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Black, white lady sa theme park

MGA ka-Misteryo naka­rinig na ba kayo ng nananaghoy na babae sa hatinggabi? O kaya gusto mong magpunta ng palikuran pero may babaeng nakatayo sa pintuan?The post Black, white lady sa theme park appeared first on Abante News Online......»»

Category: newsSource: abante abanteJul 12th, 2019

Nationals fans rejoice in red as hometown heroes are honored

By Carole Feldman and Lynn Berry, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The song "Baby Shark" blared over loudspeakers and a wave of red washed across this politically blue capital Saturday as Nationals fans rejoiced at a parade marking Washington's first World Series victory since 1924. "They say good things come to those who wait. 95 years is a pretty long wait," Nationals owner Ted Lerner told the cheering crowd. "But I'll tell you, this is worth the wait." As buses carrying the players and team officials wended their way along the parade route, pitcher Max Scherzer at one point hoisted the World Series trophy to the cheers of the crowd. At a rally just blocks from the Capitol, Scherzer said his teammates grinded their hearts out to "stay in the fight." And then, after backup outfielder Gerardo Parra joined the team, he said, they started dancing and having fun. And they started hitting. "Never in this town have you seen a team compete with so much heart and so much fight," he said. And then the Nats danced. Team officials, Nationals manager Dave Martinez and several players thanked the fans for their support through the best of times and staying with them even after a dismal 19-31 start to the season. "I created the circle of trust and I trusted these guys," he said. The camaraderie among the players was a theme heard throughout the rally. "It took all 25 of us, every single day we were pulling for each other," said pitcher Stephen Strasburg, the World Series MVP. Nationals veteran slugger Howie Kendrick, 36, said that when he came to the Nationals in 2017, "I was thinking about retiring. This city taught me to love baseball again." Mayor Muriel Bowser declared DC the "District of Champions." The Capitals won Stanley Cup in 2018, the Mystics won the WNBA championship this year, and now the Nationals. The city had been thirsting for a World Series championship for nearly a century. The Nationals gave them that by winning in seven games over the Houston Astros; the clincher came on the road Wednesday night. "I just wish they could have won in DC," said Ronald Saunders of Washington, who came with a Little League team that was marching in the parade. Nick Hashimoto of Dulles, Virginia, was among those who arrived at 5 a.m. to snag a front-row spot. He brought his own baby shark toy in honor of Parra's walk-up song, which began as a parental tribute to the musical taste of his 2-year-old daughter and ended up as a rallying cry that united fans at Nationals Park and his teammates. As "Baby Shark, doo doo doo doo doo doo" played on a crisp morning, early risers joined in with the trademark response — arms extended in a chomping motion. Chants of "Let's go Nats!" resonated from the crowd hours before the rally. Kimberly Ballou of Silver Spring, Maryland, said sports "is a unifier" that transcends race, gender and class and brings people together. The crowd along the route was deeply packed. Cheers went up and fans waved red streamers, hand towels and signs that said "Fight Finished" as the players rode by on the open top of double-decker buses. General Manager Mike Rizzo, a cigar in his mouth, jumped off with the World Series trophy to show the fans lining the barricades and slap high-fives. Manager Martinez also got in on the fun. "We know what this title means to DC, a true baseball town, from the Senators to the Grays and now the Nationals," Bowser said at the rally. "By finishing the fight you have brought a tremendous amount of joy to our town and inspired a new generation of players and Nationals fans." Bowser added: "We are deeply proud of you and I think we should do it again next year. What do you think?" Then she started a chant of "Back to back! Back to back!" Martinez said he liked to hear the mayor pushing for back-to-back championships and said: "I get it. I'm all in. But let me enjoy this one first. I don't know if my heart can take any more of this right now. I need to just step back and enjoy this." Martinez, who had a heart procedure recently, said that during the Series, as things heated up, players and fans shouted at him to watch out for his heart. "All this right here has cured my heart," he said. And as the "Baby Shark" theme played once more, team owner Lerner told the team's veterans, "From now on, you can call me 'Grandpa Shark.'" President Donald Trump has invited the Nationals to the White House on Monday, though relief pitcher Sean Doolittle doesn't plan to attend. "There's a lot of things, policies that I disagree with, but at the end of the day, it has more to do with the divisive rhetoric and the enabling of conspiracy theories and widening the divide in this country," Doolittle told The Washington Post. Doolittle found support from Larry Stokes of Boyds, Maryland, citing Trump's stand on immigrants. "They're playing this game, but he doesn't like immigrants," Stokes said. But to fan Bridget Chapin, who came from Burke, Virginia, with her husband, Mark, "Regardless of how you feel, you go to the Oval Office. I'm really weary of athletes making political statements. I watch sports to get away from all that." The president attended Game 5 in Washington and was greeted with loud boos when he was shown on the giant video screen during a tribute to veterans. The boos more than overwhelmed a scattering of cheers. Delores Smith of Washington, a longtime baseball fan who said she had an uncle who pitched in the Negro Leagues, said the World Series was "a big win" for the city. "This is the first time in a long time that I've seen the whole city come together. There's no fussing about Trump." Even with the threat of stars leaving for free agency — as outfielder Bryce Harper did after 2018 — fans hoped the Nationals' success would continue. "I don't think it's going to be our last time. This team, even when our last superstar left, this team rallied around, they played as a team," Larry Stokes said. Fans urged the Nationals to re-sign third baseman Anthony Rendon, who was greeted with chants of MVP......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2019

