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DSWD counsels mother who left son unattended inside car

QUEZON CITY, July 11 -- Following the news in social media of a toddler allegedly left unsupervised inside a car, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has already offered its counse.....»»

Category: newsSource: philippinetimes philippinetimesJul 11th, 2018

PBA: SMB’s first loss no laughing matter for AZ Reid

Up by ten in the third quarter of their 2018 PBA Governor’s Cup matchup against the Blackwater Elite, Wedenesday, San Miguel committed the mortal sin of coasting. As they would come to learn the hard way, a ten point lead with more than a quarter left in the game isn’t always the safest cushion. The Beermen would go on to lose, 103-100 for their first loss of the conference, and for import AZ Reid, that first notch on their loss column is no laughing matter. Speaking to the media following their defeat at the Big Dome, the six-foot-five forward expressed his dissatisfaction with how they approached their opponents. “We took ‘em lightly.” Reid said. “We didn’t play the way we normally play, like the way we played in the first game. We played around, a lot of smiling, a lot of joking, so we lost.” While Reid finished with a team-high 26 markers to go with 12 boards, he feels that as the import, he needs to be the one shouldering the blame. In fact, Reid says he relishes the pressure. “Give me the blame, I like the pressure, it’s fine. Just give it to me, put the loss on AZ. It’s fine.” With about 29 seconds left in the third quarter, the Beermen had their biggest lead of the game, 82-72. Four minutes into the fourth quarter, the Elite were back on top after going on a 14-3 run. For Reid, the blown lead was simply a result of a decline in play as the game progressed. “We stopped doing what got us the lead. We started relaxing, chilling and thinking it’s funny, laughing around and joking.” “It’s unbelievable, man.” Reid added. As Reid and the Beermen head to the two-week break coming off their first loss of the conference, the Carolinian hopes that they can maintain a level of mental toughness and a sense of urgency the next time that they take to the courts. “We lost, okay, cool. It’s tough, it’s a very tough loss, we’ve got a long break, coming in 1-1, this game that we need, we lost. We just gotta regroup and hopefully everyone take it serious next time. We gotta stay tough, mentally tough, get a lead and not fold, not break. We broke tonight, and it resulted in a loss.” Reid added that inside the court, he isn’t about playing games, so to say. “Just play more serious. You saw the game, you see people were laughing and joking, it’s not a laughing and joking matter. If you wanna laugh and joke, you can laugh whenever you go home, but in between them lines, it’s not a game, it’s serious. I’m not gonna play around and joke and laugh with you when I’m out there.” “Like I said, put the blame on AZ. I’m the import, I take the blame, I’m used to it. I can handle it. Give it to me.” he stated......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Duterte calls Hitler ‘insane’ at Holocaust memorial

JERUSALEM -- President Rodrigo Duterte, who once likened his drug war to the Holocaust that killed six million Jews, called Nazi leader Adolf Hitler as "insane" during his visit to the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial here on Monday. "I could not imagine of a country obey an insane leader. And I could not ever fathom the spectacle of a human being going into a killing spree, murdering old men, women, men, children, mother," Duterte said in a brief speech at the Hall of Names inside the Yad Vashem. The Hall of Names is a memorial to each Jew who perished during the Holocaust. "I hope that this will not happen again. We have learned so much [over] the years during the two wars. T...Keep on reading: Duterte calls Hitler ‘insane’ at Holocaust memorial.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2018

Four Walls And Beyond: Overworked and underpaid

The story of the young teacher who took her life to get away from the stressful and enormous workload has been a hot topic circulating on social media in the past few days. Her colleagues even launched a “Justice” Facebook page where expressions of grief and sympathies flooded. They were seeking justice while ranting against piles of paper work the DepEd has been requiring. They also expressed concerns that if their sentiments were left unattended, such incident would happen again in the future......»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsAug 26th, 2018

