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History made?

SINGAPORE — Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un hailed their historic summit Tuesday as a breakthrough in relations between Cold War foes, but the agreement they produced was short on details about the key issue of Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons. The extraordinary encounter saw the leader of the world’s most powerful….....»»

Category: newsSource: journal journalJun 12th, 2018

Tom Brady loses for 1st time in 9 games vs Jaguars, 31-20

By Mark Long, Associated Press JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Tom Brady trudged off the field with his helmet in one hand, grass stains on his jersey and a look of frustration on his face. This was a different feeling for the New England Patriots quarterback — at least against Jacksonville. Brady lost for the first time in nine starts against the Jaguars, a 31-20 setback Sunday in which Blake Bortles outshined the three-time league MVP and five-time Super Bowl champion. Jacksonville had been the only remaining AFC team to never beat Brady. The Jags (2-0) finally got it done in a rematch of last season's AFC championship game. It shouldn't take long for Brady and the Patriots (1-1) to bounce back. They play winless Detroit next week. "It's a long year," Brady said. "I think you have a bad day against a good team, it's a recipe for losing." Brady completed 24 of 35 passes for 234 yards, with two touchdowns and a turnover. He was sacked twice, including once by Dante Fowler in the fourth quarter that caused a fumble. He said New England's offensive execution has room for improvement. "I don't think it's anywhere near where we're capable of or what we've done at different points through a season," Brady said. "We've got to make improvements, and I think September and October, that's what they're for. I think there's a lot of practices we need and a lot of time that we need to figure out what we do well and what we don't do so well. But you have to try to win in the meantime. And today obviously wasn't enough." The Jaguars, who can get to 3-0 for the first time since 2004 next week against Tennessee, did just about everything right. They held tight end Rob Gronkowski to two catches for 15 yards. They slowed New England's running game to 3.4 yards a carry. They allowed just two plays longer than 25 yards. And Bortles delivered the best game of his five-year career. Bortles threw for 377 yards and four touchdowns. He tossed perfect passes in the end zone to Donte Moncrief, Keelan Cole and Austin Seferian-Jenkins in the first half, and then connected with Dede Westbrook on a short crossing route in the fourth quarter that Westbrook turned into a 61-yard score . "We go against Blake in practice," Jaguars defensive end Calais Campbell said. "He has some days where he is just lights out and gets us. If he can get us, he can get anybody because we feel pretty good about ourselves. I know what's going to happen. If he keeps getting opportunities, he's going to be a big-time player. "I was just grabbing popcorn every time the ball was in Bortles' hands. I say, 'He's going to do something great', and then he's running and spinning and, man, it was impressive." Here are some other things we learned from the game: COLE STEPS UP Cole had the key block on Westbrook's big play that sealed the victory and is proving to be the team's go-to receiver. He finished with seven catches for 116 yards and a score. He made a spectacular, one-handed catch on Jacksonville's second drive and beat Eric Rowe for a 24-yard touchdown three plays later that got Rowe benched. "Keelan made an unbelievable play on the sideline," coach Doug Marrone said. "Everybody saw that. He's a guy that has been really steady for us, really worked his butt off. ... The first year is tough. You're trying to find your way. That second year you kind of get set in a way, and he's been good right from the beginning, very focused and has done a nice job for us." HOME STREAKING The Jaguars can set a franchise record next week by winning their eighth consecutive game at home. They host Tennessee next Sunday. Jacksonville hasn't lost at home since falling to the Los Angeles Rams in Week 6 of last season. RECORD HEAT The teams played in the hottest game in Jaguars history. Temperature at kickoff was 97 degrees, with a heat index of 107 degrees. According to the NFL, it was the warmest game since Green Bay played at Arizona in 2003. KEY INJURIES The Patriots lost two of their best defenders to concussions. Defensive end Trey Flowers left the game in the first quarter, and safety Patrick Chung was hurt injured in the second half. Jaguars left tackle Cam Robinson injured his left knee in the first quarter and was helped off the field. UP NEXT The Patriots play at Detroit, where former New England defensive coordinator Matt Patricia is now the head coach. The Jaguars host AFC South rival Tennessee in the second of three straight home games......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