In Focus: White House Christmas Theme: 'The Gift Of The Holidays'

For her family's final Christmas in the White House, Michelle Obama used the holiday decor to highlight her core initiatives as first lady: Military service, education, and health......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 1st, 2016

JIL celebrates 41st founding anniversary

The religious group Jesus Is Lord Church Worldwide celebrated its 41st founding anniversary yesterday at the Rizal Park in Manila with the theme “One in Christ” that was attended by thousands of church members and some politicians......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 27th, 2019

Panda dog cafe sparks China animal rights debate

BEIJING, China – A pet cafe in China where dogs are dyed black and white to look like panda cubs has triggered a heated online debate over the treatment of animals. The Cute Pet Games cafe opened last month in Chengdu, capital of southwest Sichuan province which is home to China's ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 26th, 2019

Addressing growing fan behavior problem top priority for NBA

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press About a dozen NBA players gathered for a teleconference with officials in the league office this summer, making their case about what they believe is one of the biggest problems in the game. Fan behavior, they said, is getting worse. The numbers show they’re right, and if that isn’t troubling enough race only adds to the complexity of the issue: Most NBA players are black, and it seems like most of those in the closest seats are white. Not every incident is racially motivated, though some clearly are. After high-profile incidents involving Russell Westbrook, DeMarcus Cousins, Kyle Lowry and others last season — including ones involving racist taunts — zero tolerance for abusive or hateful behavior is now to become the NBA’s policy going forward. The league is changing and toughening its code of conduct for fans, especially putting those in closest proximity to the players and the court on alert that anything over the line will lead to ejections and possibly more. “We’ve added any sexist language or LGBTQ language, any denigrating language in that way, anything that is non-basketball related,” said Jerome Pickett, the NBA’s executive vice president and chief security officer. “So ‘your mother’ comments, talking about your family, talking about test scores, anything non-basketball related, we’ve added that in as well as being something that we will go and pull a fan out of the seat and investigate what happened.” Westbrook and Cousins were subjected to racist taunts in Salt Lake City and Boston and the fans involved in those incidents were banned by the Jazz and Celtics. Lowry was shoved by a minority partner of the Golden State Warriors’ ownership group, seated courtside during the NBA Finals, and that person was banned from team business for a year by the league. There were more. Those were just the highest-profile ones. The NBA would not release exact numbers — and the totals are believed to be very low — but Pickett said the ejections of fans in the courtside area still more than doubled last season. Westbrook declined comment for this story, saying through a Rockets official that he was not comfortable discussing the matter. But the players’ union insists that the problem is getting bigger and bigger. “Last season, I began to sense even at the games I was attending that there was a certain, I’ll call it absence of civility, that permeated the games,” said Michele Roberts, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association. “I was seeing more bad-mouthing opposing teams that were not simply ‘you suck,’ which every one of us will tolerate, but really nasty, nasty comments being directed at players.” The Celtics banned a fan for two years for directing racist chants at Cousins. Westbrook was involved in a pair of incidents in Utah that came to light last season; was offended by a fan during the 2018 playoffs by a fan calling him “boy” before a playoff game, and then last season was involved in a back-and-forth shouting match with another fan. The Jazz banned both fans for life, and Westbrook was fined $25,000 by the NBA for threatening the fan involved in last season’s incident. “I try very hard not to have my default answer be, ‘It’s racism.’ I really do because I don’t think that necessarily advances the argument,” Roberts said. “If it’s undoubtedly that, then I’m happy to say it.” It’s not always racism, either — Roberts also said she’s received complaints from many white players about being the subject of nastiness from fans. Amira Davis is an assistant professor at Penn State specializing in 20th Century American History with an emphasis on race, gender, sports and politics. She believes fans feel more emboldened now to say whatever they like, without fear of repercussions. “There have been plenty of sober fans yelling slurs and attacking players in the worst way,” Davis said. “I think it’s a mix of all of those things and when looking at predominantly white spaces like Utah and a largely black labor force, it ratchets it up a little bit more and makes it a lot more intense. Particularly in this political climate in which it’s very easy to project onto high-profile black athletes and pathologies and misconceptions about the black community.” Fan behavior is not just a concern in the NBA. It is being noted everywhere. Racist chants and taunts are a major issue in European soccer, including at a Euro 2020 qualifier between Bulgaria and England last week. Green Bay and Philadelphia fans fought in the stands at Lambeau Field last month. The Atlanta Braves had fans stop doing their “tomahawk chop” during the playoffs earlier this month. During the AL Championship Series between Houston and New York, Astros manager A.J. Hinch told umpires that he felt the behavior of fans at Yankee Stadium had crossed the line and that it “was becoming a dangerous situation.” “There’s no place for that,” Hinch said, referencing matters like debris being thrown from the stands toward players and taunts directed toward some of the Astros. “Both teams will agree. And it’s really hard to stop fans from doing that. But it’s also very dangerous.” And the athletes are not always just victims, either. Golfer Bio Kim was suspended by the Korean PGA for three years for making an obscene gesture at the crowd during the final round of a tournament that he won, angry because of noise from a cellphone camera. In the NBA, the league is expanding the area in arenas most closely monitored when it comes to player-fan interaction. The top-priority area used to be just those seated with feet on the court itself or maybe the first couple rows of courtside seats; now, that area goes several rows deep in every building, plus the areas where teams and referees enter and exit the court. The fan code of conduct, a standard announcement at every NBA arena for years, is now being shown and promoted more times in each game. Season-ticket holders have been put on notice by teams that they may lose their seats even if they give their tickets to someone who goes over the line and harasses players or officials too vociferously. Fans believed to have been involved in incidents will be removed from seats while officials investigate; many times, when a security guard asks those in a certain area what just happened, no one would volunteer information with the suspected heckler present. “I think players are definitely vulnerable,” Golden State’s Draymond Green said after the Lowry incident. “Any time you’re in a situation where you can do no right, like in defending yourself, you’re vulnerable.” ___ AP Sports Writer Kyle Hightower in Boston contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 21st, 2019

Liza Soberano, Enrique Gil got Hollywood actor s nod for White Chicks costume at Black Magic party

Hollywood actor Marlon Wayans has given his approval to Kapamilya love team Enrique Gil and Liza Soberano who wore a “White Chicks”-inspired costume at the recent Star Magic Halloween party called Black Magic......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 21st, 2019

