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1.3% of schools still needing support for coming school year – DepEd

MANILA, Philippines – About 1.3% of schools are still in need of support before the opening of classes on June 4, announced Department of Education (DepEd) Undersecretary Jesus Mateo on Monday, May 21. Mateo explained the readiness of schools were evaluated based on 6 variables: (availability of) teachers, classrooms, toilets, seats, ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerMay 21st, 2018

170 private schools in Metro raising tuition

The Department of Education (DepEd) has granted the request of 170 private elementary and high schools in the National Capital Region to increase tuition in the coming school year......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2018

DepEd to replace SHS textbooks with tablets

THE Department of Education (DepEd) announced that some Senior High School (SHS) students will be using tablet computers as alternative to textbooks this coming school year. The DepEd earlier said the new set of computer packages will be distributed to public schools nationwide starting this year. According to Education Undersecretary….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsApr 28th, 2018

PH schools to join drive vs tobacco

ALL public and private schools this coming school year are expected to take part in the tobacco control policy initiative by the Department of Education (DepEd). Dubbed “EskweLABAN sa Sigarilyo Project,” it is a three-year project in partnership with the Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund to be implemented in schools in….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsApr 8th, 2018

DepEd announces Oplan Balik Eskwela launching for coming school year

DepEd has announced the launching of the national Oplan Balik Eskwela (OBE) for this coming school year to ensure the smooth opening of classes in all public schools nationwide in June. #BeFullyInformed DepEd announces Oplan Balik Eskwela launching for coming school year The Department of Education (DepEd) has announced the launching of the national Oplan… link: DepEd announces Oplan Balik Eskwela launching for coming school year.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2018

DepEd backs chessfest

THE Department of Education has thrown its full support to the 19th ASEAN Age Group Chess Championships slated June 18-28 in Davao City by allowing student participants leeway in the classes they will miss at the start of the school year. In a memorandum sent to all its regional directors….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 6th, 2018

IN PHOTOS: Opening of classes for 2018

MANILA, Philippines – Classes began on Monday, June 4, for around 27.7 million students nationwide. The Department of Education (DepEd) earlier said it is "all systems go"  for school year 2018-2019, despite perennial problems that still hound some schools, including the availability of classrooms. The Philippine National Police (PNP) deployed ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

DepEd is still short of teaching personnel

ACT PRESS RELEASE www.nordis.net MANILA—Less than a week before the start of classes in public schools, ACT Teachers Party-List Representatives Antonio Tinio and France Castro urged the Department of Education (DepEd) and the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) to address the shortage of teachers and school support staff by ….....»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

27.7M students returning to school nationwide

MANILA, Philippines – More than 27.7 million students are set to return to class as most schools across the country open on Monday, June 4.  The Department of Education (DepEd) said on Sunday, June 3, that it is "all systems go" for school year 2018-2019......»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

27.7M studes flock to schools today

AROUND 27.7 million students are expected to troop both from public and private schools nationwide for the opening of classes for the 2018-2019 school year, according to the Department of Education (DepEd). According to DepEd, all systems go for today’s school opening as the agency made all the necessary preparations….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

DepEd strengthens financial literacy program in public schools  

To boost financial literacy among Filipinos, the Department of Education has partnered with the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) and the BDO Foundation (BDOF) to disseminate learning materials on managing finances to public schools nationwide. Under the partnership, audiovisual tools will be distributed to around 700,000 public school teachers and non-teaching personnel in the coming months. These learning materials will be used for training teachers and other personnel, as well as for classroom instruction. The videos, which will be distributed through different platforms based on the needs and capabilities of the schools, will focus on teaching learners simple ways to save and m...Keep on reading: DepEd strengthens financial literacy program in public schools  .....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 31st, 2018