'aNYmoLaSalle: DLSU Lady Spikers enjoy the Big Apple

Some members of the two-time defending champions DLSU Lady Spikers are still celebrating their title in style as they visit New York City. The UAAP Season 80 women's volleyball champs are just rolling through the Big Apple, snapping photos of each remarkable sight. Worry not, though, we've got you covered. Here are some of what the DLSU Lady Spikers saw in their trip in one of the biggest, busiest, and most beautiful cities in the world!   ART LIFE The Lady Spikers didn't pass up on the opportunity to visit two of the most well-kept museums in the world. They visited the American Museum of Natural History, as well as The Met and saw everything from fossils... to ice cream.         View this post on Instagram                 A post shared by Gyra Barroga (@gyrabarroga) on Sep 11, 2018 at 2:46am PDT           View this post on Instagram                     A post shared by Majoy Baron (@majoybaron) on Sep 11, 2018 at 10:56pm PDT   GLAMOUR New York is full of Instagram-worthy sites, and the ladies were no-holds barred in posing for their smartphones and for all the waiting fans.         View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Gyra Barroga (@gyrabarroga) on Sep 12, 2018 at 4:22am PDT           View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Majoy Baron (@majoybaron) on Sep 13, 2018 at 10:40am PDT           View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Desiree Wynea Cheng (@itsmedescheng) on Sep 12, 2018 at 5:13am PDT           View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Dawn Macandili (@dawn_macandili) on Sep 12, 2018 at 5:09pm PDT   ARCHITECTURE & HISTORY The Lady Spikers are also soaking up New York’s rich history and culture through its various buildings, memorials, and man-made structures. It’s part-Instagram feed goal, part-history lesson, and part-culture appreciation, all in one go.            View this post on Instagram                     A post shared by Kim Kianna Dy (@kiannady) on Sep 14, 2018 at 4:39am PDT           View this post on Instagram                 #aNYmolasalle 🗽 A post shared by Majoy Baron (@majoybaron) on Sep 13, 2018 at 12:36am PDT           View this post on Instagram  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

Muntinlupa, Imus still streaking in MPBL

The streak keeps on going for Muntinlupa and Imus even as last Thursday even as the two teams pulled off contrasting wins over their respective rivals in the 2018 Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League Anta-Datu Cup at the Imus Sports Complex in Cavite. The Cagers survived a near meltdown before holding on for a 77-76 win over the Parañaque Patriots. Muntinlupa had to hold its breath before notching its seventh straight win as it squandered a 31-point lead in the third period and watched Parañaque chop the lead slowly but surely. The Cagers were still comfortably ahead, 73-50, inside the final seven-minute mark when the Patriots let their defense do the work, holding their rivals to just a lone field goal. Ryusei Koga came through with a triple then completed a steal, setting up Ivan Valenzuela for two free throws for a 77-74 count with only five seconds left in the game. Koga gave up a duty foul to stop the clock, but put more pressure on Chito Jaime to make at least one of his two free throws. The ex-pro forward missed the first, then made the second then Harold Arboleda let loose a triple that went in as time expired, making Jaime’s split charities earlier more significant. Arboleda led all scorers with 21 points, but also contributed 10 rebounds for his 10th double-double performance in the league, the most completed by any player in the young two-season history of the fastest growing regional amateur basketball league in the country.    Muntinlupa coach Aldrin Morante admitted that his wards relaxed too much when it built a big lead, but blamed himself as well for experimenting on using different combinations, particularly in giving more playing time to the second stringers. In the nightcap, Imus streaked to its fourth straight win after outplaying Pampanga, 88-76, to improve its win-loss record to 5-3 and forge a tie for second spot in the Southern Division. The Bandera, however, needed to survive a 36-point explosion from Juneric Baloria before extending its winning streak. Baloria’s 36 markers is the new all-time record for most points in a game......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 14th, 2018

PVL Finals By The Numbers: Atin ‘To

The University of the Philippines Lady Fighting Maroons made history on a rainy Wednesday evening after capturing their first major title since 1982. The Diliman-based squad survived a wild match and Finals series against a hobbled yet determined Far Eastern University squad to clinch the Premier Volleyball League season 2 Collegiate Conference championship. While the title showdown was epic in itself, the Lady Maroons’ journey to supremacy, and the numbers behind it will speak about their long, hard road to ending an extended drought. As the Diliman volleybelles celebrate their hard-earned title, let’s take a look at some interesting statistics from their championship run. 0-3 The Lady Maroons’ record against UAAP teams in the elimination round. UP was always on the brink of getting kicked off the Final Four race after failing to beat any of its fellow UAAP-based squads. All of their wins came at the expense of NCAA teams, but they were just enough to lift them to the semis, where they eventually showed what the Utak-Puso spirit is all about. 10  Number of sets played in the Finals. UP’s run to the title was nothing short of astounding. All two matches went the distance, and then some. Standing toe-to-toe against FEU, a squad that flee under the radar, all the way to the Finals of the UAAP season 80 volleyball tournament, the Lady Maroons fought tooth-and-nail to the very last point. In the series opener, UP climbed back from down two sets to steal the advantage from the George Pascua-led Lady Tamaraws. In the second game, UP came oh so close to surrendering their two-set advantage after a meltdown of epic proportions caused by FEU’s proven spirit. But the Lady Maroons somehow survived.  8-0 UP’s opening lead in the third set. FEU was in shambles after the Lady Maroons flew to a 2-0 match lead in Game 2. In the third, and what many believed was the final set, UP zoomed to a commanding 8-0 advantage, prompting fans in the arena to already start celebrating. UP fans starting to feel it 👀 #PVLonABSCBN pic.twitter.com/2k0MbNaNLk — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 12, 2018 But Coach Pascua pleaded to the Lady Tams during a timeout to continue fighting. And they did, eventually erasing UP’s lead late in the set to stay alive. Rejuvenated by that enthralling comeback in Set 3, FEU claimed the fourth frame, and then took a commanding lead in the final set to make the hopes of a rubber match for all the marbles possible. 13-7 FEU’s lead in the fifth and final set. Stunned after giving up two sets, UP was at the wrong end of a historic comeback. Now facing a six-point deficit in a deciding point in the series, UP unloaded a spirited 8-0 run to once again stun FEU, and to snap a 36-year drought for UP volleyball. 6  Combined points for Finals MVP Isa Molde and team captain Ayel Estrañero in that final 8-0 burst. 🏆 Moment for the UP Lady Fighting Maroons!!! #PVLonABSCBN pic.twitter.com/91vPP5TsCG — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 12, 2018 Once again, the Lady Maroons’ veterans came through. After willing the squad through the Final Four and the Finals, it was Molde who led the fightback with emphatic hits before Estrañero‘s steady serve clinched the championship. 19 Isa Molde’s scoring average in the Finals. MVP ✅ Finals MVP ✅@IsaMolde10, everyone 👏 #PVLonABSCBN pic.twitter.com/EZnfeo6jjD — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 12, 2018 With everything on the line, UP’s golden girl stepped it up. After earning the MVP award after norming 15.14 points in the elimination round, Molde came through in the championship series, dropping 16 and 22 points respectively to finally deliver a long-awaited volleyball title to Diliman......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 13th, 2018