US OPEN 18: Zverev leads group of up-and-comers in New York

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press Alexander Zverev has shown he can win run-of-the-mill tournaments and Masters titles, too. He's shown he can make it to the second week of a major. What everyone is watching — and waiting — for now is a Grand Slam semifinal, final or trophy. "Sascha Zverev," said Citi Open co-founder and chairman Donald Dell, using Zverev's nickname after the 21-year-old German won Washington's hard-court tuneup for the U.S. Open a second consecutive year, "is the future of pro tennis." Zverev is seeded No. 4 at Flushing Meadows, where play begins Monday, and is widely considered the likeliest member of the latest generation of tennis pros to make a deep run at this U.S. Open after getting to his first major quarterfinal at the French Open. Zverev isn't alone, though. He's part of a crop of youngsters who might be ready to take over the sport from the old hands who have dominated it for more than a decade. Stop us if you've heard that before, though. "They're still there," Zverev said about the so-called Big Four of Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray. "Obviously, they're still contenders for every single tournament they play." It's worth noting that Zverev is one of only five active players who's won at least three Masters events. The others? Federer, Nadal, Djokovic and Murray, who are all in their 30s and have combined to win 49 of the past 54 Grand Slam titles. Men's tennis just keeps skewing older: Last month at Wimbledon, all four semifinalists were in their 30s, the first time that happened at any Slam in the half-century of professional tennis. Ah, but look closely, and there are signs that change could be on the way. "They're definitely knocking on that door," Federer said, "and there is some exciting talent around." At the Citi Open this month, for example, Zverev's victory over 19-year-old Alex de Minaur of Australia made for the youngest final on the ATP World Tour since a 20-year-old Nadal beat a 19-year-old Djokovic at Indian Wells in 2007. And the ages of the two losing semifinalists in Washington? Andrey Rublev is 20; Stefanos Tsitsipas turned 20 the following week at the Toronto Masters, where he became the youngest player to beat four top-10 opponents at one tournament since the ATP World Tour was established in 1990. "Four 'NextGen' players in the semifinals. That's amazing for tennis, I think," Zverev said in Washington, referring to the marketing campaign the tour uses to promote up-and-comers. "Me being the oldest — that never happened to me before. It's interesting. And I like where tennis is going. I like the development of the other young guys. It's going to be interesting to see what it'll be like in the future." Agreed. Zverev is one of seven men who are 21 or younger and ranked in the top 50. Here's a look at the other half-dozen, each worth keeping an eye on during the U.S. Open: ___ STEFANOS TSITSIPAS Country: Greece Age: 20 Ranked: 15th (career high) Plays: Right-handed; one-handed backhand Career Titles: Zero 2018 Record: 30-20 Best Grand Slam Showing: 4th Round at Wimbledon in 2018 Best U.S. Open Showing: Making debut His Words: "I am part of a group of (young) players that make me better — and I make them better. We have a very good competition among us. Without this, I probably wouldn't even be inside the top 100." ___ BORNA CORIC Country: Croatia Age: 21 Ranked: 20th (career high) Plays: Right-handed; two-handed backhand Career Titles: 2 2018 Record: 26-14 Best Grand Slam Showing: 3rd Round, four times Best U.S. Open Showing: 3rd Round in 2017 His Words: "I learned by now that this is tennis and, you know, one week can be great; another one can be a disaster." ___ DENIS SHAPOVALOV Country: Canada Age: 19 Ranked: 28th (career high is 23rd) Plays: Left-handed; one-handed backhand Career Titles: Zero 2018 Record: 25-20 Best Grand Slam Showing: 4th Round at U.S. Open in 2017 Best U.S. Open Showing: 2017 His Words: "I'm only 19 and I've proved a lot to myself this year." ___ ANDREY RUBLEV Country: Russia Age: 20 Ranked: 37th (career high is 31st) Plays: Right-handed; two-handed backhand Career Titles: 1 2018 Record: 15-14 Best Grand Slam Showing: Quarterfinals at U.S. Open in 2017 Best U.S. Open Showing: 2017 His Words: "When you see, for example, somebody, a young guy, winning a big match, I start to think, 'If he can win, maybe I also can win it. Why not?' Is (giving) me more motivation." ___ FRANCES TIAFOE Country: United States Age: 20 Ranked: 42nd (career high is 38th) Plays: Right-handed; two-handed backhand Career Titles: 1 2018 Record: 24-16 Best Grand Slam Showing: 3rd Round of Wimbledon in 2018 Best U.S. Open Showing: 0-3 record His Words: "There's so much more work that needs to be done to be at the top of the game. I'm at the middle grounds now. I just want to do more. I want to keep working." ___ ALEX DE MINAUR Country: Australia Age: 19 Ranked: 43rd (career high) Plays: Right-handed; two-handed backhand Career Titles: Zero 2018 Record: 16-13 Best Grand Slam Showing: 3rd Round of Wimbledon in 2018 Best U.S. Open Showing: 0-1 record His Words: "I really wanted to be known in the locker room as that guy that's never going to give up: He's going to find until the end and you're really going to have to play well to beat him. That's something that I've tried to do every time I step out on court." ___ AP Sports Writer Brian Mahoney in New York contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 25th, 2018

Adults over 60 caring for elderly parents face physical, emotional, financial stress

