast, Federer was pushed to the very limit, edging Andy Roddick 16-14 in the fifth set of a final that remains the longest, by games, of any Grand Slam title match in tennis history. Here is a year-by-year look at Federer's trophy runs at Wimbledon: ___ No. 1: 2003 Final: Beat Mark Philippoussis 7-6 (5), 6-2, 7-6 (3). Grand Slam Title: 1 Age: 21 At Stake: Pegged for great success, Federer had yet to get past the quarterfinals of a major tournament. Close Call: Federer dropped only one set, to Mardy Fish in the third round, but the toughest moment came in the round of 16, when Federer needed treatment on his aching back while beating Feliciano Lopez. Key Quote: "There was pressure from all sides — also from myself. I wanted to do better in Slams." — Federer. ___ No. 2: 2004 Final: Beat Andy Roddick 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Grand Slam Title: 3 Age: 22 At Stake: His first attempt to defend a major championship. Close Call: After dropping the first set, then trailing by a break at 4-2 in the third, Federer used a rain delay to change strategy, opting to charge the net more. He made that switch on his own, because he'd been without a coach since firing his a little more than six months earlier. It worked: Federer won 24 of the next 28 points on his serve. Key Quote: "This is a very important phase in his career as well, that he could step back, not rely on somebody, get to know himself, get to know his own tennis and technique." — Federer's mother, Lynette. ___ No. 3: 2005 Final: Beat Roddick 6-2, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Grand Slam Title: 5 Age: 23 At Stake: Trying to become the first man in 50 years to win his first five major finals. Close Call: None, really. Federer dropped merely one of 22 sets he played over the two weeks, a tiebreaker against 25th-seeded Nicolas Kiefer in the third round, but quickly recovered to win that match 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-1, 7-5. Key Quote: "It's hard for him, because I really played a fantastic match — one of the best of my life. Today it seemed liked I was playing flawless." — Federer. ___ No. 4: 2006 Final: Beat Rafael Nadal 6-0, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (2), 6-3. Grand Slam Title: 8 Age: 24 At Stake: Entering the championship match, Federer was 0-4 that season against Nadal — including a loss in the French Open final weeks earlier — and 55-0 against everyone else. Close Call: Once again, nothing to speak of, because Federer dropped just one set all tournament, this time in the final. Nadal did serve for the second set at 5-4, but missed three forehands and double-faulted to get broken there, before ceding the ensuing tiebreaker. Key Quote: "I'm very well aware of how important this match was for me. If I lose, obviously, it's a hard blow for me — he wins French, Wimbledon back-to-back. It's important for me to win a final against him, for a change, and beat him, for a change." — Federer. ___ No. 5: 2007 Final: Beat Nadal 7-6 (7), 4-6, 7-6 (3), 2-6, 6-2. Grand Slam Title: 11 Age: 25 At Stake: Joining Borg as the only men in the last 100 years to win Wimbledon five years in a row. Close Call: After dropping just one set (in a quarterfinal against 2003 French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero) along an unusually short road to the final (fourth-round foe Tommy Haas withdrew with an injury), Federer got all he could handle against Nadal. Key Quote: "He's an artist on this surface. He can stay back. He can come in. No weaknesses. I believe if he continues the way he's doing and stays away from injuries and has the motivation, he'll be the greatest player ever to play the game." — Borg. ___ No. 6: 2009 Final: Beat Roddick 5-7, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5), 3-6, 16-14. Grand Slam Title: 15 Age: 27 At Stake: Breaking Sampras' record for most major singles trophies won by a man and reasserting his supremacy at Wimbledon after losing a 9-7 fifth set to Nadal in the 2008 final. Close Call: What could be a closer call than that fifth set? Federer's only break of the day came in the match's 77th and last game. Also worth remembering is that 2017 International Tennis Hall of Fame inductee Roddick led the second-set tiebreaker 6-2 but did not convert any of the four points that would have given him a two-set lead. Key Quote: "He's a legend. Now he's an icon." — Sampras. ___ No. 7: 2012 Final: Beat Andy Murray 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4. Grand Slam Title: 17 Age: 30 At Stake: Tying the record held by Sampras and William Renshaw (who played in the 1800s) for most Wimbledon men's championships, plus ending a personal 2½-year Grand Slam drought. Close Call: Federer dropped the first two sets in the third round against 29th-seeded Julien Benneteau of France, then was two points away from losing a half-dozen times, but pulled out a 4-6, 6-7 (3), 6-2, 7-6 (6), 6-1 comeback. Key Quote: "Oh, my God, it was brutal. The thing, when you're down two sets to love, is to stay calm, even though it's hard, because people are freaking out, people are worried for you." — Federer. ___ No. 8: 2017 Final: Beat Marin Cilic 6-3, 6-1, 6-4. Grand Slam Title: 19 (he added No. 20 at this year's Australian Open) Age: 35 At Stake: Breaking the mark for most men's singles titles at the All England Club after coming up just short with losses to Novak Djokovic in the 2014 and 2015 finals. Close Call: Nothing whatsoever. The closest thing to a close call came in the semifinals, when 2010 runner-up Tomas Berdych pushed Federer to tiebreakers in each of the first two sets. Cilic was hampered by foot blister in a final that was lopsided throughout. Key Quote: "Wimbledon was always my favorite tournament. Will always be my favorite tournament. My heroes walked the grounds here and walked the courts here." — Federer......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 2nd, 2018

