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WATCH: Here’s the Trailer for Netflix Original ‘The Kissing Booth 2’!

Netflix debuts the trailer to The Kissing Booth 2 today. The anticipated film is the sequel to The Kissing Booth, released in 2018. Joey King, Jacob Elordi, Joel Courtney, and Molly Ringwald are all back together in this new film with some new faces. Joining them are Maisie Richardson-Sellers and Taylor Perez. Elle Evans (Joey […].....»»

Source: Metrocebu MetrocebuCategory: NewsJul 8th, 2020Related News

For these athletes, this is a spring break they don t want

By ERIC OLSON AP Sports Writer OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Creighton right-hander Ben Dotzler was supposed to be in the bullpen at TD Ameritrade Park this weekend, readying himself to pitch against Northern Colorado. Molly Little, who plays lacrosse for Denver, expected to be on the road for a much anticipated match against Michigan, the team the Pioneers beat to reach the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament last year. Avrey Steiner thought she would be with her softball teammates for Illinois' first home games of the season against Bowling Green and Green Bay. Everything changed for thousands of college athletes when the NCAA announced Thursday it was canceling all spring sports championships, along with remaining winter championships, because of the coronavirus pandemic. Conferences followed, saying they were temporarily or permanently shutting down their regular seasons. Suddenly, athletes who put in long hours juggling commitments to their sports and academics had lots of free time. And they're miserable. “We didn't work a whole year,” Dotzler said, “to play 15 games.” Little said she woke up at 6:30 every morning to go to the training room to rehab an injury and stretch before lifting weights and running — all before going to a 2 1/2-hour practice and then her classes. “There's nothing that can prepare you for the feeling of your season being done, and it's not because you lost in NCAAs,” Little said. “I spent many hours crying with teammates. You work your whole life to get to this point, to play on this big stage, and to have it taken from you is devastating.” Steiner said she was doing fine emotionally until she started cleaning out her locker Friday. “That really got me,” she said. “A lot of people are going to say, 'Oh, yeah, this is like a week off or getting a couple days off. I guarantee you it's going to hit me and other people in the coming weeks.” Some good news arrived on Friday when the NCAA informed schools that spring athletes would be given another year of eligibility to make up for their lost season. Details must be worked out. States Fort, a senior on the Coastal Carolina men's golf team, hopes to return for another year even though he'll graduate in May. “I would try to make it work with grad courses,” he said. “I would do everything in my power as long as the finances are there. I would love to come back and play with these guys." Not all seniors will be able to take advantage of being granted an extra year. Some already have jobs lined up. Others have been accepted into graduate programs at other schools. There are athletes who currently are on partial scholarships, and they may not be able to afford paying the difference for another year. Though the eligibility extension offers some consolation, it will be impossible for athletes to duplicate the experiences of playing with their 2020 teams. The Richmond women's lacrosse team, for example, was off to a program-best 7-0 start and ranked in the top 20 nationally for the first time since 2008. “We just accelerated into the season and started off so hot,” senior goaltender Megan Gianforte said. "Personally, I thought I was peaking this year. I felt I was in the best condition for this season. That's why I was so excited for it. We brought in so much talent, which helps me defensively. “I'm leaving Richmond now with such unfinished business, knowing all the potential we could have had. I just know how much more we have to give.” Now the spring athletes are left to wonder what they'll do with themselves. “It is just heartbreaking to see these kids face this unfortunate situation,” longtime University of San Francisco baseball coach Nino Giarratano said. “They are too young.” Creighton sophomore Tommy Steier said he and Dotzler, his roommate, have been spending a lot of time hanging out with teammates, rehashing old stories and plotting their immediate futures. Creighton isn't allowing athletes to use the school's training facilities during the shutdown. Baseball players will work out on their own and prepare to join summer teams in a few months — if the summer leagues operate. Fort, the Coastal Carolina golfer, said a temporary sports stoppage would have been more appropriate, followed by a reassessment of the situation. He wishes the NCAA would have waited before canceling championships scheduled for months from now. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. The vast majority of people recover from the virus. “Obviously I'm biased because I play a small outdoor sport where spectators aren't much of an issue,” Fort said. “It was kind of quick and a little rash and short-sighted on the NCAA's part, especially to blanket cancel all sports. "I can understand basketball. That's a spectator sport where you have a ton of people constantly rubbing shoulders. I can almost understand baseball. But sports like (men's) volleyball, softball, golf and lacrosse don't have as much of a pronounced fan base.” Creighton's baseball team was busing back to Omaha from Minnesota on Thursday when the players' Twitter feeds started showing conference basketball tournaments being canceled. An hour after the players got home they received a text telling them to return to campus for a meeting. Steier and Dotzler said everyone sensed what was coming. As coach Ed Servais broke the news, seniors, who wouldn't know for another 24 hours they would be allowed to come back next year, broke into tears. “It was hard to see all of them knowing they were losing what they love to do,” Steier said. Gianforte, the Richmond lacrosse goalie, said she and her teammates had a feeling as early as Wednesday afternoon their season might be in jeopardy. That's when the Ivy League announced it was closing down spring sports. “I think the other conferences were feeling some peer pressure,” she said. Then the NBA announced Wednesday night it was suspending its season. “That," Gianforte said, “is when we knew we were goners.” ___ AP Sports Writer Janie McCauley in San Francisco contributed to this report......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMar 15th, 2020Related News

World Cup champion women pushed: Could they beat German men?

