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Report: Jordan Clarkson signs $52M extension with Utah Jazz

A free agent this offseason, Clarkson and the team agreed to a four-year, $52M contract with the Jazz where he made an impact until the squad's push in the post season......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: SportsNov 21st, 2020Related News

Pari sapol ng virus, simbahan ni-lockdown

Pinag-utos ni Jordan, Guimaras Mayor Ruben Corpuz ang pansamantalang pagsara ng isang simbahan sa kanilang lugar matapos na dapuan ang isang 64-anyos na pari ng COVID-19. The post Pari sapol ng virus, simbahan ni-lockdown first appeared on Abante......»»

Source: Abante AbanteCategory: NewsNov 19th, 2020Related News

Actor Micheal B. Jordan is this year’s ‘Sexiest Man Alive’

  CEBU CITY, Philippines— PEOPLE magazine has named this year’s Sexiest Man Alive. Nope, it is not your husband or boyfriend. But it is almost every girl’s dream guy, actor Michael B. Jordan. The 33-year-old actor played Erik “Killmonger” in the 2018 film Black Panther, which made him even more popular. In his interview with […] The post Actor Micheal B. Jordan is this year’s ‘Sexiest Man Alive’ appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: NewsNov 18th, 2020Related News

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsNov 15th, 2020Related News

Major floods in Manila as Vamco batters Philippines

Major floods in Manila as Vamco batters Philippines Jordan Times.....»»

Source: Manilanews ManilanewsCategory: NewsNov 13th, 2020Related News

Gloc-9 ibinebenta ang Air Jordan collection para sa mga biktima ni Ulysses

PARA makatulong sa mga nasalanta ng Bagyong Ulysses, ipinagbebenta na ng rapper-songwriter na si Gloc-9 ang ilan sa koleksyon niya ng sapatos. Ayon kay Gloc-9 o Aristotle Pollisco sa tunay na buhay, mas mabuting pakinabangan na lang ito ng ibang tao at maging pera para mai-donate niya sa mga kababayan nating nawalan ng bahay at […] The post Gloc-9 ibinebenta ang Air Jordan collection para sa mga biktima ni Ulysses appeared first on Bandera......»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: NewsNov 13th, 2020Related News

Seattle s Morris, Lodeiro among five MVP finalists

Seattle Sounders teammates Jordan Morris and Nicolas Lodeiro were among the five finalists announced Wednesday for the 2020 Landon Donovan MLS Most Valuable Player award. Joining the Seattle duo are.....»»

Source: Manilanews ManilanewsCategory: NewsNov 12th, 2020Related News

Kamala Harris’s husband Doug Emhoff to be first ‘second gentleman’

When Kamala Harris makes history as the first woman and first Black US vice president, her husband Doug Emhoff will break his own new ground: as the original “second husband.” Media and entertainment lawyer Douglas Emhoff is seen here with his wife Kamala Harris after she took part in the vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City, Utah on October 27, 2020; he will make history as America’s first “second husband” (AFP/ MANILA BULLETIN) Harris and Emhoff, who married in 2014 — she for the first time, he for the second — will also be the first mixed-race couple to occupy their positions. He is white while she is the daughter of Indian and Jamaican immigrants. Both are 56. The contours of Emhoff’s new role as the nation’s “second husband” — some prefer “second gentleman” — have yet to be determined; he has been vague about his plans so far.  Traditionally, the spouses of presidents and vice presidents have been expected to forge a careful balance of supportiveness and independence. Many pick a charitable cause to promote. Emhoff, who was credited as a “secret weapon” on the campaign trail for his wife — even earning his own following on social media — is an accomplished lawyer specializing in media, sports and entertainment law. He took leave in August from the multinational DLA Piper, which has lobbying offices in Washington. That could raise prickly conflicts of interest with Harris’s work. Emhoff has been publicly vague about whether he will stay with the firm, though he ha stold interviewers he might want to pursue pro bono legal work. Emhoff marks another milestone: he would be the first Jew to be part of America’s first or second families. Friends have described him as a less-than-observant Jew but one who identifies strongly with, and is deeply shaped by, Judaism.  The Jewish publication Forward embraced him as the “Second Mensch.” When its reporter asked Emhoff’s mother Barbara about his religious upbringing, she was coy, but offered: “He was bar mitzvahed in New Jersey, I can tell you that.” Born in Brooklyn and raised in New Jersey, he is said to have happy memories of Jewish summer camp, where he won athletic awards. While in high school, his father moved the family to Los Angeles. Emhoff earned a law degree at the University of Southern California, then worked at other law firms before reaching DLA Piper. When Emhoff met Harris on a blind date arranged by friends, it was “love at first sight,” he later said.  His children by his first marriage — Cole, named after John Coltrane, and Ella, named after Ella Fitzgerald — have embraced their stepmother as “Momala.”  Emhoff’s ex-wife Kerstin Mackin remains friendly and even joins the family at Thanksgiving. The “second husband-elect,” incidentally, shares one thing with Donald Trump: both are avid golfers.  .....»»

