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Climate change hits Winter Olympic preparation

SAAS-FEE, Switzerland --- The athletes' half-hour commute in the Swiss Alps --- up two gondolas, then through a tunnel in the world's highest underground train to a glacier at 11,000 feet --- served up daily grim reminders that global warming is threatening their line of work. After exiting the train, they squelched through a field of grayish mud to reach shrinking snowfields scarred by new crevasses. Occasionally, they heard the sharp roars of glacial ice breaking off in monster chunks, then echoing across the peaks where they trained jumps, tricks and turns for the Pyeongchang Olympics. Most days, they basked inbrilliant, snow-melting sunshinethat bathed the whole scene in deceptive...Keep on reading: Climate change hits Winter Olympic preparation.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerDec 18th, 2017

A Filipino lensman captures majestic polar bears–before they’re gone

When Filipinos, who live in a tropical country, think of polar bears, they think of fluffy white animals, often associated with winter and the recent Christmas season.   The fact is that these magnificent creatures (Ursus maritimus) are apex predators of the Arctic, rulers of the snow---and now, with climate change, are in a swiftly worsening state of vulnerability, as classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).   Climate change isn't the species' only problem, however; oil and gas exploration in the Arctic also brings habitat destruction and exposure to toxins from oil exploration work.   Last October 2018, Filipino wildl...Keep on reading: A Filipino lensman captures majestic polar bears–before they’re gone.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 6th, 2019

Sports world must join climate change crusade - IOC | The Manila Times Online

KATOWICE, Poland: The world of sports must join the effort to tame global warming, and the International Olympic Committee intends to lead the way, it said on Tuesday (Wednesday inREAD The post Sports.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsDec 14th, 2018

