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Education leaders gather to promote lifelong learning

QUEZON CITY, June 13 (PIA) - Education leaders from the country convened for a high level policy forum at the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education OrganizationRegional Center for Educational Innovat.....»»

Category: newsSource: philippinetimes philippinetimesJun 14th, 2018

Education leaders gather to promote lifelong learning

QUEZON CITY, June 13 (PIA) - Education leaders from the country convened for a high level policy forum at the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education OrganizationRegional Center for Educational Innovat.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Education leaders gather to promote lifelong learning

QUEZON CITY, June 13 (PIA) - Education leaders from the country convened for a high level policy forum at the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education OrganizationRegional Center for Educational Innovat.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Colombia park fights animal trafficking with education

    BOGOTA, Colombia --- On the outskirts of Colombia's capital red macaws share a nature reserve with ocelots and black-headed parrots. A white-crested harpy eagle whistles at schoolchildren who walk on a well-preserved trail.   The animals come from different regions of this ecologically diverse South American country. But most of them share one thing in common: They were rescued from animal traffickers.   As leaders in the fight against wildlife trafficking gather in London this week at the Illegal Wildlife Trade Conference, conservationists around the world are working to provide shelters to the thousands of animals that have been rescued fro...Keep on reading: Colombia park fights animal trafficking with education.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 13th, 2018

Learning to change the world

While attending a recent three week-long educational leadership seminar workshop at one of the most prestigious universities in the world, I was struck by the sign that states, “Learn to Change the World.” This message hangs brightly in front of the Gutman Library of the Graduate School of Education of Harvard University, and this is the theme that resonated during my stay in Cambridge, Massachusetts. As I looked at that sign every day, I knew that through learning, I would be able to change the world despite an environment that is characterized as volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous. While at Harvard, I was mentored by some of the world’s best, and was also able to learn with some of the brightest educational leaders in Asia. This was part of my fellowship with the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia (UBCHEA). The post Learning to change the world appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

ASEAN insight: A glimpse in the eyes of a youth leader

ASEAN insight: A glimpse in the eyes of a youth leader Vox Bikol Sat, 12/09/2017 - 01:35 PILI, Camarines Sur, Dec.06 (PIA) ---  “It’s unbelievable! The experience seemed so surreal but I was there, flesh and body, and have represented the Philippines as one of the delegates to the #NOWASEAN 2017Conference, promoting among others, the significant role of the youth in understanding climate change and disaster resilience in ASEAN countries.” Emman Cleodoro, Coordinator of El Verde Youth for Climate Action and  Environment, Disaster Management and Emergency Response Office (EDMERO) Environmental Advocacy Officer  of the Provincial government of Camarines Sur was the lone representative of the country and was among the youth leaders from different countries chosen to participate in the conference in commemoration of the celebration of the 50th Anniversary of ASEAN and the Philippines’ National Day for Youth in Climate Action  held at Sofitel Philippine Plaza, Manila last November 23 to 26. “It’s an honor and a privilege to be the representative of the Philippines in the ASEAN conference in Manila. This conference taught me a lot of things, most especially what can the youth do to create a significant impact on the country’s campaign on climate change and disaster risk reduction management. This experience is something that I will treasure for the rest of my life,” Cleodoro humbly stated. At the prime of his youth at 27, Emman as he is fondly called by friends and colleagues had been advocating a cleaner and greener environment for the past 5 years under the helm of EDMERO. He owed his achievements to his mentors and points to EDMERO Chief Lucena “Che” Bermeo and the dynamic and young Camarines Sur Governor Migz Villafuerte as the source of his fervor to passionately pursue his environmental advocacy and share it with the young crowd. One of the highlights of the conference, Emman narrated was the adoption of the Southeast Asian Youth in Climate Action and Disaster Resilience Network (SAYCAN) Framework Agreement. The agreement binds the youth in a commitment to advocate youth empowerment on climate action and disaster resilience by promoting education and capacity building, engaging champions and strengthening partnership with other environmental stakeholders through online and on-ground strategies. ““The NowASEAN Conference is an initiative of the Filipino youth-led climate action undertaking dubbed as #NowPH or Not on our Watch Philippines. One of their outputs is the adoption of the SAYCAN Framework agreement.  It played a significant role in gathering signatures for the adoption of the Paris agreement held in France in 2015,” Emman elaborated. SAYCAN hopes to bring young people towards a common understanding of the ill effects of climate change and what the community can do to alleviate the impact of any catastrophe in their areas.  To do this, education and capacity building, including engaging environmental champions and stakeholders is a must. It is also important to build partnership, establish and strengthen them by the use of various strategies, both online and on-ground thereby engaging more and more stakeholders to take part in the fight to win back greener days and a safer environment for the next generation. “In the years that I have served as Environmental Advocacy Officer, I have seen the prowess and competence of the youth to promote a climate and disaster-resilient way of life and pursue sustainable development.  Meeting other ASEAN youth leaders coming from our neighboring ASEAN countries, only proves that we are all attuned towards this one vision of creating a haven of environment loving people who is as concerned as I am in ensuring that our children’s children will still have a place which they can call “home” in the upcoming years.”  (LSMacatangay, PIAV/Camarines Sur)  .....»»