PVL Finals: UP makes history, rules Collegiate Conference

University of the Philippines wrote history on a rainy Wednesday night. The championship newbies made the more experienced Far Eastern University crumble under pressure as the Lady Maroons completed a sweet sweep of the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference Finals series, 25-20, 25-18, 23-25, 20-25, 15-13 to hoist their first major title in 36 years. The sea of maroon’s loud celebration drowned the heavy downpour that relentlessly pounded the roof of the FilOil Flying V Centre as history unfolded before their eyes. The Lady Maroons after squandering a two-set lead flirted with disaster in the fifth, trailing 7-13. But Conference and Finals Most Valuable Player Isa Molde willed her team back with a thrilling 8-0 closing run capped by an ace from Ayel Estranero. The duo scored six of the UP's last eight points in the game. Molde, also the conference 1st Best Open Spiker, finished with 22 points - all from attacks - while Marist Layug and Marian Buitre scored 12 each. Sophomore Roselyn Rosier finished with 10 for the Lady Maroons, who received 40 points off FEU's miscues. Estranero tallied 28 excellent sets to help UP punch in 52 spikes.    "Once we we're 13-13 I expected something to happen because this is volleyball. They (FEU) are more tensed, they were out of timeout just like us. It was the mind strength again, that pushed us through. I think eventually we came out stronger mentally," said UP coach Godrey Okumu.     UP, which took the series opener in a five-set shocker over the UAAP Season 80 runners-up and last year’s second placers, with momentum on their side took the first two sets but encountered tough resistance from the Lady Tams in the third frame. The Lady Maroons opened with a commanding 8-0 lead but saw FEU slowly dismantle their advantage to tie the set at 14. UP even went four points closer to the title but slowly faded away as the Lady Tams stole a frame. FEU again did it in the fourth. But it proved to be a minor delay with the Lady Maroons date with destiny -- a feat that the Diliman-based squad last carved out in the UAAP back in 1982.               In a battle of nerves that decided the wild finish, it was FEU that blinked first allowing the Lady Maroons to end a long championship drought.      Rookie Lycha Ebon led the Lady Tams with 13 markers, Jerrili Malaban posted 12 points while Jeanette Villareal had 10.     ---- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 12th, 2018

