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Duterte believes Espenido not link to drugs, says it& rsquo;s black ops

President Rodrigo Duterte believes in the innocence of Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido, the controversial police officer who was later revealed to be part of his drug list, the Palace said Friday......»»

Category: newsSource: thestandard thestandardFeb 14th, 2020

Duterte wants evidence; Espenido blames poor intel

​President Rodrigo Duterte’s view on Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido may change if there is evidence proving his involvement in illegal drugs, the Palace said Monday even as the police official said his inclusion in the government’s narco-list was a result of a “failure of intelligence.”.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2020

Duterte: Espenido ‘clean,’ accusations ‘untrue’

MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte believes that Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido is “clean” and his inclusion in the so-called narcolist is only part of “black propaganda” to derail the government’s bloody war on drugs, Malacañang said on Friday. “President Rodrigo Roa Duterte (PRRD) believes that Police Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido is clean,” presidential spokesperson and […] The post Duterte: Espenido ‘clean,’ accusations ‘untrue’ appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2020

Narco-politicians& rsquo; nemesis in hit list

The Palace said Tuesday it will validate the report saying Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido, the controversial police officer who gained notoriety in the administration’s war against drugs, was included in President Rodrigo Duterte’s narco list......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 12th, 2020

Palace downplays Espenido’s inclusion in narco list

The credibility of the Duterte administration’s war against drugs has not suffered with the recent inclusion of sacked Bacolod police officer Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido in the Philippine National Police drug list, presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo said yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated News5 hr. 29 min. ago

Espenido: Who put me on the drug list?

CEBU CITY — “Who put me on the list?,” controversial police official Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido raised this question as he thanked President Duterte for keeping his trust on him despite his inclusion in the list of police officers allegedly involved in the illegal drugs trade. “I appreciate the wisdom of the President. I do […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated News19 hr. 54 min. ago

Duterte can still lose confidence in Espenido depending on intel

MANILA, Philippines – President Rodrigo Duterte can still lose confidence in one of the most lauded cops in his unrelenting but lagging anti-illegal drugs campaign, Lieutenant Colonel Jovie Espenido . In a press briefing on Monday, February 17, Duterte spokesman Salvador Panelo said Duterte can still change his position on ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2020

Walang kai-kaibigan kay PDU30: Espenido, patunay na walang sinisino ang gobyerno – Sen. Go

Manila, Philippines – “Patunay lamang na walang sinisino ang gobyerno pagdating sa laban sa illegal drugs.” Ito ang reaksyon ni Senador Bong Go sa pagkakasama ni Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido sa mga iniimbestigahan dahil sa pagkakasangkot umano sa illegal drug operation sa bansa. Ayon kay Go, ibinigay nila ni Pangulong Rodrigo Duterte ang kanilang tiwala […] The post Walang kai-kaibigan kay PDU30: Espenido, patunay na walang sinisino ang gobyerno – Sen. Go appeared first on REMATE ONLINE......»»

Category: newsSource:  remateRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2020

‘Duterte believes Espenido is clean’ – Malacañang

MANILA, Philippines (UPDATED) – As far as President Rodrigo Duterte is concerned, Police Lieutenant Colonel Jovie Espenido is “clean,” Malacañang said on Friday, February 14. Presidential Spokesperson Salvador Panelo issued the statement two days after it was reported that Espenido was on the list of cops suspected of drug links. “President Rodrigo Roa Duterte believes ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2020

Duterte believes Espenido is clean, says Panelo

Panelo said that Duterte believes the media reports on Espenido are untrue and that the cop is clean......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 14th, 2020

Gamboa orders President& rsquo;s PNP officers drug list verified

Philippine National Police Chief Gen. Archie Gamboa on Friday ordered his men to verify a list of 357 policemen, who are on President Rodrigo Duterte’s drug watchlist if they are indeed involved in illegal drugs......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2020

An array of MPBL stars have been drafted in the PBA. Who will shine?

