Advertisements


No kidding: Video calls with goats boost British farm

Blackburn, United Kingdom — A British farmer came up with a jokey idea to rent out her goats to liven up video call meetings — and found an unexpected source of lockdown income. The floppy-eared goats glance curiously as farmer Dot McCarthy holds up a mobile phone to film them eating hay and prancing around […] The post No kidding: Video calls with goats boost British farm appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: NewsFeb 11th, 2021Related News

They are saving Cubans lost on the island for 33 days; They survived by eating coconuts and mice

The three Cubans who were rescued from an uninhabited island in the archipelago of the Atlantic Ocean in the Bahamas, where 33 days passed and.....»»

Source: Thedailyguardian ThedailyguardianCategory: NewsFeb 11th, 2021Related News

Missing man found in bush after 18 days

A man who went missing more than two weeks ago in Australian bushland has been found alive, apparently surviving his ordeal by “drinking dam water and eating mushrooms,” authorities said Sunday......»»

Source: Thestandard ThestandardCategory: NewsJan 24th, 2021Related News

Eating octopus

By KIM ATIENZA   ATING ALAMIN: Favorite ko po sa Japanese restaurant ang okonomiyaki. Gawa raw po ito sa octopus. Hindi ko po alam na edible pala ito. Alam nyo bang ang isang octopus ay kayang magluwal ng 56,000 eggs at one time? Inaalagaan ng mother octopus ang kanyang mga itlog sa loob ng anim na […].....»»

Source: Tempo TempoCategory: NewsJan 21st, 2021Related News

Ma, what’s on my plate?

THE WEEKEND READER: This submitted essay proposes an alternative way of living this new year, with a mind set to be more international and conscious of what we do—beginning with what we eat By Khennan John Suarez The year 2020 has been… unhealthy. But if there’s one thing we were given a chance for, it’s to take a harder look at our lifestyles in retrospect. For some, myself included, this means becoming more conscious of the food that goes into my body. The advancement in nutritionism over the past 20 years has changed the way we look at our plates. Once colorful meals that consisted of “go, grow, and glow” staples are now replaced with single, nutrient-packed breakfast bars coupled with energy drinks endorsed by the influencer-of-the-week. One would think that all these diet bars, and pills, would’ve transformed people healthier, with lifestyle diseases kept at bay. Sadly, this remains a dream today as it was 10 years ago. (Manila Bulletin/Unsplash) Data from WHO, CDC, and UN reveal that some of the top killer diseases in our country are attributed to lifestyle. And while life expectancy has increased over the past decade, so have cases of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and stroke. This fact raises more questions in nutrition. Despite crazy fads that promise longevity, what are we doing wrong? It makes sense to start a closer examination of what goes into our bodies. In An Eater’s Manifesto—highly recommended!—by Sam Pollan, there is a mantra that could be an ultimate guide to eating better. Eat food. And by this, he means eat whole food. For a beat, let’s forget about these canned goods, boxed cereals, processed fruit juices, and everything with ingredients we can’t even pronounce. Let’s forget about the most recent trend in nutrition and trace back to what our bodies (and our ancestors’ bodies) instinctively know as good food—whole grains, fresh fruits, and vegetables, sizeable portions of animal meats, milk, nuts, and all other products that are organic. Food products that are as close to their most natural forms as possible. Let’s assemble our plates in a way that pushes highly processed and artificial products away from it, whenever we can. For as hard as science has been working to understand nutrition better, and until we eventually come up with a “fountain-of-youth” pill, there remain cellular processes that we are yet to discover. For the meantime, it makes more sense to stick with natural basics. (Manila Bulletin/Unsplash) It’s also quite notable to know that while nutritionists still argue about which diet is best for us, they can all agree that plants do not kill us. Becoming more in tune with our nutrition is also an opportunity to start building relations to our farmers, and ask how produce is grown. Is the ground healthy? Are they showered with chemicals? Are the animals that supplied our food well-fed? This even raises ethical questions as to how they were raised and slaughtered. This strengthens the relationships we have with people that grow our food, our connection to our community, and the relationship we have with the earth around us. After all, nutrition is just a portion of more complex symbiotic relationship bigger than all of us. With the dawn of a new year, it pays that we become more intentional and more conscious of what we do. And today, we can start by asking, “Ma, what’s on my plate?” About the author: Khennan John is a 20-something health enthusiast with a knack for writing. The Weekend Reader is a Sunday submission segment of Manila Bulletin Lifestyle Arts + Culture. Those who wish to submit their essays for the Weekend Reader may do so via email: mblifestyleonline@gmail.com. As subject of the email, write WEEKEND READER followed by the title of your essay. The opinions and views expressed in The Weekend Reader are of the respective authors and not of the Manila Bulletin......»»