WIMBLEDON 18: Roger Federer eyes record-extending 9th title

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — Men to watch at Wimbledon, where play begins Monday: ___ ROGER FEDERER Seeded: 1 Ranked: 2 Age: 36 Country: Switzerland 2018 Match Record: 25-3 2018 Singles Titles: 3 Career Singles Titles: 98 Grand Slam Singles Titles: 20 — Wimbledon ('03, '04, '05, '06, '07, '09, '12, '17), U.S. Open ('04, '05, '06, '07, '08), Australian Open ('04, '06, '07, '10, '17, '18), French Open ('09) Last 5 Wimbledons: '17-Won Championship, '16-Lost in Semifinals, '15-Runner-Up, '14-RU, '13-2nd Aces: After skipping clay-court season for second year in a row, won title on grass at Stuttgart, then reached final at Halle before losing to Borna Coric, possible fourth-round opponent at Wimbledon. Topspin: Even as 37th birthday (Aug. 8) nears, tough to count out Federer at a tournament he's won more times than any other man. ___ RAFAEL NADAL Seeded: 2 Ranked: 1 Age: 32 Country: Spain 2018 Match Record: 30-2 2018 Singles Titles: 4 Career Singles Titles: 79 Grand Slam Singles Titles: 17 — Wimbledon ('08, '10), U.S. Open ('10, '13, '17), French Open ('05, '06, '07, '08, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14, '17, '18), Australian Open ('09) Last 5 Wimbledons: '17-4th, '16-Did Not Play, '15-2nd, '14-4th, '13-1st Aces: Has not competed since winning record-extending 11th French Open title on June 10. ... Four of past five Wimbledon losses came against opponents ranked 100th or worse. Topspin: Since reaching the final in five consecutive Wimbledon appearances from 2006-11, hasn't been past the fourth round. ___ MARIN CILIC Seeded: 3 Ranked: 5 Age: 29 Country: Croatia 2018 Match Record: 27-9 2018 Singles Titles: 1 Career Singles Titles: 18 Grand Slam Singles Titles: 1 — U.S. Open ('14) Last 5 Wimbledons: '17-RU, '16-QF, '15-QF, '14-QF, '13-2nd Aces: Runner-up to Federer at two of the past four majors. ... Won Queen's Club grass-court tuneup last week, beating Novak Djokovic in the final. Topspin: When his serve and forehand are clicking, as big a threat as anyone to make a deep run. ___ JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO Seeded: 5 Ranked: 4 Age: 29 Country: Argentina 2018 Match Record: 28-7 2018 Singles Titles: 2 Career Singles Titles: 22 Grand Slam Singles Titles: 1 — U.S. Open ('09) Last 5 Wimbledons: '17-2nd, '16-3rd, '15-DNP, '14-DNP, '13-SF Aces: Back at career-best No. 4 in rankings after semifinal run at Roland Garros. Topspin: Biggest forehand in the game could carry him far at All England Club. ___ JOHN ISNER Seeded: 9 Ranked: 10 Age: 33 Country: United States 2018 Match Record: 16-11 2018 Singles Titles: 1 Career Singles Titles: 13 Grand Slam Singles Titles: 0 — Best: QF, U.S. Open ('11) Last 5 Wimbledons: '17-2nd, '16-3rd, '15-3rd, '14-3rd, '13-2nd Aces: Ranks 2nd in 2018 in aces and percentage of service games won. Topspin: Never has put together a second-week run at the place where he won the longest tennis match in history in 2010. ___ NOVAK DJOKOVIC Seeded: 12 Ranked: 17 Age: 31 Country: Serbia 2018 Match Record: 18-9 2018 Singles Titles: 0 Career Singles Titles: 68 Grand Slam Singles Titles: 12 — Wimbledon ('11, '14, '15), U.S. Open ('11, '15), Australian Open ('08, '11, '12, '13, '15, '16), French Open ('16) Last 5 Wimbledons: '17-QF, '16-3rd, '15-W, '14-W, '13-RU Aces: Reached 1st tour final in nearly a year last week, and it was on grass. Good sign as he tries to come back from right elbow troubles. Topspin: Has won 12 of past 15 matches after going 6-6 to start 2018. ___ NICK KYRGIOS Seeded: 15 Ranked: 19 Age: 23 Country: Australia 2018 Match Record: 16-6 2018 Singles Titles: 1 Career Singles Titles: 4 Grand Slam Singles Titles: 0 — Best: QF, Wimbledon ('14), Australian Open ('15) Last 5 Wimbledons: '17-1st, '16-4th, '15-4th, '14-QF, '13-DNP Aces: Only three players have hit more aces or won a higher percentage of service games this season. Topspin: If he can maintain focus and play up to his abilities, can go far on a surface that suits his game. ___ ANDY MURRAY Seeded: Unseeded Ranked: 156 Age: 31 Country: Britain 2018 Match Record: 1-2 2018 Singles Titles: 0 Career Singles Titles: 45 Grand Slam Singles Titles: 3 — Wimbledon ('13, '16), U.S. Open ('12) Last 5 Wimbledons: '17-QF, '16-W, '15-Lost in Semifinals, '14-QF, '13-W Aces: Ranks 3rd among all active players in career percentage of return games won, trailing only Nadal and Djokovic. Topspin: Played only three matches in the last year because of hip surgery. ... Streak of making at least QFs in last 10 Wimbledon appearances could be in danger......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 30th, 2018

