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World body opposes ‘vaccine tourism’

Developed economies are asked to refrain from using their surplus of vaccines to attract tourists to visit their countries, as this may risk the recovery of travel in developing nations struggling to purchase doses......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMay 17th, 2021

WHO approves Sinopharm’s Covid-19 vaccine for emergency use  

The World Health Organization (WHO) has granted emergency approval for the anti-coronavirus vaccine made by Chinese state-owned firm Sinopharm, making it the first non-Western manufacturer to win the body’s backing. The WHO announced on Saturday that Sinopharm’s jab met its criteria for emergency use — a signal to national regulators worldwide that the product is safe and […] The post WHO approves Sinopharm’s Covid-19 vaccine for emergency use   appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsMay 8th, 2021

India’s curb on Covid jab exports ‘problematic’ for Africa: official

India’s decision to slow coronavirus vaccine exports will make it difficult for Africa to hit its year-end vaccination goal, the head of the continent’s disease control body said Thursday. Dubbed the “pharmacy of the world,” India announced last week it was putting the brakes on exporting Covid-19 vaccines as it battled a new wave of […] The post India’s curb on Covid jab exports ‘problematic’ for Africa: official appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsApr 1st, 2021

Vaccine passports divide world

PARIS, France — The idea of vaccine passports, which would allow people who have been inoculated the freedom to travel, is gaining traction. While some countries trumpet them as a way out for the hard-hit tourism and airline industries, others are more skeptical with only a tiny percentage of the world’s population vaccinated. As European Union leaders […] The post Vaccine passports divide world appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsFeb 25th, 2021

2 Philippine hotels granted Safe Travels stamp by world tourism body

The World Travel and Tourism Council recently awarded two luxury hotels in Metro Manila Safe Travels stamp through the Department of Tourism......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 25th, 2021

Covid-19 reinfection casts doubt on virus immunity: study

Covid-19 patients may experience more severe symptoms the second time they are infected, according to research released Tuesday confirming it is possible to catch the potentially deadly disease more than once. A study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal charts the first confirmed case of Covid-19 reinfection in the United States — the country worst hit by the pandemic — and indicates that exposure to the virus may not guarantee future immunity. The patient, a 25-year-old Nevada man, was infected with two distinct variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, within a 48-day time frame. The second infection was more severe than the first, resulting in the patient being hospitalised with oxygen support. The paper noted four other cases of reinfection confirmed globally, with one patient each in Belgium, the Netherlands, Hong Kong and Ecuador. Experts said the prospect of reinfection could have a profound impact on how the world battles through the pandemic. In particular, it could influence the hunt for a vaccine — the currently Holy Grail of pharmaceutical research. “The possibility of reinfections could have significant implications for our understanding of Covid-19 immunity, especially in the absence of an effective vaccine,” said Mark Pandori, for the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory and lead study author. “We need more research to understand how long immunity may last for people exposed to SARS-CoV-2 and why some of these second infections, while rare, are presenting as more severe.” Waning immunity?Vaccines work by triggering the body’s natural immune response to a certain pathogen, arming it with antibodies it to fight off future waves of infection. But it is not at all clear how long Covid-19 antibodies last. For some diseases, such as measles, infection confers lifelong immunity. For other pathogens, immunity may be fleeting at best. The authors said the US patient could have been exposed to a very high dose of the virus the second time around, triggering a more acute reaction. Alternatively, it may have been a more virulent strain of the virus. Another hypothesis is a mechanism known as antibody dependent enhancement — that is, when antibodies actually make subsequent infections worse, such as with dengue fever. The researchers pointed out that reinfection of any kind remains rare, with only a handful of confirmed cases out of tens of millions of Covid-19 infections globally. However, since many cases are asymptomatic and therefore unlikely to have tested positive initially, it may be impossible to know if a given Covid-19 case is the first or second infection. In a linked comment to The Lancet paper, Akiko Iwasaka, a professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology at Yale University, said the findings could impact public health measures. “As more cases of reinfection surface, the scientific community will have the opportunity to understand better the correlates of protection and how frequently natural infections with SARS-CoV-2 induce that level of immunity,” she said. “This information is key to understanding which vaccines are capable of crossing that threshold to confer individual and herd immunity,” added Iwasaka, who was not involved in the study......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 13th, 2020