Source: Mb.com.ph Mb.com.phCategory: NewsJan 17th, 2021Related News

QC local gov t reverts limit for persons allowed outdoors to ages 18-65

“For most of us, especially families with younger children, we have to forego some of our Christmas traditions like traveling and eating out together. But in exchange, this will give us peace of mind as we’ll remain safe and COVID-free,” said Belmonte......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsDec 6th, 2020Related News

Galvez proposes more restrictions for passengers of public vehicles

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 19 November) – Eating, talking and using of mobile phones on public transport should be prohibited to control the spread of the coronavirus disease, National Task Force Covid-19 chief implementer Carlito Galvez said. Galvez, speaking at the meeting of the Coordinated Operations to Defeat Epidemic (CODE) Team in Camp Quintin Merecido of […].....»»

Source: Mindanews MindanewsCategory: NewsNov 20th, 2020Related News

Food once made only for senator’s guests can now be enjoyed by many

Bettina Osmeña learned how to prepare authentic spaghetti carbonara from Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida, no less. Kapampangan mother, and food reigned supreme in our household. Way before traffic became a Metro Manila plague, we would drive all over Manila for family food trips. When I turned 17, my mom decided that eating well was not […].....»»

Source: Balita BalitaCategory: NewsNov 20th, 2020Related News

DA-10: Support local farmers by buying, eating local products

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY, Nov. 11 (PIA)-Emphasizing strength in supporting local farmers to attain rice security through buying and eating local products, the Department of Agriculture (DA)-10 kicked of.....»»

Source: Manilanews ManilanewsCategory: NewsNov 12th, 2020Related News

DA-10: Support local farmers by buying, eating local products

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY, Nov. 11 (PIA)-Emphasizing strength in supporting local farmers to attain rice security through buying and eating local products, the Department of Agriculture (DA)-10 kicked of.....»»

Source: Philippinetimes PhilippinetimesCategory: NewsNov 12th, 2020Related News

To sleep, perchance to dream

Having difficulty drifting into sweet slumber? Listen to Dr. Roland dela Eva, sleep disorders specialist......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsOct 26th, 2020Related News

Alex Gonzaga, her parents, and fiancé Mikee recover from Covid-19

Despite plans that have been cancelled, the actress is still grateful for many things Earlier today, Alex Gonzaga shared an intimate and very personal documentary video of how life was the past three weeks since they found out that she and her parents, fiancé Mikee, and one household help Sophie, were infected with Covid-19.  She was contemplating if she should share how life was when Covid-19 hit them, and decided that she should, “so you can learn from our mistakes and to give you hope so that you know you can get better.” She started off by revealing that the virus infected their family because a member went out to buy food. The first one who got infected was her mom Pinty, and thankfully, both parents were asymptomatic.  It was her and Mikee who had it worse, and Alex was able to document how she felt on a daily basis and put it out in her vlog. She started with day three where one can see her crying, “My plans were ruined. I wanted to get married with my family and a few friends, so I needed to change my plans. I also have a new show, but I couldn’t attend. For the next two weeks, I’ll be staying here at home.” On the fourth day, she admitted that she was emotional because so many of her plans didn’t push through, including attending the birthday of her one and only nephew Seve. “Right now, no one leaves the house,” she added that it’s also important to take lots of rest, drink fluids, and take Vitamin C. She also shared the symptoms she was experiencing that time such as feeling weak, slight fever (37.7C), sore throat, loss of appetite, clogged nose, and loss of taste. They also taped a sheet of plastic over on each of the rooms so that they would not leave their rooms. Both her parents are also staying in different rooms. Thankfully, her sister Toni and family, along with her friends, tested negative.  On the fifth day, she didn’t have the appetite to eat and her mom suggested that she should go to the hospital but Mikee recommended to stay at home since things might worsen if she went to the hospital. She also started taking Melatonin, so that she can sleep better and get her much needed rest. True enough, on the sixth day, she woke up at around 10a.m. For the next few days, she added other ways to boost her immunity by eating more protein, opening the curtains and taking in the sun and savoring its warmth. She also kept an oxygenator by her side so she could check her oxygen level. On the eighth day, she was slightly back to normal except that she got tired more often. On the tenth day, she started getting emotional again, but felt very blessed. “God healed us, and my parents didn’t experience any symptoms, even if they’re senior citizens,” she continues. “And it just dawned on me that we survived Covid-19.” They had everyone, including the whole house staff, tested on the 15th day for Covid-19, with the negative results for everyone, even Mikee. It’s been three weeks and she shares in her vlog that she’s happy to be back and happy that they survived Covid-19 as a family. “You can survive Covid-19. Don’t panic. Consult with your doctor and really take care of your body. Boost your immune system. Drink your vitamins. Gargle with salt and water, and take lots of rest,” she reminds her viewers. “We should stop thinking about ourselves, we should really start thinking about others. It’s not about you, but the people around you. So that we can avoid infecting people during this pandemic.”.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: LifestyleOct 24th, 2020Related News

