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1.3% of schools still needing support for coming school year – DepEd

MANILA, Philippines – About 1.3% of schools are still in need of support before the opening of classes on June 4, announced Department of Education (DepEd) Undersecretary Jesus Mateo on Monday, May 21. Mateo explained the readiness of schools were evaluated based on 6 variables: (availability of) teachers, classrooms, toilets, seats, ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerMay 21st, 2018

170 private schools in Metro raising tuition

The Department of Education (DepEd) has granted the request of 170 private elementary and high schools in the National Capital Region to increase tuition in the coming school year......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2018

DepEd to replace SHS textbooks with tablets

THE Department of Education (DepEd) announced that some Senior High School (SHS) students will be using tablet computers as alternative to textbooks this coming school year. The DepEd earlier said the new set of computer packages will be distributed to public schools nationwide starting this year. According to Education Undersecretary….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsApr 28th, 2018

PH schools to join drive vs tobacco

ALL public and private schools this coming school year are expected to take part in the tobacco control policy initiative by the Department of Education (DepEd). Dubbed “EskweLABAN sa Sigarilyo Project,” it is a three-year project in partnership with the Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund to be implemented in schools in….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsApr 8th, 2018

DepEd announces Oplan Balik Eskwela launching for coming school year

DepEd has announced the launching of the national Oplan Balik Eskwela (OBE) for this coming school year to ensure the smooth opening of classes in all public schools nationwide in June. #BeFullyInformed DepEd announces Oplan Balik Eskwela launching for coming school year The Department of Education (DepEd) has announced the launching of the national Oplan… link: DepEd announces Oplan Balik Eskwela launching for coming school year.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2018

DepEd mourns teacher who killed self

THE Department of Education (DepEd) Leyte Division has extended its “deep sympathies” to the bereaved family of 21-year-old grade school teacher Emylou Malate who killed herself on July 12. “The Schools Division of Leyte personally extended condolences and deep sympathies to the bereaved family of Teacher Emylou Malate. We are saddened and in pain over… link: DepEd mourns teacher who killed self.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 18th, 2018

DepEd OKs tuition hike in 947 private schools

The Department of Education (DepEd) has approved the request of 947 private elementary and high schools to increase tui­tion this school year......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 30th, 2018

