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DSWD counsels mother who left son unattended inside car

QUEZON CITY, July 11 -- Following the news in social media of a toddler allegedly left unsupervised inside a car, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has already offered its counse.....»»

Category: newsSource: philippinetimes philippinetimesJul 11th, 2018

DSWD counsels mother who left son unattended inside car

QUEZON CITY, July 11 -- Following the news in social media of a toddler allegedly left unsupervised inside a car, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has already offered its counse.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

DSWD counsels mother who left son unattended inside car

QUEZON CITY, July 11 — Following the news in social media of a toddler allegedly left unsupervised inside a car, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has already offered its counse Source link link: DSWD counsels mother who left son unattended inside car.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

DSWD counsels mother who left son unattended inside car

QUEZON CITY, July 11 -- Following the news in social media of a toddler allegedly left unsupervised inside a car, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has already offered its counse.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 11th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

2 minors roasted in Tanay fire

TWO minor siblings died when they were trapped inside their burning house after their mother reportedly left them to watch her favorite “teleserye” in her neighbour house while their father was drinking with friends a few meters away in Tanay Rizal, Friday night. Reports gathered from Superintendent Antonio Sobejana IV,….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJul 29th, 2018

DSWD may take custody of child left in parked car

The Department of Social Welfare and Development may take temporary custody of a two-year-old child left unattended by a couple in a parked car in Pasig City on Sunday. Source link link: DSWD may take custody of child left in parked car.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018

When parents leave a 2-year-old child inside a car at Metrowalk

A video of a crying two-year-old child left inside an unattended car has sparked a conversation about unlawful acts against children......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018

DSWD may take custody of child left in parked car

The Department of Social Welfare and Development may take temporary custody of a two-year-old child left unattended by a couple in a parked car in Pasig City on Sunday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018

Brown scores 30, Celtics roll to 120-106 win over Bucks

By Kyle Hightower, Associated Press BOSTON (AP) — Jaylen Brown had a playoff career-high 30 points and the Boston Celtics pulled away into second half to earn a 120-106 win over the Milwaukee Bucks on Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time). Terry Rozier added 23 points for Boston, which took a 2-0 series lead in the first-round matchup. Game 3 is set for Friday (Saturday, PHL time) in Milwaukee. The Celtics led by as many as 20 in the fourth quarter. Milwaukee got as close as 107-97 with 4:13 to play. But the Celtics responded with an 11-2 run, capped by a banked in three-pointer by Brown to push their lead back up to 118-99. Giannis Antetokounmpo finished with 30 points, nine rebounds and eight assists. Khris Middleton added 25 points. Turnovers were an issue for the second straight game for Milwaukee. The Bucks finished with 15, leading to 21 Boston points. They also shot just 41 percent from the free-throw line (7-of-17). The Celtics bench came up big, outscoring their Milwaukee counterparts 41-25. Marcus Morris led Boston’s reserves with 18 points. Boston led by as many as 13 in the first half, taking advantage of 10 Milwaukee turnovers. Antetokounmpo scored 18 points in the opening 24 minutes. He had his way on the inside, connecting on eight of his nine shots from the field. TIP-INS Bucks: Have been outscored 42-13 in second-chance points through two games. ... Shot 62 percent in the first half (23 of 37). Celtics: Brown is the youngest player in Celtics history to score 30 or more points in a playoff game. .. Boston went 13-of-31 from the three-point line. ... Shane Larkin (11 points) scored double-digits in a playoff game for the first time in his NBA career. FREAK’S STREAK Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) marked the ninth straight game that Antetokounmpo has scored at least 20 points against the Celtics. HEAVY HEART Celtics guard Marcus Smart has a heavy heart as he continues to work his way back from right thumb surgery. Smart revealed prior to Tuesday’s (Wednesday, PHL time) game that his mother, Camellia Smart, was recently diagnosed with bone marrow cancer. He was able to visit her briefly in Texas last week. But he said she wants him to be with the team because seeing him play would “put a smile on her face.” “She told me she’d rather me be here than back there,” Smart said. “Doing what I love to do.” HAYWARD UPDATE Gordon Hayward has hit a new milestone in his left ankle rehab. He is currently at St. Vincent Sports Performance in Indianapolis, Indiana, working with a running mechanics specialist. “We’re just trying to get him ready for Friday’s (Saturday, PHL time) game. And we’re hopeful he can play,” Stevens joked before the game. He then quickly made it clear it’s simply the “logical next step” in what remains a long rehab process. “He’s not gonna join us in Milwaukee,” Stevens said. “He’s still a long, long, long way away.” SPECIAL GUESTS Boston Marathon winner Desiree Linden was honored during a timeout in the first quarter. On Monday Linden became the first American woman to win the race since 1985. ... There were also several New England Patriots seated on the sideline and the crowd, including team owner Robert Kraft, Julian Edelman, Duron Harmon, James White and Kyle Van Noy......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 18th, 2018

