Advertisements


Wanted: Pandemic prevention experts

It is a long-term initiative to support studies into the origins of any and all future emerging pathogens......»»

Category: newsSource: tribune tribuneAug 22nd, 2021

Experts weigh in on cyberbullying in the time of pandemic

With schools forced to implement alternative education modalities such as online learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, incidences of cyberbullying are expected to soar even higher in the coming months.  To help parents as well as education practitioners learn how both online and offline communities can protect children and youth from cyberbullying, a panel of local and international experts shared suggestions on how to prevent this phenomenon. Experts from the Philippines and South Korea exchanged views on cyberbullying and how this can be prevented especially with the rising cases among youth in a webinar on cyberbullying organized by Ramon Magsaysay Award Foundation recently. During the webinar, 2019 Ramon Magsaysay Awardee and Blue Tree Foundation (BTF) founder Kim Jong-ki shared how he and his foundation has been battling school violence in the past 20 years. The BTF was very instrumental in curbing incidences of violence against students in schools. BTF Preventive Education Center Head Park Ju-han shared that in South Korea, school violence has declined for 15 years but has risen again since 2015. “The main factors are the low aging and the increase of cyberbullying,” he said. Meanwhile, BTF Research and Counseling Team Leader Lee Sun-young discussed how the foundation has been working with schools on the prevention of violence among students and shared some best practices that can be adopted by other countries like the Philippines. “We need to teach children when to respond when cyberbullying is happening,” she said.  “Digital literacy is the first key on how to be nice in the world,” she added.  In the Philippines, UP Manila-Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit (CPU) head Dr. Bernadette Madrid noted that “bullying has been increasing.” Based on the results of the national baseline survey on violence against children in 2016, she shared that “bullying in the Philippines was quite high” with 65 percent of the youth – ages 13 to 17 years old – have experienced some form of bullying. Same goes for the prevalence of cyberbullying wherein 44% of the students reported cyber violence. “It is a real problem here in our country, it is harmful but it can be prevented,” Madrid said. Given this, she noted that in terms of prevention, a single program is not enough to address cyberbullying. “We need multiple programs to be more successful,” she added. Meanwhile, Don Bosco Technical College Cebu president and dean Fr. Fidel Orendain noted that protecting students from violence and abuse especially with the shift to e-learning is a challenge for many schools. “This topic is a hot issue for us right now,” he admitted. Since schools are familiar with face-to-face familiarity, he noted that online learning is “challenging our identity and the way we educate.” To resolve this, he urged schools to increase their presence by way of talks and conferences. “We can also make ourselves available for counseling,” he added. For Stairway Foundation, Inc. Senior Advocacy Officer Ysrael Diloy, protecting children at this time is more crucial than ever. In the past 18 years, he has been working with key government agencies in the Philippines, via national level councils and working groups, advocating for child protection policy, and programmatic changes. “We are at an age wherein the current generation of children has known technology as the norm,” he said. Diloy has initiated the CyberSafe program which is currently the flagship child online protection program of the Department of Education (DepEd). “Now more than ever, we need to ensure that we are all contributing to make the Internet a safe space for and with children, so that they can reap all the benefits and opportunities that technology presents – this is the very essence the CyberSafe program hopes to achieve,” he ended......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2020

