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PBA: New diet and extra shooting doing wonders for RR Pogoy

RR Pogoy was a top prospect when he entered the PBA, and his status was only proven when he won Rookie of the Year in 2017. Since then, Pogoy has made a steady climb as a true key piece for TNT, and his rise to become a PBA star was accelerated and became complete last season for the KaTropa. Pogoy, always a reliable defender and shooter, became a top-10 scorer in the PBA in 2019. His 16.6 points per game actually led the KaTropa, beating out teammates Troy Rosario and Jayson Castro. A key turning point for Pogoy's rise can be attributed to his health and nutrition, which was emphasized when active consultant Mark Dickel first joined the team late in the 2018 season. "Binago yung diet ko," Pogoy said during the PBA's Kamustahan session online. "Nagpa-gaan ako ng timbang, bawas-bawas ako sa rice, and more on healthy foods ang kinakain ko," he added. On top of his new diet, Pogoy also worked extra for his shooting. The results were seen immediately as Pogoy made 124 total three-point shots on 35 percent shooting last year. Pogoy peaked in the mid-season Commissioner's Cup, where he converted a career-high 10 triples in one game, making him the the fourth of five players to accomplish such feat. "Alas-9 yung ensayo pero 6:30 pa lang nandoo na kami ni Coach Mark, nage-extra na kami. Siguro doon ko nakuha yung ganda ng laro ko," Pogoy said. "Kumpiyansa ako kasi alam ko ini-ensayo ko araw-araw. Sa awa ng Diyos, gumanda ang laro ko. May bunga talaga pag magta-tanim ka," he added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMay 29th, 2020Related News

WHAT IF… Bea De Leon missed the rest of Season 77?

Ateneo de Manila University achieved perfection in UAAP Season 77 after the Lady Eagles swept their way to a second straight women’s volleyball title. Stacked with powerful hitters in Alyssa Valdez, Michelle Morente, Ella de Jesus and Jho Maraguinot, Ateneo’s offense was unstoppable. The Katipunan-based squad also had prized setter Jia Morado and libero Denden Lazaro with veteran middle Amy Ahomiro. But another vital cog that made Ateneo a super team that year was the presence of rookie middle Bea De Leon. The former Poveda standout earned a starting spot in the Tai Bundit-mentored team, which the year before completed a Cinderella story with a championship.    De Leon proved her worth and even had a strong case for the coveted Rookie of the Year award. She was having a splendid season until she was forced to miss three games after suffering a finger injury during practice with Ateneo already in a 10-game romp. De Leon chose to just have her left index finger stitched and have therapy than go under the knife. She returned just in time for the pivotal end of the elimination round match against archrival De La Salle University. Getting the green light to play on the eve of the game, De Leon was surprised as she was included in the starting line-up and she did not disappoint.       De Leon, who risked aggravating her heavily bandaged finger, scored 11 points including three kill blocks in the Lady Eagles’ 25-20, 21-25, 25-23, 27-25, victory that sent Ateneo straight to the Finals with a thrice-to-beat advantage. From there, Ateneo made history. But what if De Leon underwent surgery? One thing is for sure, De Leon would be out of commission for an extended period if not for the remainder of the season. Without her, Ateneo would surely be in a precarious situation in that decisive end of the elims match against the Lady Spikers. Taking down DLSU won’t be easy for the Lady Eagles to begin with. In their first meeting, Ateneo had to come back from a set down to outlast DLSU in a five sets match. Without De Leon, Coach Tai would be forced to put in either veteran but seldom-used Aeriel Patnongon or another rookie Maddie Madayag to help Ahomiro. Both rode the bench in the first Ateneo-DLSU encounter. DLSU, which was coming off a six-game win run, would be in a favorable position to exploit its height advantage and would’ve had an open sky for the Lady Spikers’ hitters.    And if DLSU won that game against an Ateneo squad missing its starting middle, that would put the semifinals in the usual Final Four format. The Lady Eagles will still have a twice-to-beat advantage and would still overpower Far Eastern University. As for DLSU, coming off a win over Ateneo, the Lady Spikers would be in high spirits against National University. The twice-to-beat Lady Spikers might not need to go to a do-or-die decider against the Lady Bulldogs. Probably, DLSU would have been spared of losing its best scorer Ara Galang from a harrowing knee injury. Of course, the Finals would’ve been a different story. Ateneo will be missing De Leon’s Finals average of eight points per game and a vital piece both on offense and defense.       But then again, the Lady Eagles still had its ace Valdez and their reliable wings to take care of the scoring as well as the steady Ahomiro. We can never know what the outcome of that Finals series would have been if De Leon missed the rest of the season. But we can surely say that De Leon’s return from that finger injury proved to be a decisive moment in the Lady Eagles' historic perfect season.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMay 27th, 2020Related News

What is RITM?