Philippines gets Safe Travels stamp from tourism body

The Philippines is the 100th destination to receive the Safe Travels stamp from the World Travel and Tourism Council, which recognizes the adoption of global health and hygiene protocols......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 20th, 2020

WHO warns of drawn out pandemic as South Africa cases top 500,000

The UN health agency warned that the coronavirus pandemic would be lengthy and could lead to “response fatigue”, as the case count in South Africa topped half a million. Although many Latin American countries have begun relaxing stay-at-home measures, the virus is still spreading quickly across much of the region Six months after the World Health Organization declared a global emergency, the novel coronavirus has killed more than 680,000 people and infected more than 17.5 million, according to an AFP tally. South Africa is by far the hardest hit country in Africa, accounting for more than half of diagnosed infections, although President Cyril Ramaphosa said the fatality rate is lower than the global average. Health authorities had been expecting a surge in cases after the gradual loosening of a strict lockdown that was imposed at the end of March. Nigeria on Saturday also announced it would ease a lockdown in the commercial capital Lagos, allowing churches and mosques to reopen next week.  An emergency WHO committee reviewing the pandemic “highlighted the anticipated lengthy duration of this COVID-19 outbreak, noting the importance of sustained community, national, regional, and global response efforts”. “WHO continues to assess the global risk level of COVID-19 to be very high,” it said in its latest statement. The agency also said the effects of the pandemic “will be felt for decades to come”. Mexico overtook Britain to become the third hardest hit country in virus deaths — after Brazil and the United States — with more than 46,600 fatal cases. Although many Latin American countries have begun relaxing stay-at-home measures, the virus is still spreading quickly across much of the region, which has now recorded more than four million cases and almost 200,000 deaths. Half of them are in Brazil, where President Jair Bolsonaro said he believes “nearly everyone” will catch the virus eventually, after himself recovering from it. The US, the hardest-hit country in the world, has now tallied more than 4.6 million cases and 154,319 deaths. Vaccine race The outlook was bleak in Asia as well, where India and the Philippines reported record increases in new daily infections. “We are waging a losing battle against COVID-19, and we need to draw up a consolidated, definitive plan of action,” said an open letter signed by 80 Filipino medical associations. Japan’s Okinawa declared a state of emergency after a record jump in cases on the islands — many linked to US military forces stationed there. The pandemic has spurred a race for a vaccine with several Chinese companies at the forefront, while Russia has set a target date of September to roll out its own medicine. However, US infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci said it was unlikely his country would use any vaccine developed in either nation. “I do hope that the Chinese and the Russians are actually testing the vaccine before they are administering the vaccine to anyone,” he said. As part of its “Operation Warp Speed”, the US government will pay pharmaceutical giants Sanofi and GSK up to $2.1 billion for the development of a COVID-19 vaccine, the companies said. ‘Day of freedom’ France, Spain, Portugal and Italy all reported huge contractions in their economies for the April-June quarter, while Europe as a whole saw gross domestic product fall by 12.1 percent.  Daily case numbers in Switzerland have crept up again in recent weeks, while Norway recorded its first virus death in two weeks. At least 36 crew members confined to a Norwegian cruise ship have tested positive for the new coronavirus, the operator Hurtigruten said on Saturday.  Despite the resurgence in cases, there have been demonstrations in Europe against the curbs.  Thousands protested in Berlin on Saturday urging “a day of freedom” from the restrictions, with some demonstrators dubbing the pandemic “the biggest conspiracy theory”. In South Korea, the elderly leader of a secretive sect at the centre of the country’s early coronavirus outbreak was arrested for allegedly hindering the government’s effort to contain the epidemic. People linked to Lee Man-hee’s Shincheonji Church of Jesus accounted for more than half of the South’s coronavirus cases in February and March, but the country has since appeared to have brought the virus under control. The pandemic has also continued to cause mayhem in the travel and tourism sectors, with more airlines announcing mass job cuts. Latin America’s biggest airline, the Brazilian-Chilean group LATAM, said it would lay off least 2,700 crew, and British Airways pilots overwhelmingly voted to accept a deal cutting wages by 20 percent, with 270 jobs lost......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2020