Panel hopes to end US NCAA one-and-dones

By Ralph D. Russo, Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The most difficult part of the NCAA’s attempt to clean up college basketball begins now. Hours after former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice presented the Commission on College Basketball’s sweeping recommendations for reforming a sport weighed down by corruption, NCAA leaders set in motion the process for turning those ideas into reality. The NCAA Board of Governors, a group of 16 university presidents and the association’s highest ranking body, unanimously endorsed all the commission’s recommendations Wednesday. Now it’s up to various subcommittees, working groups and college administrators to dig into a mountain of work over the next three months as the NCAA attempts to change NBA draft rules, create a new enforcement body, toughen penalties for rules violations, revamp summer recruiting and certify agents. All while trying to get buy-in from organizations that might not be motivated to help. “It’s going to be a challenge to say the least,” NCAA President Mark Emmert said. “This is a pace of decision making that the association’s really never done on this kind of scale before.” The Division I Council, comprised mostly of athletic directors and headed by Miami AD Blake James, has the job of turning the recommendations into rules. That requires feedback from schools, then council votes with some conference votes counting more heavily than others. Each proposal then goes to the Board of Directors, where a majority vote is needed to send it to the Board of Governors for final approval. It’s a winding path — crossing 351 Division I schools with varied priorities and concerns — and requiring consensus building and compromise for measures to pass. NCAA rule changes can sometimes take a full calendar year to sort out. “We’ve got to make sure we don’t let the good fall victim to the perfect here,” Emmert said. “Nobody believes we’re going to get everything perfect the first time through.” The independent commission Rice led released a much-anticipated and detailed 60-page report , seven months after the group was formed in response to a federal corruption investigation that rocked college basketball. Ten people, including some assistant coaches, have been charged in a bribery and kickback scheme , and high-profile programs such as Arizona, Louisville and Kansas have been tied to possible NCAA violations. “They believe the college basketball enterprise is worth saving,” Rice told the AP of commission members in an interview before addressing NCAA leaders. “We believe there’s a lot of work to do in that regard. That the state of the game is not very strong. We had to be bold in our recommendations.” The proposals were wide-ranging, falling mostly into five categories: NBA draft rules, specifically the league’s 19-year-old age limit that has led to so-called one-and-done college players; non-scholastic basketball such as AAU leagues and summer recruiting events; the relationship between players and agents; relationships with apparel companies; and NCAA enforcement. “Some people like some of (the recommendations) more than others, which is human nature, but as a board we’re unanimous in the endorsement and the acceptance of these recommendations for the NCAA,” said Minnesota President Eric Kaler, chairman of the Division I Board of Directors. It’s not yet clear how the governing body would pay for some of the proposals, though the NCAA reported revenues of more than $1 billion dollars for fiscal year 2017 in its most recent financial disclosures. The commission offered harsh assessments of toothless NCAA enforcement, as well as the shady summer basketball circuit that brings together agents, apparel companies and coaches looking to profit on teenage prodigies. It called the environment surrounding hoops “a toxic mix of perverse incentives to cheat,” and said responsibility for the current mess goes all the way up to university presidents. It also defended the NCAA’s amateurism model, saying paying players a salary isn’t the answer. “The goal should not be to turn college basketball into another professional league,” the commission wrote in its report. The commission did leave open the possibility that college athletes could earn money off their names, images and likenesses, but decided not to commit on the subject while the courts are still weighing in. Rice called the crisis in college basketball “first and foremost a problem of failed accountability and lax responsibility.” ONE-AND-DONE The commission emphasized the need for elite players to have more options when choosing between college and professional basketball, and to separate the two tracks. The commission called for the NBA and its players association to change rules requiring players to be at least 19 years old and a year removed from graduating high school to be draft eligible. The one-and-done rule was implemented in 2006, despite the success of straight-from-high-school stars such as LeBron James, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett. “I’m confident they are going to be very supportive,” Emmert said of the NBA and NBAPA. The NBA and players union praised the recommendations on enforcement and expressed concerns about youth basketball. On draft eligibility rules, however, there was no commitment. “The NBA and NBPA will continue to assess them in order to promote the best interests of players and the game,” they said. The commission did, however, say if the NBA and NBPA refuse to change their rules in time for the next basketball season, it would reconvene and consider other options for the NCAA, such as making freshmen ineligible or locking a scholarship for three or four years if the recipient leaves a program after a single year. “One-and-done has to go one way or another,” Rice told the AP. ENFORCEMENT The commission recommended harsher penalties for rule-breakers and that the NCAA outsource the investigation and adjudication of the most serious infractions cases. Level I violations would be punishable with up to a five-year postseason ban and the forfeiture of all postseason revenue for the time of the ban. That could be worth tens of millions to major conference schools. By comparison, recent Level I infractions cases involving Louisville and Syracuse basketball resulted in postseason bans of one year. Instead of show cause orders, which are meant to limit a coach’s ability to work in college sports after breaking NCAA rules, the report called for lifetime bans. “The rewards of success, athletic success, have become very great. The deterrents sometimes aren’t as effective as they need to be. What we want are deterrents that really impact an institution,” said Notre Dame President Fr. John Jenkins, who was a member of the Rice commission. AGENTS The commission proposed the NCAA create a program for certifying agents , and make them accessible to players from high school through their college careers. AAU AND SUMMER LEAGUES The NCAA, with support from the NBA and USA Basketball, should run its own recruiting events for prospects during the summer , the commission said, and take a more serious approach to certifying events it does not control. APPAREL COMPANIES The commission also called for greater financial transparency from shoe and apparel companies such as Nike, Under Armour and Adidas. These companies have extensive financial relationships with colleges and coaches worth hundreds of millions of dollars, and Adidas had two former executives charged by federal prosecutors in New York in the corruption case......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 25th, 2018

Smoking ban in all schools begins in June

STARTING next school year, puffing away inside and near school premises is strictly prohibited as all schools nationwide are expected to be part of the full rollout of the “EskweLa BAN sa Sigarilyo,” an initiative that aims to strengthen the implementation of the tobacco control policy of the Department of Education (DepEd). The Education department [...] The post Smoking ban in all schools begins in June appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMar 24th, 2018