A passel of Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League ballers have been drafted into the PBA. These gifted young Pinoys prove that the MPBL is a worthy proving ground for the pro league. We asked a few observers of the league to give their two cents on who they think will fly in the pros, namely commentators Migs Gomez and Martin Antonio as well as league head of ops, Emmer Oreta. Both Gomez and Oreta think that Manila Frontrow Star Aris Dionisio will make the biggest splash in the pros. “Aris Dionisio is the best MPBL player in the (PBA) draft,” says Gomez. “I think his length and athleticism can translate his defensive abilities to the PBA easily. Offensively, he is also capable of running the floor and shooting threes, so converting him from center to small forward will not be a problem.” The 6 foot 5 Dionisio was nabbed by Magnolia with the 9th choice in the first round. “Aris Dionisio is a versatile player who can play a lot of positions, and can also can play off the ball,” notes Oreta. “And the most important thing is he can play defense, for sure.” “Dionisio is next in line to Marc Pingris,” adds Martin Antonio. Oreta and Gomez also agree that Mike Ayonayon will be an impact player immediately in the PBA. The 6-foot San Juan Knight is “a baller, a lengthy swingman who is very athletic and likes the open floor,” says Gomez. The former PCU Dolphin was selected third by NLEX and is etched in league lore because of his Reggie Miller-esque 12-point, two-minute outburst for San Juan that enabled the Knights to a close comeback win versus Bataan earlier in the season. Antonio believes that Ayonayon will thrive and develop under Road Warriors mentor Yeng Guiao. “Ayanayon + Guiao = Killer,” says Coach Hammer. “Yeng Guiao loves players like Mike,” adds Antonio. Gomez even gives the high-flying Antipoleno the ultimate compliment. “I came up with my signature line “Magic in the Air” because of him.” When it comes to sleeper picks and project players, the experts are split. Oreta and believes that Chris Bitoon, Dionisio's teammate in Manila, could be a surprise package. “A late pick, but for sure coach Nash Racela knows this guy well, and he can really play.” The former Manuel L. Quezon University Stallion had his number called in the third round by Blackwater Elite. Also getting drafted by Elite was Richard Escoto, who played for the Iloilo Royals, where Racela was an assistant before getting the Blackwater head coaching job. Gomez believes that Aaron Black is a worthy project for Meralco. The Zamboanga combo guard who also played for QC early in the season was corralled by the Bolts, who are coached by his father, Norman. “The pressure has always been there for Aaron to live up to his last name, but he has embraced it and blossomed in the MPBL,” explains Gomez. “He has a good relationship with his father, and with the skillset and body that he has now, I can only see him improving more and more. Aaron can play point guard and get triple-doubles.” Gomez also throws another name into the ring when it comes to project players: Yankie Haruna. The former CSB Blazer, currently with the Bacolod Master Sardines club, was drafted 9th in the second round by Magnolia. The 6 foot 2 New Jersey-native is an enticing prospect. “He’s tall enough, very athletic, and likes to penetrate with full authority. I think his body can translate into an explosive scorer in the PBA,” explains Gomez. Oreta on the other hand thinks Cris Dumapig can rise up from obscurity to become a PBA player. “He is a workhorse of a big man, for sure this kind of a player Coach Pido Jarencio really wants. I'm hoping he can sign with the team.” Dumapig was taken by NorthPort in the middle of the third round. The rebounding machine is a vital cog for a Basilan Steel Jumbo Plastic side that is third in the South Division as of the writing of this piece. Oreta also thinks another big man can make waves: Cebu Sharks – Casino Ethyl Alcohol's Will McAloney. “Coach Yeng really loves players from the south, playing physical and all-out every time,” said Oreta. The burly homegrown Cebuano was the first of NLEX's two second round selections. There are so many MPBL stalwarts who are testing the waters in the PBA, like Allyn Bulanadi, the stylish scorer taken by Alaska, and Rey Publico, the Iloilo big man also absorbed by the same PBA team. Rey Suerte of Batangas will don the colors of Blackwater after his early selection (Editor's note: Bulanadi and Suerte were selected as part of the special Gilas Draft and will focus on national team duties before suiting up in the PBA). Big names like Prince Rivero and Arvin Tolentino will also attempt to show their wares at the country's highest stage. Most if not all of these players will remain with their MPBL teams until April. Whether it's in the Liga ng Bawat Pilipino or at the PBA, we can expect tons of fireworks from this bumper crop of young Pinoy hoops talent......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 24th, 2020