FIBA releases guidelines for 'Return to Basketball'

As the world governing body for basketball, FIBA has released its own set of guidelines in order for the sport to come back after the COVID-19 pandemic. FIBA published the Return to Basketball – Restart Guidelines for National Federations, partnering with the World Health Organization for a Risk Assessment Tool that focuses on basketball. Australia's Dr. Peter Harcourt, the FIBA Medical Commission Chairman, developed the said guidelines. Dr. Harcourt consulted with the FIBA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group (MAG) and the FIBA Medical and Players Commissions before releasing the guidelines. "In these challenging times, on behalf of FIBA's Medical Commission, I would like to share our heartfelt support and solidarity with the basketball community across the world. I have witnessed that FIBA has been working tirelessly to ensure the health and safety of national federations, players, officials and other partners," Dr. Harcourt said in a statement. "Rest assured that our Medical Commission will keep working and collaborating closely with WHO and will endeavor to assist FIBA to safeguard the basketball community from the current pandemic crisis based on the scientific knowledge," he added. Most of the major basketball leagues in the world were shut down in mid-March due to the coronavirus pandemic. [Related: NBA says it is talking with Disney about resuming season] Recently, the Euroleague has cancelled its season while the NBA is working on a possible comeback as its season was cut short a few weeks before the playoffs. In Asia, Japan's B.League and the Korean Basketball League cancelled their respective seasons. Taiwan's Super Basketball League managed to finish its season but all teams played under a "basketball bubble" with no live crowd. [Related: With neighbor leagues cancelled or still suspended, what's next for the PBA after COVID-19?] The Chinese Basketball Association is planning a comeback, while the Philippine Basketball Association is waiting until August to decide whether to push through or cancel its current season. After COVID-19 ravaged the world and shut down pretty much all of sports, FIBA set up its COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group in April. The special advisory was established to review the latest scientific knowledge regarding COVID-19 and to advise on the return of international basketball competitions. Members of this special advisory group include the Chair and Deputy Chair of the FIBA Medical Commission, the NBA Director of Sports Medicine, the Senior Advisor to the World Health Organisation's (WHO) Executive Director, a University of Melbourne Professor of Medicine specialized in immunology and vaccine research, and, as an observer, the IOC Medical Director. "I wish to sincerely thank the FIBA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group, FIBA's Commissions involved and the World Health Organisation (WHO) for their invaluable work, expertise and continued contribution towards protecting our national federations, players, officials and basketball event organizers," FIBA Secretary General Andreas Zagklis said. "This set of guidelines will be very beneficial for the basketball community in their return to our game. We all miss our sport being played and as the situation related to the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, FIBA remains committed to providing guidance for a safe environment for the 'Return to Basketball,'" Zagklis added. FIBA's Return to Basketball Guidelines are directed to every country's basketball federations, in the Philippines' case that being the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP). [Related: PBA teams may practice soon under new quarantine quidelines] However, FIBA's guidelines are not to disregard each country's existing tools set up by their governments. In the Philippines, sporting events can come back under a modified general community quarantine but will be limited to a 50-percent capacity of each venue.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 27th, 2020

Who will be proclaimed as Miss Talent, Best Body at Miss World Philippines 2021?