Cuban s tanking talk raises key issue for NBA

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst The NBA fined Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban $600,000 for being honest. Cuban told Naismith Memorial Hall of Famer Julius Erving on Erving’s podcast a couple of weeks ago that he told his players during a recent dinner that “losing is our best option. Adam (Silver) would hate hearing that…(but) we want the players to understand. As a player, you know that even though you may not agree, but at least if you respect the fact that someone took the time to talk to you, and you understood their perspective, you’re going to give me your feedback, but you’re part of the process.” But the league fined Cuban for what it called “public statements detrimental to the NBA” three days later. And Silver sent a memo to all 30 teams last week detailing the league’s position. “Throughout this period,” Silver wrote, “we have been careful to distinguish between efforts teams may make to rebuild their rosters, including through personnel changes over the course of several seasons, and circumstances in which players or coaches on the floor take steps to lose games. “The former can be a legitimate strategy to construct a successful team within the confines of league rules; the latter -- which we have not found and hope never to see in the NBA -- has no place in our game.” Yet Cuban did not in any way, nor has any evidence to the contrary emerged, state the Mavericks were losing games on purpose; that is, players were intentionally missing shots, or not putting forth effort on defense to let the other team score, or anything like that. (Even Silver acknowledged in the memo that the league has “no basis at this time to conclude that the Mavericks team is giving anything less than its best effort on the court, and Mark has assured us that this is not the case.”) So, why the fine? Was what Cuban said so incendiary? ‘’Mark knew his comments were public, so it surprised me that he was so candid, but that's who Mark is,” said one very high-ranking official from another team over the weekend. “To me his comment wasn't indicating tanking as their strategy but more about setting the expectation that playoffs were not a possibility. The only consolation of not making the playoffs is being in the lottery. You can't blame a team from trying to turn the lemon (losing) into lemonade (top 4 pick). The league needs to find a way not to reward losing.” Exactly. What Cuban said was spot on -- losing to improve the Mavericks’ Draft position was, and is, the best and quickest way for Dallas to get better and start winning games again. That doesn’t mean everyone agreed with Cuban being so blunt. “I think it was a totally inappropriate to say that to players,” said another extremely high-ranking team official for another team. “Whatever the team’s strategy may be, I firmly believe that the players should always play to win. The fine is meaningless to Mark; in fact, sometimes I think he enjoys the publicity he gets from the fines.” But. We ask people to be truthful and not lie about their intentions. We tell our kids that no lie is worth telling, and that telling the truth, no matter how painful, is always the best choice. So Cuban is honest and tells the truth, that short-term losing makes more sense for his franchise’s long-term interests, and he’s relieved of 600 large by the league. Meanwhile, the Philadelphia 76ers are lauded -- and revel in their slogan, “Trust the Process,” celebrated by the team’s most ardent supporters -- whose central tenet was to lose, and keep losing, until you could draft a player good enough to build around and win down the road. Which is, exactly, what Dallas is doing now. Indeed, increased tanking is the logical extension of an analytics-dominant league. If three is greater than two -- the reasoning behind the primacy of the 3-pointer in today’s NBA -- then doing anything you can to get more ping-pong balls in the hopper is the correct thing to do. You can’t just embrace the parts of doing it by the numbers that are pleasant. This is the flip side. Burying one’s head in the sand and pretending teams don’t do this doesn’t make sense. Everyone does it in every sport, or don’t you recall “Suck for Luck,” the chant of Indianapolis Colts’ fans before the 2012 NFL Draft? What of Major League Baseball’s Houston Astros losing 324 games from 2011-13? Were they trying to win games, or did we all imagine them going from $102 million in payroll in 2009 to $26 million by 2013? “I resist the word ‘tanking,’ but I’m very pro ‘rebuilding,’ when it’s necessary,” said Los Angeles Dodgers President Stan Kasten, who in a former life ran the Hawks as general manager in the ‘80s and ‘90s, by telephone Sunday. “And, it’s painful,” Kasten said. “You’ve got to explain it to your team, your fans, to your front office, to your coaches, to your wife, to your kids, to the country club. It’s hard. It’s painful. It’s nobody’s first choice. But if it’s necessary, it’s often the quickest way to get the team back to winning. And don’t lose sight of that.” Kasten’s Dodgers lost the World Series to the Astros, who methodically built their team the last four years around young drafted players like Series MVP George Springer, last fall in seven games. But not only is he not angry with Houston for the way management took the franchise’s foundation to the studs -- compared with his high-spending Dodgers -- he admires the speed with which they went from worst to first. “I have real feelings about what they did,” Kasten said. “Because Mark Walter (the CEO of Guggenheim Partners, the global firm that bought the Dodgers in 2012) and I, before we bought the Dodgers, we were looking