Boy, 9, burned to death

ROXAS CITY, Capiz – A 9-year-old boy died in a fire that hit their house on Feb 3, 2018 at Brgy. Nagba Cuartero. Police identified the victim as Johnny Flores who was left alone inside their house when the fire occurred. Based on police investigation, Johnny’s mother Sally asked her father to feed her child […] The post Boy, 9, burned to death appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsFeb 4th, 2018

On Christmas Day, a well-deserved applause for the ‘other’ team in action

Before the PBA held Christmas Day games, Mich Flores spent the 25th of December with her family, serving in church. Her mother and twin sisters would join her as lectors while her father acts as lay minister. "Other ministers usually go to their provinces or spend time with family and relatives during Christmas time, so we're the only ones left," she said. Today, the 25th means running social media sites and making sure they keep up with all the basketball action going on. Willie Marcial, meanwhile, remembers traveling to Batangas to spend time with his family and "sharing drinks with friends" on Christmas Day. Nowadays, he manages traffic inside the press room, tending to the n...Keep on reading: On Christmas Day, a well-deserved applause for the ‘other’ team in action.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 25th, 2017

House OKs bill banning unattended children in vehicles

CHILDREN eight years old and below should not be left unattended inside a motor vehicle according to a measure approved by the House of Representatives. Unanimously supported by the lawmakers, House Bill 6570 was passed on third and final reading which main purpose is to prohibit leaving children eight years….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsDec 4th, 2017