PVL Finals: ‘Atin ‘to, atin to’ is the new UP Ikot

Last year, Paul Desiderio shouted ‘Atin ‘to!’ during University of the Philippines’ last huddle in a UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball game. After that, Desiderio sank the game-winning buzzer-beating triple to down University of Sto. Tomas. It has since been the battle cry of the Diliman-based student-athletes. On Wednesday, the Lady Maroons did their own version that morale-boosting mantra. Down 7-13 in the pivotal stretch of the fifth set, the words again echoed in UP’s huddle up until they marched back inside the court.          “Atin ‘to, atin ‘to!” Like a shot of adrenaline, the Lady Maroons charged with renewed energy. Afterwards, they made history. UP completed a sweet sweep of the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference best-of-three Finals series, 25-20, 25-18, 23-25, 20-25, 15-13, to hoist its first major title in 36 years at the FilOil Flying V Centre. “Nu’ng nagsimula pa lang ‘yung fifth set we talked na how much do we want to win and in order for us to actually get the championship title,” said veteran setter Ayel Estranero, whose ace, which landed like a dagger right at the middle of the stunned Lady Tamaraws, sealed the championship that eluded UP in almost four decades. “Kailangan namin gustuhin lahat kami,” added Estranero, whose squad won the series opener also in five sets. “‘That’s why everyone actually never gave up until the end.” Estranero and Isa Molde, who collected the conference and Finals Most Valuable Player as well as the 1st Best Outside Spiker, took matters on their own hands in that closing stretch as they scored six of the last eight points.    But the duo was quick to give credit to the collective effort of the whole team. “Kita naman e,” said Estranero. “Atin ‘to, atin ‘to,” Molde butted in during the postgame interview where the two joined head coach Godfrey Okumu. “Yeah, atin ‘to, atin ‘to. Di kami makakapalo talaga kung walang dumepensa or di ako maka-set ng walang dumepensa so until the end it was still a collective effort from everyone from the coaches and the players even those in the bench,” Estranero pointed out. “So ‘yun pero siyempre andun din yung conscious effort na gugustuhin mo talaga and you’ll do whatever it takes,” added Estranero. When the playmaker trooped behind the service line – UP at championship point – Estranero murmured a little prayer.    “When I was serving I was just actually praying and I just actually believed that the team can actually win despite na sobrang haba ng hinabol namin. Kahit ang layo ng score namin but then na-feel namin sa loob na hindi pa kami talaga susuko that everyone is still willing to fight,” she recalled.  “So ‘yun nu’ng nag-serve ako hindi ako kinakabahan as in I just really want to win for the team and for everyone,” Estranero added. When she made the connection on her serve, the ball flew in at a low arching trajectory. “Gulat ako kasi I mean like hindi ko naman totally alam ano mangyayari sa bola pag release ko,” said Estranero. It was supposed to be a sure reception from FEU's libero. But like having their feet cemented on the taraflex floor, FEU libero Buding Duremdes and the rest of the Lady Tams just froze. “But when I saw the ball dropped and touch the floor, it was just so overwhelming,” said Estranero. Estranero rolled and then sprawled on the floor face down after the final whistle, slamming her hand on the court. Her teammates were already crying, shouting, hugging and congratulating each other as they round inside the court after completing their conquest. Confetti slowly fell. History made. “Atin ‘to, atin ‘to.” UP owned the night.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 12th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

LOOK: Haslem reveals why he chose to return to Heat

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — Udonis Haslem arrived at the Miami Heat facility for a workout one day last week, and was told he needed to sign a waiver before he took the court. The reason: Technically, he wasn't on the team. "That was a little weird, having to do that," Haslem said. It won't be a problem for the next year. Haslem officially signed his one-year, $2.4 million contract with the Heat on Monday, a deal that was struck last week and finally became official when he put pen to paper. Haslem will enter his 16th NBA season, all with the Heat, and that means the Miami native will be with his hometown franchise for more than half of its 31-year history. "For the hometown kid in me, that means the world," Haslem said. "I wish I understood how big that is right now, because I really don't, but I know it's big." Haslem was the seventh-oldest player in the NBA last season — and will rise at least one spot on that list this season, with the retirement of San Antonio's Manu Ginobili. Vince Carter is 41 and will play for Atlanta, Dirk Nowitzki is 40 and back with Dallas, and Haslem is 38. "It's great to have our captain back," Heat President Pat Riley said. The others who played last season and are older than Haslem are Jason Terry, Damien Wilkins and Jamal Crawford. They all remain unsigned for the coming season. So, too, does Dwyane Wade. He and Haslem are the only two players who were part of all three Heat championship teams. Haslem said he's busily recruiting his business partner — the pair shares several off-court interests, including a pizza chain — to come back as well. "My mindset has always been for us to finish it together," Haslem said. "I want us to do a whole season together. Experience the road, dinner on the road, go through that whole process. I want us to experience that together." Wade tweeted his congratulations to Haslem when the deal was signed. "You are (the) most selfless person I've ever met," Wade said in his tweet. Congrts to my brother @ThisIsUD on season number 16 coming up! You are thee most selfless person I’ve ever met!— DWade (@DwyaneWade) September 11, 2018 Haslem appeared in only 14 games last season, and hasn't had much of a role with the Heat in the last three seasons. Haslem believes he can still play — he has kept himself in tremendous condition — but knows that he probably won't have a big on-court presence again. Still, a meeting with Heat coach Erik Spoelstra last week helped seal the deal to return. "Me and Spo were honest with each other," Haslem said. "Honesty is not always telling somebody what they want to hear. And we both have gotten to that point in our careers where we value each other's opinions, whether we want to hear them or not. We trust each other. We root for each other. We both have the best interests of this team in mind." But even if he doesn't get much in the way of minutes, Haslem knows he's valued. Spoelstra raves about the way he interacts and mentors teammates, and Haslem said that was a huge part of his decision as well. "It's about my love for the organization and my love for the guys," Haslem said. "It wasn't about me. If I was looking for playing time, I could have gone someplace else or played in China or something. But at the end of the day, would it have made me as happy as being around this organization and being around these guys? No, I don't think it would.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Darnold recovers from 1st-play pick-6, helps Jets rout Lions