‘Incredible’ Nadal’s 11th French crown

PARIS, France– Rafael Nadal hailed his 11th French Open title as “just incredible” after he demolished Austria’s Dominic Thiem 6-4, 6-3, 6-2 despite a worrying injury scare in the closing stages of Sunday’s final. The 32-year-old world number one now has 17 Grand Slam titles, just three behind great rival Roger Federer. Nadal endured a […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJun 12th, 2018

Nadal wins 11th French Open

PARIS, France -- Rafael Nadal hailed his 11th French Open title as “just incredible” after he demolished Austria’s Dominic Thiem 6-4, 6-3, 6-2 despite a worrying injury scare in the closing stages of Sunday’s final. The 32-year-old world number one now has 17 Grand Slam titles, just three behind great….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018

‘Not crazy’ to chase Fed stuff’

PARIS, France– Rafael Nadal insists that he has no desire to become locked into an arms race with Roger Federer to surpass his great rival’s 20 Grand Slam titles. Nadal clinched an 11th French Open with a 6-4, 6-3, 6-2 victory against Dominic Thiem on Sunday to take his majors total to 17. That’s three […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018

No showdown: Injured Serena Williams out of French Open

PARIS --- Serena Williams called off her Grand Slam comeback because of a chest muscle injury on Monday, pulling out of the French Open shortly before she was supposed to play Maria Sharapova in the fourth round. "It's extremely disappointing," Williams said during a news conference at Roland Garros. "But also, I made a promise to myself and to my coach and to my team that if I'm not at least 60 percent or 50 percent, then I probably shouldn't play." Williams, who has won 23 Grand Slam singles titles, said she can't hit serves because of a problem with her right pectoral muscle. Her voice trembled a bit as she explained that she will get an MRI exam and consult with doctors ...Keep on reading: No showdown: Injured Serena Williams out of French Open.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