This is a sidebar report to our special report: RITM, the missing piece in the Philippines’ mass testing capacity vs. COVID-19 By JANESS ANN J. ELLAO Bulatlat.com Established in 1981, RITM was an outcome of a series of negotiations between the Philippine and Japanese governments. The 50-bed capacity hospital was tasked to plan and implement… The post What is RITM? appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Source: Bulatlat BulatlatCategory: NewsMay 26th, 2020Related News

RITM, the missing piece in the Philippines’ mass testing capacity vs. COVID-19

The decrease in the RITM budget is also coupled with the decline in the allotment of other related health concerns, such as the Epidemiology and Surveillance Department, with a 40-percent drop from P247 million in 2019 to P101 million this year. Since 2015, no additional isolation rooms have been built. Related story: What is RITM?… The post RITM, the missing piece in the Philippines’ mass testing capacity vs. COVID-19 appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Source: Bulatlat BulatlatCategory: NewsMay 26th, 2020Related News

WHAT IF...Tony Koyfman played for the Blue Eagles in UAAP Season 80 Finals?

In UAAP Season 79, Ateneo de Manila University completed an amazing sweep of the men’s tournament. The Blue Eagles stamped their class on the competition thanks to the powerful tandem of Marck Espejo and Tony Koyfman and the then graduating pair of Rex Intal and Josh Villanueva as they went unbeaten in 16 games, including a pair of thrilling five-setters in the championship series against National University. However, the following season proved to be huge challenge for Ateneo not just because of the departure of Intal and Villanueva but also with the absence of Koyfman. The Russian-American skipped Season 80 because of health issues. With the 6-foot-8 opposite hitter out, Espejo had to shoulder most of the scoring load for the Blue Eagles in his swan song. Ateneo managed to advance to the Finals, but Espejo, who made history with his 55-point explosion in the semis against Far Eastern University, could only do so much against the onslaught of the Bulldogs as the Blue Eagles' three-year reign crumbled in two games.        Ateneo sorely missed the services of Koyfman in that series. But what if Koyfman suited up for the Blue Eagles in that championship showdown? Koyfman would have given Ateneo an added offensive threat, first of all. The Blue Eagles that season still had one the one of the league’s best playmakers in Ish Polvorosa and with him controlling the offense and with more options at hand, it would surely have caused problems for the Bulldogs’ net defense. Koyfman’s presence would have eased the scoring burden of Espejo, who was the obvious marked man in that series. In Season 79, Koyfman averaged 14.5 points per game in the Finals on his way to winning the Finals Most Valuable Player award. With the tandem of Koyfman and Espejo at the wings, it would also free up other scoring threats like Ron Medalla, John Rivera, Gian Glorioso and middle Chu Njigha. Koyfman would’ve also been an imposing defensive piece for Ateneo at the net. With him around to help Glorioso and Njigha, the Blue Eagles would’ve given NU’s top spikers Bryan Bagunas and James Natividad a hard time penetrating their attacks or pose a challenge for Kim Malabunga and Francis Saura at the middle.           Another key contribution that he could've given the Blue Eagles was his championship experience. The Bulldogs paraded an intact core. It would've had been a better matchup had the Katipunan-based squad had another veteran available.  Although, we cannot say if Ateneo can indeed complete the four-peat with Koyfman around against a very determined NU squad, we can agree that he was a missing piece to the Blue Eagles championship puzzle that season.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMay 20th, 2020Related News

EO 114

The title of this piece refers to the President’s latest executive order that promulgates a new “Balik Probinsya, Bagong Pag-asa” (BP2) program, about which I also wrote here some weeks back before the EO itself was issued......»»

Source: Thestandard ThestandardCategory: NewsMay 19th, 2020Related News

D-Day this Friday: From ECQ to GCQ?

I already wrote my piece about the issue that closed the ABS-CBN Network by government regulators and even asked why they could not get a new franchise during the term of then president Benigno “PNoy” Aquino at a time when he was so powerful......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsMay 12th, 2020Related News

Views from an expanding overton window: Tools for reimagining a more compassionate economy-in-crisis

In our previous piece, we built a case for radical economic compassion for the vulnerable, arguing how it is at once both the vaccine against a looming social crisis and the very antidote to our post-pandemic economic woes......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: FinanceMay 11th, 2020Related News

PERA

“PERA” is the predictable acronym for a new piece of legislation pending in the House, dubbed the Philippine Economic Recovery Act. Right now it’s in the process of consolidating three separate bills filed by the ubiquitous Albay former governor and now Rep. Joey Salceda and two of his beauteous colleagues, party-lister Sharon Garin and UP economics professor Stella Quimbo from Marikina......»»

