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EDITORIAL - Escaping accountability

Public office is a public trust. Anyone who is physically and mentally qualified to serve as a public official must be deemed physically and mentally fit to face punishment in case of conviction for graft and other offenses involving betrayal of public trust......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarNov 15th, 2018

Editorial: Free education is not a dream

The Philippines has since been under the worst economic and social conditions. It is under these dire conditions that education has become the “greatest gift” a parent can pass on to their children. A college diploma is seen as a “gate pass” to the dream of escaping poverty. For years, families endure all kinds of sacrifice to access the much-sought out education, as the family’s valued “investment”......»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsAug 19th, 2018

Editorial Raises Issue of Police Accountability

Photo of Inquirer editorial.CHEERS TO the for its editorial that looked into police accountability in the death of a detainee.The August 12 editorial "Unremit.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

Editorial Raises Issue of Police Accountability

Photo of Inquirer editorial.CHEERS TO the for its editorial that looked into police accountability in the death of a detainee.The August 12 editorial "Unremit.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

EDITORIAL - Accountability

Don’t expect a miracle, the Department of Transportation has asked the public, even as it promised “diligence” in improving the Metro Rail Transit 3 service......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 7th, 2017

Media’s gaffes, accountability

THE RECENT editorial lapses of the state-run Philippine News Agency can be traced largely to a blurred corporate vision and ill-defined accountability......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 16th, 2017

What is South Korea’s take on the killing? – BBC News

Only a few people know why VX was chosen &'' presumably by North Korea &'' as the chemical agent of Kim Jong-nam's assassination, and they're not talking. The (perhaps unwitting) women who smeared his face with the highly toxic oil are unlikely to know much about the substance. And the men who left the terminal in Kuala Lumpur for Dubai even as the victim staggered around seeking medical help are not about to share their secrets with anyone far from Pyongyang. But in South Korea, there is much speculation. Was it a deliberate signal from the North that nuclear isn't the only weapon of mass destruction just over the border? Or was it simply an effective way of killing a reclusive man in a public place? It has certainly raised the temperature in South Korea. Monday's Joongang Daily says: &'8220;The government must take steps immediately to protect the country from chemical weapons dangers.&'8221; The editorial raises the spectre of North Korea supplying terrorists with the substance (in the same way it may have helped Pakistan with nuclear technology and Syria with missile development). The editorial continues: &'8220;North Korea is known to have chemical weapons from 3,000 tonnes to 5,000 tonnes. It could threaten the world if Pyongyang sells any of these weapons to Islamic militants or other extremists to secure hard cash.&'8221; There is no doubt that the attack has sent a tremor of fear through the defector community in South Korea. Fugitives who were previously easy to contact have gone to ground. Thae Yong-ho, the diplomat who defected from the London embassy last year, already had bodyguards as he went incognito around Seoul but they would not have been able to protect him against a seemingly innocent member of the public just coming up and smearing him with a speck of VX. Two years ago, the American ambassador in Seoul was lucky to survive when his face was slashed with a blade in public. How much easier it would be to kill someone with a mere trace of a chemical. The great advantage of poisoning for the assassin is that it can be perfectly targeted and it kills with little immediate fuss. Only scientific examination afterwards reveals the cause. Those behind Kim Jong-nam's killing watched, then left. Alexander Litvinenko, a fugitive spy from Russia, took tea with two former KGB agents in London in 2006 and died three weeks later of poisoning by radioactive polonium-210, believed to have been administered in the cup. The BBC producer, Georgi Markov, was murdered at a bus stop in central London in 1978 but his killer vanished in the crowd seconds after the victim felt the pin-prick from an umbrella used like a syringe to inject the fatal poison. He had been a thorn in the side of the Bulgarian communist government but so simple and bloodless was the killing that nobody was ever identified as the perpetrator. The efficiency of poison as a means of assassination is leading North Korea watchers in South Korea to think that there was no great intention to send a signal by using VX specifically. Koh Yu-hwan, of Dongguk University, thinks that VX was chosen because of its efficiency; North Korea &'' or at least leader Kim Jong-un &'' allegedly wanted Kim Jong-nam dead and VX offered certainty. It also offered the possibility that the death would pass as being from natural causes, at least for the time before a serious post-mortem scientific examination could take place. Chang Yong-seok, of Seoul National University's Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, adds: &'8220;North Korea was already under immense pressure over its efforts to develop nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles, and also its human rights issues. Things will get even more complicated for Pyongyang if its chemical weapons issues are thrown into the mix.&'8221; There are benefits and costs to Pyongyang of being caught red-handed. On the one hand, it would send a signal to dissidents that there will be no escaping the regime's ruthlessness. On the other, it also says to North Koreans that the regime at the top is insecure and fratricidal. News from outside does get into North Korea and the revelation that one ruling Kim was allegedly having his half-brother bumped off could scarcely strengthen the regime in the people's eyes. &'160; As a columnist in Daily NK puts it: &'8220;With the influx of information pouring into North Korea, more of its citizens are learning for the first time of Kim Jong-nam's existence, prompting them to speculate on the motive for the assassination.&'8221; There is some speculation in South Korea about the role of the two women suspected of carrying out the hit job. One researcher told the Associated Press news agency that the theory VX had been mixed from two innocuous chemicals into a deadly combination on the victim's face was unlikely. The expert said that VX could be produced in this way but not reliably. It is more likely that it was applied in its deadly form by people wearing protective gloves. &'8220;The security camera footage shows one of the women heading to the bathroom to wash her hands after attacking Kim. If she touched VX with her bare hands, she wouldn't have had the time to do even that,&'8221; the researcher told AP. If the means of murder is causing debate, the motive is not. In dynasties with hereditary rule, brothers are [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2017