Women are having a greater impact on NBA than ever before

By Kyle Hightower, Associated Press Practice is over and Boston Celtics assistant coach Kara Lawson is still working. She stands under the basket rebounding and giving feedback to rookie guard Carsen Edwards as he shoots from different spots on the court. After swishing his final three attempts he jogs over to her. “Thanks, coach,” Edwards says before exchanging a high-five with Lawson. Welcome to the new-look NBA, in which women’s footprints are directly impacting every aspect of the game — from broadcasting booths, to officiating, coaching on the sidelines, front-office executives to ownership. Lawson is one of a record 11 women serving as assistant coaches in the NBA this season. While former WNBA star Swin Cash and Sue Bird are working in NBA front offices. “It’s not a fad,” said Basketball Hall of Famer Nancy Lieberman. “It’s opportunities going to very accomplished women who have given their life to the game.” While it may not be a fad, it is a recent trend. Lieberman remembers a time when the presence of women was hard to spot, or at best found only behind the scenes. The 61-year-old — who has broken barriers as a player, as a coach in the WNBA, head coach in NBA G League and in the NBA as assistant — learned quickly that building relationships was the skeleton key to erasing gender hurdles and opening opportunities in the league. That, along with an occasional assist from forward thinking men like former coach Don Nelson, who in 2009 hired her as the head coach of the Texas Legends, the Dallas Mavericks’ G League affiliate. Several have continued Nelson’s vision, including San Antonio Spurs Gregg Popovich, who made Becky Hammon the NBA’s first full-time assistant in 2014; current Mavericks’ coach Rick Carlisle (he hired Jenny Boucek as assistant in 2017) and the Sacramento Kings organization, which has been responsible for hiring three women as assistants (Lieberman, Boucek and Lindsay Harding). Even the BIG3, spearheaded by founder and entertainer Ice Cube, is helping normalize the idea of women leading men, Lieberman said. “I remember Donnie did an interview and he said, ‘Maybe the best man for the job isn’t a man at all.’ He had a list of criteria he wanted to hit for his head coach. And I hit those,” Lieberman said. The women who have broken into the NBA ranks are garnering respect from players for their experience and basketball knowledge. Celtics guard Gordon Hayward said Lawson has already made her presence felt. “She’s been good as far as just the experience she has as a basketball player,” Hayward said. “Reading the game and kind of little things she sees coaching on the sideline. Having somebody that well-versed in basketball, that experience is good.” Earlier this month, Wizards assistant Kristi Toliver was on the court helping the Mystics win their first WNBA championship. On the sideline, Washington NBA All-Stars John Wall and Bradley Beal were wearing the Wizard assistant’s WNBA jersey and dancing from the stands . NBA players are treating the feedback from Toliver and the other women in the league with the same reverence they give their male counterparts. “The biggest thing I learned is to share your voice and what you’ve learned,” Toliver said. “Doing that has helped me communicate with my guys.” Toliver is in a unique salary situation since she coaches for the Washington Wizards and plays for the Washington Mystics — both owned by same franchise. She was only paid about $10,000 with the Wizards last year because of WNBA salary cap rules. WNBA teams can only pay all their players a combined $50,000 in offseason to supplement pay and Washington only had $10,000 left to pay Toliver. There are no such hiccups in New Orleans, where Pelicans guard Frank Jackson said he always expected to benefit from Cash and Teresa Weatherspoon, who was hired as a New Orleans assistant this season. “They were ballers,” Jackson said. “They were good at their craft and I’ve taken a lot from both of them. ... I’ve always had open eyes and open ears to anyone who plays this game.” The 21-year-old Jackson knows of the women’s exploits because he has witnessed it firsthand. And he is not alone. The WNBA has been around since most players were teenagers, and is older than others; the league was launched in 1996. “As the years go on, they’re going to get more and more recognition,” said Jackson, in his third year out of Duke. “Girls can hoop, too. ... I just think as times change, you’ll see more and more.” Cash believes the NBA is realizing having more women is important to growing the league’s overall brand, business and bottom line. “The reality is and the statistics prove it, is that having women included in your business helps you get more inclusion, helps you get the diversity you need,” she said. “Diversity of thought, not just Black, White, Asian, Latino, whatever.” Stephanie Ready, a former assistant in the then D-League, said a big factor in the opportunities women are getting are coming because the younger generation of NBA executives, such as 76ers general manager Elton Brand. She said the new crop of hiring managers are doing a better job of recognizing what women bring to the table and as the older generation retires, it will get even better. “Some people will age out,” said Ready, one of the first women to be a men’s assistant on the collegiate level with Coppin State and a former broadcaster with the Charlotte Hornets who now currently covers the NBA for TNT and Yahoo. “By that I mean the old regime of men who thought that only men could do these jobs.” Richard Lapchick, who tracks racial and gender hiring numbers for the NBA, NFL, NHL and MLB, has long lauded the NBA as being the leader in gender hiring practices. He credits the leadership of Commissioner Adam Silver, who said the league needed to increase the number women coaches and referees in the NBA. Along with the record number of female assistants, five women referees will be working NBA games this upcoming season. Lapchick also believes the NBA will soon have its female head coach. Whether that is Hammon in San Antonio remains to be seen. But whoever it is, Lapchick said the move would go a long way in putting even more women in position to make basketball decisions. “I’d be surprised if it doesn’t happen before the next season,” he said, “or during the next season.” ___ AP Basketball Writer Brian Mahoney and AP Sports Writers Doug Feinberg in New York and Brett Martel in New Orleans contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 17th, 2019