Source: Thestandard ThestandardCategory: NewsMay 5th, 2020Related News

DID YOU KNOW?: Rex Intal is into painting

Rex Intal is an accomplished volleyball player. He won three straight titles in the UAAP while playing for Ateneo de Manila University. He also collected championships in the commercial league and made history when he helped the national team capture a silver medal in the 2019 Southeast Asian Games. But did you know that Rex is also a talented painter?      “Growing up siguro I didn’t know I had talent in art,” Intal told ABS-CBN Sports. “I kept drawing lang and thought my works were normal and anyone could do that.” He likes to draw, but didn’t realize then that he’s actually good at it.    “I compared my artworks with my classmates’ and I thought na baka tinatamad lang sila, haha!” he said. Rex shared that it was during grade school that people started to recognize his talents.    “I think I was Grade 2 ata when I copied and drew Spiderman from the newspaper, then everyone got impressed,” he recalled. “Since then I was hailed as the class artist, haha!” got to squeeze in some time to paint before i go to sleep! #wip pic.twitter.com/xzqqtVgynl — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 2, 2020 The interest in the arts according to Rex runs in his family. Actually, his brother Phoenix Fuel Masters forward JC launched his first solo exhibit last February after rekindling his interest in the arts recently. “My mother, and two of my brothers, JC and JR have talent in art but they never pursued it,” said Rex. “Well, except for Kuya JC who rekindled his passion two years ago and ventured the art world.” But back then, just like other kids his age, Rex had other interests.   “Growing up I never wanted to be an artist,” he admitted. “I wanted what the other kids dreamed of, a businessman, a doctor, an NBA player, an astronaut,” Rex continued. “I knew so little growing up and I just fixated my mindset na I wanted a lucrative job in the future.” It didn’t help that no one in his family, although gifted in the art, seriously pursued it. “And I knew na I had no one to lean on kasi growing up, ako na lang ‘yung nagdo-drawing,” said Rex. “So I knew I had talent but didn’t wanna pursue it like what they did.” His artistic side had to take a backseat further more when Rex discovered his athletic talent. Following the footsteps of his high-flying and athletic brother JC when he donned the blue and white as part of the Ateneo basketball team, Rex landed a spot on the Blue Eagles volleyball squad. Quick abstract portrait exercise with @MasonNjigha as my model pic.twitter.com/409VYZRJH4 — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 3, 2020 pic.twitter.com/I0AjHNpo8n — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 3, 2020 pic.twitter.com/Ca8XgWWxPj — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 3, 2020 But like soulmates destined for each other, Rex and his love for art crossed paths once again. “Entering college, I took up BS Management in my first year. Latter part of my first year, I was so focused on my course, but I thought it was too broad for me,” he said. “That’s when I saw the BFA Information Design students,” Rex added. “I took a look at their curriculum and saw Drawing, Painting, and Graphic Design classes and I felt that urge and passion again.” He felt his heart beat once again. “I felt na this was more fit for me,” he said. “So in my second year I shifted to BFA Information Design and that’s when I made my first painting.” His first artwork? “It was a dog lang and my brother, JC, wanted to buy it,” said Rex.    “I never really painted ‘til after college. My teammate asked me to paint for his thesis so I painted another piece and my brother wanted to buy it again.” JC, who like his younger brother, found his way back into painting, gave Rex the confidence to pursue his artistic craft.   “Then around a year and a half ago, my brother got inspired to paint. His works are abstract so we have different styles but that gave me the confidence to paint,” he said. “Before kasi I thought I was alone lang in this field but my brother paved the way in the art world and I wanted to follow his footsteps, just like how I followed his footsteps in being an athlete,” Rex continued. “We both represented the country in sports and we also entered the arts industry but different fields. He plays basketball I play volleyball. He paints abstract I paint portraits.” Art also serves as a way for the Intal brothers to bond. “Sometimes we would paint together in his house and my other brothers would either watch or join in so nagiging bonding na rin,” said Rex, who also found a way to help the frontliners battling the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic through his art.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMay 4th, 2020Related News