"This won't go on for very long," Sharon Hall said to herself when she invited her elderly mother, who'd suffered several small strokes, to live with her. That was five years ago, just before Hall turned 65 and found herself crossing into older age. In the intervening years, Hall's husband was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia and forced to retire. Neither he nor Hall's mother, whose memory had deteriorated, could be left alone in the house. Hall had her hands full taking care of both of them, seven days a week. As life spans lengthen, adult children like Hall in their 60s and 70s are increasingly caring for frail, older parents --- something few people plan for. "Wh...Keep on reading: Adults over 60 caring for elderly parents face physical, emotional, financial stress.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 24th, 2018

Fire razes candle factory in Ozamiz City

PAGADIAN CITY --- A candle factory was razed by a fire here on Wednesday morning, killing a worker and injuring two others. Authorities said the fire started inside the Bryant Milling and Marketing candle factory in Barangay Carangan, Ozamiz Cityaround 10:29 a.m. Acting City Fire Marshall SFO4 Rolando Bondaco Jr. identified the fatality as Mitchell Lou Ramayrat, who supervised the operation of the factory that produced wax, candles, and drinking straws. Investigators said workers were cooking paraffin wax using a "pugon" when an explosion occurred. Genara Ramayrat, the victim's mother, said her daughter was trapped inside the factory. The victim's body was found inside th...Keep on reading: Fire razes candle factory in Ozamiz City.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

Playing bridge at the Asian Games: ‘Athletics of the mind’

JAKARTA, Indonesia --- What's left of Finton Lewis' thinning hair is spiked and dyed an orange-red color. The 64-year-old Lewis says the haircut keeps him feeling younger on the outside, and playing the card game of bridge keeps his brain nimble on the inside. "I know I'm not as physically fit as most sports people are," said Lewis, who is playing for India in the bridge competition at the Asian Games. Being fit doesn't matter much in bridge, which is being included for the first time in the Asian Games. Fans like to talk it up as a "mind game" in the same realm as chess. Yang Kong Te of the Philippines is playing in the Asian Games at 85. Lee Hung Fong of Malaysia is ...Keep on reading: Playing bridge at the Asian Games: ‘Athletics of the mind’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

‘Dream or reality?’ Koreans to meet after decades apart

SEOUL, South Korea --- Lee Soo-nam was 8 the last time he saw his older brother. Sixty-eight years ago this month the boy watched, bewildered, as his 18-year-old brother left their home in Seoul to escape invading North Korean soldiers who were conscripting young men just weeks after invading South Korea to start the Korean War. An hour later his brother, Ri Jong Song, was snatched up by North Korean soldiers near a bridge across Seoul's Han River. Lee always assumed Ri died during the three-year war that killed and injured millions before a cease-fire in 1953, but his mother prayed daily for her lost son's return, only giving up a few years before her death in 1975. But Ri sur...Keep on reading: ‘Dream or reality?’ Koreans to meet after decades apart.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 19th, 2018

Chelsea tops Arsenal in EPL thriller, Kane ends August curse

By Steve Douglas, Associated Press Chelsea and Arsenal served up a feast of goals in a thrilling London derby in the Premier League. Across the capital, Harry Kane was happy with just the one goal to end his August hoodoo in England's top division. Chelsea scored twice in the opening 20 minutes, conceded twice before halftime and had a late winner through Marcos Alonso in a 3-2 victory over Arsenal at Stamford Bridge on Saturday. In a game between teams with newly hired managers, Maurizio Sarri will be delighted with the attacking spark his Chelsea team has shown in the opening two games of the Premier League. It also scored three times in a win against Huddersfield last week. But it's two straight losses for Arsenal manager Unai Emery, whose side is showing the same defensive frailties as it did in the final seasons of predecessor Arsene Wenger's 22-year reign. After 15 games and more than 1,000 minutes, Kane finally scored a top-flight goal in August to seal Tottenham's 3-1 win over Fulham at Wembley Stadium. Spurs have also won their first two games after an offseason when they didn't buy a single player. ___ SARRI-BALL Sarri arrived at Chelsea promising to bring some fun after a difficult end to the tenure of previous manager, Antonio Conte. He is doing just that. Leaving gaps at the back but attacking in waves, Chelsea has been a thrill to watch in the opening two weekends — much different to the often cagey approach of fellow Italian Conte. Pedro Rodriguez and Alvaro Morata exploited Arsenal's high line to put Chelsea 2-0 up against Arsenal, which wasted a string of great chances at the other end before scoring twice in a five-minute span through Henrikh Mkhitaryan and Alex Iwobi. Alonso swept in a cut-back from substitute Eden Hazard for the winner. KANE CURSE OVER Kane was fully aware of his August woes — he made reference to it in a Twitter post last season after scoring in his first game in September — and the England international failed to score in the 2-1 win at Newcastle last week in Tottenham's opening game. With only one more game left this August, at Manchester United, it looked like the curse might continue after Kane volleyed a shot against the post in the 71st minute against Fulham. His goal came six minutes later when he took a pass from Erik Lamela on the left of the penalty area, cut inside, and bent a low shot into the corner. Brazilian winger Lucas Moura and Kieran Trippier, off a shot from a free kick, had already scored for Tottenham, with Aleksandar Mitrovic making it 1-1 for Fulham just after halftime while sitting on the ground. ___ VARDY RED CARD Jamie Vardy was sent off on his first start of the season for Leicester but the team still eased early-season pressure on manager Claude Puel with a 2-0 victory over newly promoted Wolverhampton Wanderers. The England striker was handed a straight red card for a strong tackle on Wolves right back Matt Doherty, who had earlier scored an own-goal to give Leicester the lead. Leicester doubled the lead through James Maddison, leaving Wolves without a win so far. RAMPANT RICHARLISON Paying up to $65 million for a 21-year-old Brazilian with one inconsistent season in the Premier League behind him seemed a gamble by Everton. Two games in, however, and Richarlison is looking a bargain. He scored his third goal of the season to help Everton beat Southampton 2-1 for its first win of the season. Richarlison netted twice against Wolves on the opening weekend. Theo Walcott set up Richarlison for his headed goal and also scored himself for Everton at Goodison Park. Offseason signing Danny Ings pulled a goal back for Southampton. OTHER GAMES An offseason of heavy spending and the recruitment of Premier League-winning manager Manuel Pellegrini hasn't done much to improve West Ham's fortunes. The London club lost for the second straight game, beaten 2-1 by Bournemouth after taking the lead through Marko Arnautovic's penalty. Callum Wilson, after a mazy dribble, and Steve Cook replied for Bournemouth, which has maximum points after defeating promoted side Cardiff last week. Kenedy missed an injury-time penalty for Newcastle in a 0-0 draw at Cardiff in the other game Saturday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 19th, 2018