From ‘happily ever after’ to hell – CNN News

Islam and Ahmed met online, looking for their &'8220;happily ever after&'8221; through a Muslim dating site. But instead of bringing love and contentment, their marriage left Islam trapped in a living nightmare. Fast forward four years &'8212; and three husbands &'' and she and her two small children are caught in limbo in northern Syria. Islam Mitat is from Morocco; Ahmed Khalil was originally from Kabul in Afghanistan, but had moved to the UK and become a British citizen by the time they met on Muslima.com. Mitat dreamed of a career as a fashion designer, and saw a British husband as a way out of her drab existence in the Moroccan town of Oujda, near the Algerian border. Months after their first online encounter, Khalil traveled to Morocco with a woman he said was his sister. He met Mitat's family, and proposed marriage, showing them bank statements to prove his intentions were serious. &'8220;He was a normal person,&'8221; Mitat recalls, though she says he did make her swap her regular choice of clothing &'8212; tight jeans and t-shirts &'' for long dresses. After they were married, the couple traveled to Dubai, and from there to Jalalabad in Afghanistan to meet Ahmed's family. Mitat says she only stayed in Afghanistan for a month, because of the security situation there, before returning home to Morocco. Khalil went back to Dubai, but shortly afterward he called her with news. &'8220;He told me had a job in Turkey,&'8221; she says, &'8220;and we're going to go for a holiday too, me and him.&'8221; The &'8220;holiday&'8221; got off to a strange start. Instead of heading to a resort or a hotel, the couple flew to Gaziantep, on southern Turkey's border with Syria. A certified copy of Ahmed Khalil's passport shows his birthplace as Kabul in Afghanistan. A man who spoke only Turkish drove them to a house full of men, women and children. The women and children were in one room, the men in another, Mitat says. She was confused, and asked the other women where they were going. &'8220;We're going hijra,&'8221; they explained. To Syria. Hijra was the journey of the Prophet Muhammad and his followers, the fledgling Muslim community, from Mecca to Medina in 622 to escape persecution. In a modern context, it signifies escape from the tyranny of the enemies of Islam to the realm of the faithful. &'8220;When we were in Dubai he told me, 'I have for you a surprise, but I will give it to you in Turkey.' This is the surprise: to go in Syria,&'8221; she says. When she objected, Khalil's response was blunt. &'8220;You are my wife and you have to obey me,&'8221; she says he told her. Mitat says she wanted to tell Turkish border officials about her predicament, but says that as she and the others approached the Syrian border, the guards opened fire so they ran into Syria. When asked about the incident on the border, a Turkish police spokesman said he could not share information about individual cases. Once inside the country, they headed to the nearby town of Jarablus, to a guesthouse for &'8220;muhajarin&'8221; &'8212; those who were making hijra to the so-called caliphate &'' like them. Mitat says the place was packed with people from &'8220;everywhere&'8221; &'8212; the UK, Canada, France, Belgium, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria and Saudi Arabia. No sooner had they arrived, than Khalil was sent off for a month of military training, leaving Mitat, who was now pregnant, behind. Once he'd been trained, ISIS sent Khalil to fight. He was killed on his first day, in the battle of Kobani. After his death, Mitat says she was terrified and didn't know what to do; banned from talking to ordinary Syrians, she was forced to stay within the muhajirin community. She moved in with her husband's brother and his family, who had also traveled to Syria, but when her brother-in-law was killed too, ISIS moved her into a guesthouse, where she stayed until her son, Abdullah, was born. As Kurdish fighters closed in, ISIS told Mitat she had to marry again and get out of the area to safety, so she wed a friend of her first husband, a man known as Abu Talha Al-Almani (his name means &'8220;the German&'8221;). He took her to Manbij, northeast of Aleppo, before moving again, this time to Raqqa as Kurdish forces closed in. A month after they got there, Mitat says she divorced Abu Talha because he wouldn't let her leave the house. She says fear played a major role in her decision not to leave immediately. Islam says she was told that other people who tried to leave had their children taken away, or were forced into weeks of intense Islamic studies. All the while, Mitat was trying to escape with little Abdullah. ISIS did its best to keep her and other muhajarin away from local Syrians who might help them, and smugglers hesitated to help, because they faced execution if caught. Others asked exorbitant fees &'8212; as much as USD $5,000 &'8212; according to Mitat. Eventually ISIS compelled her to marry for a third time, this time to a man who Mitat describes as a gentle soul, called Abu Abdallah Al-Afghani. This name &'' given to him by ISIS &'8212; indicates he was of Afghan origin. Mitat, though, says he was Indian, and that his mother lived in Australia. She says he [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 26th, 2017