Source: Mb.com.ph Mb.com.phCategory: NewsNov 8th, 2020Related News

Rafael Nadal charges into Paris quarters

PARIS—Top seed Rafa Nadal was forced to save a set point before overcoming Australian Jordan Thompson 6-1 7-6(3) on Thursday to reach the Paris Masters quarterfinals. A day after becoming the fourth player in the Open Era to record 1,000 tour-level wins, Nadal resumed his pursuit of a maiden Paris-Bercy title and broke Thompson’s serve […] The post Rafael Nadal charges into Paris quarters appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: NewsNov 6th, 2020Related News

Coke PH expands Balik Pinas program for repatriated OFWs

Coca-Cola Beverages Philippines, Inc. (CCBPI)—the bottling arm of Coca-Cola in the country—has expanded its Balik Pinas program to national scale to reach more repatriated overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) and help them start their own business at home. Gareth McGeown, CCBPI President and CEO. “Coca-Cola’s commitment to Filipinos has only grown stronger, in weathering this crisis together,” said Gareth McGeown, CCBPI President and CEO. “We will help and support where we can. Through Balik Pinas, our goal is to help repatriated OFWs who have lost their livelihood abroad to start anew, via owning and operating their own business and be successful here, at home, with their families.” With the help of the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), CCBPI aims to reach more OFWs who are interested to start their own business through Balik Pinas. Data from the Department of Foreign Affairs show that as of September 2020, over 190,000 overseas Filipino workers have been repatriated. Balik Pinas gives opportunities to OFWs to be part of the Coca-Cola family as a distributor, wholesaler, or a community reseller. Balik Pinas is a journey that the company and new entrepreneurs take together at every step—from setting up the business, to sustaining it, to ensuring growth. Coca-Cola assists former OFWs in choosing a suitable business model for their area, helps in managing their cash flow and inventory, and sees to it that they are given proper guidance and training until they are fully ready and equipped to operate on their own—all in all, a sustainable and profitable business founded on practical support from a global beverage brand. According to Carlos Rivera, CCBPI Territory Sales Team in Naga City, the Balik Pinas Program started as a small-scale initiative in Naga City to help former OFWs. Just a couple of months after returning home, Carlos Manzano and his family was able to set up their business as Coca-Cola distributor through the Balik Pinas Program, which Carlos said has reshaped his life and outlook forever. IN PHOTO: Carlos and their family’s multi-cab routing unit with the Coca-Cola Naga Sales team. When the program’s pilot rollout started, the Manzanos—brothers Carlos and Jazz, and their father Lito—were among the pioneer members. Carlos and Jazz had both been working for several years in Qatar until the COVID-19 pandemic shook the trajectory of their career and, consequently, the well-being of their families. Together with their father, Lito, who also used to be an overseas worker, they set up a beverage distribution business in their hometown Naga City. Their optimism, as with any new business venture, was tempered with anxiety over how it would all turn out—especially with the considerable challenge of launching during such tenuous times until Rivera offered them membership to the Balik Pinas Program of Coca-Cola. Now, the Manzanos are running a profitable business as Coca-Cola distributors. “Even when I had to leave Qatar suddenly because of the lay-offs, I always envisioned that I would head back to work there when things settle. But with Coca-Cola’s Balik Pinas, I have a livelihood that doesn’t take me away from my family as being an OFW had,” said Carlos.  Lito can still remember his first order of 60 cases of Coke products. Now, the Manzano  family business has grown to an average of 4,000 cases a month, just five months after they started—a feat magnified for it being in the middle of a pandemic and strict quarantine measures. The Manzanos have also since invested in routing units to augment their business’s capabilities—a multicab and a tricycle. Since starting his business in 2019, Billy Belleza (left), is now one of the prominent Coca-Cola distributors in his area and has added another mini truck to serve more routes and deliveries. Billy is one of the pioneers of Coca-Cola’s Balik Pinas program. Another Balik Pinas program pioneer member is Billy Belleza who decided to return to the country after working for 20 years in Brunei. “I am really thankful that Coca-Cola reached out to me to be a part of this. They have never failed to present opportunities for me and my business to grow since I decided to take part in the Balik Pinas Program. My sales actually soared this year,” said Belleza, who is also based in Naga City. According to Rivera, Balik Pinas Program was really designed for returning OFWs like Billy, Carlos, and Jazz and their families to set up and run a viable business at home. “With their success and in light of current events, this program was expanded to operate on a national scale, so the company can lend assistance to repatriated OFWs and their families as they weather through new challenges brought on by the pandemic,” Rivera said. Coca-Cola has consistently sought to create programs to support MSMEs, more so now with the COVID-19 pandemic having disrupted countless lives and livelihoods. With programs like Balik Pinas, Coca-Cola remains firm in their commitment to help local communities, contributing to the restart of the national economy—by way of reaching out to Filipinos.  To know more about the program, you may reach Coca-Cola’s contact center at (02)-8813-COKE (2653). For SMART/PLDT users: toll-free number: 1800-1888-COKE (2653); and for GLOBE users: toll-free number: 1800-8888-COKE (2653). You may also contact 0919-160-COKE (2653) via SMS......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: LifestyleOct 24th, 2020Related News