Breaking Down Gilas vs Kazakhstan

From the get-go, it was obvious that this iteration of Gilas Pilipinas would be a bit different. Coach Yeng Guiao, who could have opted on a more offensively potent starting unit, decided to go with familiarity and defense, starting three players from the Rain or Shine core in Gabe Norwood, Maverick Ahanmisi, and Beau Belga, and inserting JP Erram at center and Stanley Pringle at the point guard spot. The effect was immediately evident, as the corner triple from Norwood off a Pringle assist in the first play of the game set the tone. The trio of Norwood-Ahanmisi-Pringle showed why they are probably one of the strongest, more athletic, quick, and defensive-minded perimeter trios that Gilas has fielded in recent years. Practically switching everything on the outside, they did not allow Kazakhstan any room to operate, nor to get any rhythm from the field while forcing multiple turnovers, with Ahanmisi getting two steals that led to transition layups early. It was a 12-2 start for the Philippines before Kazakhstan could blink. The only thing going for the opposing team was their offensive rebounding, albeit these only prevented further transition baskets from the Philippines, as the Kazakhs couldn’t convert on the put backs. One thing Gilas has to adjust to however, is the way the international referees call the game, as their bigs – Almazan and Belga – got into foul trouble early, and penalty situation allowed Kazakhstan to make some headway from the line despite shooting just 1/13 from the field in the first. It was a low scoring first quarter, with Gilas held scoreless for the last 4 minutes and Kazakhstan unable to capitalize on the penalty situation, missing multiple charities. The quarter ended 16-9, Philippines. The second quarter started with Kazakhstan giving up their 7th turnover, which would be a recurring theme throughout the game thanks to Gilas’ defensive pressure. With 6 steals through the first 15 minutes of the game, Gilas prevented their opponents from getting any rhythm offensively, despite Rustam Yergali coming out more aggressive on the offensive end.  James Yap came off the bench and poured in 7 points in the first half, hitting 1 of Gilas’ 6 first half triples. They were 6/19 from deep while holding Kazakhstan, who is known for their outside shooting, to 1/12 at the half. Defense was once again the key in the 2nd quarter, as Gilas allowed just 11 Kazakhstan points, with themselves scoring 25. They forced 15 turnovers with 11 steals total in the first half, scoring 18 turnover points as a result; while they themselves committed just 5 turnovers, yielding 0 turnover points for the Kazakhs. The only downside was they gave up 18 freethrows to Kazakhstan, who luckily only converted on 11 of them. The half ended with the Philippines holding a commanding 21-pt lead, 41-20. Stanley Pringle was impressive to say the least, running the offense and controlling the pace of the game, living up to the all the accolades thrown his way prior to the Asiad. Kazakhstan came out of the halftime huddle with a lot more urgency, employing full court pressure all throughout the 3rd quarter, and outscoring Gilas 9-5 in the first 2 1/2 minutes. They also continued to hold the rebounding edge, especially on the offensive glass. While the Philippines continued to pressure defensively, doubling the ballscreens, Kazakhstan was able to adjust, hitting the rolling big man on multiple occasions for easy undergoal baskets. It was here that Fil-German Standhardinger went to work, getting offensive rebounds and scoring on back-to-back baskets midway through the 3rd, despite picking up his fourth personal with still 4 minutes left in the quarter. This turned out to be Kazakhstan’s best quarter, and the only one where the breached the 20-pt mark, outscoring Gilas 23-20. Whether it was the adrenaline rush with the arrival of Jordan Clarkson in the venue or an earful from Coach Yeng at the end of the third, Gilas started out much better in the fourth, with Pringle once again leading the charge. He hit back-to-back baskets to get to his game high 18pts to start the fourth period; while Almazan – who had multiple skirmishes throughout the game – also hit back-to-back baskets. By the time Paul Lee hit his 3rd consecutive triple midway through the fourth – his only field goals of the game – the game had been blown wide open on a Gilas 20-9 fourth quarter run, 81-52. At that point everyone started getting into the scoring picture while they kept the defensive intensity and held Kazakhstan to just 16 points in the fourth for an emphatic 96-59 opening day win. It was an impressive start to the tournament for Gilas, despite the absence of Kazakhstan’s best player due to injury, and more so with all that had happened prior to arriving in Indonesia. They now have four days to prepare for a key matchup with powerhouse China. With Clarkson, they get not just another elite athlete on the perimeter, but a legitimate NBA talent in his prime. It will take a lot more than that however, as the game against Kazakhstan showed. There will be no room for error against the huge and athletic Chinese frontline, and their younger guards. Defensively they’ll have to communicate as well, if not better; and our bigs will have to work extra hard to box out their Chinese counterparts. We can’t give up too many fouls, as the Chinese are tremendously better free throw shooters, and putting our already thin frontline in foul trouble will further limit their ability to implement Coach Yeng’s defensive gameplan. Offensively, I’m confident we have the talent to compete or even surpass China in the perimeter, and everyone knows Coach Yeng is a master at bringing out the best in his players. If our guards can wreak havoc and break China’s perimeter defense, and we’ll be able to get open looks both inside and out. If our bigs, Belga, Erram, Standhardinger, Almazan, and Taulava can limit China’s 2nd chance opportunities and give us a decent amount of 2nd looks, then we definitely have a shot. This Gilas squad definitely looks promising. I’m sure glad we decided to send one.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