National men s volleyball team standout Rex Intal uses art to help frontliners

The local volleyball community is doing its share to help the frontliners and vulnerable communities amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. From jersey auctions to fund-raising drives, volleyball stars and fans have been working together to extend help to those in need in this time of crisis.   National men’s volleyball team member Rex Intal is no different. But the 2019 Southeast Asian Games silver medalist used his artistic side, his personal touch in his effort to help. The middle blocker posted on his Twitter account his yet to be finished art piece which he intends to sell to raise funds for medical frontliners. got to squeeze in some time to paint before i go to sleep! #wip pic.twitter.com/xzqqtVgynl — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 2, 2020 The Ateneo de Manila University product shared that the heroic effort of medical frontliners in the fight against the contagion was his inspiration in creating his oil painting.                            “Got inspired while I was watching news and videos online,” said the three-time UAAP champion. “I saw and felt the frontliners sacrifice and dedication.” “So, in this artwork I hope I could help and support their ongoing battle because they are the real heroes in this pandemic,” he added. The amount the painting will raise, according to Intal, will be used to buy personal protective equipment and other essentials for medical frontliners. “Once finished I will put it up for sale or for auction and 100% of the proceeds will go to the frontliners’ essential needs like PPE’s, etc.,” he said. “Haven’t put that much thought pa which foundation, hospital, or wherever ko ido-donate.” Intal posted a sketch of his painting on his Twitter account last month. “I take like two to three hours per session while painting this one,” he said. “And siguro mga two to three days interval din kasi I’m letting it dry pa kaya natatagalan. In those 2-3 days that’s where I squeeze in some time to exercise painting and paint other stuff.”    --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMay 4th, 2020Related News

No sports activities for PSC until December

BY WAYLON GALVEZ       Here’s another piece of bad news for Filipino sports fans. Getting orders from the Malacanang, the Philippine Sports Commission (PSC) is canceling all sports activities this year and will instead focus its budget on various outstanding commitments as the country continues to combat the spread of coronavirus. In a virtual […].....»»

Source: Tempo TempoCategory: NewsApr 29th, 2020Related News

Foolish and premature

As I write this piece, President Duterte has yet to announce his decision on what to do with the Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ) in Luzon, due to end on April 30. Will he extend it for, say, another month or so, this time under stricter controls as most people expect given our continuing inability to level up to the internationally acceptable standards under which a lockdown can be eased? Or will he give in to the entreaties of many in the business sector, which has been urging a modified ECQ, whatever that means?.....»»

Source: Thestandard ThestandardCategory: NewsApr 23rd, 2020Related News

LA Tenorio auctions off custom Iron Man sneakers through Off-Court Action

A little over a week after putting his jersey up for auction, Ginebra guard LA Tenorio is upping the ante by auctioning off a pair of customized sneakers through Off-Court Action: Auction For A Cause.  Off-Court Action is a jersey auction drive initiated by PBA star Paul Lee and talent manager Stanley Santos with the aim of raising funds to help indigent families and frontliners affected by the COVID-19 pandemic that's gripping the Philippines and the whole world  The veteran PBA guard, whose game-worn Ginebra jersey went for PHP 4,500, is offering up his customized Iron Man Nike Air Force 1s with a starting bid of PHP 10,000.  The customized sneakers are likely a tribute to Tenorio's standing as the PBA's very own Iron Man, holding the record for most consecutive games played in the league after beating Alvin Patrimonio's record back in March of 2019. Now, you have a chance to own a piece of history.  Bidding for Tenorio's Iron Man Air Force 1s begins on Tuesday, April 21st and ends on April 28th.   For more information about Off-Court Action and auction mechanics, visit them on Facebook and on Instagram......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsApr 21st, 2020Related News

Prepare for The Last Dance with these essential Michael Jordan pieces

The highly-anticipated Michael Jordan documentary series, The Last Dance is finally here. Over two decades after his final game as a Chicago Bull, the GOAT is once again ready to take the world by storm, especially during this time of great uncertainty. Showing on ESPN and Netflix, The Last Dance details Jordan’s last season in Chicago over 10 episodes. In 1998, Jordan’s Bulls completed their second three-peat in eight years, once again beating the Utah Jazz in an NBA Finals Rematch. The season was capped by “The Shot” and Jordan cemented his place as basketball’s greatest. Tuning in to The Last Dance for 10 episodes will surely be a treat, however, it’s not the first definite look at Michael Jordan’s work as a Chicago Bull. Hopefully, it won’t be the last as well. Just before everyone makes a deep dive in His Airness’ latest documentary series, here are some essential viewing and reading to truly appreciate Michael Jordan’s last dance.   Take Flight Before The Last Dance, these were the documentaries that made up the essentials if you wanted to get close with Michael Jordan himself. Come Fly With Me (1989) and Michael Jordan’s Playground (1990) both last less than 45 minutes, but they offer a great perspective on the man himself before he started his championship runs with the Chicago Bulls. Arguably the two best Michael Jordan documentaries, Come Fly With Me detail’s the GOAT’s beginnings all the way to his MVP award in the 1988 All-Star Game. Michael Jordan’s Playground is pretty straightforward, telling Jordan’s story from the start – from the playground. Michael Jordan: Air Time, came out in 1993 and it follows the GOAT’s first two championships from the previous two seasons. The 1996 piece, Michael Jordan: Above and Beyond, is pretty much the sequel to Air Time and it follows his time away from basketball after the 1993 championship. After the first three-peat, MJ tried his luck in baseball. However, it was also the time when MJ dealt with the murder of his father, James. Jordan’s time in baseball didn’t last long though, as two words delivered via the most iconic press release of all time announced the GOAT’s return to the court. 1999’s Michael Jordan: His Airness features the 1998 Finals against the Jazz, making it closer to what The Last Dance has to offer. It should be a nice review piece for every Jordan fanatic.   The Specials Another video worth the watch is Michael Jordan’s Hall of Fame Speech in 2009. It’s much more than just the birth of the epic Cying MJ meme. Swear. Buzzfeed Unsolved also has an interesting Jordan piece, exploring the conspiracies of MJ’s first retirement after the 1993 title. It has been long rumored that Jordan’s first retirement was related to gambling. A more recent video is MJ himself appearing on Good Morning America to discuss The Last Dance. The rare interview is really the perfect preview for the upcoming docuseries.    Good Reads While waiting for new episodes of The Last Dance, catching up on some Michael Jordan books seems like a great idea as well. Sam Smith’s The Jordan Rules chronicles MJ’s first championship season in 1991, but it was definitely not all good propaganda towards Jordan as it showed a supposed different side to Michael. Arguably the most definitive book on the GOAT, Michael Jordan The Life by Roland Lazenby explores the man himself to the fullest. It is the story of Michael Jordan.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8 .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsApr 20th, 2020Related News