Jordan, LeBron nganga kay Sexton

WALA si LeBron James sa top 5 NBA players of all time ni Cavaliers sophomore guard Collin Sexton. The post Jordan, LeBron nganga kay Sexton first appeared on Abante......»»

Source: Abante AbanteCategory: NewsOct 23rd, 2020Related News

Ageless through the years

In the NBA, there have been 30 players who saw action when they were over 40, including Michael Jordan, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili, Dirk Nowitzki, John Stockton, Karl Malone, Grant Hill, Jason Kidd and Steve Nash......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: SportsOct 20th, 2020Related News

LeBron improves case as & lsquo;Goat& rsquo;

Los Angeles, United States---As the first player to lead three different teams to NBA titles, LeBron James has revived the question of whether he or Michael Jordan is the league’s greatest-ever superstar......»»

Source: Thestandard ThestandardCategory: SportsOct 16th, 2020Related News

Suns Monty Williams: Sotto, Green could pave NBA path for Filipino cagers

The first-year head coach, who led the Suns to a perfect 7-0 outing in the NBA bubble, believes that Sotto's accomplishment, along with those of Filipino-Americans like Jalen Green and even Jordan Clarkson, may give way to bigger opportunities for Filipinos in the NBA......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: SportsOct 9th, 2020Related News

Yemenis return home after mercy flight to Jordan

Yemenis who were airlifted to Jordan to undergo treatment for critical illnesses earlier this year were brought home on Sunday on a flight into the rebel-held capital Sanaa, the United Nations said......»»

Source: Thestandard ThestandardCategory: NewsOct 5th, 2020Related News

Ronaldo rescues a point for Juventus at Roma

Cristiano Ronaldo scored twice to salvage a point for 10-man Juventus in a 2-2 draw at Roma as Napoli hammered Genoa 6-0 in Serie A on Sunday. Champions Juventus were trailing 2-1 and a man down after an hour at the Stadio Olimpico after a Jordan Veretout brace for the hosts and Adrien Rabiot’s sending […] The post Ronaldo rescues a point for Juventus at Roma appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: NewsSep 29th, 2020Related News

Air Jordan 35 officially unveiled

The latest shoe pays homage to the Air Jordan 5, first released 30 years ago, with nods to the decades-old shoe through the Air Jordan 35's shoe tongue design and heel molding......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: SportsSep 26th, 2020Related News

Jordan buys NASCAR team; recruits Wallace to be lead driver

Los Angeles—Basketball icon Michael Jordan announced Monday he has purchased a NASCAR Cup series charter team and recruited trailblazing black driver Bubba Wallace to race for the new outfit next season......»»

Source: Thestandard ThestandardCategory: SportsSep 22nd, 2020Related News

Ateneo Blue Eagles tap Fil-Am guard as recruiting spree goes on

Koon, 19, will join Fil-Iltalian Gab Gomez and Fil-Kiwi Jordan Perez as Ateneo's latest overseas recruits along with local catches Dave Ildefonso and Forthsky Padrigao......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: SportsSep 11th, 2020Related News

What Sayaw ng Buhay means for a self-confessed ‘old soul’

While he listens to the latest music from different genres such as R&B, ballad and jazz, Vincent Jao III always finds himself going back to the classics......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsSep 9th, 2020Related News