& lsquo;Crime rate drop proves drug war gaining& rsquo;

The significant decline in the Philippines’ crime rate is proof of the Duterte administration’s victory in its campaign against all forms of criminality, particularly illegal drugs, an official said Wednesday......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 9th, 2020

Leni: Drug war & lsquo;massive failure& rsquo;

Vice President Leni Robredo on Monday took a swipe at the Duterte administration’s war on illegal drugs, saying the government was able to confiscate only less than 1 percent of the country’s shabu supply and drug money in three years......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 6th, 2020

Leni& rsquo;s drug war & lsquo;teaser& rsquo; draws flak

Vice President Leni Robredo on Monday postponed the release of her “discoveries” on the war on drugs of the Duterte administration......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 17th, 2019

Leni& rsquo;s drug war & lsquo;teaser& rsquo; draws flak

Vice President Leni Robredo on Monday postponed the release of her “discoveries” on the war on drugs of the Duterte administration......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 16th, 2019

Robredo bides time, teases proposal on drug war

Vice President Leni Robredo said Tuesday she will announce her findings and recommendations on the Duterte administration’s war on drugs on Dec. 16......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 11th, 2019

Duterte: Continue Bonifacio& rsquo;s revolution

President Rodrigo Duterte on Saturday encouraged all Filipinos to continue the revolution started by Gat Andres Bonifacio by fighting corruption, illegal drugs and other social ills that beset the country......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 1st, 2019

VP Leni, Sara told: Don& rsquo;t seek presidency

​President Rodrigo Duterte advised Vice President Leni Robredo not to run for president in the 2022 polls, calling her clueless days after firing her as co-chairperson of the Inter-Agency Committee on Anti-Illegal Drugs......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 1st, 2019