Johnny Manahan s daughter Juana advocates healthy eating in new cook book

“This cookbook is the next step, as a tool to reach even more people and as a way to keep the recipes handy,” said Juana who disclosed her creative vegetable dishes in the project to get more Filipinos excited about local produce.  .....»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsOct 22nd, 2020Related News

Literary Fiesta

Filipino dining in Philippine literature Pahiyas festival, illustration by Manuel Baldemor It’s not Pinoy dining if it’s not a feast. And our Philippine literature has told many stories that illustrate our healthy appetite, traditional palayok (clay pot) cooking, siesta, fiesta, flavors, and fusions.  Doña Victorina fans herself amid the smoke of a roasting pig. Her guests are coming, their noses up in the air sniffing the flavors. On the table, adorned with gilded copa de vino (wine glass) and plato, are sinigang na dalag with alibambang leaves, callos, adobo, tinola, and pochero. Everybody was in high spirits. Never mind if the doña is broke (to begin with). At least her guests are full. Jose Rizal drew a perfect picture of the Pinoy fiesta and salu-salo (gathering) culture. Our national hero himself loves to eat. He prefers a hefty serving of champorado and tuyo for breakfast. For dessert, he likes minatamis na santol (sweetened santol) made from boiled santol slices soaked for three days in hugas bigas (water used to wash rice). Before starving in Europe, where he published El Filibusterismo, Rizal would feast in carneng asada (beefsteak with sauce), made from lean meat marinated in olive oil, lime juice, and parsley and served with fried potatoes. Gabriela Silang loved pinakbet. Emilio Aguinaldo listed sardines with tomatoes among his favorites. Marcelo H. del Pilar would die (pun intended) for his apparent favorite, pochero, the local version of the Spanish cocido. Andres Bonifacio got his strength and protein source in nilitsong manok sa zaha (grilled chicken wrapped in sampaloc and banana leaves). The Filipino salu-salo Never mind if some of our celebrated dishes are not “purely” Pinoy. “What is Filipino food and how does food become Filipino?” asks the late food critic Doreen Fernandez. She argued that food only became Pinoy by process of indigenization, like patis (fish sauce) put in a foreign dish. And this is how Pinoy fusion came to life. What we have on our modern plates are many fusions, crazy or ingenious, like paella with lechon, sinigang na steak, adobong tapa, pancit with kangkong. Yes, you get the picture.  Could their favorite Filipino flavors be the reason behind the intelligence and nationalism of our heroes Rizal and Bonifacio? Too bad, many young Pinoys nowadays barely know what minatamis na santol is, or any Pinoy traditional merienda for that matter. What replaced maruya, nilagang kamote, turon, kutsinta, and ginataang mais are French fries, burger, pizza, and pasta. You know what they say: You are what you eat.   In another table setting, Padre Damaso looks across the dining table. Everybody’s enjoying tinola, a stew of chicken and green papaya, but not him. Who wants chicken neck for lunch? He didn’t finish his plate. And this, people, was how the concepts of degustation and small plates were born. They’re not, after all, a French discovery or New York’s. We can blame our mañaña habit. We’re too slow to grab the credit. And oh, we are pioneers of the culture of not finishing plates, too. Blame these all to Padre Damaso (or Jose Rizal?). The tinola brouhaha scene in Noli Me Tangere started it all.  Lechon haus mural by boonsai While it’s rude in other cultures not to devour all the food served on the plate, in the Philippines, it’s not. Pinoy eating tradition tells you it’s okay to have leftovers. Telenovela , movies, and literature are great examples. When a family fights over the dining table, the father (or any member) walks away with an unfinished plate. In Ibong Adarna, over a scrumptious dinner, the brothers were all too busy planning how to catch the elusive bird that they forgot to finish their plate.       Besides books, paintings also tell our delicious food experience. Fernando Amorsolo captured Pinoy eating habits in his painting Afternoon Meal of the Rice Workers. It shows Pinoy families cooking meals in a palayok and eating under the shade of a tree, seemingly ready to sleep after an afternoon feast. With all the food trends coming and going on our plates and literature pages flying off to oblivion, what remains steadfast in our eating habit is this: Siesta. –NICKKY FAUSTINE P. DE GUZMAN.....»»

Source: Mb.com.ph Mb.com.phCategory: NewsOct 18th, 2020Related News

What do you think?