at Houston. Because they were available. And truthfully, when we looked at where they were, we were going to do the same thing. It had to be done. Because they were not on a track to win. And frankly, I don’t think I could have done it as fast, or as well, as (Astros owner) Jim Crane, or (GM) Jeff Luhnow. Because doing that, to the extreme, takes real intestinal fortitude.” Kasten makes a strong distinction between a team cutting payroll and going young and that winds up losing, and one that’s actively seeking ways to lose more games. “All of these owners are hyper-competitive, and they want to win,” Kasten said. “And truthfully, the quickest way to win, at least if you look at the last three world champions, is to rebuild and get young and get prospects and do it that way. And if you don’t think that’s the better way to go, ask the fans in Houston and Chicago and Kansas City how they feel. You won’t get one fan who disagrees with what is done. It is the quickest way to win.” Please do not misunderstand. I hate tanking. I hate the idea of introducing losing into your shop, even indirectly. It’s like a virus, extremely difficult to get rid of once it gets in a franchise’s bloodstream. A ticket is, in essence, a contract between parties: I pay top dollar, you give me top-dollar product in exchange. When a team tanks, it violates that compact; I don’t recall any team that’s given fans a tanking discount. It is also very difficult to tank effectively in the NBA. The last three teams with the best odds of getting the No. 1 in the Draft going into the Lottery -- Boston (2017), Philadelphia (2016) and Minnesota (2015) -- have indeed won. But prior to that, the team with the best odds didn’t get the first pick for 10 consecutive years, and 22 times out of the last 25 years. And even the teams that did buck the odds and get the first pick often picked wrong, or did I miss Anthony Bennett Night in Cleveland, or the Andrea Bargnani statue outside of Air Canada Centre? “The Draft is often a crap shoot anyway,” the official from the second team said. “So why not give your fans the best product that you can and then draft Donovan Mitchell,” as Utah did this season. The Jazz traded for the rights to the Kia Rookie of the Year candidate, who was taken near the bottom of the Lottery (13th overall by the Denver Nuggets). This came a season after the Jazz went 51-31 and won its first-round playoff series. I agree. Tanking does not reward excellence in team building -- good drafting, good free-agent signings, good player development -- it rewards the exact opposite of that. It’s a Golden Ticket that doesn’t even require you to buy an Everlasting Gobstopper. But, tanking is reality. You can’t pretend it isn’t. And the only way to completely get tanking out of pro sports is to eliminate the Draft in all sports, including the NBA. We don’t want to have that conversation, do we? Personally, I’d love it. Can you imagine the fight that would set up between interested teams -- and who wouldn’t be interested? -- in a certain 7-foot-1 freshman center almost certain to leave school early who currently plays for a school that’s been in the news for all the wrong reasons lately? Would he help the Lakers? The Knicks? The Bulls? The NBA team in the state in which the college player currently plays, which rather desperately needs another star to pair with its one really great player (whose name, if you must know, rhymes with “Nevin Cooker”)? Would he help any team in the league that doesn’t currently employ Anthony Davis, Joel Embiid or Karl-Anthony Towns in the middle? Most assuredly. And if he could control where he wanted to go, and for how much, the process would be must-see TV. Yet, while the real-world implications would be fascinating, I’m not sure how you could eliminate the Draft without loosening the underpinnings of the entire pro basketball enterprise (and, yes, one could make a moral case for doing just that, as it does go against the whole Manifest Destiny thing to artificially bind someone to a company rather than letting them market their services to the highest bidder). If there was no Draft, why would any player with Lottery-level talent go to college? Yes, there would be the occasional Grant Hill/unicorn who wants to go to college to better themselves intellectually and/or embrace the person growth that often comes from being on your own for four years. But, while sad to say, most kids with NBA dreams go to college because that’s the path through which they can ultimately get to the pros the fastest. With no Draft, and few of the top college-age players thus needing/wanting to go to college, you’d have a very different March Madness than you have now. And as that is a multi-billion enterprise, both for the broadcast networks that air it (including Turner Sports, which runs NBA.com) and the colleges that reap the financial deluge it produces, the likelihood of across the board support for a new player acquisition model is slight. Not to mention, you’d have a much different salary structure in the NBA, as there would be no rookie slotting for drafted players. And if you think the game’s superstars would stand idly by and watch more of that cheddar that they helped produce go out the door to guys who haven’t yet done anything … you’d be wrong. So, the Draft isn’t going anywhere. Which means the NBA must decide whether it wants to continue to be shocked, shocked that tanking is going on in its league, or accept the reality that there is not much patience for being in the middle ground in a league where every team is now worth more than $1 billion. There is only, as Pat Riley said a long time ago, winning and misery. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