Mets GM Sandy Alderson steps down after cancer returns

By Mike Fitzpatrick, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson is taking a leave of absence because his cancer has returned, and he does not expect to return to the job. With the team in a massive tailspin, Mets chief operating officer Jeff Wilpon and the 70-year-old Alderson made the announcement before Tuesday night's game against Pittsburgh. "With respect to the future, I would say two things: One is, notwithstanding the good prognosis, my health is an uncertainty going forward," said Alderson, who agreed to a contract extension in December. "And secondly, if I were to look at it on the merits, I'm not sure coming back is warranted." Asked whether he would like Alderson to resume his GM duties if his health eventually allowed that, Wilpon avoided expressing an opinion and answered the same way twice: "I think his health and his family are first and foremost." Assistant general manager John Ricco and special assistants J.P. Ricciardi and Omar Minaya will run the team's baseball operations in Alderson's absence. Minaya preceded Alderson as Mets general manager, and Ricciardi was GM of the Toronto Blue Jays from 2001-09. Alderson was hired by the Mets after the 2010 season. He was diagnosed with cancer at the end of the 2015 season and had surgery but stayed on the job. He reduced his work schedule at times but remained in a full-time role while undergoing chemotherapy treatments. "One difference between then and now is that that took place in the offseason," Alderson said. "I had a surgery in the offseason, I had some chemo in the offseason. Much easier to manage that with offseason activity. I had the decision-making authority basically at that time. I will not have the decision-making authority going forward. If people want to call me, they're welcome to do so. But at the same time, I don't expect to be involved in day-to-day activity." Ricciardi, Minaya and first-year manager Mickey Callaway were all in the news conference room at Citi Field when Alderson and Wilpon made the announcement. Wilpon said Alderson approached him Sunday about the idea. Alderson informed players in the clubhouse Tuesday before addressing the media. "It is paramount to all of us that care greatly for Sandy that he makes this a priority for him and his family," Wilpon said. Alderson said a recurrence of his cancer was detected around late April or early May and he's been receiving treatment since. "I expect that the treatment will continue so I can have surgery later this summer. My prognosis is actually good. But in the meantime, the chemotherapy, the surgery, all take their toll," Alderson said, choking back tears. He said the treatment affects his energy level and leads to other side effects, explaining why he hasn't been traveling on road trips lately. "Which makes it difficult to stay up with sort of the pace, the tempo of the every day," Alderson said. "Operations continue, the game continues, we have a season to play. So I think in the best interests of the Mets and for my health, this is the right result. "I feel badly that we've had the season that we have had to date. I feel personally responsible for the results that we've had," he added. "At the same time, I have confidence in our manager, our coaching staff, our players, that this will change. John, Omar, J.P., I'm sure will take a hard look at where we are, maybe take a fresh look at where we are and I have every confidence that they will serve the franchise well over the next few months through the end of the season." New York reached the 2015 World Series after rebuilding under Alderson and made it back to the playoffs the following year, but injuries and underperformance have decimated the team since. The Mets started this season 11-1, but a 6-24 slide left them at 31-45 going into Tuesday night's game, fourth in the NL East. Alderson, a Marine Infantry Officer who served in Vietnam, is a Harvard Law School graduate. Before joining the Mets, he worked in the commissioner's office and had success running the Oakland Athletics and San Diego Padres. "Difficult day for me, but I appreciate everybody being here, appreciate the support that everyone has provided me over the course of a long period of time but certainly recently as well," he said. "And I'm looking forward to the Mets getting back on track.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 27th, 2018

Every teacher’s dilemma in this day and age

The school year has started in the public schools and in some private schools nationwide. As teachers prepare for the coming of the students, many are perplexed with the existing laws that make “disciplining” the students in school a challenge......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