DeChambeau wins Memorial in playoff on 2nd extra hole

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) — For the fourth straight year, Bryson DeChambeau leaves Ohio feeling like a winner. This time he had a trophy to show for it, and a handshake with Jack Nicklaus to remember. DeChambeau finally made it easy on himself the third time playing the 18th hole at the Muirfield Village on Sunday, rolling in a 12-foot birdie putt on the second playoff hole to beat Byeong Hun An and win the Memorial. "I can't believe I did it," said DeChambeau, a winner for the second time on the PGA Tour. He had played the Memorial only once before, though the 24-year-old Californian has been a regular in central Ohio. He has made it through the 36-hole U.S. Open qualifier each of the last three years, all in the Columbus area. This was far more rewarding. DeChambeau watched his putt disappeared and raised both arms, pumping them seven times as he yelled above the cheers of fans. Many of them lingered at the 18th green after spending much of the final round as if this might be the day Tiger Woods returned to winning. It wasn't. Woods was never a serious factor, especially after missing a 3-foot par putt on the 10th hole and hitting another tee shot into someone's backyard on the 13th hole. One of his best weeks hitting the ball ended with an even-par 72 and a six-way tie for 23rd. The finish was no less entertaining. DeChambeau went from a two-shot deficit at the turn to a one-shot lead after No. 12, and he kept it the rest of the way until a three-putt bogey on the 18th hole from about 55 feet for a 1-under 71. That tied with An, who had closed with a 69 in the group ahead and was the first to reach 15-under 273. Kyle Stanley joined them in playoff. He hit into the water on the par-3 12th to fall five shots behind with six holes to play, only to run off four straight birdies, capping the big run with a 30-foot putt on the 17th to tie DeChambeau. Just his luck, Stanley hit a tree on the right elbow of the dogleg at No. 18, and it shot the ball across the fairway and nearly into a creek, except the ankle-deep rough was thick enough to slow it. Even so, he could only advance it 100 yards and made bogey for a 70. In the playoff, his tee shot was enough to the right that the ball was well above his feet in thick grass. Stanley choked up and took a swing, but the ball squirted ou t about 30 yards to the right, leading to another bogey, and he was quickly eliminated. "A couple bad breaks on 18," Stanley said. "I mean in the playoff, if I knock that ball 2-3 feet right of where it was I would have had a shot. But after hole 12 my chances were looking pretty slim, so to come back and make some birdies coming in ... it's a bit of a sour finish, but proud of the way I hung in there." An took some of the pressure off DeChambeau on the second playoff hole, also on No. 18, when he yanked his approach into the gallery. He played a marvelous flop shot out of deep rough to a couple of feet for a certain par, only for DeChambeau to hit his approach 12 feet behind the hole and make the birdie. "I finally got it right the third time," DeChambeau said. "It took me a little bit." Patrick Cantlay also had a chance on Sunday, leading by two shots going to the back nine. But he didn't make a birdie over his last 10 holes, and he fell back when he went bunker-to-bunker on the 17th and made bogey to fall two strokes behind. Cantlay narrowly missed a 25-foot birdie putt on the final hole, shot 71 and finished fourth. Peter Uihlein (66) was alone in fifth. Joaquin Niemann, the 19-year-old from Chile, birdied the 18th hole to tie for sixth. That was enough for him to earn special temporary membership on the PGA Tour, meaning he can get unlimited sponsor exemptions. Justin Thomas shot 68 and tied for eighth in his debut at No. 1 in the world. He will keep that ranking going into the U.S. Open. Woods started five shots behind. He pulled to within three shots with a two-putt birdie on the par-5 fifth hole, but he didn't make another birdie until he had fallen seven shots behind and only had eight holes in front of him. Woods was second to last in the key putting statistic among the 73 players who went all four rounds. "If I just putt normally, I probably would be right there with those guys and up there in the last couple of groups," Wood said. "If I just keep building on this, with how I'm hitting it right now, I'm in good shape for two weeks from now." The next stop for Woods is the U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills. DeChambeau will be there, too, his confidence higher than ever. He first played the Memorial in 2016 and was coming off four straight missed cuts. He tied for 38th that week, a small victory, but realized his game wasn't good enough. Now, he has PGA Tour titles in successive seasons. And his victory moved him to No. 8 in the Ryder Cup standings......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