How Sarah sees herself as a mother: I want my kid to be strong; I won t be very strict

From left: Xian Lim, Geronimo and James Reid Sarah Geronimo's journey to superstardom has been nothing but arduous--and it didn't come overnight. But, the so-called Popstar Royalty is app.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Investigate list of 4Ps beneficiaries – Aquino

  The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) should investigate whether the "poorest of the poor families are benefiting" from the government's Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps), Senator Bam Aquino urged Monday. Aquino made the call after the Commission on Audit (COA) reported that around P1.3 billion were left unclaimed by 1.9 million individual beneficiaries in 2017. Citing COA'saudit report, Aquino noted that the lapse of time that beneficiaries failed to claim their grants showed they were not in severe need of the subsidy as it also cast doubt on the eligibility of the listed beneficiaries. "Sa totoo lang, imoral iyong may pondo pero hindi n...Keep on reading: Investigate list of 4Ps beneficiaries – Aquino.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 13th, 2018

NCAA: Prince Eze wins game, then Player of the Week for Perpetual

Not wanting to get embarassed by the San Sebastian Golden Stags on their own home floor last Thursday, Prince Eze made sure to not let the Perpetual Help Altas and the Perpetualites in attendance down. "At halftime, I got mad actually," admitted first-year Perpetual head coach Frankie Lim as the Altas fell behind by as much as 21 points against their visitors. "I told them, guys, it's not about the Xs and Os. It's about your desire to win." Prince Eze and the Altas responded with a huge third quarter-outing to give themselves a chance to stun the Golden Stags. In the final frame, Perpetual and San Sebastian figured in a nip and tuck affair that saw the tilt go down to the final possession. With 3.3 ticks left, the two proud squads were knotted at 76-all. Burning his last timeout, Lim crafted a play for his main man Prince Eze, who had anchored his defense all game long. After the timeout, Eze received a well-time lob from AJ Coronel, perfectly angling his hands in the air to lay-in the game-winner with .5 seconds to spare. Disaster averted. "I don't want to lose whatever it takes," the 21-year-old Nigerian student-athlete said. "I know if I tap the ball, I'm still gonna catch it back. So I went inside." For his heroics, Eze, who finished the game with 22 points, 18 rebounds, and six blocks, was crowned as the Chooks-to-Go NCAA Press Corps Player of the Week. Though Eze says that luck has been on their side so far that has led them to solo fourth in the standings, their current mindset is something that they must sustain the rest of the way. "I mean, a win is a win. And we have to live with that," last season's Defensive Player of the Year shared. Eze bested CJ Perez of Lyceum, Robert Bolick of San Beda, Bong Quinto of Letran, and Alvin Capobres of San Sebastian for the weekly honor handed out by print and online writers covering the league......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 12th, 2018