Longtime friends James, Wade prepare for last meeting as opponents

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com LOS ANGELES — Friendships are never formed totally by choice, because fate demands a say-so in the process by creating the time and the place and in the curious case of LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, the basketball court. It was in Chicago, June of 2003, site of the NBA’s annual draft combine, the meet market for young players gathered to someday change the game, when Wade and LeBron had each other at wassup. In some ways, it was an unlikely pairing: Teenaged phenom from Akron, Ohio, fresh from the cover of Sports Illustrated and the high school prom who already had a national following; and an overlooked underdog from the Chicago suburbs who only became an acquired basketball taste weeks earlier after a searing run through the NCAA tournament. That day, Wade and LeBron went through the checkup lines for height and weight, vertical leap and whatever else the combines put rookies through and then during a break came the only measurement that counted, when one future Hall of Famer sized up the other. LeBron said: “Some things you can’t explain. Sometimes it’s just chemistry.” Wade said: “When you’re young and coming into the league, you find guys you have something in common with, then you continue to link and that’s what we did. It’s organic how we built this friendship.” Some 15 years later, the bond will endure, likely forever. The basketball part, however, ends Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) after the game when Wade, who’s calling it a career after this season, peels off his sweat-soaked Heat jersey and swaps it for a Laker top belonging to LeBron. It might qualify as the best trade of the NBA season, or at least the most emotional. "It's sweet and sour,” said LeBron, anticipating the moment at Staples Center. “The sweet part about it is I've always loved being on the same floor with my brother. And the sour part about it is that this is our last time sharing the same court.” Brother? How many folks with different blood can call each other that? True friendship is answering the phone at 3 a.m. instead of letting it ring, and reaching for the tab with longer arms, and above all, becoming a mattress when the other guy falls. Those tests were aced throughout the LeBron-Wade bromance that stretched through two Olympic teams, four years in Miami, two NBA championships and even 46 games in Cleveland together but of course was always put on hold whenever they were on opposite benches. This is best placed into proper context by Gabrielle Union, the actress and wife of Wade, who says ever so delicately about her husband in those friend vs. friend moments: “He wants to kill him. Drop three-balls on him.” Perhaps so, because as Wade says, “you always want to beat your best friend,” yet their competitive spirit is confined within the baselines and between the jump ball and buzzer. Then the teasing and bragging rights begin by text or call, almost instantly. This arrangement irked the old-school basketball culture, long cringing at the chummy ways of a new generation, believing that most if not all interaction should cease until the offseason, or even better, when careers are done. Wade and LeBron then turned up the volume on that subject when they linked up as teammates with the Heat in 2010, angering the purists and creating, at least initially, a team to be despised as well as respected. Not that Wade and LeBron regret that experience at all, or the noise that followed; this was, as Union observed, “far bigger than basketball.” The chance to be neighbors and watch their kids grow up together and celebrate championships on South Beach until well past sunrise was a priceless part of the bonding process, something neither will be able to duplicate as they begin a new phase of their relationship. The chance to let their hair down (well, Wade anyway) and loosen up, away from the crowds and the media, is something they could keep to themselves. Although: Mrs.Wade spilled a few friendship secrets the other day, with an ohmigod and a roll of the eyes. “They laugh a lot,” she said. “LeBron is silly. Dwyane is silly. They’re silly and goofy together. When they’re around each other it’s like a never-ending sleepover. That’s what it feels like when you’re in their orbit. They have an unspoken language and jokes and it’s like a show and everyone’s watching.” It helped that, in addition to being in the same sport, both LeBron and Wade became all-time greats, because like-minded and like-talented people tend to magnetize. It was LeBron who collected MVP awards and a huge social media flock at first, then Wade followed up by winning a championship first, and this created a mutual respect for each other’s abilities. It also allowed them to walk through the same exclusive doors together, for example, making a pair of Olympic teams and a batch of All-Star Games, therefore putting them in close company even before the Heat experience. From those moments, a relationship tightened. And when life threw airballs in their direction, one was there to help the other. “When I was going through the custody of my kids and that battle, he was someone I talked to constantly and told him what I was going through,” said Wade. “And vice versa, when he was going through things family-wise, I could talk to him and try to relate. You lean on guys who have similar stories and have gone through similar things in their lives to help with advice or just be there to listen.” Curiously, one of their few awkward moments happened when they became teammates in Miami initially. The transition, Wade admitted, was friction-free but not totally smooth. Superstars have egos. Adjustments were needed and were done and this was made possible by LeBron’s game, which is built on unselfish play. “It would’ve been easier if we went to a neutral site,” Wade said. “But because he came to Miami, it was my team before he got there. It was a little hard because of that, but once we got through the first year it was easy. He can play with anybody. He can go out and score or he can get 17 points and 20 assists. He knows if a guy hasn’t shot the ball in a while and how to get him going.” Their on-court chemistry was astonishing to witness at times, the best entertainment in basketball back then. They knew each other’s tendencies, spots on the floor and how to mesh. How many times did Wade toss a lob to a streaking LeBron for a dunk, or vice-versa? Along with Chris Bosh, this was one of the most productive link-ups in NBA history. Four years and four trips to the NBA Finals don’t lie. And true friendship is following your pal to Cleveland in winter, as Wade did last year in an awkward attempt to re-create the past. To this, Wade shook his head and laughed: “Yeah, yeah, you right about that.” While Wade is putting a bow on this retirement season, he marvels at his friend’s staying power and salutes LeBron’s decision to sign up with the Lakers and take on Los Angeles. “I think it’s great, something he wanted to do,” Wade said. “For a player to be able to map out his career the way he has been able to do, he’s doing it his way. This is the way he wanted, to end it here in L.A., on and off the court. His career is not over, but this is the last layer of his career.” And LeBron, reflecting on Wade’s NBA imprint, said: “D-Wade has definitely had a helluva career, obviously. A first-ballot Hall of Famer, a three-time champion and so on and so on. I mean, it speaks for itself. But what he's done for that franchise and what he's done for that community since he's been drafted has been a pretty good story.” This is curious timing, how the NBA schedule has Wade making his last trip to Los Angeles and against LeBron not long after Wade and Union, who have a home in L.A., recently welcomed a newborn daughter. The families spent Sunday (Monday, PHL time) together at the baby shower, then the farewell game tips 24 hours later. Union calls it the “end of a basketball brotherhood but the beginning of a real friendship with basketball gone” and Wade agrees. “When we first came into the league people couldn’t understand how we could be friends during the season," Wade said. "When I was in Cleveland for a game I’d go to his house the night before, we’d go to the movies and hang out and then we’d go at each other in the game. We’d laugh about that. We enjoy having a different relationship than what was done before us, but then going out and playing against him, I’d always want to whup his you-know-what. And vice versa. Just the times we shared. The moments when it’s not all been great, but to be able to have somebody to talk to and run things by. A lot of people don’t have a LeBron James to call up and say, 'Hey, I’m thinking about this, what do you think about it?’ That’s special.” What will also be special Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) is when Wade, as has been his routine after every game this season, swaps jerseys with an opposing player; this will be the 1,001st game of Wade’s dwindling NBA career. “Obviously this is something I wanted to do in my last year,” Wade said. “But of all the players in the league, LeBron is one of my closest friends so this one will mean a little more, because of the paths that we both went down as competitors against each other and as teammates. We’ll be linked together forever.” And what might be said between friends and competitors caught up in that moment? Wade offers this: “We’ll look at each other and say, 'Yo, this is it.’ It’s crazy that it happened so fast. We remember the night we got drafted like yesterday. But it comes fast. Just an ending of a chapter in both of our lives.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