Megaworld sets up education venture

Tycoon Andrew Tan-led property developer Megaworld Corp. is debuting into the education space through a partnership with De La Salle Brothers and is poised to open its first school at its 30-hectare The Mactan Newtown township in Cebu this coming schoolyear. With the assistance of the De La Salle Brothers through the Lasallian Schools Supervision Services Association Inc. (LASSSAI), the school is officially named "Newtown School of Excellence." Located on an almost a hectare campus near the entrance of the township along Mactan Circumferential Road, the Newtown School of Excellence will initially offer classes for the primary school this new school year. Megaworld has spent...Keep on reading: Megaworld sets up education venture.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 5th, 2018

UAAP eyeing 3x3 to be a regular sport next season

Far Eastern University has yet again proven to be at the forefront of change in the UAAP. The host school that instituted the Final Four format and that moved volleyball games to bigger venues has another innovation now in the 80th Season – 3x3 basketball. The league is nothing but excited to venture out into another new frontier. “Historically, FEU has taken bold steps and we see that again this year, the first time we’re having the 3x3. We thank them for taking another bold step forward,” executive director Atty. Rebo Saguisag said in the pre-event press conference on Thursday. The first-ever 3x3 tournament in the UAAP will be held on Sunday at the SM MOA Music Hall in Pasay. As it turns out, this is all in aid of growing 3x3 as a sport – especially as it is set to become an Olympic event in 2020. “We discussed it internally muna and really felt na we wanted it to be pushed by FEU this year. Hopefully, pati na rin buong UAAP,” FEU athletic director Mark Molina said. According to Molina, all eight member-schools have been nothing but receptive of the innovation. “When we presented it to the UAAP, it was unanimous on the part of all schools. They were behind it 100 percent,” he said. Not only that, even the host venue is enthusiastic about partaking in what could be a historic inaugural tournament. “The response is quite good from everybody. MOA is excited and we’re happy,” the FEU athletic director said. Still, the host school knows very well that this is only the beginning and UAAP 3x3 basketball can only grow from here. “This will be the start. This will be very modest lang, one day lang muna tayo,” Molina said. That also means, however, that the Morayta-based school is already planning to push the event to become a regular sport in the season. “Hopefully, this will be a regular sport in the UAAP come next season. If volleyball has indoor and beach volleyball, I don’t see any reason why we can’t have indoor and 3x3 basketball,” their athletic director said. He continued, “It can be a regular sport in the second semester by Season 81 – that’s the target.” At present, the league has 15 regular sports and two demonstration events in cheerdance and streetdance. For now, 3x3 basketball will also be a demonstration event. With a good showing in its inaugural tournament, though, Saguisag sees no obstacle for it to become an event that will count in the general championship. “We really ask for your support. We’re very positive and everybody’s excited,” he remarked. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 1st, 2018

Nowitzki disgusted by report of hostile workplace for Mavs

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Dirk Nowitzki said Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) he was “disgusted” to read about allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct by former team president Terdema Ussery in a Sports Illustrated report that described a hostile workplace for women. The 20-year player who has spent his entire career with the Mavericks told reporters after the first post-All-Star break practice in Los Angeles that he was glad the franchise was addressing the situation by hiring outside counsel to investigate the allegations. “It’s very disappointing,” Nowitzki told The Dallas Morning News. “It’s heartbreaking. I’m glad it’s all coming out. I was disgusted when I read the article, obviously, as everybody was. I was shocked ... that our franchise, my franchise, that stuff like that was going on.” Ussery was accused of making sexually suggestive remarks to several women. He spent 18 years with the team before going to the sports apparel company Under Armour in 2015. Ussery, who was investigated by the team over similar claims in 1998, denied the allegations in a statement to SI. The report said team website reporter Earl Sneed was twice accused of domestic assault while working for the Mavericks, including a guilty plea in a case that was dismissed when he met the conditions of the agreement. The team said Sneed had been fired, and Mavericks owner Mark Cuban told SI that he fired human resources director Buddy Pittman after learning details of the magazine’s report. The Mavericks said Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) they hired Evan Krutoy and Anne Milgram to lead the independent investigation. Krutoy served as a prosecutor at the Manhattan District Attorney’s office for over 20 years and served as Acting Deputy Bureau Chief of the Sex Crimes Unit. Milgram is a professor at New York University School of Law, and a former New Jersey attorney general. A day earlier, the NBA said the Mavericks had informed the league of the allegations involving Ussery and Sneed. The league said it would “closely monitor” the investigation. “Their findings are going to go directly to Mark Cuban and (Commissioner) Adam Silver, and the Mavericks will abide by whatever recommendations are made,” coach Rick Carlisle said after practice. “I can tell you that when it comes to anything involving the Mavericks, Mark Cuban is a strong believer in extreme ownership, extreme accountability.” SI contacted six female former Mavericks or American Airlines Center employees who claimed they left the sports sector because of a structure that left them feeling vulnerable and devalued while protecting powerful men who misbehaved. A male former department head said there was “built-in protection for a lot of men.” A woman who had recently been hired as a support staffer said Ussery made sexually suggestive remarks to her in the media dining room before a game during the 2010-11 season, when the Mavericks won their only NBA championship. The woman said she had been told by others to be wary of Ussery. “Obviously there’s a problem in the Mavericks organization and we’ve got to fix it,” Cuban told the magazine. “I’m embarrassed, to be honest with you, that it happened under my ownership, and it needs to be fixed.” Cuban declined comment to The Associated Press on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Two women claimed Ussery harassed them for years, incidents that ranged from inappropriate remarks to requests for sex to touching women’s calves and thighs during meetings. Ussery had left Nike to join the Mavericks and had previously served as commissioner of the old Continental Basketball Association. He was praised by former NBA Commissioner David Stern and served as the Mavericks’ alternate governor with the league. “I am deeply disappointed that anonymous sources have made such outright false and inflammatory accusations against me,” Ussery said. “During my nearly 20-year tenure with the Mavericks, I am not aware of any sexual harassment complaints about me or any findings by the organization that I engaged in inappropriate conduct.” Ussery said he had raised concerns about other Mavericks employees who he said engaged in inappropriate sexual conduct and the organization didn’t address those concerns. “I believe these misleading claims about me are part of an attempt to shift blame for the failure to remove employees who created an uncomfortable and hostile work environment within the Mavericks organization,” Ussery said Cuban told the magazine that the team was establishing a hotline for counseling and support services for past and current employees. He is mandating sensitivity training for all employees, himself included......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2018