NCAA: Eze wins it for Perps at home against Baste

The smiles on the faces of the University of Perpetual Help faithful inside their home gym in Las Pinas on Thursday was up to the left hand of Prince Eze. The Nigerian powerhouse did nothing but come through as his tip-in with his left hand proved to be the difference for the Altas against visiting San Sebastian College-Recoletos, 78-76. Eze ended with 21 points, 12 rebounds, three blocks, and three steals, but his most important contribution was the tip-in that put Perps back inside the winner’s circle now at 3-2 in the NCAA 94 Men’s Basketball Tournament. With the two teams tied at 76 with 3.3 ticks to go on the clock, coach Frankie Lim called a timeout. “I would really go to Prince on that last shot. It was a tip-in and he made it,” he told reporters post-game. Off of that, Jielo Razon inbounded to AJ Coronel who then had a good look for a baseline jumper. “I really designed it that way. Ang ine-expect ko, ide-deny nila si [Edgar] Charcos so sabi ko kay AJ, you have to be available for the pass,” their mentor said. Instead, Coronel lobbed the ball near the top of the rim and right-handed Eze directed it off the board and down the net with his left hand. Moments later, Perpetual finished the job in successfully defending its home court and rising to solo fourth at 3-2. This, even though they fell behind by as much as 18-39 in the second quarter. “Beggars can’t be choosy. We were down by 21 at the half and we won by two, still a great win for us,” coach Frankie said. Charcos played big in the second half, with all but one of his 18 points while Coronel also chipped in all of his nine points in the final frame. The Altas also welcomed contributions from Kim Aurin who stuffed the stat sheet with four points, eight assists, five rebounds, two steals, and two blocks as well as Razon who had three markers, six dimes, and five boards. For the Golden Stags, Allyn Bulanadi topped the scoring column with 21 points to go along with 12 rebounds, three steals, and two assists while Alvin Capobres also scored 19 markers. Unable to stop Eze in that pivotal play, however, they dropped to 3-5. BOX SCORES PERPETUAL 78 – Eze 22, Charcos 18, Peralta 11, Coronel 9, Mangalino 5, Aurin 4, Razon 3, Gallardo 2, Cuevas 2, Sese 2, Tamayo 0, Pasia 0 SAN SEBASTIAN 76 – Bulanadi 21, Capobres 19, Dela Cruz 11, Calma 8, Are 6, Calisaan 5, Desoyo 2, Isidro 2, Villapando 2, Valdez 0, Sumoda 0 QUARTER SCORES: 12-20, 27-46, 51-57, 78-76 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

NCAA: Frankie Lim designs the play, Prince Eze executes it

The NCAA on Tour for Season 94 is over, capped off by a great ending at the University of Perpetual Help gym in Las Piñas. The Altas had just clawed back from a 21-point deficit in the first half, 18-39, and were tied with the San Sebastian Stags at 76 with 3.3 seconds left.  Coach Frankie Lim had designed a very unusual play, but an effective one. Jielo Razon was supposed to inbound to scorer Edgar Charcos. But somehow, the ball was passed to the open AJ Coronel, who lobbed it to Prince Eze, who tipped the ball in with 0.5 left.  AJ Coronel NO! Prince Eze YESSSS! FOR THE WIN! #NCAASeason94 #GalingNCAA pic.twitter.com/XwAe8FndZw — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) August 9, 2018 Game over. Perpetual wins, 78-76, in front of a very supportive crowd. Students up in the hallway of the UPHSD Gym witness Prince Eze's game-winner •#NCAASeason94 #GalingNCAA @abscbnsports pic.twitter.com/OOVfUL2aV7 — Philip Martin Matel (@philipptionary) August 9, 2018 Thought it was a broken play? Nope, it was exactly how the experienced Lim wanted it to be.  "It was designed that way. Inexpect ko kasi i-dedeny nila si Charcos. Sabi ko kay AJ, you have to be available for the pass, which happened. If ever, if you have that shot, itira mo. Taas mo kay Eze. Ganoon lang yan. It made me look good," the former San Beda coach said after the game. It was not supposed to happen this way as the now 3-2 Altas dug themselves a very deep hole, because the team, Lim says, had been too aggressive to put up a show in front of the adoring fans. "Feeling ko they froze. Hindi na natin kailangan magkaroon ng ganyan. Do just like what you do in practice. That's all I ask. Do what you do in practice and you'll be all right." For Eze, who made the game-winner, he never wanted to disappoint the home crowd, who filled the building to the rafters. "I don't want to lose whatever it takes. Because I know if I tap the ball, I'm still gonna catch it back. So I went inside. I guess, he knows me very, very well. We've been lucky, I mean, a win is a win. And we have to live with that.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

