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Visas pending for karate team

Karate Pilipinas Sports Federation president Ricky Lim said yesterday four of the seven karatekas representing the Philippines at the Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Paris on June 11-13 are still lacking visas to enter France, and since they’ve been locked down in Istanbul since March, the process to secure travel passage isn’t easy......»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarMay 8th, 2021

Karatekas to gain French entry

The wait is finally over Karate Pilipinas Sports Federation president Ricky Lim has confirmed receiving an email from the French consul in Istanbul for an appointment today to clear the way for four athletes with pending visa applications to compete in the Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Paris on June 11-13......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 10th, 2021

AUK bags 18 gold medals in Hakuakai International Karate Championships

CEBU CITY, Philippines—One of Cebu’s vaunted karate-do team, the Association for the Upliftment of Karate-Do (AUK) put on a sterling performance in the recent 4th Annual Hakuakai International Karate Championships E-Kata & E-Fantom Kumite held last April 24 to 25, 2021.  The online karate-do tournament drew karate-do clubs from the Philippines, South Borneo, Iraq-Kurdistan, Macau-China […] The post AUK bags 18 gold medals in Hakuakai International Karate Championships appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 27th, 2021

Jamie Lim, other karatekas enter Turkey bubble for 2nd training

Southeast Asian Games karate gold medalist Jamie Lim and the Philippine team have joined up with Filipino-American Joane Orbon to start a second bubble training in Istanbul, Turkey......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 22nd, 2021

Philippine karatekas now in Turkey

With an eye on Tokyo Olympic slots, SEA Games karate gold medalist Jamie Lim and the Philippine team, including Fil-American Joane Orbon, are now in bubble training in Istanbul, Turkey......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 22nd, 2021

TEAM chief urges operators to regularly check pending violations of their drivers

MANDAUE CITY, Philippines – The Traffic Enforcement Agency of Mandaue (TEAM) is urging operators and vehicle owners to regularly check if their drivers have pending violations. They can do so at the TEAM office. Edwin Jumao-as said this when he sat as the TEAM’s new executive director. He ordered to dig up pending violations of […] The post TEAM chief urges operators to regularly check pending violations of their drivers appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2021

WHO virus investigators head for China, but await visas

Members of an international expert team set off for China to investigate the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic, but Beijing has yet to grant them entry, the WHO chief said Tuesday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 6th, 2021

Mandaue PUJ drivers told: Get TEAM clearance, pay penalties in installments

MANDAUE CITY, Philippines — Drivers of traditional public utility jeepneys (PUJs) in Mandaue City with pending penalties of traffic violations can have the chance to go back to the streets and ply their routes again. This developed after the Mandaue City government met with officials from Pagkakaisa ng mga Tsuper at Operators Nationwide (PISTON) Cebu […] The post Mandaue PUJ drivers told: Get TEAM clearance, pay penalties in installments appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2020

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Taulava still uncertain on retirement as NLEX ends PBA bubble stint

The writing is already on the wall but evergreen Asi Taulava’s retirement may not happen inside the bubble just yet pending official discussion with coach Yeng Guiao and NLEX team management......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 11th, 2020

Ayala Philippine Athletics slated next year at New Clark City

Pending the approval of the Inter-Agency Task Force, the annual event is scheduled from March 19-21 at the same venue where the national track and field team harvested 11 gold, eight silver and eight bronze medals in the Southeast Asian Games that helped the country win the overall title......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 7th, 2020

6 karatekas seeking slots in Olympics

Six members of the national karate team are still pursuing their dreams of making it to the Tokyo Olympic......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 6th, 2020

PRA suspends processing of Special Resident Retiree’s Visas amid review

The Board of Trustees of the Philippine Retirement Agency, an attached agency of the Department of Tourism, on Friday announced the suspension of issuance of the Special Retirees Residence Visa (SRRV) pending a review and possible amendments......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 23rd, 2020

PBA: 'Due process' ongoing for Blackwater s own protocol breach

The ongoing "Sorsogon Bubble" saga surrounding the UST Growling Tigers has cast a light on supposed quarantine violations by sports teams in the Philippines. UST is the first major case for amateur teams but Blackwater already made headlines last month when it comes to PBA teams. The Elite got into hot water for allegedly breaking quarantine protocols for having players work out. Things got so bad that team owner Dioceldo Sy put the team up for sale for P150 million. The team ended up taking a P100,000 fine from the PBA after Sy issued statements seen as detrimental to the league. The issue has died down quite a bit, with the Elite actually officially practicing this week as PBA teams were finally allowed to do so. As for the final resolution on the Blackwater saga, the team's case is pending as far as the PBA Board is concerned. "To be transparent, we're going through the process. What is important is due process." Chairman Ricky Vargas said about the Blackwater issue during the recent PSA forum. "What is also important is to ascertain that the decision that is going to be made, or has been made, is not contrary to the constitution and by-laws of the PBA," he added. Since the Blackwater issue first hit mainstream, Vargas says all concerned parties have maintained constant communication. However, the topics being discussed are not to be made public just yet. "This is a very sensitive issue that we are looking into. Exchanges of letters have been happening, we are awaiting for Blackwater to bring this matter up to the Board," Vargas said. "We choose to remain quite about this at the moment, I hope you could respect that. Both parties agreed to keep the discussion private. The whole Board will be part of this process.     — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 27th, 2020