Why ISIS offered to kill this 4-year-old girl – CNN News

&'8220;I want my mommy,&'8221; Hawra' mumbles while cradled in the arms of her grandmother, Aliya. The four-and-a-half-year-old's lips barely move to form the weak but desperate plea. Her face is etched with small wounds, gauze wrapped around her throat and leg over burns that have yet to heal. She can't open her eyes; there is shrapnel in one of them, the other painfully closed. Doctors don't know if she will be able to see properly again. Her grandmother is lost for words. Tears start to fall. In one of the March 17 airstrikes, Hawra' suffered a broken leg and shrapnel to the face and lower back. She may never see again. &'8220;I am thinking it's better to be dead. I am thinking to die, rather than a life like this. (Hawra') was like a little flower. She would play and run. Now, she how has no mother, no eyes,&'8221; Aliya says. Hawra's mother was killed, we are told, in an airstrike on March 17. There were multiple US coalition-led strikes that day in their west Mosul neighborhood, where allegations of civilian casualties have since emerged. The series of airstrikes are now under investigation by both the US and Iraqi governments. But a US defense official has said that, so far, there has been no indication of a breakdown in US military procedures governing airstrikes. So far, 141 bodies have been recovered at the site of the airstrike on March 17, Col. Mohammad Shumari, head of Iraqi civil forces, told CNN on Thursday. He added: &'8220;There are still bodies under the rubble.&'8221; In reality, the number is probably much higher. &'8220;It was a mass killing,&'8221; Aliya says through her tears. Ala'a Al-Tai describes how he and his mother, Aliya (sitting on the left), pleaded with ISIS fighters to let them leave and find treatment for his wounded daughter, who is now recovering at West Erbil emergency hospital. Ala'a Al-Tai, Hawra's father, describes that day and the street their home was on. He says there was a row of houses that led to an intersection where ISIS fighters had gathered. The houses are interconnected by rat lines &'8212; holes carved out of the walls that are 40 centimeters wide and 100 centimeters high (about 15 inches wide by 39 inches high) &'8212; and allow ISIS fighters to move undetected. &'8220;ISIS did that?&'8221; I ask. &'8220;No, they (ISIS) made us do it,&'8221; Ala'a responds. The tunnels offered the families a shelter. Around 30 people, including women and children, sought refuge in a single home at one end of the street. Before the fighting broke out, little Hawra' along with her mother and two relatives used the rat lines to move through three buildings and return to their house to bake bread, wash and grab more clothes. the shooting intensified and then the strikes started. &'8220;There was dust everywhere,&'8221; Ala'a tells us.  &'8220;My mother started to scream &' Rocks and debris were falling down on the house we were in. She said go see what happened.&'8221; Three homes on the block were leveled including the one with his family still inside. Ala'a says all that was left of his wife was her left leg attached to her torso. He covered her with a blanket and saved his daughter. All he could hear was his daughter's feeble cry. &'8220;I could just hear her voice,&'8221; he recalls. &'8220;There was a block that had fallen on her. There was also a metal frame &'8212; that's what lodged the shrapnel in her face and her eyes. I screamed for her mother, my aunt and uncle but no response.&'8221; Pulling her from the rubble, she was barely recognizable; she was black and looked charred. They begged the ISIS fighters to allow them to leave. Instead, an Iraqi ISIS member offered to kill his little girl, Hawra'. &'8220;He (an Iraqi ISIS member) said 'I could just shoot her,'&'8221; Ala'a remembers. &'8220;He said 'why do you want to save her, she's going to die anyways.'&'8221; They even pleaded to go further into ISIS territory in pursuit of medical assistance, but Ala'a says an Egyptian ISIS member, who he thinks was the head of that unit, told them they couldn't leave because ISIS were using the remaining civilians as human shields. 16-year-old Fatima lies in a bed at a the same Erbil hospital with a broken back. She was injured in an airstrike in the last two weeks though she doesn't recall specifically which. She only remembers being pulled out of the rubble afterwards. Ala'a tried to clean Hawra' up; she was moaning as he tried to give her some water. He adds: &'8220;I saw my wife the next day, I saw her leg and her intestines so I covered her in a blanket and left.&'8221; It took three days for the Iraqi security forces to liberate the neighborhood. Three days to get his little girl medical help. Others helped by burying the bodies of his wife, aunt and uncle. Hawra' plays with her doll while recovering in hospital. It is not yet known if she will recover her sight. She keeps asking for her mother who died in the airstrikes on March 17. That was not the deadliest of the strikes that day. Around the corner, a multi-story building was also brought down, where more than 100 people are believed to have sheltered. And these are hardly the only allegations of civilian casualties. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2017