Iriga City poised to become Bicol’s volleyball center next year

Iriga City bids to become a sporting mecca in the Bicol Region with the construction of a 5,000-seat gym in this city 400 kilometers southeast of Manila. Mayor Madelaine Alfelor-Gazmen, owner-manager of the Navy-Iriga City Lady Oragons, said the gym is under construction and will be finished by December.       “Maybe next year the PVL on Tour could go to Iriga now that we will have the facilities to host some of its games,” she said, referring to the league’s program to bring the league's matches to the provinces, which started last year.      Sports Vision president Ricky Palou said Iriga City’s strong partnership with the PVL organizing outfit continues to serve “…our vision of promoting and upgrading volleyball in the country.”  Among others, the Iriga City gym will provide excellent facilities in volleyball as part of the mayor’s vision to restore Bicol’s lofty position in volleyball. “It used to be that Bicolanos were highly regarded in the sport and regularly picked for the national teams,” she said. When the sports arena finally rises six months from now, it will occupy pride of place with Iriga’s new city hall, already transferred to its new home in barangay Sta. Cruz Sur, new library, new public market and new slaughterhouse as part of the more concrete legacy the mayor wants to leave to her constituents.   But it is in sports where the sports-minded chief executive of this multi-awarded city wants to involve her young constituents to develop physical fitness, character and mental toughness, prerequisites, she said, to making the young transform into productive citizens and ideal leaders and followers of the future.   High sports awareness      At no other time has sports awareness in Iriga City been this incredibly high and involving as it is now.  Mayor Madelaine Alfelor-Gazmen fittingly provides the face to this exciting sports phenomenon happening in her city of birth, where generations from her side of the family have served and continue to serve their people through holding public offices.    The well-loved first and only woman mayor of Iriga said she keeps her balance by finding time to indulge her passion in sports. She is into a lot of sports for recreation or for competition. She still plays volleyball, lawn tennis, table tennis and badminton. At one time in elementary and high school she took up softball as a shortstop and even football. It was her serious intent to lure primarily her youthful constituents into sports that led Mayor Alfelor-Gazmen to form her own club team that proceeded to compete in the 2016 nationally telecast season of the Sports Vision-organized V-League.    After seeing their mayor, her prodigy Grazielle Bombita from Camarines Sur and fellow Bicolanos tangle with the best players in Manila in a big time league on television for the first time ever, parents from even as far as Sorsogon and the Visayas, Mayor Alfelor-Gazmen said, would see her at the city hall or stop her in her tracks to recommend their daughters for training under her volleyball program.      As a result, the city government has tied up with elementary and high schools in Iriga to train kids of all genders not only in volleyball but in basketball, table tennis, lawn tennis and football as well. Scholarships are given to training program participants from San Miguel Elementary School, University of St. Anthony, University of Northeastern Philippines, Ceferino Arroyo High School and Rinconada National Technical and Vocational School.   Multi-awarded city    Daughter of the late Camarines Sur Rep. Ciriaco R. Alfelor, granddaughter of the CamSur Gov. Felix O. Alfelor, and niece of ex-Iriga City Mayor Emmanuel R. Alfelor, Madelaine Alfelor-Gazmen became Iriga’s first woman mayor in 2004. She served for three consecutive terms via the biggest margin of votes in Iriga’s political history.    Younger brother Ronald Felix Y. Alfelor, an electrical engineer by profession, was voted into the same position next before she assumed the office again.     Under her leadership anchored on an advocacy on good governance and responsible citizenship, Iriga City has distinguished itself with several awards from national and international organizations.  Among these are the 2009 Award of Excellence in Good Local Governance given by the DILG; 2010 citation as among the Top 10 performing local governments under the component cities category from the DILG; 2010 citation as a Galing Pook Award finalist; 2010 citation for Best Practices given by the Asia Foundation and British Embassy for the city’s programs on people’s participation, revenue generation and environment protection; 2011 Region’s Best Outstanding Local Government Agency award given by the Civil Service Commission; and the 2011 Outstanding Human Resource Management award. Mayor Alfelor-Gazmen finished BA Humanities in the University of the Philippines, BS Biology in Far Eastern University, but instead of proceeding to study medicine, she took up law in the University of Santo Tomas, a course she didn’t get to finish because of she said she was ‘sidetracked’ by marriage.   Mayor Alfelor-Gazmen’s children, all Ateneo students – Maria Cenen, 23; Brendan, 20; and Brian, 18 – may not have inherited her one-of-a-kind passion for sports but they support all her sporting decisions and endeavors.   Her only daughter gets to flex some athletic muscles, though, during university intramurals. Eldest son Brendan is team captain of the popular Ateneo Blue Babble Battalion. Brian, the youngest, helps her mom manage and cheer the Navy-Iriga City Lady Oragons in the PVL if he’s not busy with his commitment as a Star Music talent......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 24th, 2018

DepEd backs chessfest

THE Department of Education has thrown its full support to the 19th ASEAN Age Group Chess Championships slated June 18-28 in Davao City by allowing student participants leeway in the classes they will miss at the start of the school year. In a memorandum sent to all its regional directors….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 6th, 2018

IN PHOTOS: Opening of classes for 2018

MANILA, Philippines – Classes began on Monday, June 4, for around 27.7 million students nationwide. The Department of Education (DepEd) earlier said it is "all systems go"  for school year 2018-2019, despite perennial problems that still hound some schools, including the availability of classrooms. The Philippine National Police (PNP) deployed ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

DepEd is still short of teaching personnel

ACT PRESS RELEASE www.nordis.net MANILA—Less than a week before the start of classes in public schools, ACT Teachers Party-List Representatives Antonio Tinio and France Castro urged the Department of Education (DepEd) and the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) to address the shortage of teachers and school support staff by ….....»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