What s in a Name? Northport Batang Pier

Name changes happen a lot in the PBA, especially with the league’s company based-teams. It’s equal parts marketing and prestige when it comes to the naming of PBA teams. There are no cities represented here and no need for sponsorships.  Out of the 12 active teams in the PBA, even the pioneers like San Miguel Beer have gone through some name changes over the years, while teams like Columbian juggle through monikers like crazy. However, there are also teams like Alaska that have stayed solid through its brand all along. This series is not about those teams though. This series is about the franchises that have taken advantage of the PBA’s somewhat unique naming convention as we shuffle through their history of changes. What’s in a name, Northport Batang Pier?   Pre-History: Coca-Cola Tigers Northport directly took over the spot of the old Coca-Cola franchise in the PBA, after the sale was approved in 2012. The Coke franchise, which for a time was under San Miguel Corp., won two PBA titles when the Tigers beat Alaska and San Miguel for the 2002 Philippine Cup and 2003 Reinforced Conference, respectively. The 2012 Powerade Tigers, the Cinderella team that became the third no. 8 seed to make the semifinals in the PBA, and later the Philippine Cup Finals, was still under the old franchise and not technically connected to the new Northport Batang Pier.   PBL days: Harbour Centre The past link for the current Northport team might as well be the old Harbour Centre in the PBL, since it was the team owned by Mikee Romeo. The Batang Pier were a powerhouse in the PBL, at one point winning seven straight championships. When Romero’s Sultan 900, Inc. bought the Powerade franchise in 2012, the Batang Pier name finally made it to the PBA, with the 2013 Philippine Cup becoming the team’s first official conference.   Globalport Batang Pier 1.0 (2012-2013 season) The Batang Pier’s naming history in the PBA is not as rich, but their official colors are. Globalport’s first season carried mostly a lineup of Powerade carry-overs, and the team’s first official colors were a mix of black, yellow, red, and white. Easily the most iconic players for the team at the time were Gary David and Willie Miller. This era of the Batang Pier was also known pit stops for Sol Mercado and Japeth Aguilar, thus forming the team’s short-lived MMDA core.   Globalport Batang Pier 2.0 (2013-2014 season until 2018) Now sporting a new look with main colors of neon green, black, and white, Globalport drafted star guards Terrence Romeo (5th) and Stanley Pringle (1st) in consecutive drafts. Easily the peak of Globalport’s Neon Nation era was getting a breakthrough semifinals stint in the 2016 Philippine Cup, albeit losing to Alaska in five games. The Batang Pier never duplicated that feat but still remained mostly competitive with playoff appearances as Romeo emerged as a many-time PBA Scoring champion and Pringle evolving into an MVP candidate. However, both star guards will be nagged by injuries and be traded away. Romeo was the first one out, getting shipped to TNT just before the 2018 Commissioner’s Cup while Pringle was by the following year.   Northport Batang Pier (2018 Governors’ Cup – present) Choosing a different neon color in orange in tandem with the color red, Northport had perhaps its most stable season in terms of performance as a franchise in 2019. Despite trading Pringle to Ginebra for a haul of role players headlined by Kevin Ferrer, the Batang Pier took over as the no. 2 seed in the 2019 Commissioner’s Cup. In the next conference, the team traded Mo Tautuaa, the key piece they received from the previous Terrence Romeo deal, to San Miguel Beer for Christian Standhardinger, leading to the franchise’s second semifinals appearance. The Batang Pier of the 2019 Governors’ Cup became the fourth team in league history to make the semis as a no. 8 seed, right after the 2012 Powerade Tigers. Northport also had two players in the Mythical 1st team for the 2019 season in Standhardinger and Sean Anthony. Star guard Robert Bolick is also on the mend after a knee injury.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8 .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsApr 14th, 2020Related News

Did Jesus exist?