Iran women attend FIFA soccer game for first time in decades

By Amir Vahda and Mehdi Fattahi, Associated Press TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — They had to sit well apart from the men, and the stadium was practically empty, but thousands of Iranian women in merry jester hats and face paint blew horns and cheered Thursday at the first FIFA soccer match they were allowed to freely attend in decades. In what many considered a victory in a decades-long fight by women in Iran to attend sporting events, they wrapped themselves in the country's vibrant red, green and white colors and watched with excitement as Iran thrashed Cambodia 14-0 in a 2022 World Cup qualifier at Tehran's Azadi, or Freedom, Stadium. "We are so happy that finally we got the chance to go to the stadium. It's an extraordinary feeling," said Zahra Pashaei, a 29-year-old nurse who has only known soccer games from television. "At least for me, 22 or 23 years of longing and regret lies behind this." As one woman shouted from a passing minibus before the match: "We are here finally!" So far, Iran's hard-line Islamic theocracy is not willing to go as far some women would like. Authorities announced they will allow women to attend only international soccer matches. Women have been banned from many sporting events in Iran since 1981, during the early years of the country's Islamic Revolution. Iran is the world's last nation to bar women from soccer matches. Saudi Arabia recently began letting women see games. Under pressure from FIFA, Iran let a carefully controlled number of women into the stadium, allocating them 4,000 tickets in a venue that seats about 80,000 people, and arranged for 150 female security personnel in black chadors to watch them. They sat at least 200 meters (yards) from the few thousand men at the match. Iranian state television, which long has been controlled by hard-liners, aired footage of women cheering, and commentators even acknowledged their presence. "There can be no stopping or turning back now," FIFA President Gianni Infantino said in a statement. "History teaches us that progress comes in stages, and this is just the beginning of a journey." Iran faced a potential ban from FIFA international matches if it didn't allow women into the game. The pressure from FIFA and Iran's soccer-loving public has grown since September, when an Iranian woman detained for dressing as a man to sneak into a match set herself on fire and died upon learning she could get six months in prison. The self-immolation of 29-year-old Sahar Khodayari, who became known as the "Blue Girl" for her love of the Iranian team Esteghlal, whose uniforms are blue, shocked Iranian officials and the public. At the match Thursday, a reporter with Iran's state-run IRNA news agency posted a video online of chador-wearing officers trying to grab a woman she said had a sign in Khodayari's honor. The crowd could be heard chanting, "Let her go!" The reporter wrote on Twitter that the woman slipped away from officers and ran off. Hard-liners and traditional Shiite clerics, citing their interpretation of Islamic law, believe in segregating men and women at public events, as well as keeping women out of men's sporting events. The effort to allow women back into stadiums has gone through fits and starts. In 2006, then-President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said he wanted women to attend matches to "improve soccer-watching manners and promote a healthy atmosphere." However, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who has final say on all matters of state, opposed the decision. Then, last year, Iranian authorities allowed a select group of women into Azadi Stadium by invitation only to watch the Asian Champion League final. Infantino said that "FIFA now looks more than ever toward a future when ALL girls and women wishing to attend football matches in Iran will be free to do so, and in a safe environment." Activist groups outside of Iran remain suspicious of Tehran. Amnesty International called the latest decision "a cynical publicity stunt by the authorities intended to whitewash their image." "Instead of taking half-hearted steps to address their discriminatory treatment of women who want to watch football, the Iranian authorities should lift all restrictions on women attending football matches, including domestic league games, across the country," said Philip Luther, Amnesty's Middle East and North Africa research and advocacy director. Still, many in Iran embraced the move, like shopkeeper Amir Ali Bagheri, who sold Pashaei a Team Melli jersey ahead of the match. Women "are so excited they are going to the stadium," he said. "God willing, there will be freedom sooner so that they can attend all matches, not just the national team matches. That will be much better." After the match, Pashaei said she hoped authorities would open up more matches to women so she could attend them with her family. "The 'Blue Girl' and her stories did help. Of course, efforts by women activists and feminists were very effective," she said. "We are happy anyway and hope this will continue, not just in national team matches." ___ Associated Press writer Jon Gambrell in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 11th, 2019