By Larry Lage, Associated Press DETROIT (AP) — Sam Darnold made a stellar debut despite throwing a pick-6 on his first NFL snap and the New York Jets intercepted five passes while routing the Detroit Lions 48-17 on Monday night. The 21-year-old Darnold became the youngest quarterback to start a season opener since the 1970 AFL-NFL merger, and he got off to a shaky start. Quandre Diggs intercepted his ill-advised, across-the-field lob toward the left sideline on the first play from scrimmage and returned it 37 yards for a touchdown 20 seconds into the game. "On that interception, I was pretty nervous," Darnold said. "After that, I put it behind me." The former USC star shook it off and completed 16 of 21 passes for 198 yards and two touchdowns. "He didn't flinch," Jets coach Todd Bowles said. "He didn't even blink." Darnold helped the Jets set a franchise record for points on the road, surpassing the 47 they scored in 1967 against the Boston Patriots. He also outplayed 30-year-old Matthew Stafford. Stafford threw four interceptions — one shy of his career high — and left the game briefly in the third quarter after being hit from the front and back. He was mercifully taken out midway through the fourth quarter and replaced by Matt Cassel with Detroit down 31. Stafford was 27 of 46 for 286 yards and a TD pass to Golden Tate early in the third quarter to tie it at 17. The Jets dominated in all phases. They scored 31 straight in the third quarter to pull away, sending Detroit's fans for the exits and setting off a jolly green party in the Motor City. It was the highest-scoring third quarter in team history and trailed only the 34-point second quarter the Brett Favre-led team scored in 2008 against Arizona. New York scored on the ground and through the air, on defense and on a punt return. The Jets could've piled on even more in the final minutes but turned the ball over on downs after kneeling to take time off the clock. Darnold flipped the ball to a referee after the final kneel down, and the official gave it right back before shaking the rookie's hand. It was a miserable coaching debut for Detroit's Matt Patricia. "Had a couple good plays," Patricia said. "But a couple good plays isn't going to make a game." New NFL head coaches dropped to 0-6 in Week 1, with Oakland's Jon Gruden the group's final hope for an opening victory in the Monday nightcap. Linebacker Darron Lee had two of New York's interceptions, including one he ran back 36 yards for a touchdown in the third quarter. Trumaine Johnson, Morris Claiborne and Jamal Adams also picked off passes in a big opener for the Jets' "New Jack City" secondary. Late in the game, just before Cassel threw an interception, hundreds of New York fans chanted: "J-E-T-S, JETS! JETS! JETS!" A crew clad in green and white filed into seats in four sections along the New York sideline and appeared to outnumber Detroit fans who stuck around for the bitter end. INJURIES Jets: CB Johnson (head injury) and CB Buster Skrine (rib) returned to play after leaving the field with injuries. Johnson was evaluated after he intercepted a pass and fumbled after taking a hard hit from Detroit receiver Kenny Golladay. Lions: DE Ezekiel Ansah, who has struggled to get and stay healthy, left the game with a shoulder after making four tackles, including a sack. OG T.J. Lang left the game with a back injury. CB Darius Slay returned to play after leaving the field to be evaluated for a concussion. UP NEXT Jets: Host the Miami Dolphins on Sunday. Lions: Visit the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

PVL Finals: Rosier gets early birthday gift

University of the Philippines hitter Roselyn Rosier got an early birthday gift after the Lady Maroons moved closer to clinching their first major tournament title in 36 years. The sophomore played big to help the Lady Maroons complete a come-from-behind, 14-25, 22-25, 26-24, 25-18, 15-5 Game 1 win over Far Eastern University in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference best-of-three Finals series Sunday at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan.    “It’s amazing, I mean doing the thing I love the most before my birthday and winning our game, is probably the best birthday gift I could ever get for myself and the team as well,” said Rosier, who will turn 20 Monday. Rosier finished with 15 points highlighted by 13 attacks while playing great floor defense with 14 digs. Her effort drew praises from Kenyan head coach Godfrey Okumu. “She did great today. She helped us win today and she played a very big role,” said Okumu. “I think she just made history for herself with her score.”     Rosier and the Lady Maroons will get a chance to end a long title drought since UP ruled UAAP in 1982 on Wednesday in Game 2.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 9th, 2018

‘Goyo’ is worth its weight in gold

  Jerrold Tarog demonstrates his versatility and knack for provocative yarn-spinning with the release of "Goyo: Ang Batang Heneral," the director's must-see follow-up to TBA Studios' wartime historical epic "Heneral Luna."   The second installment of Tarog's hero trilogy is as visually sumptuous as it is pertinently reflective of the political turmoil the country is currently embroiled in---a curious case of art assertively imitating life, and vice versa.   It's made more significant by the fact that it's making apathetic, often self-entitled millennials take interest in history and its hard-earned but seldom-heeded lessons. Proof? When we watched the fi...Keep on reading: ‘Goyo’ is worth its weight in gold.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