Category: newsSource:  voxbikolRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

City wants word out on anti-discrimination law

TO promote a culture of respect, the Cebu City Government urged all barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan officials, and leaders of urban poor and homeowners’ associations to take part in the barangay-based education drive for City Ordinance 2339, or the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance. The ordinance was written by former councilor Alvin Dizon, who now sits as executive… link: City wants word out on anti-discrimination law.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 7th, 2018

Globe, De La Salle–College of Saint Benilde prepare for the Future of Learning

As an advocate for technology use in Philippine education, Globe Telecom joined hands with the De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde (DLS-CSB) in launching a Research Grant for Digital Learning to prepare the country for the future of learning. To seal the partnership, a Memorandum of Agreement was signed between the two parties led by Michelle Tapia, Head of Strategy, Innovation, and Transformation of Globe myBusiness, and Br. Dennis Magbanua FSC, DLS-CSB President. Under the MoA, research grants will be used to fund two academic researches to be conducted by full-time DLS-CSB faculty who are screened after a rigorous selection process to promote further research in the fie...Keep on reading: Globe, De La Salle–College of Saint Benilde prepare for the Future of Learning.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

Choosing the preschool discipline: play or work for U.N. agenda 30 for sustainable development?

Confronting the new K to 12 program that demands a continuum of learning from kindergarten to senior high school to match the U.N. Agenda 30 for Sustainable Lifelong Development, the Department of Education (DepEd) is still in the process of searching for the ideal preschool curriculum as its basis and its corresponding teacher training program......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2018

National Book Store College opens this school year 2018-2019

MANILA, Philippines — After over 75 years of supporting Filipinos’ education and lifelong learning, National Book Store is taking the next step by creating a.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 25th, 2018