PBA return pushed back again as Metro Manila under MECQ anew

Following another late-night announcement Sunday, Metro Manila is once again under a modified enhanced community quarantine. The new quarantine measures will take effect starting August 4 and will last until August 18. The PBA is directly affected, as sports gatherings are not allowed under MECQ, resulting in another speed bump to the league's planned return. "The government knows what is good for us, and we conform with their orders. We will follow the guidelines and will wait for the next word from them with regards to restrictions on whatever quarantine status we're in," PBA Commissioner Willie Marcial said. "As for the 14-day return of Metro Manila to modified enhanced community quarantine (MECQ), I look at it as a short detour that we'll pursue in the hope of getting our teams back in the gym at the right time," Marcial added. The PBA earlier received official government approval to start team practices by small batches. [Related: PBA hopeful for 2020 return after getting practice green light] Pending COVID-19 swab testing for all teams, which were scheduled later this week at Makati Med, teams were on track to return to the court by next week. Now, all plans have been pushed back, including the swab testing. "We have no recourse but to adjust the schedule of our activities. The supposed swab testing of the players at the Makati Med on Aug. 6-7 will be pushed back," Commissioner Marcial said. "Ngayon, we'll communicate with them [PBA teams] to inform them that we'll have to hear the next call of the government," he added. As of Sunday, August 2, hours before the MECQ announcement, the Philippines has recorded 103,185 positive COVID-19 cases.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2020

IATF clears basketball, football to resume training

PBA teams can now return to practice after the government gave the green light for basketball and football training to resume after months of halt due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The two team sports were cleared to resume activities by the Inter-Agency Task Force (IATF) on Emerging Infectious Diseases according to Presidential Spokesperson Harry Roque. “Pinayagan na po ang practice at yung conditioning ng basketball at football sang-ayon po sa request ng PBA at ng iba pang football associations,” said Roque in a press briefing on Friday. The clearance was given to the professional basketball and football leagues with the Philippine Sports Commisision, the Games and Amusement Board and Department of Health drafting the guidelines for training.    The PBA last month submitted a request to the IATF to allow teams to resume training under strict health and safety protocols during the general community quarantine in Metro Manila.     According to the protocol submitted by the PBA, practices will be strictly for conditioning purposes only. Coaches will be barred from attending while teams will be holding practices by batches of four players, with one trainer and one health officer. Tune-up games and scrimmages are not allowed. The training clearance could pave the way for the return of the PBA’s single-conference season late this year as well as for the Philippine Football League’s resumption. Earlier, national sports association leaders from athletics, basketball, volleyball, football, rugby, gymnastics and karate crafted a one-month trial program for athletes to resume training under a strict health and safety protocols. The IATF’s approval for the resumption of basketball and football training also raises hopes for other sports to return to training activities especially another popular team sport in volleyball......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2020

Terror bill under review; Duterte says Reds top threat

Even as President Duterte has yet to sign the new anti-terrorism bill pending the advise of his legal team which will check on possible constitutional infirmities of the measure, the Chief Executive identified communist rebels as the “number one threat” to the country today, amid the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 24th, 2020

Basketball, volleyball to retain normal format in UAAP Season 83

The UAAP may be looking at a possible Southeast Asian Games style of holding its sporting events to fit a condensed schedule but centerpiece sports basketball and volleyball will retain their usual tournament format. Speaking to reporters Tuesday during the online session of the Philippine Sportswriters Association Forum, UAAP Season 82 president Em Fernandez of Ateneo said that with the current situation of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the pending the decision of the government to give the green light for sporting events to resume, UAAP Season 83 could open around the first quarter of 2021.   De La Salle University will host the next season.  With this, the UAAP is looking at fitting a full calendar within a limited number of months and one of the options is to hold the season patterned after the SEA Games length of around two weeks. [Related story: UAAP looking at full calendar of events for Season 83] But Fernandez cleared that spectator team sports basketball and volleyball and other team events will run their tournament using the usual format.      “Right now we’re not planning on tweaking the format,” said Fernandez, who was joined by UAAP Executive director Atty. Rebo Saguisag in the session presented by San Miguel Corporation, the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (PAGCOR), Amelie Hotel Manila, Braska Restaurant, and Go For Gold PH. “So it would be the same format, double-round robin (eliminations) with a Final Four and Finals,” added Fernandez. However, under a condensed calendar, basketball and volleyball tournaments will run simultaneously alongside other events.   “The idea to have the school calendar, if possible operationally, to start it in the first quarter of 2021,” said Fernandez. “Para kaming nag-second semester sport all sport ganoon lang naman ang mangyayari.” In Season 82, basketball completed its tournament in the first semester while volleyball was affected by the cancellation of the season last March.   ---    Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 16th, 2020