China, Europe fill gap as US cedes global climate leadership

  WASHINGTON -- The latest indications of the success of human efforts to dial back climate change are not promising.   Arctic ice is melting, but in a large "hot spot", it is melting at an even faster rate, according to a new study published in the journal Nature.   In the northern Barents Sea, surface warming and loss of sea ice in winter are the most rapid in the Arctic region.   Separately, last month, Reuters reported on a leaked United Nations report to be released later this year, which said the international community looks like it is falling short of the more ambitious targets for greenhouse gas emissions set by the 2015 Paris Agreeme...Keep on reading: China, Europe fill gap as US cedes global climate leadership.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 5th, 2018

FPH chief hits banks for supporting coal plants

By Victor V. Saulon, Sub-Editor CEBU CITY — Local banks continue to extend loans to new coal-fired power plant projects despite the Philippines being directly hit by climate change, the chairman of Lopez-led First Philippine Holdings Corp. (FPH) said. Federico R. Lopez, who is also FPH chief executive officer, said banks are “tripping over each […] The post FPH chief hits banks for supporting coal plants appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2018

Michael Martinez super happy about his second Olympic bid

Figure skater Michael Martinez is 'extremely happy' that he has a chance of making Philippine sporting history as this Winter Olympics will be the first time that the country will be sending athletes in two different events of the quadrennial event. Martinez joins Fil-Am Asa Miller, a 17-year old from Portland, Oregon, who qualified in the giant slalom event. The figure skater expressed his elation after the Philippine Olympic Committee informed him of the good news, saying that Sweden had withdrawn from the event, leaving the door wide open for the 21-year old, to go for his second Olympic stint since Sochi in 2014.  Martinez clinched the final spot in the figure skating event as the Scandinavian nation pulled out Alexander Majorov for failing to meet the Swedish Olympic committee’s minimum qualifying scores. The now two-time Olympian was outside looking in as he finished 8th in the Nebelhorn Trophy in Germany last year, as the competition only takes the Top 7 for Olympic qualification.  By virtue of his 8th-place finish, Martinez was named as alternate, should any situation like this arises.  Since he had anticpated an event like this would occur, he continued to train in California, and is now in preparation for Feb. 8, a day after the opening ceremony. Martinez is asking again for the country's support and thanks everyone who believed in him in an interview with ABS-CBN News' Dyan Castillejo. Michael Martinez ecstatic about news he is in the Winter Olympics says he has continuously been training pic.twitter.com/Oh0OTatSDq — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) January 25, 2018.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 25th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Scherzer shows starters in relief are a roll of the dice