Addressing growing fan behavior problem top priority for NBA

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press About a dozen NBA players gathered for a teleconference with officials in the league office this summer, making their case about what they believe is one of the biggest problems in the game. Fan behavior, they said, is getting worse. The numbers show they’re right, and if that isn’t troubling enough race only adds to the complexity of the issue: Most NBA players are black, and it seems like most of those in the closest seats are white. Not every incident is racially motivated, though some clearly are. After high-profile incidents involving Russell Westbrook, DeMarcus Cousins, Kyle Lowry and others last season — including ones involving racist taunts — zero tolerance for abusive or hateful behavior is now to become the NBA’s policy going forward. The league is changing and toughening its code of conduct for fans, especially putting those in closest proximity to the players and the court on alert that anything over the line will lead to ejections and possibly more. “We’ve added any sexist language or LGBTQ language, any denigrating language in that way, anything that is non-basketball related,” said Jerome Pickett, the NBA’s executive vice president and chief security officer. “So ‘your mother’ comments, talking about your family, talking about test scores, anything non-basketball related, we’ve added that in as well as being something that we will go and pull a fan out of the seat and investigate what happened.” Westbrook and Cousins were subjected to racist taunts in Salt Lake City and Boston and the fans involved in those incidents were banned by the Jazz and Celtics. Lowry was shoved by a minority partner of the Golden State Warriors’ ownership group, seated courtside during the NBA Finals, and that person was banned from team business for a year by the league. There were more. Those were just the highest-profile ones. The NBA would not release exact numbers — and the totals are believed to be very low — but Pickett said the ejections of fans in the courtside area still more than doubled last season. Westbrook declined comment for this story, saying through a Rockets official that he was not comfortable discussing the matter. But the players’ union insists that the problem is getting bigger and bigger. “Last season, I began to sense even at the games I was attending that there was a certain, I’ll call it absence of civility, that permeated the games,” said Michele Roberts, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association. “I was seeing more bad-mouthing opposing teams that were not simply ‘you suck,’ which every one of us will tolerate, but really nasty, nasty comments being directed at players.” The Celtics banned a fan for two years for directing racist chants at Cousins. Westbrook was involved in a pair of incidents in Utah that came to light last season; was offended by a fan during the 2018 playoffs by a fan calling him “boy” before a playoff game, and then last season was involved in a back-and-forth shouting match with another fan. The Jazz banned both fans for life, and Westbrook was fined $25,000 by the NBA for threatening the fan involved in last season’s incident. “I try very hard not to have my default answer be, ‘It’s racism.’ I really do because I don’t think that necessarily advances the argument,” Roberts said. “If it’s undoubtedly that, then I’m happy to say it.” It’s not always racism, either — Roberts also said she’s received complaints from many white players about being the subject of nastiness from fans. Amira Davis is an assistant professor at Penn State specializing in 20th Century American History with an emphasis on race, gender, sports and politics. She believes fans feel more emboldened now to say whatever they like, without fear of repercussions. “There have been plenty of sober fans yelling slurs and attacking players in the worst way,” Davis said. “I think it’s a mix of all of those things and when looking at predominantly white spaces like Utah and a largely black labor force, it ratchets it up a little bit more and makes it a lot more intense. Particularly in this political climate in which it’s very easy to project onto high-profile black athletes and pathologies and misconceptions about the black community.” Fan behavior is not just a concern in the NBA. It is being noted everywhere. Racist chants and taunts are a major issue in European soccer, including at a Euro 2020 qualifier between Bulgaria and England last week. Green Bay and Philadelphia fans fought in the stands at Lambeau Field last month. The Atlanta Braves had fans stop doing their “tomahawk chop” during the playoffs earlier this month. During the AL Championship Series between Houston and New York, Astros manager A.J. Hinch told umpires that he felt the behavior of fans at Yankee Stadium had crossed the line and that it “was becoming a dangerous situation.” “There’s no place for that,” Hinch said, referencing matters like debris being thrown from the stands toward players and taunts directed toward some of the Astros. “Both teams will agree. And it’s really hard to stop fans from doing that. But it’s also very dangerous.” And the athletes are not always just victims, either. Golfer Bio Kim was suspended by the Korean PGA for three years for making an obscene gesture at the crowd during the final round of a tournament that he won, angry because of noise from a cellphone camera. In the NBA, the league is expanding the area in arenas most closely monitored when it comes to player-fan interaction. The top-priority area used to be just those seated with feet on the court itself or maybe the first couple rows of courtside seats; now, that area goes several rows deep in every building, plus the areas where teams and referees enter and exit the court. The fan code of conduct, a standard announcement at every NBA arena for years, is now being shown and promoted more times in each game. Season-ticket holders have been put on notice by teams that they may lose their seats even if they give their tickets to someone who goes over the line and harasses players or officials too vociferously. Fans believed to have been involved in incidents will be removed from seats while officials investigate; many times, when a security guard asks those in a certain area what just happened, no one would volunteer information with the suspected heckler present. “I think players are definitely vulnerable,” Golden State’s Draymond Green said after the Lowry incident. “Any time you’re in a situation where you can do no right, like in defending yourself, you’re vulnerable.” ___ AP Sports Writer Kyle Hightower in Boston contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 21st, 2019