Get ready for Serena Williams vs. Maria Sharapova in Paris

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — If the upcoming French Open showdown between Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova provides any of the sort of animus and back-and-forth they manage to stir up away from the court, look out. During a news conference after both won Saturday to set up the longtime rivals' fourth-round matchup at Roland Garros, Williams criticized Sharapova's autobiography as "hearsay" and twice brought up the Russian's 15-month doping ban. Producing by far the best performance in her return to Grand Slam tennis — 16 months after her last major tournament and nine months after having a baby — Williams played cleanly and powerfully in a 6-3, 6-4 tour de force against 11th-seeded Julia Goerges that lasted a mere 75 minutes and lacked much in the way of theatrics. "There is still a ways to go, but it's moving in the right direction," said Williams, who made only three unforced errors in the first set, 12 in all. "And I think that as long as it's moving in the right direction, I know I will get there." Sharapova advanced with a similarly lopsided win, 6-2, 6-1 against 2016 U.S. Open runner-up Karolina Pliskova. Now comes the drama: Williams vs. Sharapova on Monday with a quarterfinal spot at stake. They have verbally clashed in the past, such as a 2013 public spat about their private lives. Williams, 36, owns 23 major singles titles. Sharapova, 31, has won five. Williams has won the French Open three times, Sharapova twice. They are the only active women with a career Grand Slam; they are two of six in history to accomplish that. Both have been ranked No. 1. But the head-to-head history is overwhelmingly in Williams' favor: She has won 19 of 21 meetings, including 18 in a row. "Quite frankly, she's probably a favorite in this match, for sure," Williams said with a chuckle. "She's been playing ... for over a year now. I just started. So I'm just really trying to get my bearings and trying to feel out where I am and see where I can go." The last time Sharapova beat Williams was in 2004. The last time they played was in the 2016 Australian Open quarterfinals, Sharapova's final appearance before her 15-month drug suspension. "Well, it's been a while," Sharapova said, "and I think a lot has happened in our lives for the both of us, in very different ways." Williams was asked about Sharapova's book, which was published last year. It contains quite a bit of material about the American, including a reference to Williams crying in the locker room after losing to Sharapova in the Wimbledon final 14 years ago. "As a fan, I wanted to read the book and I was really excited for it to come out and I was really happy for her. And then the book was a lot about me. I was surprised about that, to be honest," Williams said. "I was, like, 'Oh, OK, I didn't expect to be reading a book about me — that wasn't necessarily true.'" Insisting she doesn't "have any negative feelings" toward Sharapova, Williams said "the success of one female should be the inspiration to another." Seconds later, Williams made reference to Sharapova's "incident of drugs." There were plenty of other results involving top names at the French Open on Saturday. Other women moving into the fourth round included 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza, two-time runner-up Simona Halep, two-time major title winner Angelique Kerber and reigning U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens. Men's winners included 10-time champion Rafael Nadal, No. 3 Marin Cilic, No. 5 Juan Martin del Potro, No. 6 Kevin Anderson and No. 9 John Isner. The story of Day 7, though, was what everyone can look forward to on Day 9: Williams vs. Sharapova. This is Williams' first Grand Slam tournament since January 2017, when she won the Australian Open while pregnant. The American made a brief foray on the tour earlier this season, but she played only four matches. She had some problems in her initial two outings in Paris, including in the second round, when she dropped the first set against 17th-seeded Ashleigh Barty before — as Williams herself put it — "Serena came out." Against Goerges, the careless errors were largely absent. The missing energy was back. In front of a crowd that included former heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson, it took 15 minutes for Williams to gain the upper hand, sprinting to reach a drop shot and whip a cross-court forehand passing winner for a 3-1 lead. Williams yelled loudly and raised her fist. It was almost as if she'd never left the scene. "Any time you play against Serena, you know what you're up against. You know the challenge that is upon you," Sharapova said. "Despite the record that I have against her, I always look forward to coming out on the court and competing against the best players.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