Fan experience to change profoundly amid COVID-19 pandemic

By DAVE SKRETTA AP Sports Writer KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Dayton Moore remembers so clearly the vast sections of empty seats inside Kauffman Stadium when he took over as general manager of the Kansas City Royals, and he remembers just as vividly — nearly a decade later — how those seats filled and fans roared as the long-suffering club won the World Series. Those dueling memories make the thought of playing games in empty stadiums hard for Moore to fathom. “I know how much strength all players draw from the fans and environment,” he said, when asked about plans to play a shortened season without crowds, “and you need that support to get through an entire Major League Baseball schedule.” As lockdowns are lifted and restrictions eased, sports are finally starting to emerge in the coronavirus pandemic. But in virtually every situation, fans are not yet being allowed to attend and the only consensus for now is that there could be a long period of empty or nearly empty seating. Some U.S. universities are modeling for 25% capacity for the upcoming football season or maybe half-full arenas for the ensuing basketball season. “I think for most sports, a reduced crowd wouldn't negatively impact the overall experience, especially in a situation like baseball or even the NFL,” said Katy Lucy, a digital marketing agent from Atlanta whose fandom is split between all things Georgia Bulldogs and the Washington Capitals. “But it would be different for sure for those who attend in person." Count her family among those who would pause before heading to the ballpark. “For me personally, I’m not sure I would feel comfortable attending a live sporting event until there is a known treatment or widely available vaccine,” Lucy said. “I trust the institutions to put the proper measures in place; however, making sure that they are enforced is another matter.” Many college and pro sports teams already were dealing with declining ticket sales. Watching at home or streaming games are factors, as is the changing social makeup of fan bases. Dynamic pricing, increases in parking and concession prices, and a push toward luxury seating have exacerbated the problem. Major League Baseball attendance has declined six of the past seven seasons. In college football, 13 of the 130 schools that played in the Football Bowl Subdivision reported average crowd sizes of 50% or less last season. Even the NFL has seen an increase in empty seats despite its generally rock-solid popularity. So as coronavirus concerns linger, how are teams going to lure fans back when stadiums do reopen? Loyalty and engagement apps, widespread around the major leagues and colleges even before the pandemic, will become even more common and interactive as teams try to recapture lost revenue. There also will be more behind-the-scenes content and enhancements available via smartphones that will only be available to those in the stadium or arena, offering fans something unique over fans watching at home. “Fans want that experience to be top-notch, period. That's why teams are thinking about this,” said Britton Stackhouse Miller, senior vice president at Fortress U.S., a developer of engagement and integration systems with clients in European soccer, baseball, the NBA, NFL and NHL. Temperature checks, hand sanitizer distribution stations and touchless vending will become the norm for a while. Even concessions will change, though one big difference — gulp — could lead to a lot of grumbling. “If you don't sell beer the number of visits to the bathroom drops dramatically,” said Marc Ganis, the director of sports consulting firm Sportscorp. “So for a time we may have to think about not selling beer.” It won't just be the vast oceans of bench seats left open, either. Many experts believe those hardy fans will be the first to return. It's the corporate suites from which many colleges and pro franchises derive so much of their gameday revenue that may end up being empty until long after games have resumed. Economic woes may last for some time. For fans who stay home, leagues are looking for ways to keep them engaged, too. When Germany's top soccer league returned without fans, broadcaster Sky knew it had a problem with silence coming through the TV. Engineers created “carpet audio” from previous games between the same teams, then teased out roars for specific events such as goals and red cards, giving those watching at home the option of a more realistic experience. “This was the only idea that we thought could be most respectful to the fans,” said Alessandro Reitano, vice president of sports production for Sky Deutschland. “To be honest, it's a major success.” Old crowd noise is a bit like an old game, though. It lacks a certain authenticity. So along came ChampTrack, which created an app that utilizes the microphones of fans. It captures their every roar and groan and sends the audio to its server, which then aggregates the noise into a single stream. That stream is then returned to the viewer using proprietary algorithms to provide the broadcast with real-time sound, which is then immediately erased to ensure personal privacy. “Once they press play on our web app, they can hear what everyone else is cheering about and their own cheer,” said ChampTrack chief executive Elias Anderson, adding the system could soon handle as many as 150,000 fans for each game. Sound is one element of the fan experience. Optics is another. “When it was clear there would be no audience this season, the fans had the idea of bringing their images to the stadium,” said Lubbo Popken, deputy press secretary for German soccer club Borussia Monchengladbach, which affixed fan likenesses to their seats. “We were surprised how many people wanted to be part of this idea and have their images in the stadium. It really changed the atmosphere in the empty stadium.” Of course, none of that is the same as having real fans creating real noise......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 8th, 2020