Machines at giant video screen ng Snow World, ‘di nasunog

IYONG Snow World sa loob ng Star City ang sinasabing pinakasikat na attraction sa nasunog na theme park. Iyon naman kasi ang kauna-unahang nagdala ng snow sa Pilipinas. Totoo ring nangyayari na may mga taong nagbabayad na lang ng entrance, hindi na nagra-rides at pumapasok na lang sa Snow World kung iyon lang naman talaga ang gusto nilang makita. ........»»

Category: filipinoSource:  hatawtabloidRelated NewsOct 4th, 2019

DOLE allocates P5.5M aid for Star City workers

MANILA, Philippines – The Department of Labor and Employment has allocated P5.5 million in emergency employment assistance for about 500 employees of Star City who were displaced by the fire that destroyed up to 90% of the theme park. The aid will be extended to the workers ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 4th, 2019

Extraordinary embrace: Gesture of forgiveness by murder victim s brother

WASHINGTON DC, USA – It was an extraordinary moment at the end of an unusual trial – a white police officer being embraced by the young black man whose brother she had been convicted of murdering. The emotional scene capped the trial of Amber Guyger, a 31-year-old Dallas, Texas, policewoman who ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 4th, 2019

It s our happy place : Netizens recall favorite memories of Star City

MANILA, Philippines – A fire of still undetermined origin broke out before dawn Wednesday, October 2, at the Star City complex in Pasay City, gutting both the theme park and the offices of the Manila Broadcasting Corporation. The news shocked many Filipinos, as Star City has been a popular weekend and ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2019

Ocean Adventure operator: SBMA move vs lease to have chilling effect

SUBIC, Philippines – The operator of the Ocean Adventure theme park said the decision of the Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority (SBMA) to preterminate its lease may cause irreparable harm to the local tourism industry and investors here. Robert Gonzaga, president and chief executive officer of Subic Bay Marine Exploratorium Incorporated (SBMEI), said ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 29th, 2019

SBMA to foreclose Ocean Adventure Park

SUBIC BAY FREEPORT ZONE, Philippines – The Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority (SBMA) is set to repossess the popular marine theme park Ocean Adventure and its related facilities due to multiple contract violations and failure to fulfill development commitments. SBMA Chairman and Administrator Wilma T. Eisma said the agency on Friday, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 28th, 2019

SBMA to close down Ocean Adventure Park

SUBIC BAY FREEPORT ZONE: The Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority (SBMA) on Friday announced it is set to repossess the popular marine theme park Ocean Adventure and related facilities due to…READ.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 27th, 2019

Sa mga nanglait sa gown ni Kim: Mamatay kayo sa inggit!