THROUGH UNTRUE Fr. Rolando V. dela Rosa, O.P.  Do you know that the constant flapping of a butterfly’s wings can cause a powerful typhoon elsewhere? According to chaos theory, seemingly insignificant and random happenings can have earthshaking effects. If the theory is correct, then even our most randomly stupid decisions may have caused all the maladies afflicting us and our country today. History has shown that the destiny of individuals and nations was sometimes determined, not by elaborate plans and decisions, but by little acts of stupidity, like Adam and Eve eating a forbidden fruit, Judas selling Christ for 30 pieces of silver, or Mary Antoinette telling her people to eat cake instead of bread. In an age where the Internet reigns supreme, stupidity has risen to the level of an epidemic because of our diminishing desire to think. Millions of people today use the computer to do the thinking for them. If they want to learn about something, they do not retreat into a quiet corner to speculate about it.  They Google and, in milliseconds, harvest a bounty of information.  But  since the computer cannot teach us how to systematize, analyze, and synthesize these data into a meaningful whole, the result of this operation is not knowledge or understanding, but data overload. The pandemic has worsened this situation. Face-to-face teaching has been replaced by online lectures. A teacher transmits lessons from her gadget to that of her student. Ideally, such lessons should pass through the student’s brain before these are saved in the latter’s laptop.  But what usually happens is,  teachers tend to act like fax machines. They evaluate their students based on the latter’s ability to repeat, word-for-word, everything the teacher says. Instead of encouraging students to think, this system suppresses creativity and logical thought. Television also contributes greatly to the gradual demise of serious thinking. Do you know that less than 5 percent of the adult population read books? A great number derive their knowledge from the Internet, radio, and newspapers, but the rest rely heavily on television, an entertainment medium and a boredom-killing machine. Ask young people how they came to know a particular idea.  Their predictable answer is: “I saw it on TV.” Many people believe that television can verify, falsify, justify, or nullify, any notion, rumor, or issue. We are often told: “Keep an open mind,” and we follow the advice literally. Every day we allow news programs to flood our mind with crimes, disasters, and human misery. Instead of helping us think, they push us to worry about problems that are too big for us to handle, generating needless anxiety and anger. The thinking individual is fast disappearing. The world is inhabited by two billion cabled, cellphoned, and earphoned couch potatoes who are mere statistics in the latest TV survey for higher ratings. What separates us from the brutes is our God-given ability to think. Through this human software, we come to know reality, understand its meaning, and arrange its varying aspects according to a well-established hierachy of values. The neglect of thinking leads to irrationality and social chaos. So, wake up, couch potatoes, computer slaves, and cell phone addicts! A truly free person is one who has the freedom to think, not the freedom FROM thinking......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: LifestyleOct 18th, 2020Related News

Around 3.6 million Filipinos suffering from mental disorders — DOH

MANILA, Philippines — Some 3.6 million Filipinos are suffering from mental disorders amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, according to a Department of Health (DOH) survey. The survey, which was presented by DOH National Mental Health Program head Frances Prescila Cuevas in a recent online press briefing, showed that at least 3.6 million Filipinos are […] The post Around 3.6 million Filipinos suffering from mental disorders — DOH appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: NewsOct 14th, 2020Related News

3.6 million Pinoys suffer from mental disorders – DOH survey

Around 3.6 million Filipinos are suffering from mental disorders amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to initial results of a Department of Health survey......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsOct 13th, 2020Related News

Making new sports traditions with LG technology

It is a well-known fact that Filipino families love watching sports. It has actually become a tradition for most – catching live basketball games, trying to get a glimpse or a selfie with your favorite player together with the kids, and eating out at a favorite restaurant after. It is a wholesome ritual that creates unforgettable memories. With the pandemic however, this tradition abruptly came to a halt for most families. Sporting events are slowly starting to resume, but actually watching it live especially with little ones are still out of the picture. This however, doesn’t mean that the bonding time as a family has to go away. LG’s OLED TVs make watching sports and movies at home in the new normal just like the real thing......»»

Source: Thestandard ThestandardCategory: SportsSep 29th, 2020Related News

Brain-eating amoeba kills Texas boy

The governor of Texas has issued a disaster declaration after the death of six-year-old boy infected with a brain-eating amoeba that was later found in his community’s water supply. The child died on 8 September  following an infection caused by the amoeba Naegleria fowleri, a microscopic organism that breeds in the warm, fresh water of […] The post Brain-eating amoeba kills Texas boy appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Source: Tribune TribuneCategory: NewsSep 29th, 2020Related News

Eating out

A mother and her daughter are letting their hair grow long as they work from home during the pandemic......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsSep 27th, 2020Related News