The Miss World Philippines organization has rolled out all of its Fast Track challenges, including the talent presentation, and announced the Top 10 qualifiers who all have a chance to secure a spot in the semi-final round......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated News7 hr. 6 min. ago

U.N. Rights Council to Investigate Killings in Philippine Drug War

By Nick Cumming-Bruce/nytimes.com – The United Nations’ top human rights body voted on Thursday to examine thousands of alleged extrajudicial police killings linked to President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs in the Philippines, a campaign that rights groups around the world have denounced as a lawless atrocity. The United Nations’ Read more ».....»»

Category: newsSource:  thepinoyRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2021

Earth s richest man Bezos to blast off into space

Jeff Bezos, the richest person in the world, is set to join the astronaut club Tuesday on the first crewed launch by Blue Origin, another key moment in a big month for the fledgling space tourism industry......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 18th, 2021

2021 Miss Queen of Hearts PH pageant may pahabol na sorpresa

Nang unang nagtawag ng mga kandidata ang Miss Queen of Hearts Philippines pageant para sa pagtatanghal nito ngayong taon, nauna nang sinabing tatlo sa mga magwawagi ang sasabak sa mga pandaigdigang patimpalak—ang Miss Global Universe, Miss Tourism Worldwide, at Miss Lumiere International World. Ngunit bago pa man dumating ang coronation night, hinayag ng Queen of […] The post 2021 Miss Queen of Hearts PH pageant may pahabol na sorpresa appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 11th, 2021

Boracay world class ang health protocol

Isa ang Isla ng Boracay sa mga nakatanggap ng World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC) Safe Travels Stamp bilang pagkilala sa pinatutupad na health protocol na pasado sa buong mundo. The post Boracay world class ang health protocol first appeared on Abante......»»

Category: newsSource:  abanteRelated NewsJul 9th, 2021

Wallstreet Coffee + Bar nominated for International Travel Awards

bai Hotel Cebu’s Wallstreet Coffee + Bar is nominated by the International Travel Awards for the category of Luxury Café 2021. The International Travel Awards is crafted to honor the excellent performers in the tourism and travel industry around the world. Located within the humble abode of bai Hotel Cebu, this quaint and traditional cafe […] The post Wallstreet Coffee + Bar nominated for International Travel Awards appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 5th, 2021

World s safest place? Vermont leads US vaccine race

Vermont—known for Bernie Sanders, maple syrup, and the birthplace of Ben and Jerry's ice cream—has a new claim to fame: America's most-vaccinated state against COVID-19......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 4th, 2021

DOST waiting for WHO protocol on vaccine trials

The Department of Science and Technology is still waiting for the final protocol from the World Health Organization (WHO) to begin the Philippine Solidarity Vaccine Trials that aim to look for candidate COVID-19 vaccines......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 2nd, 2021

WHO to cover 3 vaccines in Philippines trials

The World Health Organization Solidarity Vaccine Trials for candidate COVID-19 vaccines are set to start, with the final SVT protocols and vaccines as well as WHO counterpart funding available this week, Science and Technology Secretary Fortunato dela Peña said yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 20th, 2021

Inoue may fight either Casimero, Donaire next

Japanese “monster” Naoya Inoue, as expected, tore down underdog challenger Michael Dasmarinas from the Philippines with body shots en route to a third-round knockout win and retained his two world titles on Sunday (Philippine time) in Las Vegas, USA......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 20th, 2021

Billions of vaccine doses needed to make the world safe

The announcement of President Joe Biden on the eve of the G7 Summit in the United Kingdom that the US will donate 500 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines manufactured by Pfizer has been described by the World Health Organization regional director for Africa Matshidiso Moeti as “a monumental step forward.”.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 12th, 2021

Spain opens borders to all vaccinated travellers

Spain opens its borders to vaccinated travellers from all over the world on Monday, hoping an influx of visitors will revitalise its all-important tourism sector which has been battered by the coronavirus pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 7th, 2021