em>By Noah Trister, Associated Press /em> Pedro Martinez and Madison Bumgarner made it look easy. For Max Scherzer, pitching in relief proved a lot rougher. When Scherzer took the mound in the top of the fifth Thursday night in Washington, the Nationals were clinging to a one-run lead, hoping their star right-hander could move them an inning or two closer to the NL Championship Series. Instead, Washington gave up the lead for good when Chicago scored four runs with two out, and the Cubs went on to a 9-8 victory in Game 5 of the NL Division Series. Scherzer's relief appearance was the kind of move that has become fashionable of late. A short postseason series creates heightened urgency, and managers are willing to ditch some of the rigid roles they've put pitchers in during the regular season. That flexibility sometimes leads to longer relief outings for closers, and it also means starters like Scherzer will occasionally come in from the bullpen. That's worked out famously for some teams in the past. Bumgarner earned a five-inning save in Game 7 of the 2014 World Series for San Francisco, and Martinez held Cleveland hitless for the final six innings when Boston beat the Indians in Game 5 of the 1999 ALDS. But Scherzer's outing was a reality check to anyone who thinks that type of performance is easy. So far in this postseason, Chris Sale, Justin Verlander, Jon Lester, Jose Quintana and Scherzer have all pitched in relief on short rest after making starts earlier in the series. The results have been decidedly mixed. Those five have combined for 12 2/3 innings in relief, allowing six earned runs and 10 hits with five walks and 10 strikeouts. The way the Division Series are scheduled, a manager often has a choice of whom to pencil in for a decisive Game 5 — since the starters from Games 1 and 2 would both have enough rest. It's tempting to use the Game 1 starter in relief on short rest in Game 4, then save the Game 2 starter for Game 5 — because that allows a team to use its top two starters in two games apiece. The Houston Astros entered Game 4 of the ALDS against Boston with a 2-1 series lead. The Red Sox, trying to extend their season, brought Sale on in relief in the fourth inning with Houston up by a run. The Astros countered in the fifth with Verlander, who like Sale had started Game 1. If there had been a Game 5, Dallas Keuchel would have been set to pitch for Houston. Verlander had never pitched in relief in the regular season or postseason. Manager A.J. Hinch put him in with a runner on first and one out. 'Justin Verlander wanted the ball. He was very good about preparation,' Hinch said. 'It did cut out of his routine, which is the one thing you question. He's been doing this routine for 13 years.' Verlander allowed a two-run homer to his very first batter, giving up the lead, but that was the only hit off him in 2 2/3 innings. He did not have a strikeout — a rare occurrence for him — but he ended up getting the win. Sale kept the Astros scoreless for four innings, but two Houston runs in the eighth were charged to him, and Boston was eliminated . 'You've just kind of got to throw your routine out the window and say, 'I'm just going to pitch,'' Verlander said. 'Once I gave up the homer and just kind of got out of that inning and then was able to go in the dugout and sit down, and I just treated that like I had just pitched the first inning and we were behind by a run, and OK, just shut the door and give our guys a chance to come back.' The change in routine can be an obstacle for a starter pitching in relief, and the short rest after a previous start may be an even bigger issue. Verlander and Sale combined to allow three runs in 7 1/3 innings that day — solid work, but not overwhelming. The decision to bring a starter in the middle innings may hinge on how much confidence a manager has in his bullpen's depth and stamina. When the New York Yankees pulled CC Sabathia in the fifth inning of their ALDS finale at Cleveland, they needed only two relievers — David Robertson and Aroldis Chapman — to get through the final 4 2/3. There are times, however, when desperation takes over. With closer Kenley Jansen running out of steam after 51 pitches, the Los Angeles Dodgers turned to ace Clayton Kershaw — on one day of rest — to get the final two outs in Game 5 of last year's NLDS against Washington. Kershaw wasn't a sure bet pitching in that situation, and neither was Verlander in relief against Boston this year. But in the postseason, each game takes on so much importance that managers are willing to push their stars a bit further. 'I think if you learn anything from watching playoff baseball or being in playoff baseball, you have to try to win today,' Hinch said. 'You can't save anything for tomorrow, if you have guys available.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 14th, 2017

World efforts to check climate change may be too late - study | Inquirer Technology

The world is on course to miss its "best chance" of preventing runaway climate change by ensuring global greenhouse gas emissions peak in 2020, the World Resources Institute (WRI) warned on.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated News19 hr. 40 min. ago