By RONALD BLUM AP Sports Writer Carli Lloyd was pushed over and over on differences between women and men. "Do you think the women's national team could beat the German men's team?" U.S. Soccer Federation lawyer Noah Finkel asked during a Dec. 20 deposition. "I'm not sure," the two-time FIFA Player of the Year replied. Finkel inquired about a 2015 email interview Lloyd conducted through her agent's assistant with the website Sportskeeda. "You wrote men are faster and stronger, right?" Finkel probed. "Yeah, if you take those away, yeah, it would be a contest," Lloyd said. Again and again, members of the champion U.S. women's team were pushed to detail distinctions between their sport, which they dominate, and the men's game, where the Americans struggle. Lawyers for the USSF are trying to show it's OK to pay the women differently than the men because the competition is different. The sides made excerpts of depositions public in court filings Thursday night. "The tone during depositions is reflective of the kind of condescension that many USSF officials employ when talking to the players about pay and workplace conditions," said Molly Levinson, spokeswoman for the players, "including the plainly disrespectful and sexist attitudes from USSF and their representatives during CBA negotiations when they refused to offer anything close to equal pay." The women sued last year, alleging the USSF violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Pay Act of 1963 in reaching what they say is an inferior collective bargaining agreement with the women than the deal struck with the American men. They are seeking more than $66 million in damages. The federation maintains the women have many benefits the men lack, including guaranteed salaries, health insurance, paid child-care assistance, pregnancy and parental leave, severance pay and access to a 401(k) retirement plan. Men get paid by the game and tournament, most earning the majority of their income from their club. Reigning FIFA Player of the Year Megan Rapinoe was questioned about her response in an interview she gave to Pod Save America in which she said: "Our pay structure is different. We play different games. We're different rankings in the world. Like, it's just apples to oranges." The USSF said that from fiscal year 2009 through fiscal year 2019, the women's national team had gross revenue of $101.3 million for 238 games, an average of $425,446, and the men grossed $185.7 million for 191 matches, an average of $972,147. The women had a $27.6 million net loss over 11 years and the men lost $3.13 million. "The international soccer environment in which the MNT players compete is far more competitive by many measures than that in which plaintiffs compete," the USSF said in one of its papers filed with the court. "The MNT players have lower odds of succeeding in the face of such greater competition. In short, MNT players must achieve more and/or better results against tougher competition in order to qualify for, and succeed in, tournament competition." Barring a settlement, the trial is scheduled to start May 5 in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. The women's five-year labor deal runs through 2021 while the men play under the terms of a contract that expired Dec. 31. During her deposition on Jan. 15, former U.S. coach Jill Ellis testified she was told the men got chartered flights at times and the women didn't. The USSF spent about $10.7 million on hotels for the men and approximately $7.3 milllion on the women during the fiscal years 2012-20. Air travel was about $6.3 million for the women during that period and $14.3 million for the men, many of whom play in Europe. The USSF increased first- and business-class travel for the women in 2017. Speaking during her Dec. 20 deposition, Lloyd talked about personally training with the Medford Strikers' under-18 boys team in New Jersey.  "It's different in the sense that men are bigger, stronger, faster. That's their makeup. There's no -- there's no denying science in that regard," she said. "But I am the most skillful player there. So if you take their speed and athleticism and their strength away, it's the same game." Former USSF President Sunil Gulati, speaking during a Dec. 17 deposition, used a comparison with an NBA star to point out differences. "LeBron James doesn't get a bonus for getting 15 points and for the Lakers finishing out of the playoffs," he said. “The expectations for him are different based on who they're playing against, what — who he is, what the level is.”.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsFeb 22nd, 2020Related News

'LondonFashionWeek: Dresses flow for Beckham, billow for Goddard, and more standout silhouettes

From Victoria Beckham’s flowing dresses to Molly Goddard’s airy creations in tulle, London Fashion Week, ending Tuesday has rolled out some standout new silhouettes. Goddard’s billowing dresses Jodie Comer, the actor who plays Villanelle, the assassin and “fashion victim” of the hit television series “Killing Eve”, made a mark when she kicked off Goddard’s show […] The post #LondonFashionWeek: Dresses flow for Beckham, billow for Goddard, and more standout silhouettes appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: NewsSep 16th, 2019Related News

Athletes using power of the selfie to clean sports of doping

BOSTON — It resembles the symbol for infinity: a sideways "S'' that Kara Goucher, Molly Huddle and other elite US athletes suddenly are sporting on biceps, w.....»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: WorldNov 19th, 2016Related News

US wants Duterte’s ‘separation’ pledge clarified

U.S. Embassy press attaché Molly Koscina said in an email to Manila Bulletin that they have yet to hear from the Philippine government what Duterte’s remarks on “separation” might mean, adding that “it is creating unnecessary u.....»»

Source: Mb.com.ph Mb.com.phCategory: NewsOct 21st, 2016Related News