AT this time, when our culture, dominated for nearly four centuries by the Hispanic model of late-medieval Catholicism, imposes on us several days of contemplating the Christian Messiah, I dare post again a piece I wrote two years ago, discussing whether Christ did exist in the first place. Someday, sometime in your lives, you will […].....»»

Source: Manilatimes_net Manilatimes_netCategory: NewsApr 9th, 2020Related News

Whatever happened to Gilas Pilipinas 2.0?

Since program’s inception, Gilas Pilipinas has been the name associated with the Philippine men’s basketball team. It gave the national team the identity it has used for a decade already. Gilas has gone through many iterations, but the current lineup, regardless of who the players are, only go by the general “Gilas” term. But early in the program’s history, each team went by a specific number, unofficially used by pretty much everyone to distinguish the teams that competed in different tournaments. It made sense too, since each team had a completely different identity. In later years, Gilas has improved in using the program as a way to ensure national basketball continuity. Nevertheless, each of the earlier Gilas versions had their success and failures. Here’s what happened to each of them.   Whatever happened to Gilas 2.0? Main tournament: 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships @ Manila, Philippines Prize: 3 tickets to the 2014 FIBA World Cup Result: Silver medal + World Cup berth (beat South Korea in semis, lost to Iran in gold medal game) Head coach: Chot Reyes Gilas 2.0 was the second time Chot Reyes handled the Philippine national team. The first time he did it, Coach Chot’s squad only managed 9th in the 2007 FIBA-Asia Championships in Japan. Six years later in Manila, Reyes is back at it again, and with some players from his 2007 team joining him too. Gilas’ silver-medal finish in the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships and ensuing FIBA World Cup appearance in 2014 is Coach Chot’s best run as national team coach. Reyes would return to coach the national team in late 2016 before resigning for good in 2018. The Players: #4 Jimmy Alapag Alapag is back for a second straight stint with Gilas Pilipinas and this is the team where Jimmy carves out his legacy as one of the best national team players ever. In the semifinals against long-time nemesis South Korea, Alapag would hit the biggest shot in program history, pushing the Philippines to its first World Cup appearance in years. [Related: FIBA: Mighty Jimmy and the shot that introduced Gilas to the World] Once in the World Cup, Jimmy would once again hit the big shot to give Gilas its first World Cup win in four decades with an overtime decision against Senegal. Jimmy has since retired twice from basketball. He won the ABL title as head coach for San Miguel-Alab Pilipinas in the 2018 season. #5 LA Tenorio Tenorio already gave a glimpse of what he can do in the national team one-year prior, leading Gilas Pilipinas to the Jones Cup championship while winning MVP honors. In his first Gilas experience, LA started most games at point guard and was the Philippines’ best two-way option at the position. Together with Alapag and Jayson Castro, Tenorio formed perhaps the best point guard rotation in program history. After Gilas 2.0, it would be years for LA to make it back to Gilas, but once he did, he got a 2019 SEA Games gold medal to show for it. Tenorio just won another title with Barangay Ginebra, their fourth since 2016. #6 Jeff Chan Gilas 2.0 was flanked by shooters all over and the best one in Manila was Jeff Chan without a doubt. It’s not like Chan was a complete unknown when he was selected to Gilas, he did win Finals MVP for Rain or Shine in 2012. However, Chan wasn’t exactly tested when it comes to national team play. He got tested, and he passed with flying colors. Chan was the best shooter for Gilas both in total 3-point field goals made and percentage, shooting an insane 47.6 percent from deep. Chan won another title with ROS in 2016, before he was moved to Phoenix and eventually, Ginebra.  #7 Jayson Castro Gilas 2.0 was Jayson Castro’s coming out party for the Philippine national team. Sharing minutes with Jimmy Alapag and LA Tenorio, Castro was the weapon unleashed by Gilas when the going got tough. And as the tournament got deeper, it got more and more evident that The Blur was the national team’s best local. After the tournament, Castro was named in the All-Star team, and his reign as the best point guard in Asia also started his journey as a Gilas legend. While he’s already retired twice from Gilas, we’ll believe Castro is done when he doesn’t actually play. #8 Gary David Even as the PBA’s best scorer at the time, Gary David readily accepted his diminished role with Gilas 2.0. Out of all players, David finished second to last in scoring, beating out only June Mar Fajardo, who played seven games and only saw 31 minutes of total court action. Nevertheless, David was a key piece that made the Gilas 2.0 machine work, his explosive performance in the quarterfinals against Kazakhstan set up the South Korea game quite nicely too. Post-PBA, Gary David is seeing action in the MPBL, even being crowned as the league’s 3-point king in 2019. #9 Ranidel De Ocampo RDO was even better in Gilas 2.0 than he was in the original Gilas. Much like Castro, De Ocampo was a reliable weapon for coach Chot’s national team, his outside shooting ultimately proving crucial for Gilas. Ranidel was behind only Chan in 3-point field goals made and percentage for Gilas, he also hit the forgotten triple that help bury South Korea in the semifinals. RDO is technically still not retired, but injuries have forced him to slow way down in his later years in the PBA as a Meralco Bolt. #10 Gabe Norwood Norwood was one of the players from Coach Chot’s 2007 Philippine team that was present for Gilas 2.0 in Manila. Gabe didn’t do much scoring, but he played the most minutes out of everyone and was easily Gilas Pilipinas’ best defender all tournament long. Norwood’s clutch block on Kim Min-goo helped secure Gilas’ win over South Korea in the semifinals. Gabe is one of the longest-tenured players not just in the Gilas program but in Philippine national team history. In 2019, he made the World Cup for the second straight time. #11 Marcus Douthit Douthit was back for Gilas 2.0 and while his production was lowered compared to the original Gilas, he was still the rock and foundation of the national team. [Related: Whatever happened to Gilas Pilipinas 1.0?] Kuya Marcus’ stint ended early, as his tournament essentially ended before halftime of the semifinals of the game against South Korea due to injury, forcing Gilas to go true All-Filipino the rest of the way. Much like in Gilas 1.0, Douthit led Gilas in scoring and rebounding with 11.9 points and 9.4 rebounds. #12 Larry Fonacier The second designated shooter for the national team in 2013, Larry Fonacier was the classic 3-and-D player for Gilas 2.0. Gilas 2.0 was Fonacier’s only Gilas stint, and winning a silver medal is not a bad result for being one-and-done.  After Gilas 2.0, Larry would continue to play for TNT for a couple more seasons, before moving on to join the NLEX Road Warriors as one of the team’s veterans. #13 June Mar Fajardo June Mar Fajardo was a very raw prospect when Gilas 2.0 won silver in the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships. The future six-time PBA MVP only played in seven games and scored a grand total of three points. Nevertheless, Fajardo was a completely different player following his stint with Gilas 2.0. After he came out of his initial stint with the national team, Fajardo proceeded to dominate the PBA for half a decade and counting, and his consistent Gilas stints in the future also slowly helped him be a consistent contributor in international play. For all intents and purposes, Fajardo could still be a key piece with the country co-hosts the 2023 World Cup, 10 years after Gilas 2.0. #14 Japeth Aguilar While still limited, Japeth was an improved version of himself by the time he played for Gilas 2.0.  He was the explosive reliever for the frontline, and was a crucial part of the rotation when Douthit suffered an injury during the South Korea game. Just like Norwood, Japeth has reached the 10-year mark in service of Gilas Pilipinas program and the national team as a whole, and Gilas 2.0 was just one of his many stops. #15 Marc Pingris The heart and soul of Gilas 2.0, Marc Pingris personified the national team’s famous battle cry. Gilas 2.0’s emotional leader, Ping had his teammates dig deep when they faced the greatest adversity of their World Cup bid in the semifinals against South Korea that eventually led to an iconic breakthrough. While his numbers won’t wow anyone, Ping’s leadership and influence in the national team resonates to this day, and it all started in Gilas 2.0.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8   .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsApr 9th, 2020Related News