Virus-proofing sports facilities presents a big challenge

By DAVE CAMPBELL AP Sports Writer MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The jersey-wearing camaraderie. The scent of sizzling sausages. The buzz before a big game. The distinctive atmosphere of live sports, that feeling in the air, will return in time as pandemic restrictions are eased. But will that very air be safe in a closed arena with other fans in attendance? The billions of dollars spent on state-of-the-art sports facilities over the last quarter-century have made high-efficiency air filtration systems more common, thanks in part to the pursuit of green and healthy building certifications. Upgrades will likely increase in the post-coronavirus era, too. The problem is that even the cleanest of air can’t keep this particular virus from spreading; if someone coughs or sneezes, those droplets are in the air. That means outdoor ballparks have high contaminant potential, too. “Most of the real risk is going to be short-distance transmission, people sitting within two, three or four seats of each other,” said Ryan Demmer, an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health. “It’s not really about the virus spreading up, getting into the ventilation system and then getting blown out to the entire stadium because this virus doesn’t seem to transmit that way. It doesn’t aerosolize that well.” The three hours spent in proximity to thousands of others is part of the fan experience. It's also why major sports leagues have been discussing plans to reopen in empty venues, for now. High-touch areas with the potential to spread the virus — called fomite transmission — are plentiful at the ballgame, of course. Door handles. Stair rails. Restroom fixtures. Concession stands. Hand washing by now has become a societal norm, but disinfectant arsenals need to be brought up to speed, too. “I can’t really find good hand sanitizer easily in stores. So think about trying to scale that up, so everybody who comes into U.S. Bank Stadium gets a little bottle of Purel. Things like that can be modestly helpful,” Demmer said. There is much work to be done. Vigilant sanitizing of the frequent-touch surfaces will be a must. Ramped-up rapid testing capability during pre-entry screening could become common for fans. Minimizing concourse and entry bottlenecks, and maintaining space between non-familial attendees, could be mandatory. Mask-wearing requirements? Maybe. Most experts, including those at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, believe the primary mode of transmission for COVID-19 is close person-to-person contact through breathing, coughing or sneezing but there's no consensus on some of the details. “There’s still widespread disagreement between experts on which mode of transmission dominates for influenza. So the likelihood of us figuring this out soon for this virus is low,” said Joe Allen, director of the Healthy Buildings Program and an assistant professor at Harvard’s School of Public Health. “We may never figure it out, but I also think it’s irrelevant because it’s a pandemic and we should be guarding against all of them.” Including, of course, the air. The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers designed the Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) scale to measure a filtration system's effectiveness (from 1-16) at capturing microscopic airborne particles that can make people sick. Not just viruses, but dust, pollen, mold and bacteria. Most experts recommend a MERV rating of 13 or higher, the minimum standard for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. An emerging technology in this area is called bipolar ionization. Connecticut-based AtmosAir has a bipolar ionization air treatment system in about 40 sports venues. Staples Center in Los Angeles was one of the first major sports customers. TD Garden in Boston and Bridgestone Arena in Nashville are among the others who’ve signed on. The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority approved last year a 10-year contract for a little more than $1 million with AtmosAir to install its system in U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the Vikings and the first indoor NFL stadium to use it. The building, which measures 1.8 million square feet, has 53 air handling units with AtmosAir tubes installed, including 30 in the seating bowl. The ions act like fresh air, reducing the amount of outside air needed to be introduced for the cleansing process. The protein spikes in the coronavirus particles make them easier to catch and kill, said Philip Tierno, a New York University School of Medicine professor of microbiology and pathology. Said AtmosAir founder and CEO Steve Levine: “We’re never going to create a mountaintop, but we’re going to put in maybe three to four times the ions over the ambient air and then let those ions attack different pollutants in the air. The ions grab onto particles and spores and make them bigger and heavier, so they’re much easier to filter out of the air." The next time fans do pass through the turnstiles, in a few weeks or a few months, in most cases they will probably encounter an unprecedented level of cleanliness. “There will be some controls that are visible, extra cleaning and disinfection, but some of it will be invisible, like for what’s happening in the air handling system,” said Allen, the Harvard professor. “The consumers will decide when they feel comfortable going back, and that’s going to depend on what strategies are put in place in these venues and stadiums and arenas and, most importantly, how well these organizations communicate that to the paying public.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 1st, 2020

