Advertisements


What makes & lsquo;PBB Connect& rsquo; different from other seasons

Pinoy Big Brother’s new season carries a the theme “Let’s stay connected, no matter what.” It’s a fitting mantra for the reality show that premiere on different platforms on Sunday.  .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: thestandard thestandardDec 7th, 2020

DLSU s volleyball program continuously evolves under De Jesus

From Iris Ortega-Patrona to legendary star Manilla Santos-Ng to Aby Marano, Ara Galang, Mika Reyes, Michele Gumabao, Majoy Baron and Kim Dy to the current crop of players in Jolina Dela Cruz to Thea Gagate, much can be said about the successful women’s volleyball program of De La Salle University. But it won’t be complete without mentioning the name of head coach Ramil de Jesus, who turned a struggling team into a perennial title contender for the past two decades. Eleven championships in 18 Finals appearances since taking the post as mentor of the Lady Spikers in 1997 with an impressive winning record, De Jesus truly is the genius behind DLSU’s powerhouse status. But what really put De Jesus a cut above the rest, Santos-Ng said, is his ability to adapt, utilize the pieces he has on hand and the way his system evolves. “The evolution of DLSU volleyball lies not only from the great players, but mainly because of the way Coach Ramil adjusts and adapts on the current situation,” said Santos-Ng in an interview on Volleyball DNA. She mentioned that during her time, De Jesus focused on making DLSU a powerhitting team. When the likes of Marano and Gumabao came, the mentor concentrated on making the Lady Spikers the strongest team in terms of blocking. The batch of Dy, Kim Fajardo, Baron and libero Dawn Macandili was known for its all-around play. What brought DLSU its success is the fact that De Jesus was quick to adapt to situations.    Of course, glory didn’t come overnight. It took De Jesus a lot of work to bring the Lady Spikers on top. De Jesus delivered DLSU’s first title in Season 62 in the Lady Spikers' second attempt at the crown. The Taft-based squad managed to advance to the Finals the next three seasons but fell short at the hands of Far Eastern University each time.   “Nu’ng pumunta ako ng La Salle, sa pagkakaalam ko hindi pa kami malakas na team eh,” said Santos-Ng “So talagang si Coach Ramil dahan-dahan n’ya talagang winorkout ang mga players and the program,” she added. “Dun mo makikita na si Coach Ramil talaga is very dedicated and committed kapag mayroon siyang goal.” After three bridesmaid finishes, DLSU, on Santos-Ng’s second year, exacted revenge on FEU to get back to the throne. DLSU won two more times for its first of three three-peats. Santos-Ng said that De Jesus during that time made his players stay in a dorm for the first time not only to monitor their conditioning but to develop a deeper team chemistry. “‘Yung time na yun gusto nya kaming maging well-bonded. Di lang strong team but well-bonded,” said Santos-Ng. “Kasi you can easily create a strong team eh. Pagsasamahin mo mga malalakas na players from this school. But strong team plus well-bonded team makes a big difference.” The ChocoMucho hitter also added that De Jesus will always look for ways to the unleash the full potential of his players. “Si Coach Ramil hindi siya nauubusan ng idea kung paano kami palakasin. Kung ano ang nakikita niya sa player na kulang talagang magpo-focus siya dun. Di siya magdya-jump kaagad sa ibang gagawin. May pagka-perfectionist siya eh,” she said. Like all of De Jesus’ players Santos-Ng had her share of rough moments while training under his watchful eyes. “Umiiyak din ako sa kanya. Pero makikita mo at the end of the day ‘yung result ng team kung paano kami gumalaw as one sa loob ng court,” she said. De Jesus according to Santos-Ng is also very strict when it comes to discipline.     “Coach Ramil is very consistent on how he manages to protect ‘yung mga players. Ayaw niyang nawawala sa focus,” said Santos-Ng. “Lagi niyang sinasabi na, Hindi ito modeling, hindi ito para magpaganda o magpa-cute. Volleyball itong pinasok nyo.’” “He always reminds us para lang talaga hindi kami mawala dun sa focus na maglaro lang talaga kami ng volleyball,” she added. More than a decade since Santos-Ng finished her tour of duty for the green and white, the Lady Spikers continue to evolve and keep up with the times yet maintain their consistency as one of the finest volleyball program in the collegiate ranks. All thanks to De Jesus.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 28th, 2020

Lovi Poe is sweet as & lsquo;Candy& rsquo; in new MV

Actress Lovi Poe slowly makes a name for herself as an international recording artist with her recently released music video for the summer pop single, “Candy.”.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2021

Critically lauded & lsquo;Hades& rsquo; makes way to consoles

Supergiant Games’ Game of the Year-winning action roguelike ‘Hades’ was released on consoles on Friday. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 14th, 2021

& lsquo;Catch Me Out Philippines& rsquo; returns with more thrilling performances, bigger surprises

GMA Network's reality game show 'Catch Me Out Philippines' makes a big comeback with even more spectacular performances from the amateurs and a stellar roster of celebrity guests beginning today......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 30th, 2021