Familiar issues, but no panic for Patriots after 1-2 start

By KYLE HIGHTOWER,  AP Sports Writer BOSTON (AP) — Two weeks, two head-shaking losses by the New England Patriots. In Week 2, the Patriots' defense was deficient in a 31-20 loss to Jacksonville in which the Patriots were victimized on third down. There were problems all over the field in Sunday's stunning 26-10 loss at Detroit, though it was Tom Brady and the Patriots offense that struggled the most against a defense coached by former Patriots defensive coordinator and new Lions head coach Matt Patricia. It's left New England at 1-2 for the first time since 2012. Things won't get any easier as the Patriots prepare to open their division schedule against 3-0 Miami. Patriots coach Bill Belichick said he sees problems everywhere on the field right now. "We're not making enough plays in any phase of the game, so we've just got to perform better," he said. "I think the energy and the effort and all of that — we're trying. Everybody's trying hard. We're just not getting it done, which is all that matters." One of the most surprising things in Sunday's loss to the Lions was how ineffective Detroit managed to render quarterback Tom Brady. The reigning regular-season MVP completed just 14 of 26 passes for 133 yards with one touchdown. He also had a costly interception midway through the fourth quarter that helped the Lions seal the victory. The 133 passing yards for Brady were his fewest in a game since he went 8 of 16 for 80 yards against Buffalo on Dec. 28, 2014. What's more troubling, though, is an offense that over the past two weeks has gone 6 of 21 on third down. "We're not scoring enough points. We're not executing well enough on a down-by-down basis. Certainly, at a high level, we should have our expectations set in," Brady said. "The process has been the same, there's been a lot of talk about it in practice, and we're going through it and watching the film and correcting stuff, it's just not getting done on the field. And we have to get it corrected soon." One common theme in the way the Jaguars and Lions succeeded in limiting the Patriots offensively, was keying on tight end Rob Gronkowski. One of Brady's favorite options, Gronk has just 13 catches for 189 yards and a touchdown this season. He hasn't scored in either of the two losses, hauling in only six total receptions. But Gronkowski said no one inside the Patriots' locker room is panicking about starting 1-2. "I mean, it's early, it's football and it's the NFL," he said. "Some crazy things happen every single week and we've just got to bounce back. We can't put our heads down, we have to keep them up. We've got to keep on fighting and there's another week next week." "We've got a big division game next week versus Miami. We've just got to keep on fighting. It's a long season, I know we're 1-2 right now, but we've got to keep on fighting and keep on going. There's no other way to do it.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 25th, 2018