EDITORIAL - Tokhang for ransom

With police allowed to do pretty much what they please and accountability flushed down the drain, abuses in the ongoing brutal drug war are inevitable......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 18th, 2017

EDITORIAL - Killers on the road

It will be a sorrowful Christmas for the families of six persons, including an infant and a two-year-old girl......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated News9 hr. 8 min. ago

EDITORIAL - Battling corruption

About two decades ago, multilateral institutions providing development assistance around the world began taking a closer look at the impact of corruption on projects funded by their aid programs......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated News21 hr. 33 min. ago

IN PHOTOS: Filipinos urged to resist dictatorship, tyranny on Human Rights Day

MANILA, Philippines – To mark the International Human Rights Day, various groups on Monday, December 10, joined protests to condemn the creeping tyranny under President Rodrigo Duterte.  Human rights groups call for accountability and justice for the thousands of victims of violations – particularly related to Duterte's bloody anti-illegal drugs ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

On Human Rights Day, groups call for accountability vs violations under Duterte

MANILA, Philippines – Various groups marked Human Rights Day on Monday, December 10, by calling for accountability and justice for the thousands of victims of violations – particularly related to President Duterte's bloody anti-illegal drugs campaign. In a statement, Karapatan secretary general Tinay Palabay called the Duterte administration“not a government for ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

EDITORIAL - Stand up for human rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights turns 70 today with its guiding principles under threat......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

EDITORIAL | Human Rights Day, alarming events over the week

Tomorrow is International Human Rights Day, that day 70 years ago, December 10, 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was originally ratified by 58 countries which included the Philippines......»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsDec 9th, 2018

EDITORIAL - Less optimistic

The inflation rate slowed down a bit from a near-10-year high of 6.7 percent in October to 6 percent last month......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 9th, 2018

Happy 33rd birthday, PDI!

Our paper celebrates a milestone today. Thirty-three years. Imagine that! No one, probably not even its founders, thought it would survive so long.   It was birthed in tumultuous, severely critical times. Some people feared it was too controversial, too forward, and dangerously gutsy. No one wants realities thrown in one's face. Too contentious, some argued. Many applauded while others gnashed their teeth.   But as a whole, everyone held his breath.   But here we are (permission to use freely the "editorial we"), over three decades later, alive and well, and although we may repeatedly struggle against the changing tides, we manage to stay on even keel, ke...Keep on reading: Happy 33rd birthday, PDI!.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 8th, 2018

With Kevin Hart’s downfall, hosting the Oscars got harder

LOS ANGELES --- The "most thankless job in town" just got even more difficult. The Oscars have a longstanding host problem, but Kevin Hart's swift downfall over old anti-gay tweets has led to bigger questions about the gig and the liability of social media histories. READ:Hart steps down as Oscars host after outcry over old tweets It's just the latest controversy for the organization that puts on the Academy Awards, which is trying to combat declining ratings for its marquee event while weathering the pressure of being a focal point for the shortcomings of the entertainment industry as a whole. "I think it's embarrassing," Matthew Belloni, the editorial director of The Ho...Keep on reading: With Kevin Hart’s downfall, hosting the Oscars got harder.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 8th, 2018

EDITORIAL - Not so guilty

The prosecution failed to prove guilt beyond reasonable doubt......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 8th, 2018

Editorial Cartoons of the Week (November 30 to December 7)

The Philippine Star, December 3, 2018Malaya Business Insight, December 4, 2018The Manila Times, December 5, 2018Philippine Daily Inquirer, December 5, 2018Manila Bulleti.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsDec 8th, 2018

Editorial Cartoons of the Week (November 30 to December 7)

The Philippine Star, December 3, 2018Malaya Business Insight, December 4, 2018The Manila Times, December 5, 2018Philippine Daily Inquirer, December 5, 2018Manila Bulleti.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsDec 7th, 2018

EDITORIAL - Legislative priorities

Lawmakers were realistic enough to note that they were just laying the groundwork for an initiative that would have to be picked up by the next Congress......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 7th, 2018