SEA Games gold winners Wong, Lim raise over 300K for fight vs COVID-19

Agatha Wong and Jamie Lim's team-up has been a triumph in the continuing COVID-19 crisis. The gold medalists in the 2019 Southeast Asian Games have raised over PHP 300K for frontliners in PGH as well as Quezon City General Hospital. Through those funds, basic necessities have been purchased for medical staff as well as recreational materials - such as TVs, activity books, and self-help guides - for recovering patients. "As athletes, Jamie and I knew that the physical aspect as well as the mentality of an individual matters for overall health," Wong, twin-gold winner in wushu, said. "We believe that when the mind is healthy, the heart and body will follow." Wong teamed up with Lim, who ruled 61 kg women's karate in the regional meet, in weekly online question-and-answer sessions where the pair discussed health, wellness, and sports as a way to lift the spirits as well as liven up the minds of viewers. And though that has been a triumph, they vowed to only continue keeping up the good fight vs COVID-19. "Based on pledges, there will be more to come. We will be posting updates soon," Wong said. At the same time, the gold medalists reiterated the importance of a healthy mind - with or without the virus in the body. "Anxiety is inevitable, but also letting yourself interrupt your troubling thoughts with positivity is possible," Wong, a proud product of College of St. Benilde where she took consular and diplomatic affairs, said. She then continued, speaking on behalf of Lim, who graduated summa cum laude in mathematics in the University of the Philippines, "We just want everyone to know that there will be an end soon. Never lose hope and take care of yourself!" --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 10th, 2020

Possible PBA green light brings hope for other sports events

The possibility of the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) getting the green light from the Inter-Agency Task Force for the Management of Emerging Infectious Diseases (IATF) to resume training and eventually its tournament could serve as a ray of hope for other sports leagues. Speaking in the online session of the Philippine Sportswriters Association Forum on Tuesday, PBA commissioner Willie Marcial expressed confidence that the IATF will give a positive response to their request to allow team training under strict health and safety protocols during the general community quarantine in Metro Manila.    “Informally, mukhang positive. Ang inaano lang natin kung kailan (papayagan),” said Marcial, who was joined by deputy commissioner Eric Castro in the session. “Tingnan natin kung i-lift na susunod ‘yung quarantine. Mukhang maganda naman pero habang wala pa… kasi baka lumala eh di wala na tayo.” “Kapag gumaganda ang sitwasyon ng Pilipinas, gumaganda na rin ang sitwasyon ng PBA,” he added. According to the protocol submitted by the PBA, practices will be strictly for conditioning purposes only. Coaches will be barred from attending while teams will be holding practices by batches of four players, with one trainer and one health officer. Tune-up games and scrimmages are not allowed. If ever the IATF allows team trainings to resume, Marcial hopes that it would eventually lead to a restart of the Philippine Cup.       Being on top of the hierarchy of organized sports events in the country, a positive feedback on PBA’s request will start a domino effect on other sports leagues affected by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. In a separate proposal to the task force, national sports association leaders from athletics, basketball, volleyball, football, rugby, gymnastics and karate crafted a one-month trial program for athletes to resume training as well as a draft of their health and safety protocols. “Sa pagkakatingin ko rin na kapag pinayagan ang PBA, hindi lang basketball baka lahat na nang sports dahan-dahan nang papayagan yan,” said Marcial. “Malaking bagay talaga itong ginawa ng PBA na sana payagan.”    “Kapag pinayagan tayo hindi lang basketball kundi pati ibang sports matutulungan natin,” he added. Volleyball leagues like the Premier Volleyball League and Philippine Superliga, the MPBL, NCAA, UAAP and Philippine Football League just like the PBA are all waiting for the decision of the IATF.   “The PBA will be a gauge for most of the sports natin,” according to Castro. “We can set as a model for other events. I hope ma-consider ng IATF ‘yung request natin.” “It will be a step-by-step (process). Again, practice then later on kung mag-MGCQ nga tayo we can proceed on our games.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 9th, 2020

Bucks lead thousands in public protest

The Milwaukee Bucks led thousands of fans on what the team described as a public protest march through downtown Milwaukee in support of social justice. Bucks officials estimated that 7,500 people participated. Before the march, Bucks guard Sterling Brown led the crowd in 9 seconds of silence to honor George Floyd. Brown has a pending lawsuit against the city of Milwaukee, saying that police used excessive force and targeted him because he is black when they used a stun gun on him on Jan. 26, 2018. “It’s great to see everybody out here standing as one, standing for equality, standing for George Floyd and his family and everybody who’s been a victim to police brutality,” Brown told the crowd before the march. Brown was at the front row with many of his Bucks teammates and led the crowd in various chants that included “black lives matter,” “no justice, no peace” and “We will be seen, we will be heard.” Several of the Bucks players also had participated in a local march against police brutality on Saturday night. “We’re here as one,” Brown told the crowd beforehand. “We’re making something great happen. We’re making something positive happen, something that’s heard around the world.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 8th, 2020