Flacco shines as Ravens deal Broncos first loss, 27-14

By David Ginsburg, Associated Press BALTIMORE (AP) — Baltimore's offensive line handled Von Miller, Joe Flacco took care of the football, and the Ravens sliced through Denver's depleted defense. Flacco found the time to throw for 277 yards and a touchdown, and the Ravens pushed aside the previously undefeated Broncos 27-14 Sunday. Baltimore (2-1) got 68 yards rushing from Alex Collins, but the line's most ample contribution was giving Flacco time to pass against a defense led by Miller, who came in with an NFL-leading four sacks. "That's a stout run defense. We kept hammering in there and bled some yards," Ravens coach John Harbaugh said. "But our pass protection really stepped up and did a great job." Flacco went 25 for 40 without an interception on a rainy afternoon. He threw 28 passes in the first half alone, when Baltimore took control. Miller finished with two tackles and no sacks. "He's able to get in there and make a ton of plays and change a game when you look at him on film," Flacco said. "That was the biggest thing, just not letting him be a factor." Flacco's success came against a Denver backfield that began the day without injured cornerback Adam Jones (thigh) and lost cornerback Tramaine Brock (groin) in the first quarter. As a result, rookie Isaac Yiadom saw significant playing time at right cornerback. "I think we kind of made it easy for them," Broncos safety Darian Stewart said. "We gave them a lot of stuff." Javorious Allen caught a 12-yard touchdown pass and ran for a score for the Ravens. Baltimore made 20 first downs, totaled 342 yards and converted half its third-down attempts. "That wasn't the game we had intended for," Miller said. "At times, we couldn't get off the field as a defense." Denver (2-1) was coming off two home wins, both by virtue of fourth-quarter comebacks. This time, the Broncos could not rally after Allen's 1-yard TD run made it 27-14 midway through the third quarter. The Broncos were flagged 13 times for 120 yards. "We probably cost ourselves 20 points today on penalties," coach Vance Joseph said. Denver's lone turnover was just as costly. The Broncos were inside the Baltimore 5 with 9 minutes left before Case Keenum was intercepted by Patrick Onwuasor, whose 89-yard return for a touchdown was wiped out by a block in the back. The Ravens took consolation in preventing Denver from getting within a touchdown. "That was a huge stop," said Harbaugh, who celebrated his 56th birthday in style. The Broncos' next drive ended at the Baltimore 11, and the Ravens ran out the clock over the final three minutes. Keenum completed 22 of 34 passes for 192 yards. Denver got a touchdown after blocking a punt and also swatted away a field goal try. Chris Harris Jr. took the second blocked kick 58 yards for a touchdown, but an illegal block nullified the second-quarter score. On the ensuing series, Broncos rookie running back Phillip Lindsay was ejected for throwing a punch during the scramble for a fumble by Keenum. "He's obviously a big part of what we do offensively," Joseph said. "Losing him, that's a big deal." A wild first half ended with Baltimore up 20-14. After Denver's Joseph Jones blocked a punt to set up a 6-yard touchdown run by Royce Freeman, Collins ran in from the 6 for Baltimore. Broncos wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders made it 14-7 with a 35-yard end around, his first career rushing touchdown. Justin Tucker sandwiched a pair of 52-yard field goals around a 12-yard touchdown throw by Flacco. Tucker now has six career games with multiple field goals of 50 yards or more, an NFL record. He has also connected on his last eight attempts from at least 50 yards. LEWIS RETURNS The Ravens welcomed back linebacker Ray Lewis, who was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in August following a 17-year career with Baltimore. After the players were introduced, the song "Hot in Herre" by Nelly boomed over the PA. Lewis emerged from the tunnel wearing his yellow Hall of Fame jacket and performed his trademark dance while the soggy crowd cheered. Lewis was presented with his Hall of Fame ring during a ceremony at halftime. He was joined by Jonathan Ogden, the Ravens' other HOF member. INJURIES Broncos: Stewart left in the second quarter with a shoulder injury but returned. Ravens: MLB C.J. Mosley was inactive with a bruised knee. UP NEXT Broncos: Host Kansas City in an AFC West showdown Monday night, Oct. 1. Ravens: Travel to Pittsburgh for a Sunday night matchup between AFC North teams......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 24th, 2018