27.7M students returning to school nationwide

MANILA, Philippines – More than 27.7 million students are set to return to class as most schools across the country open on Monday, June 4.  The Department of Education (DepEd) said on Sunday, June 3, that it is "all systems go" for school year 2018-2019......»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

27.7M studes flock to schools today

AROUND 27.7 million students are expected to troop both from public and private schools nationwide for the opening of classes for the 2018-2019 school year, according to the Department of Education (DepEd). According to DepEd, all systems go for today’s school opening as the agency made all the necessary preparations….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

DepEd strengthens financial literacy program in public schools  

To boost financial literacy among Filipinos, the Department of Education has partnered with the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) and the BDO Foundation (BDOF) to disseminate learning materials on managing finances to public schools nationwide. Under the partnership, audiovisual tools will be distributed to around 700,000 public school teachers and non-teaching personnel in the coming months. These learning materials will be used for training teachers and other personnel, as well as for classroom instruction. The videos, which will be distributed through different platforms based on the needs and capabilities of the schools, will focus on teaching learners simple ways to save and m...Keep on reading: DepEd strengthens financial literacy program in public schools  .....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 31st, 2018

Panel hopes to end US NCAA one-and-dones

By Ralph D. Russo, Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The most difficult part of the NCAA’s attempt to clean up college basketball begins now. Hours after former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice presented the Commission on College Basketball’s sweeping recommendations for reforming a sport weighed down by corruption, NCAA leaders set in motion the process for turning those ideas into reality. The NCAA Board of Governors, a group of 16 university presidents and the association’s highest ranking body, unanimously endorsed all the commission’s recommendations Wednesday. Now it’s up to various subcommittees, working groups and college administrators to dig into a mountain of work over the next three months as the NCAA attempts to change NBA draft rules, create a new enforcement body, toughen penalties for rules violations, revamp summer recruiting and certify agents. All while trying to get buy-in from organizations that might not be motivated to help. “It’s going to be a challenge to say the least,” NCAA President Mark Emmert said. “This is a pace of decision making that the association’s really never done on this kind of scale before.” The Division I Council, comprised mostly of athletic directors and headed by Miami AD Blake James, has the job of turning the recommendations into rules. That requires feedback from schools, then council votes with some conference votes counting more heavily than others. Each proposal then goes to the Board of Directors, where a majority vote is needed to send it to the Board of Governors for final approval. It’s a winding path — crossing 351 Division I schools with varied priorities and concerns — and requiring consensus building and compromise for measures to pass. NCAA rule changes can sometimes take a full calendar year to sort out. “We’ve got to make sure we don’t let the good fall victim to the perfect here,” Emmert said. “Nobody believes we’re going to get everything perfect the first time through.” The independent commission Rice led released a much-anticipated and detailed 60-page report , seven months after the group was formed in response to a federal corruption investigation that rocked college basketball. Ten people, including some assistant coaches, have been charged in a bribery and kickback scheme , and high-profile programs such as Arizona, Louisville and Kansas have been tied to possible NCAA violations. “They believe the college basketball enterprise is worth saving,” Rice told the AP of commission members in an interview before addressing NCAA leaders. “We believe there’s a lot of work to do in that regard. That the state of the game is not very strong. We had to be bold in our recommendations.” The proposals were wide-ranging, falling mostly into five categories: NBA draft rules, specifically the league’s 19-year-old age limit that has led to so-called one-and-done college players; non-scholastic basketball such as AAU leagues and summer recruiting events; the relationship between players and agents; relationships with apparel companies; and NCAA enforcement. “Some people like some of (the recommendations) more than others, which is human nature, but as a board we’re unanimous in the