After silver finish in Asian cycling meet, Rex Krog on track for even better things

A promising future awaits Rex Luis Krog, the Asian Cycling Championships juniors road silver medalist, as his team, Go For Gold, and PhilCycling start charting his career following his impressive performance in Myanmar. Krog was presented to media yesterday, and the 17-year-old from Caloocan City, who traces his roots to Nueva Ecija was modest bask in his accomplishment. “Katulad po ng sinasabi nila, marami pa akong kakaining bigas. Pero okay lang naman po ‘yun kasi alam ko naman po kailangan ko pa rin mag-improve overall,” Krog told the event at the Kabisera Restaurant in BGC-Taguig. Krog finished second behind a Japanese and ahead of a Thai rider in last Saturday’s 103-km road race that drew 48 of the best youngsters in Asia at the Myanmar capital of Nay Pyi Taw. The medal was a rarity for Philippine cycling on the Asian stage. Rustom Lim clinched a bronze medal also in juniors competition in 2011. Jeremy Go, Vice President for Marketing of Powerball Marketing and Logistics Corp., the company behind the noble Go for Gold project, and his coach, Ednalyn Calitis Hualda, were all praises for Krog’s passion for cycling. Hualda disclosed that Krog, son of former national team members Marita Lucas and the late Edward Krog, is already being groomed to join this year’s UCI Road World Cycling Championships in Innsbruck, Austria, from September 22 to 30 pending the green light from PhilCycling. Go said overseas training and exposure awaits Krog, who at five-foot-10 looks genetically perfect for both road and track events of cycling. “Natural climber siya pero sa pagpalit ng gear, lumalabas rin ang skills niya sa sprint. ‘Pag matangkad ka rin, advantage na ‘yun sa track,” Go said. PhilCycling President Abraham “Bambol” Tolentino said Krog’s future looks bright especially with his attitude on training and competition. “Given the proper training and program, Luis will be a star,” Tolentino said. Go said they will make sure that the up-and-coming rider will be at his best form. “With the kind support given by PhilCycling and UCI, we’re looking for a specialized training for him in Korea or Switzerland,” he said. Currently a senior high school student at the Lorraine Technical School of Caloocan City in Monumento, Krog, whose grandfather is German, has all the makings of becoming a future world champion, according to Hualda. “Motivated palagi si Luis at ‘yun ang pinakamaganda sa kanya. Maganda rin ang kanyang decision-making At kapag ang isang atleta naniniwala sa coach, anything is possible” she said. “Motivated palagi si Luis at ‘yun ang pinakamaganda sa kanya. Maganda rin ang kanyang decision-making At kapag ang isang atleta naniniwala sa coach, anything is possible” Hualda said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2018

NCAA Jrs. MVP Will Gozum says UP has always been where his heart is

Will Gozum will be making a return to the stage where he first started opening eyes. The NCAA Juniors MVP is set to play once more for the University of the Philippines, giving a long-suffering community even more reason to hope for the end of a two decade-long playoff drought. Even with the sentimentality of staying in Mapua University or the lure of transferring to National University or University of Sto. Tomas, Gozum said coming home to Diliman was the best decision for him. “Home is where your heart is and sa UP ko feel na feel yun,” he shared. The six-foot-six big man was once part of a promising core for UP Integrated School alongside Gomez de Liano brothers Javi and Juan. However, he was cut from the roster for reasons he opted not to disclose. Fortunately, Gozum landed on his feet with the Red Robins and established himself as one of the blue-chip prospects in high school in his two years there. Through it all, the 18-year-old said his love for UP and the UP community’s support for him never wavered. “Dati pa, kahit po nasa Mapua ako, sinu-support nila ako. Lalo na po yung Gregorios and GDLs, nakatututok sila lagi sa akin at gusto nila akong bumalik sa UP,” he said. Allan Gregorio and son Jaggie were Gozum’s former head coach and teammate, respectively. The GDLs, meanwhile, went on an all-out offensive to recruit their one-time running mate. Now the reunion has come true, Gozum wants nothing more than to prove he is deserving of a spot in the Fighting Maroons’ surprisingly stacked lineup. Able to play both center and power forward, he will bolster a frontline that already includes Bright Akhuetie, Paul Desiderio, Javi GDL, Jerson Prado, Gelo Vito, and Noah Webb. Then manning the backcourt are Diego Dario, Juan GDL, Jarrell Lim, Jun Manzo, and Jaydee Tungcab. The UP commit promises to do whatever it takes to help his new team get back to the Final Four for the first time since 1997. “Ngayon po, back to zero kasi wala na naman dito yung high school career. Basta ako, trabaho lang lagi,” he said. He then continued, “I’m not expecting playing time. Basta matawag ako rito, I will do my 101 percent sa loob ng court.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2018