Kim Chiu is one of the rare celebrities gifted with impeccable SARTORIAL taste. Since 2015, she has impressed fellow attendees of the Star Magic Ball. Her off-shoulder bareback white number courtesy of Pepsi Herrera in 2015 was a head-turner. Her body-hugging black gown in 2016 by Val Taguba drew admiration from her fellow celebrities. The […] The post Sa mga nanglait sa gown ni Kim: Mamatay kayo sa inggit! appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2019

IN PHOTOS: Beauty queens at the ABS-CBN Ball 2019

MANILA, Philippines — Beauty queens celebrated with Philippine showbiz's biggest stars during the ABS-CBN Ball at Shangrila at the Fort on Saturday, September 14.  Miss Universe 2015 Pia Wurtzbach was fierce lady in a terno by Ezra Couture. Miss Universe Philippines 2016 Maxine Medina was in a white terno by ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 15th, 2019

Pagbalik (Return), natatanging Visayan movie sa PPP

PAMPAMILYA, simple ang istorya, malinis, at higit sa lahat para sa mga Bisaya. Ito ang sinabi ni Suzette Ranillo kagabi sa premiere night ng nag-iisang Visayan movie na black and white at kalahok sa 2019 Pista ng Pelikulang Pilipino, ang Pagbalik (Return). First directorial job ni Suzette ang Pagbalik na nagtatampok sa kanyang inang si ........»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 14th, 2019

Shelter for the night

Residents of several subdivisions in Bangkal, Davao City seek refuge at the covered court of the Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Central Park Subdivision, Bangkal due to the flash flood Wednesday night, 28 August 2019. The residents returned home when the waters subsided. MindaNews photo by GREGORIO BUENO.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsAug 29th, 2019