Tale of 2 cities: Olympics sponsors in Pyeongchang and Tokyo

em>By Youkyung Lee and Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press /em> SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Winter Olympics coming to South Korea in February offer an example of the Olympian efforts often required to meet corporate sponsorship goals. Tokyo tells a different story: The coffers are already overflowing for the 2020 Summer Games. It's a tale of two cities and two Olympics — winter and summer. Pyeongchang is a little-known destination in one of South Korea's poorest provinces. It is the 'little town that could,' bidding twice unsuccessfully for the Winter Olympics before winning on its third try. A final push enabled it to reach its sponsorship target of 940 billion won ($830 million) in September, with just five months to go. Tokyo is an established global capital, and the Summer Games usually generate more excitement — and more money. Organizers have raised 300 billion yen ($2.7 billion) in sponsorship, twice any previous Olympics. International Olympic Committee Vice President John Coates describes it as a remarkable achievement. The divergent experiences of two Asian host cities illustrate the challenges that smaller bidders face, as well as South Korea's dependence on the big family-owned companies that dominate its economy. Not that Tokyo is home-free. The cost of the 2020 Games has nearly doubled from initial projections. As with most Olympics, taxpayers will have to foot a good part of the bill. ___ strong>WHERE 'CHAEBOLS' RULE /strong> Starting with the 1988 Seoul Olympics, South Korea has used mega-events such as the soccer World Cup to raise the profile of the country and its manufacturing exporters. Pyeongchang is different. The project was initiated by local politicians in an area long alienated politically and economically in South Korea's rise to prosperity. Some feared people would confuse the city's name with Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. They couldn't count on the automatic support of the huge family-run conglomerates, known as 'chaebol,' such as Samsung, Hyundai and LG. 'When such mega-events were the nation-state's key project, the chaebol were called on and were expected to become the leading participants,' said Joo Yu-min, a professor at the National University of Singapore who co-authored a book on South Korea's use of mega-events. In the end, the national government brought the conglomerates in, first in the bid process, and then for sponsorship. That underscores both the outsized role they play in the economy and their close ties with government. They owe a debt to special treatment from the government, which in turn used them to industrialize the country after the devastating 1950-53 Korean War. After Pyeongchang's bid was rejected a second time, the government called on Samsung and others to help. The president even pardoned Lee Kun-hee, the patriarch of the Samsung founding family who had been an IOC member but voluntarily suspended his membership after being indicted for tax evasion. The IOC reinstated Lee in 2010 with a reprimand and some restrictions, allowing him to lobby heavily for what became Pyeongchang's winning bid in 2011. It took three years for the organizing committee to sign its first domestic sponsor, KT Corp., the country's second-largest mobile carrier. Again, the national government asked the conglomerates for help. All the major ones signed on, after the office of then-President Park Geun-hye made a special request and multichannel pressures for financial assistance, Joo said. Elsewhere, companies may weigh sponsorship decisions based more on the marketing benefits. 'In South Korea, companies make donations out of a sense of duty that they are being part of the national event,' said Park Dong Min, the executive director overseeing membership at the Korea Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Sponsors who signed up late weren't willing to give as much, because there was less time to enjoy the marketing benefits. A bank that signed on less than a year before the Games significantly reduced its sponsorship. To top it off, a massive sports-related political corruption scandal rocked South Korea in 2016, just when Pyeongchang was making last-ditch efforts to raise sponsorship. 'Companies showed some reluctance' to sponsor the Olympics, said Eom Chanwang, director of the Pyeongchang organizing committee marketing team. 