endorsement and the acceptance of these recommendations for the NCAA,” said Minnesota President Eric Kaler, chairman of the Division I Board of Directors. It’s not yet clear how the governing body would pay for some of the proposals, though the NCAA reported revenues of more than $1 billion dollars for fiscal year 2017 in its most recent financial disclosures. The commission offered harsh assessments of toothless NCAA enforcement, as well as the shady summer basketball circuit that brings together agents, apparel companies and coaches looking to profit on teenage prodigies. It called the environment surrounding hoops “a toxic mix of perverse incentives to cheat,” and said responsibility for the current mess goes all the way up to university presidents. It also defended the NCAA’s amateurism model, saying paying players a salary isn’t the answer. “The goal should not be to turn college basketball into another professional league,” the commission wrote in its report. The commission did leave open the possibility that college athletes could earn money off their names, images and likenesses, but decided not to commit on the subject while the courts are still weighing in. Rice called the crisis in college basketball “first and foremost a problem of failed accountability and lax responsibility.” ONE-AND-DONE The commission emphasized the need for elite players to have more options when choosing between college and professional basketball, and to separate the two tracks. The commission called for the NBA and its players association to change rules requiring players to be at least 19 years old and a year removed from graduating high school to be draft eligible. The one-and-done rule was implemented in 2006, despite the success of straight-from-high-school stars such as LeBron James, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett. “I’m confident they are going to be very supportive,” Emmert said of the NBA and NBAPA. The NBA and players union praised the recommendations on enforcement and expressed concerns about youth basketball. On draft eligibility rules, however, there was no commitment. “The NBA and NBPA will continue to assess them in order to promote the best interests of players and the game,” they said. The commission did, however, say if the NBA and NBPA refuse to change their rules in time for the next basketball season, it would reconvene and consider other options for the NCAA, such as making freshmen ineligible or locking a scholarship for three or four years if the recipient leaves a program after a single year. “One-and-done has to go one way or another,” Rice told the AP. ENFORCEMENT The commission recommended harsher penalties for rule-breakers and that the NCAA outsource the investigation and adjudication of the most serious infractions cases. Level I violations would be punishable with up to a five-year postseason ban and the forfeiture of all postseason revenue for the time of the ban. That could be worth tens of millions to major conference schools. By comparison, recent Level I infractions cases involving Louisville and Syracuse basketball resulted in postseason bans of one year. Instead of show cause orders, which are meant to limit a coach’s ability to work in college sports after breaking NCAA rules, the report called for lifetime bans. “The rewards of success, athletic success, have become very great. The deterrents sometimes aren’t as effective as they need to be. What we want are deterrents that really impact an institution,” said Notre Dame President Fr. John Jenkins, who was a member of the Rice commission. AGENTS The commission proposed the NCAA create a program for certifying agents , and make them accessible to players from high school through their college careers. AAU AND SUMMER LEAGUES The NCAA, with support from the NBA and USA Basketball, should run its own recruiting events for prospects during the summer , the commission said, and take a more serious approach to certifying events it does not control. APPAREL COMPANIES The commission also called for greater financial transparency from shoe and apparel companies such as Nike, Under Armour and Adidas. These companies have extensive financial relationships with colleges and coaches worth hundreds of millions of dollars, and Adidas had two former executives charged by federal prosecutors in New York in the corruption case......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 25th, 2018

Smoking ban in all schools begins in June

STARTING next school year, puffing away inside and near school premises is strictly prohibited as all schools nationwide are expected to be part of the full rollout of the “EskweLa BAN sa Sigarilyo,” an initiative that aims to strengthen the implementation of the tobacco control policy of the Department of Education (DepEd). The Education department [...] The post Smoking ban in all schools begins in June appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMar 24th, 2018