49ers fear QB Garoppolo sustained season-ending ACL injury

By Dave Skretta, Associated Press KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Kyle Shanahan was watching as Jimmy Garoppolo scrambled toward the 49ers sideline and, rather than safely duck out of bounds, stepped back to his right and took a wicked shot from Steven Nelson. At first, the San Francisco coach thought his quarterback had sustained a concussion. Turns out it may have been a season-ending knee injury. Garoppolo's left knee buckled just before the Chiefs' cornerback delivered a shoulder-to-shoulder blow, and that was the reason he went down so hard. Garoppolo was on the turf for a couple of minutes before he was helped to his feet and eventually carted off late in a 38-27 loss to Kansas City. "We fear an ACL," Shanahan said afterward. "We'll find out more tomorrow." That's bad news for the banged-up 49ers (1-2), who already lost top running back Jerick McKinnon to a season-ending knee injury and only have two other quarterbacks on the roster. C.J. Beathard took over for Garoppolo with just over five minutes left Sunday, and he appeared to throw a touchdown pass to George Kittle before offensive pass interference wiped it out. San Francisco had to kick a field goal and that wound up being the final margin. Now, Beathard is in line to start next week when the 49ers play the Chargers in Los Angeles, and Nick Mullens could get a call-up from the practice squad to serve as the backup. "Any time you lose your starting quarterback, that's a big deal. It was when we lost our starting running back, too," Shanahan said. "Feel for him personally. I know how disappointed he is." Beathard said he spoke to Garoppolo briefly in the trainer's room, and what little of their exchange he was willing to repeat made it quite clear the 49ers' franchise quarterback — who signed a five-year, $137.5 million extension in February — expects his season to be over. "I told him I'll be praying for him and I love him and he just told me to lead these guys," Beathard said. "I've never been in that situation with something possibly that serious. I can only imagine how tough it is for him this early in the season." It's also a big blow for the 49ers, who thought they had the pieces to contend for a playoff spot his season. Now, they've lost two of their most important offensive pieces, to say nothing of a series of injuries on defense Sunday that left them with a piecemeal backfield. Top cornerback Richard Sherman went down with a calf injury, while backup Tarvarius Moore left with a wrist injury. Strong safety Jaquiski Tartt was inactive with a shoulder injury and free safety Adrian Colbert hurt his ankle, forcing a bunch of backups to play significant snaps. Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes wound up handling them for 314 yards passing and three TDs. "They do a lot of things. They use their personnel well. They have a lot of guys that are interchangeable and have a lot of tools," said backup safety Antone Exum Jr. "It's a team you have to stay disciplined on and play your assignment." Still, the 49ers leaned on running backs Alfred Morris and Matt Breida and the strong arm of their quarterback to mount a comeback. And after Garoppolo's TD toss to Marquis Goodwin in the third quarter made it 35-24, there was a sense of optimism on the San Francisco sideline. The 49ers were still trailing 38-24 when Garoppolo led them inside the Kansas City 5 in the final minutes. The Chiefs answered with sacks by Allen Bailey and Justin Houston on consecutive plays, then flushed Garoppolo from the pocket on third-and-goal from the 20-yard line. That's when the San Francisco quarterback headed for the sideline, decided to stay in play rather step out of bounds, and ultimately put the rest of the 49ers' season in question. "Just like we always do, you show up to work tomorrow," Shanahan said. "We'll all be men about it. We'll grade the tape hard and see what we did wrong. And when we show up Wednesday it's time to go. "It's part of the NFL season. It's what you have to do," he added. "We all feel for Jimmy. There's no doubt about it. We dealt with this with our running back, too. It's part of the NFL. We're not the first team this has happened to.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 24th, 2018

A child of the streets turns hero in Cebu

IN 1981 13-year-old Egmedio 'Bill' Felisan was apprehended for eating food left unattended at a stall. He had thought they were someone's leftovers. He was turned over to a facility.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