'Nevertheless, they still joined.' The scandal brought down Park, the president. Lee Jae-yong, the heir to the Samsung group, received a five-year sentence for bribery. Lee, who has appealed, had become de facto chief of the Samsung group after his father Lee Kun-hee, the IOC member pardoned in late 2009, fell ill. It was the younger Lee who signed an agreement with IOC President Thomas Bach to extend Samsung Electronics' sponsorship of the Olympics globally through 2020. Samsung declined interviews for this story. With the scandal still fresh in people's minds, major companies have held back from launching full-fledged marketing to promote the Games. 'Samsung traditionally has done consumer marketing through the Olympics, but because its chief is in jail, it cannot do as much these days,' said Kim Do-kyun, a sports professor at Kyung Hee University Graduate School of Physical Education. The Pyeongchang Games were the biggest victim of the scandal, he said. ___ strong>SUMMER OF '64 /strong> The president of Japan's biggest toilet manufacturer was seven years old when the Olympics first came to Japan. TOTO Ltd. made news in 1964 for its prefabricated toilet-and-bath units that helped speed the construction of a luxury hotel, the New Otani, in time for the Games. The company, now known for high-tech toilets that baffle some foreign visitors, is back as a sponsor of Tokyo 2020. 'I feel our company and the Olympics have been bonded by fate,' TOTO president Madoka Kitamura said at a sponsorship signing ceremony at the same hotel last year. The $2.7 billion in sponsorship for Tokyo 2020 is more than three times the original estimate. By comparison, sponsorship revenue was $848 million in Rio de Janeiro last year, and about $1.2 billion for both London 2012 and Beijing 2008. The Winter Olympics typically attract less, though Sochi, Russia, raised $1.2 billion in 2014. Analysts attribute Tokyo's success to both patriotism and a sense of nostalgia for the 1964 Summer Games. They were much more than a sports contest for Japan. They were a moment of pride, marking the country's return as an industrial power after the devastation of World War II and a seven-year U.S. occupation. 'All of Japan still recognizes the unique role that the 1964 Olympics played in Japan's stepping out onto the world stage,' said Michael Payne, a former IOC marketing director who now works as a consultant. 'Many of the CEOs of top Japanese companies would have been young kids back in '64 and are very aware of the role those Games played for the psychological recovery from the Second World War.' They grew up with the high-speed 'Shinkansen' bullet train, inaugurated in 1964; modern expressways and western-style toilets, all symbols of Japan's postwar economic growth. 'Now they have become business leaders, they want to contribute and leave something behind that can be remembered for the next 50 years,' said Masahiko Sakamaki, executive director of marketing for the Tokyo organizing committee. He said that memories of the recovery may have boosted interest in sponsorship, as Japan was still reeling from a deadly 2011 earthquake and tsunami when Tokyo won the bid in 2013. Sakamaki said the organizing committee started receiving sponsorship inquiries as soon as it was established in 2014, before the official start of sponsorship contracts in 2015. There is so much interest that the IOC is allowing Tokyo to have multiple sponsors in some categories, instead of the usual one, including in aviation, newspaper publishing, electronics and banking. TOTO officials won't say how much they are contributing, but media reports say companies in its sponsorship category give between 6 billion and 15 billion yen ($53 million to $133.5 million). Tokyo 2020 wouldn't comment on those reports. 'We believe our presence as part of an all-Japan effort toward a successful Olympics will enhance our favorable brand image,' said Mariko Shibasaki, the company's senior planner for sports communication. Thanks in part to robust sponsorship revenue, the organizing committee has increased its contribution to the cost of the games from 500 billion to 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion). The sponsorship revenue makes up half of the income in the privately-run organizing committee's operating budget. Other revenue comes from the International Olympic Committee, marketing and ticket sales. The overall cost of the Tokyo Olympics is estimated at 1.4 trillion yen (12.4 billion) with the Tokyo government shouldering 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion) and the remaining 200 billion yen (1.8 billion) paid by the national government and local governments hosting events. ___ em>Yamaguchi reported from Tokyo. Associated Press writer Stephen Wade in Rio de Janeiro contributed to this story. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