Women are having a greater impact on NBA than ever before

By Kyle Hightower, Associated Press Practice is over and Boston Celtics assistant coach Kara Lawson is still working. She stands under the basket rebounding and giving feedback to rookie guard Carsen Edwards as he shoots from different spots on the court. After swishing his final three attempts he jogs over to her. “Thanks, coach,” Edwards says before exchanging a high-five with Lawson. Welcome to the new-look NBA, in which women’s footprints are directly impacting every aspect of the game — from broadcasting booths, to officiating, coaching on the sidelines, front-office executives to ownership. Lawson is one of a record 11 women serving as assistant coaches in the NBA this season. While former WNBA star Swin Cash and Sue Bird are working in NBA front offices. “It’s not a fad,” said Basketball Hall of Famer Nancy Lieberman. “It’s opportunities going to very accomplished women who have given their life to the game.” While it may not be a fad, it is a recent trend. Lieberman remembers a time when the presence of women was hard to spot, or at best found only behind the scenes. The 61-year-old — who has broken barriers as a player, as a coach in the WNBA, head coach in NBA G League and in the NBA as assistant — learned quickly that building relationships was the skeleton key to erasing gender hurdles and opening opportunities in the league. That, along with an occasional assist from forward thinking men like former coach Don Nelson, who in 2009 hired her as the head coach of the Texas Legends, the Dallas Mavericks’ G League affiliate. Several have continued Nelson’s vision, including San Antonio Spurs Gregg Popovich, who made Becky Hammon the NBA’s first full-time assistant in 2014; current Mavericks’ coach Rick Carlisle (he hired Jenny Boucek as assistant in 2017) and the Sacramento Kings organization, which has been responsible for hiring three women as assistants (Lieberman, Boucek and Lindsay Harding). Even the BIG3, spearheaded by founder and entertainer Ice Cube, is helping normalize the idea of women leading men, Lieberman said. “I remember Donnie did an interview and he said, ‘Maybe the best man for the job isn’t a man at all.’ He had a list of criteria he wanted to hit for his head coach. And I hit those,” Lieberman said. The women who have broken into the NBA ranks are garnering respect from players for their experience and basketball knowledge. Celtics guard Gordon Hayward said Lawson has already made her presence felt. “She’s been good as far as just the experience she has as a basketball player,” Hayward said. “Reading the game and kind of little things she sees coaching on the sideline. Having somebody that well-versed in basketball, that experience is good.” Earlier this month, Wizards assistant Kristi Toliver was on the court helping the Mystics win their first WNBA championship. On the sideline, Washington NBA All-Stars John Wall and Bradley Beal were wearing the Wizard assistant’s WNBA jersey and dancing from the stands . NBA players are treating the feedback from Toliver and the other women in the league with the same reverence they give their male counterparts. “The biggest thing I learned is to share your voice and what you’ve learned,” Toliver said. “Doing that has helped me communicate with my guys.” Toliver is in a unique salary situation since she coaches for the Washington Wizards and plays for the Washington Mystics — both owned by same franchise. She was only paid about $10,000 with the Wizards last year because of WNBA salary cap rules. WNBA teams can only pay all their players a combined $50,000 in offseason to supplement pay and Washington only had $10,000 left to pay Toliver. There are no such hiccups in New Orleans, where Pelicans guard Frank Jackson said he always expected to benefit from Cash and Teresa Weatherspoon, who was hired as a New Orleans assistant this season. “They were ballers,” Jackson said. “They were good at their craft and I’ve taken a lot from both of them. ... I’ve always had open eyes and open ears to anyone who plays this game.” The 21-year-old Jackson knows of the women’s exploits because he has witnessed it firsthand. And he is not alone. The WNBA has been around since most players were teenagers, and is older than others; the league was launched in 1996. “As the years go on, they’re going to get more and more recognition,” said Jackson, in his third year out of Duke. “Girls can hoop, too. ... I just think as times change, you’ll see more and more.” Cash believes the NBA is realizing having more women is important to growing the league’s overall brand, business and bottom line. “The reality is and the statistics prove it, is that having women included in your business helps you get more inclusion, helps you get the diversity you need,” she said. “Diversity of thought, not just Black, White, Asian, Latino, whatever.” Stephanie Ready, a former assistant in the then D-League, said a big factor in the opportunities women are getting are coming because the younger generation of NBA executives, such as 76ers general manager Elton Brand. She said the new crop of hiring managers are doing a better job of recognizing what women bring to the table and as the older generation retires, it will get even better. “Some people will age out,” said Ready, one of the first women to be a men’s assistant on the collegiate level with Coppin State and a former broadcaster with the Charlotte Hornets who now currently covers the NBA for TNT and Yahoo. “By that I mean the old regime of men who thought that only men could do these jobs.” Richard Lapchick, who tracks racial and gender hiring numbers for the NBA, NFL, NHL and MLB, has long lauded the NBA as being the leader in gender hiring practices. He credits the leadership of Commissioner Adam Silver, who said the league needed to increase the number women coaches and referees in the NBA. Along with the record number of female assistants, five women referees will be working NBA games this upcoming season. Lapchick also believes the NBA will soon have its female head coach. Whether that is Hammon in San Antonio remains to be seen. But whoever it is, Lapchick said the move would go a long way in putting even more women in position to make basketball decisions. “I’d be surprised if it doesn’t happen before the next season,” he said, “or during the next season.” ___ AP Basketball Writer Brian Mahoney and AP Sports Writers Doug Feinberg in New York and Brett Martel in New Orleans contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 17th, 2019