Rex ntal puts artwork for sale to help frontliners

Philippine men’s volleyball team middle blocker Rex Intal is putting his artistic talent to good use. The 30th Southeast Asian Games silver medalist is working on a piece of artwork which he intends to sell to raise funds to purchase medical supplies and other essentials for frontliners fighting the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Intal posted on his Twitter account his yet to be finished art piece. Currently working on an artwork Will be selling this piece and 100% of the funds collected will be donated to raise funds for our frontliner’s medical supplies and other essentials. pic.twitter.com/tcZSnixmda — Rex Intal (@rexintal) April 7, 2020 The former Ateneo de Manila University star joined other volleyball players who are actively doing their share to help frontliners and our kababayans in need during this time of crisis.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles   .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsApr 7th, 2020Related News

British Open canceled, Masters to November in major rescheduling

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer The Masters goes from that annual rite of spring to two weeks before Thanksgiving. The U.S. Open now is scheduled in September for the first time since amateur Francis Ouimet took down Britain’s best at Brookline in 1913 to put golf on the map in America. And the oldest championship of them all won’t even be played. Golf organizations tried to salvage a season unlike any other Monday with a series of changes, starting with the British Open being canceled for the first time since 1945. The PGA Championship, which last year moved to May, would go back to August. That would be followed by the PGA Tour’s postseason, the U.S. Open and Ryder Cup in consecutive weeks, and then the Masters on Nov. 12-15. “Any Masters is better than no Masters,” Augusta native Charles Howell III said. Still to be determined was when — or even if — golf could resume because of the COVID-19 pandemic that has shut down sports worldwide. Augusta National Chairman Fred Ridley said the Masters identified November as “intended dates.” CEO Seth Waugh said the PGA of America was “holding” Aug. 6-9 as dates for the PGA Championship at Harding Park in San Francisco. USGA chief Mike Davis said moving from June to September was the best chance to mitigate health and safety concerns — Winged Foot is 5 miles from New Rochelle, New York, a virus hot spot — to have “the best opportunity” of staging the U.S. Open. The British Open effectively is pushing its schedule back one year, saying the 149th Open still is set for Royal St. George’s on July 15-18, leaving the 150th Open for St. Andrews the following year. “I can assure everyone that we have explored every option for playing The Open this year, but it is not going to be possible,” R&A chief Martin Slumbers said. Golf’s major organizations, starting with the PGA Tour and its calendar filled with tournaments, have been trying to piece together a puzzle for the last three weeks. Each agreed to announce their plans together in a show of collaboration. Still missing is the starting line, along with some details on what could be the most hectic pace golf has ever known. “We hope the anticipation of staging the Masters Tournament in the fall brings a moment of joy to the Augusta community and all those who love the sport,” Ridley said. “We want to emphasize that our future plans are incumbent upon favorable counsel and direction from health officials.” Augusta National closed early this year because of the coronavirus and does not open until October. The bloom of dogwoods and azaleas will give way to fall foliage. Instead of being the second full week in April, it will compete against football. “It feels like in these extraordinary times, we need to do extraordinary things,” said Kevin Kisner, who grew up 20 miles away in Aiken, South Carolina. “We can sacrifice a little bit of our life being perfect.” The PGA Tour has tentatively planned to complete its FedEx Cup season close to schedule, with the Tour Championship finishing on Labor Day. It is contemplating putting tournaments in dates that previously belonged to the U.S. Open, British Open and Olympics. “It’s a complex situation, and we want to balance the commitments to our various partners with playing opportunities for our members — while providing compelling competition to our fans,” PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan said. “But all of that must be done while navigating the unprecedented global crisis that is impacting every single one of us.” The new schedule: — Aug. 6-9: PGA Championship. — Aug. 13-16: End of PGA Tour regular season at Wyndham Championship. — Aug. 20-23: Start of FedEx Cup playoffs at The Northern Trust. — Aug. 27-30: BMW Championship, second playoff event. — Sept. 4-7: Tour Championship for the FedEx Cup. — Sept. 17-20: U.S. Open at Winged Foot. — Sept. 25-27: Ryder Cup at Whistling Straits. It was not immediately clear how the teams from Europe and the United States would be determined for the Ryder Cup, although European captain Padraig Harrington has said he would not be opposed to picking all 12 players. For the 24 players, that means going from what long has been regarded as the toughest test in golf to what has become the most tiresome three days in golf. “It’s definitely better than leaving the Tour Championship and going to France, or leaving the Bahamas to go to Australia,” said Patrick Cantlay, referring to the Americans' most recent Ryder and Presidents cup itineraries. Like everything else, so much remains up in the air until golf get the signal to resume. Gian Paolo Montali, the general director for the 2022 Ryder Cup, said on Italian radio Monday that officials faced a May deadline to postpone the Ryder Cup to odd-numbered years (as it was before the matches were postponed by the Sept. 11 attacks). He described the chances as 50-50. Montali also said players already have vetoed a Ryder Cup without its raucous fans. Other details must be sorted out, such as U.S. Open qualifying. The next tournament on the PGA Tour schedule is Colonial on May 21-24, though that appears unlikely. Ridley said every player who has received invitations to play the Masters in April will stay on the list. He said the Augusta National Women’s Amateur was canceled, and every player can keep their spots for next year provided they don’t turn pro. The U.S. Senior Open at Newport Country Club in Rhode Island and the U.S. Senior Women’s Open at Brooklawn Country Club in Connecticut have been canceled. As for the British Open, Shane Lowry gets to keep the claret jug longer than anyone since Dick Burton, who won in 1939 at St. Andrews in the last Open before World War II. Burton went from “champion golfer of the year” to member of the Royal Air Force. Lowry said in a video tweet he understood and supported the R&A’s decision. “You can trust me when I say the claret jug is going to be in safe hands for another year,” Lowry said. ___ AP Sports Writer Andrew Dampf in Italy contributed to this report......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsApr 7th, 2020Related News