Cuban s tanking talk raises key issue for NBA

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst The NBA fined Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban $600,000 for being honest. Cuban told Naismith Memorial Hall of Famer Julius Erving on Erving’s podcast a couple of weeks ago that he told his players during a recent dinner that “losing is our best option. Adam (Silver) would hate hearing that…(but) we want the players to understand. As a player, you know that even though you may not agree, but at least if you respect the fact that someone took the time to talk to you, and you understood their perspective, you’re going to give me your feedback, but you’re part of the process.” But the league fined Cuban for what it called “public statements detrimental to the NBA” three days later. And Silver sent a memo to all 30 teams last week detailing the league’s position. “Throughout this period,” Silver wrote, “we have been careful to distinguish between efforts teams may make to rebuild their rosters, including through personnel changes over the course of several seasons, and circumstances in which players or coaches on the floor take steps to lose games. “The former can be a legitimate strategy to construct a successful team within the confines of league rules; the latter -- which we have not found and hope never to see in the NBA -- has no place in our game.” Yet Cuban did not in any way, nor has any evidence to the contrary emerged, state the Mavericks were losing games on purpose; that is, players were intentionally missing shots, or not putting forth effort on defense to let the other team score, or anything like that. (Even Silver acknowledged in the memo that the league has “no basis at this time to conclude that the Mavericks team is giving anything less than its best effort on the court, and Mark has assured us that this is not the case.”) So, why the fine? Was what Cuban said so incendiary? ‘’Mark knew his comments were public, so it surprised me that he was so candid, but that's who Mark is,” said one very high-ranking official from another team over the weekend. “To me his comment wasn't indicating tanking as their strategy but more about setting the expectation that playoffs were not a possibility. The only consolation of not making the playoffs is being in the lottery. You can't blame a team from trying to turn the lemon (losing) into lemonade (top 4 pick). The league needs to find a way not to reward losing.” Exactly. What Cuban said was spot on -- losing to improve the Mavericks’ Draft position was, and is, the best and quickest way for Dallas to get better and start winning games again. That doesn’t mean everyone agreed with Cuban being so blunt. “I think it was a totally inappropriate to say that to players,” said another extremely high-ranking team official for another team. “Whatever the team’s strategy may be, I firmly believe that the players should always play to win. The fine is meaningless to Mark; in fact, sometimes I think he enjoys the publicity he gets from the fines.” But. We ask people to be truthful and not lie about their intentions. We tell our kids that no lie is worth telling, and that telling the truth, no matter how painful, is always the best choice. So Cuban is honest and tells the truth, that short-term losing makes more sense for his franchise’s long-term interests, and he’s relieved of 600 large by the league. Meanwhile, the Philadelphia 76ers are lauded -- and revel in their slogan, “Trust the Process,” celebrated by the team’s most ardent supporters -- whose central tenet was to lose, and keep losing, until you could draft a player good enough to build around and win down the road. Which is, exactly, what Dallas is doing now. Indeed, increased tanking is the logical extension of an analytics-dominant league. If three is greater than two -- the reasoning behind the primacy of the 3-pointer in today’s NBA -- then doing anything you can to get more ping-pong balls in the hopper is the correct thing to do. You can’t just embrace the parts of doing it by the numbers that are pleasant. This is the flip side. Burying one’s head in the sand and pretending teams don’t do this doesn’t make sense. Everyone does it in every sport, or don’t you recall “Suck for Luck,” the chant of Indianapolis Colts’ fans before the 2012 NFL Draft? What of Major League Baseball’s Houston Astros losing 324 games from 2011-13? Were they trying to win games, or did we all imagine them going from $102 million in payroll in 2009 to $26 million by 2013? “I resist the word ‘tanking,’ but I’m very pro ‘rebuilding,’ when it’s necessary,” said Los Angeles Dodgers President Stan Kasten, who in a former life ran the Hawks as general manager in the ‘80s and ‘90s, by telephone Sunday. “And, it’s painful,” Kasten said. “You’ve got to explain it to your team, your fans, to your front office, to your coaches, to your wife, to your kids, to the country club. It’s hard. It’s painful. It’s nobody’s first choice. But if it’s necessary, it’s often the quickest way to get the team back to winning. And don’t lose sight of that.” Kasten’s Dodgers lost the World Series to the Astros, who methodically built their team the last four years around young drafted players like Series MVP George Springer, last fall in seven games. But not only is he not angry with Houston for the way management took the franchise’s foundation to the studs -- compared with his high-spending Dodgers -- he admires the speed with which they went from worst to first. “I have real feelings about what they did,” Kasten said. “Because Mark Walter (the CEO of Guggenheim Partners, the global firm that bought the Dodgers in 2012) and I, before we bought the Dodgers, we were looking