ARMM hires 75 new teachers for Maguindanao, more expected to get jobs

COTABATO CITY – Dozens of newly hired teachers for the province of Maguindanao were added to the roster of the Department of Education in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (DepEd-ARMM) on Monday, officials said. ARMM Governor Mujiv Hataman signed the appointment papers of 75 teachers and said  their profession is more of service and commitment than livelihood. “You chose this path because it is your passion — because you are committed and determined that you want our youth to learn. The regional government will not neglect your efforts and will provide what you deserve,” he said. Debunking the misconception that appointments in ARMM are tainted with corruption, Gov. Hataman said those appointed are qualified and do not have those so-called backers. A mechanism was made to ensure that appointees are well-distributed to schools that are in need. Along with the appointment order is a deployment order. In his first appearance as the newly appointed DepEd-ARMM Secretary, Atty. Rasol Mitmug, Jr. reminded the teachers that the region’s “youth is expecting to receive quality education.” “Sana maging daan kayong mga guro na matulungan ang mga batang magsumikap sa pag aaral dahil maraming kabataan ang umaasa na magkaroon ng maayos at dekalidad na edukasyon,” he told the teachers. One of the teachers, Elpigenia Apellido, a 41-year old single mother with two children, said: “Excited ako na may halong kaba.” Her appointment was 18 years in the making. Since her graduation in 1999, Apellido served as a factory worker in Luzon and also as a farmer in her hometown in Sultan Kudarat. During the past two years, she served as a volunteer teacher in Kulasi Elementary School where she did not receive compensation. Previously teaching in makeshift classrooms to underprivileged children, she is now eager to go back as a full-fledged teacher and help her students who usually go to school without basic supplies such as pens and notebooks.  “As a teacher and the second mother of my students, I play an important role in nurturing them for their future,” she said. “It’s never too late to reach for your dreams. I’m here now signing my papers, although long overdue, this serves as a message to everyone.” “Sacrifices have to be made along the way, but if you get the chance to go to school, do not miss it, since you never know when your break will come,” she said. Gov.  Hataman said the appointments comprised just the first batch of new teachers in the region. More appointees are expected to be made this year. “The process will be easier now. Our main goal is to finish all appointments, including senior high school, by first quarter of this year,” he said, adding, DepEd-ARMM will fill all teaching positions in nine schools divisions in the region in the first quarter of this year.   Newly hired teacher Sahira Kalipapa said the distance between her home and her school assignment may be challenging, but she is more excited to help her students. A 30-year-old resident of Datu Paglas North, she will be deployed to Darampua Elementary School in Sultan sa Barongis town, an hour away from her place. “Wala pong kaso sa akin ang layo, ang mahalaga po sa akin ay makatulong sa mga estudyante sa sarili kong probinsya,” Sahira said. Overwhelmed with joy as she signed her deployment order, she said: “It’s an answered prayer po. Sobrang saya po na finally teacher na po ako.” “Ang sarap po sa pakiramdam dahil alam namin na dumaan ito sa tamang proseso. Libu-libo ang applicants na kasabay ko dito at masaya ako na napabilang ako sa mga newly hired teachers,” she said.  Sahira said that she never thought of applying to other places outside the ARMM. “Mas pipiliin ko pa rin po ang lugar namin dahil mas kailangan po kami sa lugar namin,” she added. Applicants for teaching positions in the ARMM have to go through the Assessment and Competency Examination for Teachers that includes a panel interview and a teaching demonstration to evaluate their aptitude and proficiency for teaching. The process is meant to promote quality education in the region. Gov. Hataman said it helps guarantee that only qualified teachers will be hired. On January 4 this year, the appointment papers and deployment orders of the 192 public school teachers in Sulu were signed by the governor. “Our goal is to fill in all the teaching vacancies in the first quarter of the year,” he said. “Nandito kayo hindi dahil sa kung sino ang nag-recommend sayo, nandito kayo dahil dumaan kayo sa tamang proseso at alam namin na qualified kayo,” he said.  Another teacher, Johaira Ali, also thanked and praised Gov. Hataman for hiring them, saying, they waited for this for a long time. “I’m excited to be finally appointed by the ARMM Department of Education because I’ve been waiting for this for a long time,” she said.   Musarafah Ebrahim, a teacher who shared her own excitement, said: “I’m happy to be here. I’ve always found joy in teaching, and I feel like this is truly the job for me.” Qualified, not endorsed   Gov. Hataman told the teachers “I made sure to meet all of you today because I wanted to tell you personally that you are here not because of anyone’s endorsement, but because you are qualified. Atty. Mitmug reminded the teachers of their crucial role as educators. “Many of the youth here in the ARMM are hoping to receive quality education in our public school system, and the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJan 27th, 2018