2-year-old defies the odds, learns to walk despite spine condition

One 2-year-old has inspired thousands of people all over the world for overcoming the odds. Roman Dinkel from Huntsville, Missouri was diagnosed with spina bifida, a birth defect where the baby’s spine and spinal cord don’t develop or close properly inside the mother’s womb, thus causing a gap in the spine. Roman was discovered to… link: 2-year-old defies the odds, learns to walk despite spine condition.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

NCAA: A new tower is on the rise for Red Robins

Mapua High School lost its biggest advantage last year when both Season MVP Will Gozum and Mythical selection moved on up to the Seniors. That twin tower pairing powered the Red Robins to a runner-up finish a season ago. Now, the team is being fronted by versatile swingman Clint Escamis as well as fellow guards Dan Arches and Karl Mariano. That doesn’t mean, however, that Mapua has a donut hole in the middle. In fact, slowly but surely, the void left behind by Gozum and Bonifacio is getting filled by rookie Jonnel Policarpio. The 16-year-old forward is giving his all to make sure the Red Robins do not get outworked and outhustled inside. He turned in his best game yet on Tuesday, posting a 23-point, 16-rebound double-double in their 85-77 victory versus San Sebastian College-Recoletos. For Policarpio, it was all just part of the job. “Ginawa ko lang yung sinasabi ni coach [Randy Alcantara] – rebound, depensa. Yun ako inaasahan ni coach,” he said afterward. For Mapua, though, that is exactly what it needs to be able to match up with the frontlines of fellow contenders College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills (Inand Fornilos, Mark Sangco) and Arellano High School (Aaron Fermin, Resty Fornis). Good thing then that their 6-foot-4 talented rookie is taking inspiration from the non-stop motor that Bonifacio, his fellow Kapampangan, had. “Sabi ni coach lagi na dapat, idolo ko si Warren – masipag, rebound lang nang rebound. Wag ko raw isipin na gagawa ng points, basta rebound nang rebound,” he shared. Even better is he has a good friend, and another kababayan, whose footsteps he could follow. “Katropa ko si Serrano,” he said, referring to now De La Salle University prized ward Encho Serrano. Like Serrano, Policarpio hails from Pampanga. Like Serrano, Policarpio plays with heart and hustle each and every second he’s on the floor. Like Serrano, Policarpio needs to play bigger than his size. And like Serrano, Policarpio is relishing his golden opportunity to see action in the big leagues after years of playing in ligang labas. “Nung 13-years-old ako, nag-ligang labas na ako para makatulong sa pamilya. Ibang-iba yung laro rito,” he said. He then continued, “Masayang-masaya akong makapaglaro rito.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 7th, 2018

PBA Finals: San Miguel s frustrations cost them their final timeout

It was a cruel turn of events for the San Miguel Beermen down the stretch in Game 4, Sunday evening.  After a June Mar Fajardo fastbreak dunk with 3:16 left in the game that put them up 83-78, the defending champions failed to put the ball in the hoop the rest of the way. Ginebra was able to build on a 9-0 run to close out the game and clinch the 3-2 advantage in the 2018 PBA Commissioner's Cup Finals, a run which may spell life or death between the two teams. San Miguel could have been up 3-2, but possible missed calls cost the Beermen some buckets, and may have helped the Gin Kings get on the fast break and score the all-important baskets. The Beermen were visibly frustrated throughout the entire ordeal, even resorting to quarreling and complaining to game officials during the final timeout. Coach Leo Austria carried his bottled-up emotions to the presser, trying to supress anger or frustration from the game partly because of the final ceasefire. "Yeah we tried our best to score, but a lot of banging inside…. and we did not get a good break. Some of the players are complaining because there’s a foul. And even in my last timeout, I wasn’t able to give an instruction because they keep on complaining so the timeout expired." Even though they squandered on their 2-1 series lead and are now down 3-2, hope is not lost for their cause, as the three-time and reigning Coach of the Year looks back on their road to the Finals. "I think the chance is still there. And siguro, the players, they will realize. There’s no time to be out-focused. There’s no time to relax. Our backs are against the wall." Regarding Renaldo Balkman's comments about the last three minutes of the game, he stressed that it was mere opinion, and admitted that the officiating is beyond their control.  "Everyone has his own opinion dahil he’s the one playing there and he feels there’s a lot of non-calls… of non-calls. It’s not a missed call. There’s non-calls, guys, so… They can feel it eh." "I’m not blaming anyone because we still have a chance to win that game if we’re ever to make that last possession." In their do-or-die Game 6 on Wednesday, backs against the wall, Austria assures that the Beermen will do everything to force a Game 7 on Sunday. "You can never know. It might happen that we might get the break of the game. So in the last three possessions, it could get 50-50 on our advantage, but you know, it’s beyond our control." __ Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 5th, 2018