at Houston. Because they were available. And truthfully, when we looked at where they were, we were going to do the same thing. It had to be done. Because they were not on a track to win. And frankly, I don’t think I could have done it as fast, or as well, as (Astros owner) Jim Crane, or (GM) Jeff Luhnow. Because doing that, to the extreme, takes real intestinal fortitude.” Kasten makes a strong distinction between a team cutting payroll and going young and that winds up losing, and one that’s actively seeking ways to lose more games. “All of these owners are hyper-competitive, and they want to win,” Kasten said. “And truthfully, the quickest way to win, at least if you look at the last three world champions, is to rebuild and get young and get prospects and do it that way. And if you don’t think that’s the better way to go, ask the fans in Houston and Chicago and Kansas City how they feel. You won’t get one fan who disagrees with what is done. It is the quickest way to win.” Please do not misunderstand. I hate tanking. I hate the idea of introducing losing into your shop, even indirectly. It’s like a virus, extremely difficult to get rid of once it gets in a franchise’s bloodstream. A ticket is, in essence, a contract between parties: I pay top dollar, you give me top-dollar product in exchange. When a team tanks, it violates that compact; I don’t recall any team that’s given fans a tanking discount. It is also very difficult to tank effectively in the NBA. The last three teams with the best odds of getting the No. 1 in the Draft going into the Lottery -- Boston (2017), Philadelphia (2016) and Minnesota (2015) -- have indeed won. But prior to that, the team with the best odds didn’t get the first pick for 10 consecutive years, and 22 times out of the last 25 years. And even the teams that did buck the odds and get the first pick often picked wrong, or did I miss Anthony Bennett Night in Cleveland, or the Andrea Bargnani statue outside of Air Canada Centre? “The Draft is often a crap shoot anyway,” the official from the second team said. “So why not give your fans the best product that you can and then draft Donovan Mitchell,” as Utah did this season. The Jazz traded for the rights to the Kia Rookie of the Year candidate, who was taken near the bottom of the Lottery (13th overall by the Denver Nuggets). This came a season after the Jazz went 51-31 and won its first-round playoff series. I agree. Tanking does not reward excellence in team building -- good drafting, good free-agent signings, good player development -- it rewards the exact opposite of that. It’s a Golden Ticket that doesn’t even require you to buy an Everlasting Gobstopper. But, tanking is reality. You can’t pretend it isn’t. And the only way to completely get tanking out of pro sports is to eliminate the Draft in all sports, including the NBA. We don’t want to have that conversation, do we? Personally, I’d love it. Can you imagine the fight that would set up between interested teams -- and who wouldn’t be interested? -- in a certain 7-foot-1 freshman center almost certain to leave school early who currently plays for a school that’s been in the news for all the wrong reasons lately? Would he help the Lakers? The Knicks? The Bulls? The NBA team in the state in which the college player currently plays, which rather desperately needs another star to pair with its one really great player (whose name, if you must know, rhymes with “Nevin Cooker”)? Would he help any team in the league that doesn’t currently employ Anthony Davis, Joel Embiid or Karl-Anthony Towns in the middle? Most assuredly. And if he could control where he wanted to go, and for how much, the process would be must-see TV. Yet, while the real-world implications would be fascinating, I’m not sure how you could eliminate the Draft without loosening the underpinnings of the entire pro basketball enterprise (and, yes, one could make a moral case for doing just that, as it does go against the whole Manifest Destiny thing to artificially bind someone to a company rather than letting them market their services to the highest bidder). If there was no Draft, why would any player with Lottery-level talent go to college? Yes, there would be the occasional Grant Hill/unicorn who wants to go to college to better themselves intellectually and/or embrace the person growth that often comes from being on your own for four years. But, while sad to say, most kids with NBA dreams go to college because that’s the path through which they can ultimately get to the pros the fastest. With no Draft, and few of the top college-age players thus needing/wanting to go to college, you’d have a very different March Madness than you have now. And as that is a multi-billion enterprise, both for the broadcast networks that air it (including Turner Sports, which runs NBA.com) and the colleges that reap the financial deluge it produces, the likelihood of across the board support for a new player acquisition model is slight. Not to mention, you’d have a much different salary structure in the NBA, as there would be no rookie slotting for drafted players. And if you think the game’s superstars would stand idly by and watch more of that cheddar that they helped produce go out the door to guys who haven’t yet done anything … you’d be wrong. So, the Draft isn’t going anywhere. Which means the NBA must decide whether it wants to continue to be shocked, shocked that tanking is going on in its league, or accept the reality that there is not much patience for being in the middle ground in a league where every team is now worth more than $1 billion. There is only, as Pat Riley said a long time ago, winning and misery. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