Bulls Carter Jr. undergoing NBA big man s trial by fire

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CHICAGO – Every August, the NBA holds its rookie transition program to give its newly minted pros an idea of what life in the league is going to be like, from handling their money and dealing with reporters to fending off assorted unsavory outside forces. And then, every October, the young guys begin their real rookie transition. Consider Wendell Carter Jr. of the Chicago Bulls. In a span of five days, he will have gone through a gauntlet of imposing NBA big men that would have some 10-year veterans flinching and wondering if their tendinitis needed a night off. Carter’s on-the-job rigors began Thursday (Friday, PHL time), when he became only the 10th Bulls rookie to start on opening night and was met in his matchup at center with Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid. It continued Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) in Chicago’s home opener against Detroit, with Carter banging at various times against both Andre Drummond and Blake Griffin. Now the 19-year-old will travel to Dallas, where he’ll get his first test against the Mavericks’ salty DeAndre Jordan. And just for the record, in the Bulls’ final preseason game, he had to cope with Denver’s crafty Nikola Jokic. For someone so young, against such a slate of established or eventual All-Stars, Carter’s early lessons have been difficult. There really is no other way. “I’m sure it’s just chaos and confusion right now for him,” Griffin said after leading the Pistons with 33 points, 12 rebounds and five assists in a 118-116 victory at United Center. “He doesn’t look that way, but that’s just how you feel – no matter what – when you’re a rookie. The game is moving so fast.” Carter, the No. 7 pick from Duke in this year's Draft, fell victim to foul trouble early and the Bulls’ need to play catch-up late, which had coach Fred Hoiberg sticking with Jabari Parker at the end. Carter logged less than 18 minutes, finishing with eight points, two rebounds and two blocks. Drummond had foul issues of his own, exiting with his sixth after just 23:33. Still, Drummond and Griffin won the frontcourt battle with 43 points and 25 boards to Carter and Bobby Portis’ combined 14 and 16. It wasn’t the sort of Windy City debut Carter would have scripted. This was, after all, kind of a big deal – he’s the player Chicago landed after an entire 2017-18 season spent gaming the NBA’s Draft lottery system. The Bulls consciously tried to dive deep, won a little too counterproductively in December and January and wound up waiting until after the first six picks were gone. That tortuous process led everyone to Saturday, when 21,289 in the stands got their first official look at the alleged silver lining from last season’s dark cloud. Carter wasn’t happy with either his or his team’s performance afterward, pulling his clothes from the hangers in his locker as he dressed and bemoaning the Bulls’ lack of defensive communication (they’ve given up 245 points in two games). Not to worry, though, Griffin said. “He’s so talented, he’s going to be fine,” the Pistons star said. “It’s just a matter of time for him. I watched him play probably more than any other player in college last year – I really like his game. I’ve known of him since he was in high school. He would be the least of my concerns if I was over there in the front office or on the coaching staff.” Hoiberg and his staff have approached Carter’s trial by fire by starting him in response to the challenges he handled in summer league and in the preseason. He arrived with a maturity, poise and defensive bent some players never achieve – a young Al Horford was a frequent comp – and isn’t about to blow that image, no matter how many lumps he takes. “I appreciate the fact I’m able to play against these very talented bigs early on in my career,” Carter said. “Learn what I’ve got to work on. I’ve got to get stronger, that’s the first thing I recognized. … Just being up against the best, I love the competition. I love going against the best players.” Truth be told, Hoiberg said he talked with Carter on Friday (Saturday, PHL time) about handling the frustrations he’ll surely encounter. He’s a little cranky about the officiating, for example, picking up at least three fouls in all six preseason and regular-season appearances while playing fewer than 23 minutes every time. He’s does the “verticality” thing as if from a textbook and still hears a whistle. “At this point, I just feel like it’s rookie calls. I don’t care what nobody’s saying, that’s how I really feel,” Carter said. “I still have respect for the game, though. I have respect for the referees. If they call it, it’s a foul. I’ve just got to do better, learn from it.” Then there was the chatter from Embiid in Philadelphia, a 19-point Sixers romp. “He was telling me what I should and shouldn’t do,” Carter said. “‘C’mon rookie, you’ve got to do’ something ‘better.’ Carter didn’t chatter back, he said. “Not yet. I’m gonna get there at some point though.” Drummond didn’t pile on, thanks perhaps only to the referees. "If I played more, I think it woulda been more of a schooling,” the Detroit center said. “This is a helluva three games for him.” Drummond, 25, remembers what it was like six years ago, when he was the one absorbing the lessons. His rookie year got dinged 22 games due to a stress fracture in his back, an injury that compounded the basketball education. “I learned my lessons the hard way,” Drummond told NBA.com. “Physically. I started out being hurt. I had to just play and figure it out game by game. Watched films. Learned the guys that I played against. And figured it out.” Drummond wound up averaging 7.9 points, 7.8 rebounds and 1.6 blocks. He had nine double-doubles and earned all-rookie status. But he’s glad to be wiser now in the NBA’s ways, given how few the shortcuts were. “It was more of a sponge season for me,” he said. “Learning the NBA. I mean, I was a young kid. Just tried to have fun with it. It was the game I loved and I was playing it at the highest level, so I just tried to enjoy every moment and take it in.” That’s Carter today, way at the front end of his career. He’s got a notebook, he said, that he scribbles in bullet points, tips and lessons from each game after he’s left the arena, his mind clear. Portis said he’ll share more with Carter as the season goes on – there hasn’t been much time and the Bulls haven’t really hit the road yet – but most of this stuff will be hands-on. “It’s as important a thing as you’re going to face in this league,” Hoiberg said. “When you’ve got a 19-year-old kid out there, it’s human nature I think when you’re playing against an opponent like Wendell has gone against, to hang your head a little bit.” The coach added: “It’s something every player goes through in this league. It’s understanding who you’re playing against. We’re showing him a lot of personnel, film on who he’s going to be going up against.” Until the day, and it will come, when young guys are studying film of Carter, going through gauntlets of their own. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News1 hr. 8 min. ago