Impacts of climate change are highest global risks – report

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews/ 18 January) – Climate change and its impacts pose the highest global risks, the World Economic Forum said in Global Risks Report released Thursday. “The results of climate inaction are becoming increasingly clear. The accelerating pace of biodiversity loss is a particular concern. Species abundance is down by 60% since 1970,” the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsJan 20th, 2019

Govt still committed to green financing

THE government remains committed to improve green financing in the Philippines. “Climate change is the most pressing problem of our time. The challenges posed by climate change demand all hands…READ The post Govt still committed to green financing appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJan 19th, 2019

Climate change pilgrimage: Winning hearts and minds

  MANILA, Philippines – Our perception of reality can change at any time. It could come during a family gathering, a school graduation, or a near-death experience. Sometimes, it happens on a walk. This is what AG Saño, a street artist and environment activist, observed during ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 19th, 2019

Mother Earth’s '10YearChallenge does not look good

Environmental groups have joined in the social media trend known as the “10 year challenge” by sharing pictures of pollution and climate change phenomena that are threatening the Earth. World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Philippines posted an image of a used plastic bottle to show the effect of plastic wastes on the environment. Meanwhile, […] The post Mother Earth’s #10YearChallenge does not look good appeared first on Interaksyon......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsJan 18th, 2019

Impacts of climate change are highest global risks – report

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews/ 18 January) – Climate change and its impacts pose the highest global risks, the World Economic Forum said in Global Risks Report released Thursday. “The results of climate inaction are becoming increasingly clear. The accelerating pace of biodiversity loss is a particular concern. Species abundance is down by 60% since 1970,” the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsJan 18th, 2019

China shares scientific data

The Chinese Academy of Sciences will release about 5 million gigabytes of data related to Earth sciences, biology and ecology from around globe, allowing scientists and officials worldwide to study and tackle issues on climate change, food security, disaster relief and environmental protection. The data which can be accessed on the CASEarth Databank at data.casearth.cn, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJan 18th, 2019

Climate change stalls Iloilo’s rice yield target

By: Gail T. Momblan THE 1-million-metric ton (MT) rice yield target remains elusive for Iloilo’s agriculture sector due to the consequences of global climate change. Provincial Agriculture Office (PAO) head Ildefonso Toledo said the 1-million metric ton (MT) rice yield target remains elusive because of uncontrollable weather conditions, among others. “From 2006-2007, this was already the time when […] The post Climate change stalls Iloilo’s rice yield target appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJan 17th, 2019

Jasmine Alkhaldi raring for SEA Games gold at home

MANILA, Philippines---Olympic heartbreaks won't make Philippine swimmer Jasmine Alkhaldi walk away from the sport. Jasmine Alkhaldi had thoughts of giving up swimming when she failed to advance to the semifinals of the 100-meter women's freestyle event in the 2016 Rio Olympics, but the notion of competing in the 2019 Philippine Southeast Asian Games made her change her mind. Representing Filipinos in her home country lit a fire in Alkhaldi that almost got doused in the pools of Rio de Janeiro and now she's on a mission to wear the Philippine colors proudly in the regional games. "It's really what keeps me going," said Alkhaldi during the PBA's opening ceremonies for the 2019...Keep on reading: Jasmine Alkhaldi raring for SEA Games gold at home.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2019

DepEd seeks to revamp basic education for climate change awareness Manila Bulletin News

DepEd seeks to revamp basic education for climate change awareness Manila Bulletin Education Secretary Leonor Briones underscored the need to rework and review the curriculum for basic education in a.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJan 12th, 2019

Beijing gears up for major events

Beijing’s Yanqing district has speeded up its preparation for the upcoming 2019 China Beijing International Horticulture Exhibition and the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics. By the end of 2018, the district had trained up to 200,000 people, including volunteers, hotel and restaurant staff members and security guards, for the two events, according to the local authorities. […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJan 7th, 2019

YEARENDER 2018: A year of hits and misses for DOTr

It was a year of hits and misses for the Department of Transportation (DOTr) as far as delivering its promises of bringing change in the lives of Filipino commuters and the general public that use various mode of land, sea and air transport......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 3rd, 2019