Nishikori runs out of gas against Djokovic

Kei Nishikori stumbled into a buzzsaw in the shape of Novak Djokovic on Friday, but the Japanese star leaves the US Open pleased with a semi-final run one year after missing the tournament through injury. "It was very good," he said of his two weeks in Flushing Meadows. "Maybe not today, but the last couple of matches I played great tennis, beat a couple of good guys. "I'm really happy to be in the semis again. Could have been better playing the final again, but maybe the my next chance." Nishikori made history in reaching the 2014 US Open final, but said he could hardly bring himself to watch last year's tournament as he battled a wrist injury that brought his 2017 season...Keep on reading: Nishikori runs out of gas against Djokovic.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

Storm, Mystics look to enjoy experience of WNBA Finals

By TIM BOOTH, AP Sports Writer SEATTLE (AP) — Sue Bird leaned over toward Breanna Stewart and made sure the current MVP of the WNBA was paying attention to what the oldest player in the league was saying. "This is advice," Bird said. The message to Stewart was clear: At age 24, don't take for granted that she's leading the Seattle Storm to the WNBA Finals and expect it to happen all the time. Bird should know. She won a title in her third WNBA season. It was another six years before she was back in the finals winning another title. And it was eight more years on top of that before Bird and the Storm finally made it back to the Finals, where they will face the Washington Mystics in Game 1 on Friday night. "I didn't think we'd be back, to be honest," Bird said. "We started a rebuild and there was no telling when we'd get on the other side of it. It's not that my hunger for it went away or my motivation. Clearly, I wanted to stay at the top of my game and wanted to help this franchise get on the other side of this rebuild, but the Finals? That was very far from my imagination." Bird is relishing this opportunity knowing it could be one of her last chances to win another title. And it was her performance in the fourth quarter of Game 5 against Phoenix that put Seattle in the championship series, hitting four 3-pointers and scoring 14 of her 22 points during a brilliant six-minute stretch that left the likes of Kobe Bryant and LeBron James singing her praises on social media. Also not taking this trip to the Finals for granted are the Mystics. It's their first Finals appearance in franchise history. Star Elena Delle Donne went to the Finals in 2014 with Chicago, as did guard Kristi Toliver with Los Angeles in 2016. "We've been leaders of this team and have just been trying to make sure everyone is focused, staying light, having a good time and spending time together, not just on the court but off the court," Delle Donne said. Here are other things to watch in the best-of-five series: STAR POWER: The matchup between Delle Donne and Stewart highlights the series. Stewart averaged 24 points in Seattle's series against Phoenix and carried the scoring load for much of Game 5 until Bird got hot late. What Delle Donne did against Atlanta may have been better. Playing with a bone bruise in her left knee suffered in Game 2, Delle Donne returned for Games 4 and 5 and while her scoring was down, her presence on the court was a boost for the Mystics. Delle Donne scored 29 and 30 points, respectively, in her two games against Seattle in the regular season, the second a blowout victory in Washington late in the season. Stewart had 25 points in each of the first two meetings but was held to 10 in the final matchup. FIRST-TIME WINNER: The Finals will feature a coach who will raise the trophy for the first time. Seattle's Dan Hughes and Washington's Mike Thibault have enjoyed incredible individual success leading teams, but neither has ever won a title. Thibault has only reached the Finals twice in his career — in 2004 and 2005 with Connecticut. In the first of those Finals trips, the Sun lost to Seattle. Hughes has reached the Finals only once in his career, in 2008 with San Antonio, where it was swept by Detroit. FRESH KICKS: Bird appears to be poking fun at herself for being the oldest player in the WNBA with shoes she had designed for Game 1 of the Finals. The shoes feature the image of Emma Webster, better known as "Granny" from the Looney Tunes cartoons. Bird tweeted on Wednesday, "Scariest Grandma I have EVER seen." Bird and Stewart have worn customized sneakers at times during the season. THAT 70s SHOW: While this is the first time Seattle and Washington have clashed in the WNBA Finals, it's not the first time the two cities have played for basketball championships. In consecutive years — 1978 and 1979 — the Washington Bullets and Seattle SuperSonics met in the NBA Finals. Washington won a Game 7 to win the title in 1978, while Seattle defeated the Bullets in five games to win the title a year later. Both Seattle teams were coached by Lenny Wilkens, a regular at Storm games......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018

Irked by criticisms, Sotto turns to social media

"Maraming masyadong epal sa history." Senate President Vicente "Tito" Sotto III made the remark on social media late Thursday night to respond to people, criticizing the Senate's decision not to allow the arrest of opposition Senator Antonio Trillanes IV. On Tuesday, Sotto directed the Senate's Sergeant at Arms not to allow the arrest of opposition Trillanes, whose amnesty had been revoked by President Rodrigo Duterte. Sotto's decision was later affirmed by by his colleagues in an all senators caucus held at the Senate. READ: Senators back Sotto's stand on Trillanes' arrest "For the "KNOW IT ALLS" JPE and other senators who had warrants of arrest were never allowed to be a...Keep on reading: Irked by criticisms, Sotto turns to social media.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

Irked by criticisms, Sotto turns to social media

“Maraming masyadong epal sa history.” Senate President Vicente “Tito” Sotto III made the remark on social media late Thursday night to respond to people, criticizing the Senate’s decision not to allow the arrest of opposition Senator Antonio Trillanes IV. On Tuesday, Sotto directed the Senate’s Sergeant at Arms not to allow the arrest of opposition… link: Irked by criticisms, Sotto turns to social media.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