‘Employability’ a major concern as age of automation, AI draws nearer

Those who received low-level education are at the greatest risk of losing their chances at employment as automation and artificial intelligence continue to shape the labor sector. Tech consulting firm Accenture revealed during the launch of its “Skills for Success” learning module that it conducted research on the difficulties faced by workers as industries shifted […] The post ‘Employability’ a major concern as age of automation, AI draws nearer appeared first on Interaksyon......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018

Quake rocks Bali as Duterte, world leaders gather

It was barely five hours after President Duterte arrived in this resort island in Indonesia when a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck at around 2:45 a.m. yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

Nationwide eye screening program for kids gets Senate nod

The Senate on third and final reading approvedon Mondaya bill establishing a program for the early detection of visual problems among kindergarten pupils. Senate Bill No. 1706 or the "National Vision Screening Act," will institutionalize a nationwide eye screening program for kindergarten pupils under the Department of Education (DepEd) and set up a funding facility for a continuing research for eye diseases and treatments. "The vision of young children, particularly those at a preschool age, plays a crucial role in their development as their sight is the primary guide to most of their learning experiences. It is clear that good and healthy visual skills are fundamental to bolster ...Keep on reading: Nationwide eye screening program for kids gets Senate nod.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 8th, 2018

Education based on world economy demands

THE digital age has dramatically revolutionized the education system. Today’s educators have integrated technology into their curriculum, digitizing information that students can access through multiple options and tools. With just a click on their mobile phone, laptop or tablet, students can gather information through MOOCs, lectures, Skype classes, webinars, video conferencing and online chats with [...] The post Education based on world economy demands appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsOct 6th, 2018

Teachers, education leaders receive Gintong Parangal Para sa Edukasyon Awards

The following is a press release from the Department of Education. The Fortune Life Insurance Co. Inc., in partnership with the Department of Education (DepEd) and Marylindbert International, recognized the unwavering efforts of teachers and education leaders through the Ambassador Antonio L. Cabangon Chua Gintong Parangal Para sa Edukasyon (Guro at Pamumuno) last ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 5th, 2018

SBP representatives attend 1st FIBA World Basketball Summit in China

Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) President Al Panlilio, SBP Executive Director Sonny Barrios and Special Assistant to the President Ryan Gregorio are in Xi’an China to attend the 1st FIBA World Basketball Summit. The first-ever FIBA World Basketball Summit takes place in Xi’an, China on October 3-4 2018, and will bring together a wide range of high-ranking personalities in world basketball, from top level officials and management personnel in federations, clubs and leagues to business leaders. As the international governing body for basketball, FIBA’s mission is to develop and promote the game worldwide as well as support their National Member Federations and the many other stakeholders in the sport to maximize their potential. The theme of the conference, “Building the Future of Basketball Together”, sums up not only its objectives but the spirit in which it is being held. It is about sharing and collaboration across the global basketball family. Panlilio was invited as one of the panel speakers and discussed effective basketball development strategies covering the role of National Federations, schools and colleges, expectations on government, achieving the best ROI and the development of young pro players. Panlilio shared the stage with former NBA All-Star Andrei Kirilenko, who is now President of the Russian Federation of Basketball  and Mr. Antti Zitting, President, Finnish Basketball Federation......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 3rd, 2018

Superheroes: Teachers of the Alternative Learning System

MANILA, Philippines – In every celebration of National Teachers' Month, we commonly see and hear tributes paid to teachers in the formal education sector. Little attention is given to the equally commendable work of teachers in informal education programs such as the Alternative Learning System (ALS). This year, we wish to ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 30th, 2018

The alternative learning system

A few years ago I had the opportunity to partner with the Alternative Learning System or ALS at the Department of Education where for the very first time I had the chance to observe classes at a small correctional facility in Tagaytay City......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 27th, 2018

World leaders gather to breathe new life into Paris accord

NEW YORK, USA – World leaders gathered in New York on Wednesday, September 26, to try to breathe new life into the Paris global climate accord , amid backsliding from several nations over commitments made in the historic deal. The "One Planet Summit," launched last year by French President Emmanuel Macron , aims to accelerate the implementation of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 27th, 2018