The case for Keenum: Vikings QB keeps on disproving doubters

By Dave Campbell, Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — When Minnesota's offense huddled for the first time that mid-September afternoon in Pittsburgh, Case Keenum's energy and confidence quickly filled the circle. The Vikings were forced to turn to their backup quarterback to start the second game of the season after Sam Bradford's knee acted up, an ominous development that can doom a team to an autumn of disenchantment and playing for draft pick position. Despite the decisive defeat against the Steelers that day, though, there was a certain assurance Keenum gave his teammates that suggested they'd be all right. "He's a guy you want to play for," wide receiver Adam Thielen said. Four months later, the Vikings and Keenum are still playing. They're two wins away from reaching the Super Bowl. "It's been a blast, man. It's been incredible. I'm sure one of these days I'll be able to look back and really appreciate it, but there's so much to enjoy right now," Keenum said. "Not really putting too much into perspective. Not really looking too much at the big picture. I'm keeping my blinders on." With a modest 6-foot-1, 215-pound frame, Keenum was mostly ignored by major college programs despite leading Abilene Wylie High School to its first state championship in football-obsessed Texas. Houston made his only FBS scholarship offer, from then-head coach Art Briles, and by the time Keenum was finished with the Cougars he was the NCAA's all-time leading passer with 19,217 yards and 155 touchdowns. Yet he still went undrafted in 2012, needing the Houston Texans practice squad to get his professional career off the ground. Keenum started 10 games over the next two years before being traded to the Rams in 2015, but they made Jared Goff the first pick in the 2016 draft so there was no future for Keenum there beyond being a veteran mentor. Even Vikings head coach Mike Zimmer was among those who typecast Keenum as a just-in-case second-stringer. Zimmer acknowledged recently he didn't gain full confidence in Keenum until the 11th or 12th game of the season and, when Teddy Bridgewater was cleared to play in mid-November, Zimmer never declared Keenum the starter for more than a week at a time. "He just wanted a chance," his father, Steve Keenum, said this week in a phone interview. "He's got to have the knack. It's just a God-given, innate thing that he's maximized by working hard." As the oldest of his three children, Case made clear at an early age to Steve that he had the makeup to be an NFL quarterback even if there was no way to predict how the skill set would unfold. "He was competitive in everything. It could be a board game. It could be playing darts. It could be playing cards. It didn't matter. But if it had a ball, he wanted to do it," said Steve, who was a high school and college coach around Texas for 24 years, including 10 seasons as the head coach at his alma mater McMurry University. Good coaching, starting with dad's tips in the family backyards, was another success factor. When Briles left for Baylor, Kevin Sumlin arrived at Houston for Keenum's sophomore year. Dana Holgorsen, now the head coach at West Virginia, was the offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. After he departed, Kliff Kingsbury, currently the head coach at Texas Tech, took charge of the quarterbacks. "They had some speed, and the next thing you know they were throwing the ball all over the field," said Steve, who attended all 57 of Case's games with the Cougars and has been to each game he's played for the Vikings. "They had some really talented kids. People talked about him being a system guy, with short passes and a run after the catch, but they didn't see him play." Steve is now an area director for the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, an organization that Case has long been active in as well. "He's come to the realization like a lot of people in big situations that there are things that are really too big to do by yourself, and in order to stay grounded you've got to find somebody or something that you believe strongly in," Steve said. "I think his faith has been that for him." Though Keenum had prior NFL experience, including nine starts for the Los Angeles Rams in 2016, he was signed by the Vikings as a one-year stopgap to be the guy in the ball cap providing sideline support and give Bridgewater ample time to recover from his colossal knee injury. Bradford had just produced an injury-free career-best performance in 2016, after all, so the Vikings were banking on him. Over the last four months, though, they've been cashing in on Keenum, a dividend that has paid out handsomely for both parties. "We've got a great group of guys here," he said, "and I think we're all excited to be extending our season." With offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur deftly adapting the team's scheme to use Keenum's mobility to better advantage and a sleeker offensive line mostly protecting him well, the Vikings have leaped up the league rankings in every significant statistical category. Among them: 28th to ninth in scoring touchdowns on possessions after passing the 20-yard line, and 19th to third in third-down conversions. Keenum will start his first playoff game Sunday against New Orleans, with a raucous home crowd at U.S. Bank Stadium ready to cheer the next step toward the franchise's elusive first championship. "Our fans are awesome," Keenum said. "All my friends and family who have come up from Texas and my friends from other teams that come in, they'll text me after the games and they'll be like, 'Dude, that place is ridiculous.' It really is.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018