LA-bound LeBron leaves lasting gift, Akron always home

By Tom Withers, Associated Press AKRON, Ohio (AP) — LeBron James stood on a stage near one of the streets he walked as a troubled kid and looked out at thousands of faces. He felt connected to every one of them. While his three-year-old daughter, Zhuri, played at his feet, James watched as his mother, Gloria, raised a flag in front of a school that is perhaps his greatest triumph. His incredible life. Full circle. Before leaving for Los Angeles, James gave his hometown quite a gift. James, who ended his second stint with Cleveland earlier this month by signing with the Los Angeles Lakers, on Monday opened his I Promise School, a year-around learning center devoted to some of the city’s most challenged youngsters — ones just like him. For James, who recalled missing 82 days of school as a fourth grader while he and his mom “looked for stability,” the opening culminated years of planning by his family foundation. “This means everything,” James told The Associated Press in an interview before the public event. “I think this is the greatest accomplishment for me because it’s not just me. A championship is for a team, that’s for an organization and a city. But these kids, this is for generation after generation after generation and it’s for these kids, so it means everything.” It was an emotional day for James, who also made his first comments since signing the $154 million deal with the Lakers — a move still causing tremors across in the NBA. James recalled beating the odds of his youth when life was a daily struggle for him and his mom. Nothing was easy as the pair constantly moved and it was only with the help of others than James found structure. Now, he’s giving kids with the same problems a path. “There is no way I could have imagined this,” he said. “I remember our foundation having a bike-a-thon, and I never thought a five-mile bike ride would turn into a school. This is something I’m at a loss of words for.” As far as basketball, the 33-year-old superstar said the decision to leave Cleveland again was difficult, but he didn’t rule out a second homecoming with the Cavaliers. “Listen, I don’t close the chapter on anything or close the book on anything,” James said when asked if he would return to Cleveland to end his career. “But hopefully I can sit there one day and watch my jersey go up into the rafters, that’s for sure.” When James announced on July 1 that he was leaving the Cavs, Cleveland owner Dan Gilbert, who famously ripped him when he left the first time, said the franchise would retire “the famous #23 Cavs jersey one day down the line.” James was unaware of Gilbert’s pledge. “I didn’t hear that,” he said. “I haven’t been in the news. That’s awesome.” James led the Cavs to an NBA title in 2016, ending Cleveland’s 52-year championship drought, and to four straight Finals — a run he admitted he didn’t think was even possible when he returned in 2011 after four seasons in Miami. James didn’t offer many details about what prompted him to sign with the Lakers, but the lure of playing for one of the most successful franchises in all of sports was more than intriguing. “There’s no reason you should become a Laker, became a Yankee, become part of Man U [Manchester United], become part of some franchise or clubs and you don’t think about winning championships or winning at the highest level,” James said. “That’s what the history is all about.” James has his work cut out for him in Los Angeles. He’ll join a young team that added some interesting pieces — Lance Stephenson, Rajon Rondo, Michael Beasley and JaVale McGee — during the offseason but a squad that has a long way to go before it can challenge the two-time defending champion Golden State Warriors. “What my expectations are for the team, we don’t have any right now,” James said. “But we’re definitely going to be better than we were the previous year. I think there’s going to be months where we’re really good, there’s going to be months where we’re not so good and that’s just going to come from familiarity.” Unlike his previous forays into free agency, James didn’t waste any time making a decision. Once his eighth straight appearance in the Finals ended with a sweep against Golden State, James met with his family and agent before agreeing with the Lakers on the first day. “I did my due diligence after the season on the pros and cons of a lot of different teams, including the Cavs, including Philadelphia, including Houston and Los Angeles,” James said. “It wasn’t as quick as it may seem. It just wasn’t as July 9 as it was before. After talking to my family more than anybody, I felt this was the next step in my journey.” This trip will take him thousands of miles from home. But as James reminded students, family and friends in the closing moments of his remarks, he’ll never be far away. “No matter if I’m playing in Los Angles or not, Akron Ohio is always home for me,” he told the crowd......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018