Megaworld sets up education venture

Tycoon Andrew Tan-led property developer Megaworld Corp. is debuting into the education space through a partnership with De La Salle Brothers and is poised to open its first school at its 30-hectare The Mactan Newtown township in Cebu this coming schoolyear. With the assistance of the De La Salle Brothers through the Lasallian Schools Supervision Services Association Inc. (LASSSAI), the school is officially named "Newtown School of Excellence." Located on an almost a hectare campus near the entrance of the township along Mactan Circumferential Road, the Newtown School of Excellence will initially offer classes for the primary school this new school year. Megaworld has spent...Keep on reading: Megaworld sets up education venture.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 5th, 2018

UAAP eyeing 3x3 to be a regular sport next season

Far Eastern University has yet again proven to be at the forefront of change in the UAAP. The host school that instituted the Final Four format and that moved volleyball games to bigger venues has another innovation now in the 80th Season – 3x3 basketball. The league is nothing but excited to venture out into another new frontier. “Historically, FEU has taken bold steps and we see that again this year, the first time we’re having the 3x3. We thank them for taking another bold step forward,” executive director Atty. Rebo Saguisag said in the pre-event press conference on Thursday. The first-ever 3x3 tournament in the UAAP will be held on Sunday at the SM MOA Music Hall in Pasay. As it turns out, this is all in aid of growing 3x3 as a sport – especially as it is set to become an Olympic event in 2020. “We discussed it internally muna and really felt na we wanted it to be pushed by FEU this year. Hopefully, pati na rin buong UAAP,” FEU athletic director Mark Molina said. According to Molina, all eight member-schools have been nothing but receptive of the innovation. “When we presented it to the UAAP, it was unanimous on the part of all schools. They were behind it 100 percent,” he said. Not only that, even the host venue is enthusiastic about partaking in what could be a historic inaugural tournament. “The response is quite good from everybody. MOA is excited and we’re happy,” the FEU athletic director said. Still, the host school knows very well that this is only the beginning and UAAP 3x3 basketball can only grow from here. “This will be the start. This will be very modest lang, one day lang muna tayo,” Molina said. That also means, however, that the Morayta-based school is already planning to push the event to become a regular sport in the season. “Hopefully, this will be a regular sport in the UAAP come next season. If volleyball has indoor and beach volleyball, I don’t see any reason why we can’t have indoor and 3x3 basketball,” their athletic director said. He continued, “It can be a regular sport in the second semester by Season 81 – that’s the target.” At present, the league has 15 regular sports and two demonstration events in cheerdance and streetdance. For now, 3x3 basketball will also be a demonstration event. With a good showing in its inaugural tournament, though, Saguisag sees no obstacle for it to become an event that will count in the general championship. “We really ask for your support. We’re very positive and everybody’s excited,” he remarked. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 1st, 2018