Tennis champ, trailblazer Althea Gibson honored at US Open

By Melissa Murphy, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Althea Gibson basked in a ticker-tape parade in New York a decade before Arthur Ashe won the 1968 U.S. Open. Gibson won 11 majors in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open singles titles. She integrated two sports — tennis and golf — during an era of racial segregation in the United States. "She's our Jackie Robinson of tennis," said Billie Jean King, who at 13 watched Gibson play. "I saw what it meant to be the best." One Love Tennis is an athletic and educational program for youth in Wilmington, North Carolina. During a rainy day in 2017, the girls watched the documentary "Althea and Arthur." They learned Ashe has a stadium named for him at the U.S. Open on the grounds of the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York. The mood in the room grew somber afterward, according to program director Lenny Simpson. The girls realized there wasn't even a "dag-gone hot dog stand" named for Gibson. Why wasn't there a monument to the first African American to win a major title (1956 French Open) before winning both the U.S. Nationals (precursor to the U.S. Open) and Wimbledon in 1957-58? Simpson suggested the girls be part of the solution by writing letters to his friend and then-U.S. Tennis Association President Katrina Adams. King and Adams had been working on the Gibson project for years. King's advocacy before the USTA board resulted in a unanimous vote. Adams later read letters to the board from the girls, including Xerra Robinson, to reinforce the importance of a tribute. "I know she would be proud to see the progress that's been made with so many women of color leading the pack in professional tennis," Adams said of Gibson, who died in 2003 at 76. "Her bravery, perseverance and determination paved the way." On Monday, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. The girls and boys of One Love Tennis will attend the ceremony, along with Gibson's 85-year-old doubles partner, Angela Buxton of Britain. "It's about bloody time," said Buxton, who won the 1956 French and Wimbledon titles with her friend. More things to know about Gibson, who made the covers of Time and Sports Illustrated and was voted AP Female Athlete of the Year in 1957-58: EARLY YEARS Gibson traveled the hard road from Harlem to Wimbledon, but she had a community of support. The oldest of five children, Gibson was born in Silver, South Carolina, before her sharecropper parents relocated to Harlem. At 18, Gibson moved to Wilmington, North Carolina, to live with Dr. Hubert and Celeste Eaton. She honed her tennis and social skills on Dr. Eaton's court at his home, called "the black country club" because African Americans couldn't play at public courts or white country clubs. "Culturally, it was a tough adjustment," said Simpson, who met his coach and mentor on that court at age 5 when Gibson gave him a racket and called him "champ." ''(In Harlem), she didn't see the signs of white and colored water fountains and white and colored bathrooms. The prejudice and discrimination certainly was there, but nothing like the Jim Crow days of the South." She spent summers in Lynchburg, Virginia, training on the court of Dr. Robert Walter Johnson, who later nurtured Ashe, a winner of five Grand Slam titles. Both were forced to play in segregated tournaments early in their careers. Barred by the precursor of the USTA, Gibson won 10 straight American Tennis Association women's titles starting in 1947. After lobbying by the ATA and a withering editorial from four-time champion Alice Marble, Gibson became the first African American to compete in the 1950 U.S. Nationals at Forest Hills on her 23rd birthday. A graduate of Florida A&M, Gibson taught physical education and considered quitting tennis because she couldn't make a living in the low-paying amateur days. But in 1955, she was tapped by the State Department for a goodwill tennis tour of Asia. That's how she met Buxton in India. ALTHEA YEARS Both were looking for a doubles partner in 1956. Buxton was denied membership at the club in London where she practiced after she listed Jewish for religion on the application. She grew up in England and South Africa and understood Gibson's struggle. "No one spoke to her, let alone played with her," Buxton said by phone from London. "(Her playing style) was like a young man. She wore little shorts, a vest and hit the ball hard, even her second serve. She came charging up to the net. She bamboozled people with her attitude." They won at Roland Garros and Wimbledon, but the "powers that be" were not thrilled and "you needed a spy glass to see the headline 'Minorities Win,'" Buxton said. Both were denied membership at the All England Club despite being Wimbledon champions. (Buxton is still waiting). Nonetheless, Gibson got the royal treatment with a ticker-tape parade in July in New York after receiving the 1957 Wimbledon trophy from Queen Elizabeth II. Two months later, she won the U.S. Nationals at Forest Hills. "That was an incredible joy for her," Simpson said. She duplicated those feats and retired from tennis at No. 1 in 1958 — a winner of more than 50 singles and doubles titles — because there was no significant prize money until the professional era began in 1968. The men's and women's 2019 U.S. Open winner will each receive a check for $3.8 million. No other African American woman won the U.S. Open until Serena Williams in 1999 or Wimbledon until Venus Williams in 2000. AFTER TENNIS Gibson played exhibition tennis before Harlem Globetrotters games, signing a $100,000 contract, and joined the LPGA full-time in 1964. In 1975, she became state commissioner of athletics in New Jersey. She served on the state athletics control board, and the governor's council on physical fitness until 1992. The twice-divorced Gibson's health failed in her late 60s after a stroke and she struggled to make ends meet. Buxton said Gibson reached out to a handful of tennis friends without much success. Gibson was on the verge of suicide in 1995 when the tennis great called her, she said. Buxton provided financial support and visited her friend in East Orange, New Jersey. "Angela Buxton saved her life, literally," Simpson said. Buxton also wrote a letter to Tennis Week magazine, and donations flooded in from all over the world. The WTA currently has a hardship fund to help former players. Frances Gray, a longtime friend and co-founder of the Althea Gibson Foundation, has kept her legacy alive. A self-described "born athlete," Gibson said she wanted to be remembered as "strong and tough and quick." "If not for Althea Gibson, there would be no Arthur Ashe, no Serena and Venus, Madison Keys, Sloane Stephens and the list goes on," Simpson said. "She opened it up for all of us.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 25th, 2019