Aretha Franklin ‘a diva to the end’

In the series of public, open-casket viewing prior to her burial, Aretha Franklin---who passed away at 76 due to pancreatic cancer last month---was dressed by her loved ones in different fabulous ensembles befitting a music royalty. At the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, which attracted hundreds of supporters wishing to pay their final respects, the Queen of Soul wore a "ruby red dress made of lace" with matching five-inch Christian Louboutin leather pumps, during the first day, according to USA Today. The next day, she was put in a powder blue dress. "What we wanted to do was something reflective of the Queen. It's beautiful. She's beautiful," Wrig...Keep on reading: Aretha Franklin ‘a diva to the end’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

30 Teams in 30 Days: After wholesale makeover, Hawks ready to rebuild

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com What offseason? That's a question many fans ask as the flurry of trades, free agent news and player movement seems to never stop during the summer. Since the Golden State Warriors claimed their third title in four years back on June 8 (June 9, PHL time), NBA teams have undergone a massive number of changes as they prepare for the season ahead. With the opening of training camps just around the corner, NBA.com's Shaun Powell will evaluate the state of each franchise as it sits today -- from the team with the worst regular-season record in 2017-18 to the team with the best regular-season record -- as we look at 30 teams in 30 days. * * * Today's team: Atlanta Hawks 2017-18 Record: (24-58, did not qualify for the playoffs) Who's new: Coach Lloyd Pierce, Trae Young (Draft), Kevin Huerter (Draft), Omari Spellman (Draft), Jeremy Lin (trade), Justin Anderson (trade), Alex Len (free agency), Vince Carter (free agency) Who's gone: Coach Mike Budenholzer, Dennis Schroder, Mike Muscala The lowdown: Three years after winning a conference-best 60 games, the Hawks crash-landed and clearly set their sights on the Draft lottery by the 2018 All-Star break. New GM Travis Schlenk dumped Marco Belinelli and Ersan Ilasova at the trade deadline and would’ve shipped off a few more players if he could. Basically, Schlenk attempted to scrub most of the work of Budenholzer, who ran the basketball operation previously. John Collins made the All-Rookie team and Taurean Prince finished strong. However, Kent Bazemore -- the club’s highest-paid player -- sputtered and never felt comfortable being a volume scorer (12.9 points per game). The Hawks couldn’t win or generate much interest in Atlanta, putting the framework for a fresh era in place well before 2017-18 ended. The Hawks held the No. 3 overall pick in the 2018 Draft. Deandre Ayton and Marvin Bagley III were off the board. What say you, Mr. Schlenk? He made a gutsy move, bypassing European sensation Luka Doncic in favor of Young and a 2019 protected first from the Mavericks. Schlenk admitted the Hawks’ war room was evenly split on Doncic and Young, but the ’19 first-rounder was the deal-maker. That’s not an overwhelming vote of confidence for Young, and you wonder if Hawks ownership nudged Schlenk into making the deal because of Young’s star potential. The organization dropped millions to give the newly-renamed State Farm Arena some bling over the last year and obviously crave a player with flair to move the needle in Atlanta. Young certainly brings a wow factor. He was the box office star at Oklahoma with his long-range shots and fancy passes. He also became the first collegiate player to lead the nation in scoring and assists in the same season. The Hawks say his ability to make teammates better is vastly unappreciated and will smooth his transition into the NBA. He also had a ragged second half of last season and became a social media punch line. His shot selection and accuracy raised red flags. In a sense, his final year at OU was a tale of two players: Tantalizing Trae and Tragic Trae. NBA scouts say Young's other drawbacks were his lack of size, athletic ability and defense. He was a polarizing Draft pick and the Hawks’ decision received mixed reviews at best among Hawks fans. That additional first-round pick Atlanta got from Dallas could prove beneficial for a rebuilding team that wants to collect as many assets as possible. The idea of Young becoming an Atlanta Basketball Jesus seems like a reach ... until you remember this franchise hasn’t had a ticket-selling sensation in its history. Even Pete Maravich and Dominique Wilkins weren’t basketball magnets in this college football-crazed town. With a new basketball regime in place, it was only a matter of time before Budenholzer, stripped of his basketball operations stripes, would bolt. Schlenk wanted his own people, which is standard operating procedure for a new GM. Once the season ended, Budenholzer began running off copies of his resume with the blessing of the Hawks. He landed in Milwaukee and Schlenk began searching for Budenholzer's successor. Eventually, Schlenk stayed in his comfort zone and hired Pierce. (Years ago, they both worked for the Golden State Warriors.) Pierce came with strong reviews for his work as an assistant coach, most recently with the Sixers. As a player, he rode shotgun in college at Santa Clara with Steve Nash and brings solid people skills to Atlanta. He is, however, a first-time coach and sometimes, it gets tricky when folks slide one seat over on the bench. It was no secret the Hawks wanted to jettison starting point guard and leading scorer Schroder this summer. He had legal issues and didn’t develop solid chemistry with his teammates. When the Thunder agreed to a proposal, the Hawks pounced, sending Schroder to OKC for Carmelo Anthony (who was subsequently bought out), Justin Anderson and a future first-rounder. Of course, this means the Hawks will either go with a rookie as their starting point guard or Lin (who’s should be healthy for training camp after he missed all but one game last season.) With their additional first-round pick this year, the Hawks took Huerter, a sharp-shooter from Maryland. Right now they’re getting nothing special offensively from the swing position and Huerter will get a long look as a rotational player. In order to help a young locker room adjust, the Hawks added 41-year-old Carter (who was a rookie when Young was born). Carter has become a lovable NBA senior citizen, which allows folks to overlook his declining skills. His veteran voice will help when the Hawks endure a losing streak. Still, the summer belonged to the deal the Hawks swung for Young. It’s one of those decisions that could make Schlenk look like a genius, especially if he scores big on the 2019 Dallas pick and Young pans out. The flip side? Doncic becomes the transcendent star in Dallas that the Hawks craved. The final verdict on this deal won’t be delivered for years. By then, will the Hawks be winners? Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