Pondering lunch, Sascha Zverev saves match point in Paris

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — Talented and pegged-for-success as Alexander Zverev might be, there he was in the French Open's main stadium Friday, on the precipice of a third-round defeat and yet another Grand Slam disappointment. A loss would have left the No. 2-seeded Zverev with an 0-8 record at major tournaments against men ranked in the top 50. A loss also would have left his resume still with merely one trip as far as the round of 16 at any Slam — and zero such runs at Roland Garros. In the fourth set, his opponent served for the victory. In the fifth, the circumstances were more dire: Zverev faced a match point. Both times, he proved steadier and sturdier than Damir Dzumhur, a Bosnian ranked 29th and seeded 26th, and Zverev eventually prevailed 6-2, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (3), 7-5 in 3 hours, 54 minutes. It gave the 21-year-old German his second consecutive five-set win; he trailed two sets to one in each. It also showed — not just to others but, perhaps more importantly, to Zverev himself — that he can handle such occasions, that he is capable of doing what's necessary when the sets and hours add up, and that he is perhaps finally ready to stride into the very last days at a major. He's the only active player outside of the "Big 4" of Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray with three Masters titles. But Grand Slam success has been elusive. As for what sort of internal strife was happening in Zverev's head Friday? "None," Zverev said. "Mainly, I was thinking (about) what I was going to have for lunch." Well, then. He acknowledged drawing a dose of confidence from managing to win two five-setters in a row, "knowing that I'm fit enough to last as long as I want." In contrast, No. 4 Grigor Dimitrov was unable to pull off back-to-back five-set wins. The two-time major semifinalist fell to 0-7 against top-50 foes at the French Open with a 7-6 (4), 6-2, 6-4 loss to 35th-ranked Fernando Verdasco. "I lost my nerves early on," Dimitrov said. "He played an absolutely stunning match. What can I say?" Verdasco's seventh career fourth-round match at Roland Garros — he's never won one — will come against 2016 champion Djokovic, who seemed to come alive after obliterating his racket in the second-set tiebreaker and wound up eliminating No. 13 Roberto Bautista-Agut 6-4, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (4), 6-2. "Sometimes emotions get the worst out of you, you know," Djokovic said, "or the best out of you, whatever you want to call it." In Dzumhur's case, he was afflicted by jitters while on the verge of making it to a major's last 16 for the first time. Dzumhur served for the match leading 6-5 in the fourth set. But everything fell apart with this sequence: forehand into the net, forehand wide, drop shot into the net, backhand into the net. Just like that, he'd been broken at love. A later errant backhand ended the tiebreaker. "I was not mentally ready to win that match in the fourth set. And I just was rushing a little bit in that service game," Dzumhur said, before offering some credit to Zverev. "He was playing very smart in that moment. He let me do mistakes." Ahead 5-4 in the fifth, Dzumhur was one point from winning while Zverev served at 30-40. But Zverev — at 6-foot-6 (1.98 meters), he is 9 inches (20 centimeters) taller than Dzumhur — came up with the goods, a 118 mph service winner. Dzumhur again helped Zverev, putting a pair of easy backhands into the net, then later said of the first of those: "That's the point that I will probably remember." Perhaps Zverev will, too. More likely, he won't fuss too much over the details, including that Dzumhur entered the French Open with a losing record this year. Instead, it's the outcome that matters. That didn't used to be the case, when Zverev was 12 and coached by Dad. His father taught Sascha, as Zverev is called by many, and brother Mischa — in third-round action Saturday — the importance at that age of process over results, preparing them for success not as juniors but as pros. And now? "I'm trying to win. That's all that matters. It doesn't matter how long it goes. It doesn't matter how much time I'll spend on court," Zverev said. "It doesn't matter if it goes 9-7 in the fifth or it goes 6-1, 6-1, 6-2." He seems more equipped for the former now than ever......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 2nd, 2018

2-time French Open champ reminds: ‘There is also Sharapova’

PARIS --- The topic was the location of Maria Sharapova's upcoming third-round match at the French Open, and a reporter noted it likely will be at one of the tournament's main arenas, given that it involves 2016 U.S. Open runner-up Karolina Pliskova. "Well," came the rejoinder, "there is also Sharapova." This was delivered with Sharapova's chin resting on her right hand and was followed by a bit of a staredown, as if to say: Let's not forget who you're talking to here. The 31-year-old Russian has, after all, been ranked No. 1. She does, after all, own five major titles. And that total does, after all, include a pair from Roland Garros. She is playing in the clay-court Gran...Keep on reading: 2-time French Open champ reminds: ‘There is also Sharapova’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 1st, 2018