PLDT Home empowers Filipinos to 'DoItBetter

Keeping up with the ever-growing demands of their different pursuits, Filipino families are working harder to excel and achieve the life they aspire for. PLDT Home, the country’s fastest fixed network, trains the spotlight on all the brilliant possibilities that Filipinos can achieve with its latest campaign, ‘Do It Better’. An assuredly optimistic, hopeful and empowering cause, PLDT Home aims to illustrate how its digital products and services enable families to do, connect, learn, and earn–better—at home. .....»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 6th, 2021

Fnatic sends TNC.Predator home, makes & lsquo;International& rsquo;

Fnatic battled its way to The International 10 after coming from behind to frustrate all-Filipino TNC.Predator......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 5th, 2021

Jerome, Nikko, Dave are your & lsquo;Good Vibes& rsquo; boys

When times are difficult, people usually look at the lighter side of things and what makes them happy. Keeping people of all ages entertained is the heart and soul of Puregold Channel on Facebook and YouTube......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 4th, 2021

DonBelle& rsquo;s & lsquo;He& rsquo;s Into Her& rsquo; makes big buzz on social media

He's Into Her, Star Cinema’s newest youth-oriented series about empowerment starring Donny Pangilinan and Belle Mariano became one of the most talked-about shows on social media, landing number 6 on the TheWit.com’s Social Wit List, a round-up of shows that have generated the biggest buzz on Instagram in May.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 15th, 2021

The curious case of Louie Ignacio& rsquo;s & lsquo;Abe-Nida& rsquo;

“A dream is a wish your heart makes,” a line from the iconic animated Cinderella Disney motion picture rings true for multi-awarded TV and film director and renowned contemporary visual artist Louie Ignacio......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2021

BGYO makes listeners fall in love with & lsquo;He& rsquo;s Into Her& rsquo; track

P-Pop group BGYO adds a heady dose of kilig to the upcoming generational series He's Into Her starring Belle Mariano and Donny Pangilinan as the group released the show’s theme song on Spotify last April 23.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 27th, 2021

& lsquo;Ang Probinsyano& rsquo; not ending in April; airs on TV5 with three other Kapamilya shows& nbsp;

ABS-CBN Entertainment, Cignal, and TV5 have joined forces to bring the best content to more Filipinos with the airing of FPJ’s Ang Probinsyano, Ang Sa Iyo ay Akin, Walang Hanggang Paalam, and Pinoy Big Brother (PBB) Connect on TV5......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 9th, 2021

Echauz graces PSA web forum

Sportsman and Standard Insurance Group Chairman Ernesto ‘Judes’ Echauz makes a rare appearance in the online session of the Philippine Sportswriters Association Forum on Tuesday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2021

PHirst Park Homes now official residence of & lsquo;Pinoy Big Brother Connect& rsquo;

PHirst Park Homes, the First Home Buyer Brand of Century Properties Group and Mitsubishi Corporation, is now the Official Home of  Pinoy Big Brother Connect Season 9. .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 25th, 2021

& lsquo;Thunder Kid& rsquo; returns to action at ONE: UNBREAKABLE

Team Lakay mixed martial arts star Lito “Thunder Kid” Adiwang makes his fourth main-stage ONE Championship appearance at ONE: UNBREAKABLE on Friday, January 22.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 12th, 2021

Bugoy and Moophs connect in collab single & lsquo;Tied& rsquo;

R&B and reggae artist Bugoy Drilon pairs up for the first time with island pop producer Moophs for a venture into the lovers rock genre with the song “Tied.”.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 11th, 2021

Why Wilbert Tolentino is & lsquo;Mister Generous& rsquo;& nbsp;

Former Mr. Gay World titlist, businessman, and philanthropist Wilbert Tolentino has a new ace on his shoulder – a vlogger who makes his presence felt in the digital universe. In just two months WIlbert Tolentino VLOGD already reached 283, 000 subscribers and it continues to grow......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 24th, 2020

I& ntilde;igo and Moophs& rsquo; & lsquo;Always& rsquo; makes it to Apple Music& rsquo;s best of 2020 list

Iñigo Pascual and Moophs’ recent collaboration, the dancehall-afrobeat pop track “Always’ made it to Apple Music’s yearly roundup of global top music releases dubbed “The 100 Best Songs of 2020 Playlist.”.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 20th, 2020

Arjo makes history& nbsp;with & lsquo;Bagman& rsquo;

Kapamilya star Arjo Atayde was named Best Actor at the Asian Academy Creative Awards (AAAs) 2020 on Dec. 4 for his role in the iWant original series Bagman, besting nine Asian actors and bagging the Philippines’ first-ever acting accolade in the main competition......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 14th, 2020

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Justin Bieber connects with fans in intimate & lsquo;New Chapter& rsquo;

YouTube Originals unveils Justine Bieber: Next Chapter, a brand-new special documentary event following the hit 10-episode original documentary series, Justin Bieber: Seasons, which chronicled the making of Justin Bieber’s latest album, Changes......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 27th, 2020