Yanks clinch wild card with 3-2, 11-inning win over Orioles

By Ronald Blum, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The Yankees are back in the postseason, though not the way they wanted. Aaron Hicks doubled home the winning run in the 11th inning, and New York clinched an AL wild card with a 3-2 win over the Baltimore Orioles on Saturday. Rookie manager Aaron Boone will lead the Yankees into the winner-take-all Oct. 3 wild-card game, most likely against Oakland. The Yankees began the day 1½ games ahead of the Athletics for home-field advantage and are 53-27 at home this season. Hicks and Luke Voit homered in the second inning, but the Orioles tied the score with runs in the third and the fifth off Lance Lynn. Tampa Bay, third in the wild-card chase, lost at Toronto as the ninth inning was about to start in the Bronx. The Yankees finally broke through after Didi Gregorius singled off Paul Fry (0-1) starting the 11th. Giancarlo Stanton struck out. Hicks fouled a pitch off his left foot, then took a ball. He lined a low, inside slider down the left-field line, and Gregorius sped home, sliding in headfirst ahead of shortstop Jonathan Villar's relay throw. Gregorius spread his arms wide, and the Yankees poured out of the dugout to celebrate. New York sprinted to a 54-27 record at this season's halfway point and was ahead of Boston by percentage points in the quest for its first AL East title since 2012, but the Yankees slowed in the second half as Aaron Judge, Gary Sanchez, Gregorius and Aroldis Chapman got hurt. The Red Sox clinched their third straight division crown by beating New York on Thursday. Still, at 95-59 the Yankees matched their most wins since 2012 and equaled their season high of 36 games over .500. They will make their 54th postseason appearance — 21 more than any other team. Boone replaced Joe Girardi after the Yankees, led by a rebuilt roster filled with youth, reached last year's AL Championship Series but lost to Houston in seven games. New York's bullpen, which has struggled at times, showed its strength. Chapman, in his second outing since returning from the disabled list, struck out two in a perfect seventh inning — his earliest appearance in a game since Aug. 24 last year. Dellin Betances fanned three straight batters in the eighth, and Zach Britton struck out two more in a one-hit ninth. Jonathan Holder allowed DJ Stewart's double on his first pitch in the 10th but escaped. Baltimore had second and third with no outs when Adam Jones grounded to third with the infield in. After an intentional walk, Chris Davis lined out to a diving Voit at first and Breyvic Valera popped out. Tommy Kahnle (2-0) pitched a one-hit 11th. Baltimore dropped to 44-110, one shy of the franchise record for losses set by the 1939 St. Louis Browns. The Orioles entered 60½ games out of first place. Hicks and Voit connected in the second off David Hess, raising the Yankees' team-record home run total to 251. Voit's drive hit the Toyota sign above New York's bullpen in right-center and gave him 11 homers and 25 RBIs in 32 games since he was acquired from St. Louis. Cedric Mullins' tapper in front of the plate drove in a run in the third, and DJ Stevens singled in the tying run in the fifth. Baltimore's Steve Wilkerson was thrown out at the plate twice, by Gleyber Torres after the second baseman retrieved Sanchez's errant throw and by Judge on Caleb Joseph's single to right in the fifth. Wilkerson threw out Torres trying to score from third on Andrew McCutchen's seventh-inning grounder to third. Lynn struggled and failed to pitch a 1-2-3 inning. He allowed two runs — one earned — in five innings but got a key out in the fifth when Adam Jones bounced into an inning-ending forceout with the bases loaded. Jones is 2 for 15 against Lynn. Hess gave up two runs in five innings and is 1-9 in his last 15 starts. STRUGGLING A day after the Yankees said the struggling Sanchez would be their postseason starter, he allowed his major league-leading 15th passed ball — he tied for the high last year with 16. He also made his sixth error. MISSING Davis struck out three times, raising his total to seven in two games and 192 this season. He is hitting .168. DOUBLING DOWN Miguel Andujar hit his 42nd double, two shy of Joe DiMaggio's Yankees rookie record in 1936. LOOKING AHEAD Baltimore assured itself the top pick in next year's amateur draft with Friday's loss, which meant the Orioles will at best be tied with Kansas City for most defeats in the major leagues. The Orioles had a poorer record in 2017, which would be the tiebreaker. Baltimore's only previous No. 1 overall selection was used for right-hander Ben McDonald in 1989. TRAINER'S ROOM Orioles: RHP Andrew Cashner remains bothered by pain in his left knee. ... RHP Hunter Harvey is to have his sore elbow examined Monday, according to manager Buck Showalter. UP NEXT LHP J.A. Happ (6-0, 2.39 ERA with the Yankees; 16-6, 3.62 overall) starts Sunday's home regular-season finale and is lined up to start the wild-card game. He allowed one run and two hits over six innings to win at Oakland on Sept. 4. RHP Alex Cobb (5-15) starts for the Orioles......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

INSIDE STORY: How Duterte handled Trillanes fiasco from Israel, Jordan

MANILA, Philippines – As President Rodrigo Duterte took off for official visits to Israel and Jordan on September 2, he left behind a big surprise for Senator Antonio Trillanes IV and the public. But it turned out that the most surprised was the President's own ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2018