The world’s future under climate change

We are a world in crisis. The pandemic was thought to be in its final stages. Now doctors and public health experts have warned us that there will be future surges......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 18th, 2021

Global retail experts banner list of speakers at 27th NRCE

Foreign experts will impart fresh ideas that will help local retailers in their adjustment to the new normal, including the best ways to navigate through a post-pandemic global retail landscape, at the two-day 27th National Retail Conference and Stores Asia Expo that will start today via virtual conference......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 11th, 2021

Vaccination: The French way

As Europe struggles to cope with the ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic which the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control said could worsen with almost five times as many new cases by Aug. 1, more governments are imposing stricter restrictions and making vaccination compulsory for adults and health care workers in both private and public sectors......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 17th, 2021

Advocates push for children’s mental health wellness

Rights advocates and child psychology experts pointed this out, underscoring the importance of ensuring and promoting children’s mental health amid the pandemic in the recent webinar organized by the Children’s Rehabilitation Center The post Advocates push for children’s mental health wellness appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsJul 17th, 2021

Drop seen in asthma attacks in pandemic

To the surprise of public health experts, asthma attacks appear to have dropped significantly in many places hit by the pandemic, contrary to the conventional wisdom that asthma and COVID-19 will feed or exacerbate each other as they target the same respiratory system......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 15th, 2021

UK to restore our freedoms after COVID lockdown

Britain's government confirmed Monday it will press ahead with "Freedom Day" next week by lifting most pandemic curbs in England, but urged caution as experts warned that politicians were moving too fast......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 13th, 2021

Heat risks add to challenges for Tokyo s pandemic-hit Olympics

Searing heat, dripping humidity, and face masks: it's going to be a sweaty Tokyo Olympics and while coronavirus measures are top priority, heatstroke remains a serious risk, experts warn......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 12th, 2021

Micro-herd immunity, safe spaces eyed as pandemic exit strategies

Experts, government officials and private sector representatives met recently to thresh out the proposed adoption of “micro-herd immunity” and “safe spaces” as strategies for the safe reopening of the economy......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 10th, 2021

Toxicology experts urge poison prevention, preparedness at home

“There really is a need to poison-proof our homes as most childhood poisoning incidents occur at home.”.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 20th, 2021

Want to try your luck in business despite pandemic? Dimples Romana shares tips

Kapamilya actress Dimples Romana shared tips to aspiring businessmen who wanted to venture into business this time of COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 20th, 2021

Security Bank improves fraud prevention, online safety

Listed Security Bank Corp. continued to improve fraud prevention and online safety as cybercriminals take advantage of the surge in digital transactions amid the pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 4th, 2021

The sustainability movement

We are now in the most existentially threatening and most complex global crisis that some experts see as the perfect storm of the pandemic and global warming......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 26th, 2021

An obvious bias

Ever since reports of ivermectin as having potential prevention and treatment properties for COVID-19 began surfacing, both the Department of Health and the Food and Drug Administration headed by Francisco Duque and Eric Domingo, respectively, have been consistent in blocking the potential pandemic game changer while promoting more expensive drugs......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 17th, 2021

IOM, Japan embark on 12-month anti-pandemic program for BARMM

Two foreign benefactors have earmarked US $2.7 million for a 12-month COVID-19 prevention program in the Bangsamororo Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 16th, 2021

‘Peltzman effect’

The term “Peltzman effect” first popped up when health and medical experts offered this theory on the possible cause of the global resurgence of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 11th, 2021

OPINION | Covid-19: Militarism and big money trampling humanity

The Covid-19 spectre, vaccine mania, deceptive remedial schemes and brutal, anti-people pandemic responses created by militarism and big money have shoved by the wayside pro-people, more sensible and a wider range of prevention and treatment strategies to address the pandemic. The post OPINION | Covid-19: Militarism and big money trampling humanity appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsApr 9th, 2021

Experts to reveal details on Covid origins as leaders urge pandemic treaty

International experts will on Tuesday unveil a report into the origins of Covid-19, as world leaders called for a global treaty to better tackle future pandemics......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 30th, 2021