Nadal reaches US Open quarterfinals, will face Thiem

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Rafael Nadal is back in the U.S. Open quarterfinals, where he won't face a rematch of the 2017 final. Instead, it's a rematch of this year's French Open final. Nadal beat Nikoloz Basilashvili 6-3, 6-3, 6-7 (6), 6-4 on Sunday at Flushing Meadows. Next up is No. 9 seed Dominic Thiem. Thiem beat Kevin Anderson 7-5, 6-2, 7-6 (2), denying the fifth-seeded South African a second shot at Nadal. Nadal beat Anderson last year for his third U.S. Open title. The top-ranked Spaniard captured his 11th title in Paris by beating Thiem in straight sets in June. That was part of what's now a 26-1 run since Thiem beat him in the quarterfinals of the Madrid Open in May. "He's a very powerful player, and, yeah, he knows how to play these kinds of matches," Nadal said. "Yeah, I need to play my best match of the tournament if I want to keep having chances to stay in the tournament." Nadal leads the series 7-3, with all the meetings on clay. On Sunday, he responded to losing the third-set tiebreaker by breaking Basilashvili twice in the fourth set. Anderson was hoping to be waiting for Nadal. His run to last year's final was a surprise; At No. 32, he was the lowest-ranked U.S. Open finalist in the history of the ATP rankings. But he backed that up with a strong season, reaching the Wimbledon final and earning the No. 5 seed in this tournament. "Of course it's disappointing," Anderson said. "I wanted to be here right until the end and put myself in contention of winning my first major. It wasn't meant to be." He had won six of seven meetings against Thiem, including all six on hard courts. Thiem's only victory had come on clay, his best surface. But Anderson couldn't get anything going in this matchup with Thiem, who won 41 of 45 points (91 percent) and never faced a break point. "First of all, I served really, really well today," Thiem said. "Not the best percentage, but I almost made every point in the first serve game. So I didn't face one break point, and I didn't feel so much pressure on service games." Thiem reached his first quarterfinal at any Grand Slam besides the French Open. He was agonizingly close to getting there last year at the U.S. Open, leading by two sets against Juan Martin del Potro in the round of 16 before the 2009 champion roared back to win. "It was not on my mind, but I was pretty close last year," Thiem said. "It was very painful." Del Potro was on Sunday's night schedule, facing Borna Coric. John Isner or Milos Raonic would meet the winner of that match. Serena Williams was in action later Sunday after routing her sister on Friday in what she felt was her best match since her return to tennis. She'll need to be sharp again, with Kaia Kanepi looking to knock out another women's star. Serena, seeded 17th, routed Venus 6-1, 6-2 in matching the most-lopsided victory in the Williams sisters' series. That put her into the match against Kanepi, the 44th-ranked Estonian who upset top-ranked Simona Halep in the first round and is seeking her second consecutive quarterfinal in Flushing Meadows......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

Duterte to reaffirm ties with Israel, Jordan in six-day visit

PRESIDENT Rodrigo Duterte aims to reaffirm the Philippines’ ties with Israel and Jordan as he embarks on a six-day visit to these countries. In his departure speech at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 2, Duterte said he would reaffirm ties with the people there, “made more significant by a meaningful shared history.” Duterte will [...] The post Duterte to reaffirm ties with Israel, Jordan in six-day visit appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

Riding through history

At 10 a.m. on a Saturday, the festive sound of drums joined in with the clatter of the approaching train at the LRT-1 Central station. Eleven teams of four members — made up of an LRT-1 driver, an LRT-1 teller, a blogger, and a reporter — hurriedly lined up at the ticketing booth to load their Beep cards, catch the next train, and explore specific cultural and historical landmarks on a list. All were determined to arrive first at the finish line — and in the process, the teams explored Manila, despite the continuous rains. The post Riding through history appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 30th, 2018