Advertisements


US Women s Open champ Saso gets pat on the back from idol McIlroy

McIlroy, a four-time major champion and a former world No. 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking, was the blueprint for Saso's swing as the teen used to watch the former's videos on YouTube to fine-tune her game......»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarJun 7th, 2021

Yuka Saso keen to meet idol Rory McIlroy

By WAYLON GALVEZ Yuka Saso is now eager to meet the man who helped her win the US Women’s Open crown on Sunday at the Lake Course of The Olympic Club Sunday in San Francisco, California. That’s no other than Rory McIlroy. Her wish was understandable since she drew strength from McIlroy. The 19-year-old Saso […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 9th, 2021

Saso, 19, wins US Women’s Open golf, pockets $1 million prize

By WAYLON GALVEZ Yuka Saso was on the ‘My Day’ story of her idol Rory McIlroy hours before she and third round leader Lexi Thompson of the United States teed off for the final round of the 76th edition of the US Women’s Open championship. The message of McIlroy, a former world No. 1 golfer, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsJun 7th, 2021

Rory McIlroy a big part in Yuka s major breakthrough

She missed browsing on her longtime idol’s inspiring message, but Yuka Saso still got the job done, snaring the US Women’s Open championship practically behind a swing she modelled after former world No. 1 Rory McIlroy......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 7th, 2021

‘Major, major’ await Pinay champ

After earning spots on the LPGA Tour’s top events, including the majors, through invites and sponsor’s exemptions, Yuka Saso now braces for a grueling campaign in big-time championships as a regular fixture following her major breakthrough in the US Women’s Open in San Francisco last Sunday. She is actually lined up for another crack at […] The post ‘Major, major’ await Pinay champ appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJun 9th, 2021

Philippines needs more young golfers, says US Women s Open champ Yuka Saso

Asked about growing the future of golf in the Philippines, Saso sees the need for more grassroots programs for the sport — which is largely played by older Filipinos......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 9th, 2021

Robin niresbakan ang bashers ni Yuka Saso: Paluin ko kayo ng golf club, eh!

PINAPURIHAN ni Robin Padilla at ipinagtanggol sa bashers ang pride ng Pilipinas na si Yuka Saso na nanalo bilang kauna-unahang Filipina sa 76th US Women’s Open Champ. Nakalaban niya sa nasabing sports event ang pambato ng Japan na si Nasa Hataoka na ginanap sa Olympic Club, San Francisco, California. Kaliwa’t kanan ang papuri kay Yuka […] The post Robin niresbakan ang bashers ni Yuka Saso: Paluin ko kayo ng golf club, eh! appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 8th, 2021

Yuka Saso takes solo lead in US Women s Open with 67

After finishing two strokes back against erstwhile leaders Megha Ganne and Mel Reid in the opening round, Saso shot a 4 under in the round to zoom to the top of the standings......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 5th, 2021

Yuka Saso gains in world ranking, Player of the Year race

Saso actually reached No. 48 from No. 55 a couple of weeks back but dropped two rungs last week after finishing tied for sixth in the JLPGA Tour Championship Ricoh Cup. But her gutsy stint in the tough storm-hit US Women’s Open at Cypress Creek netted her 2.47 average points for a total points of 86.45 to post her best world ranking at the close of her rookie campaign......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 16th, 2020

Saso fades with 77; Shibuno hangs on despite 3-over 74

Back to Cypress Creek which she conquered the first time out, Yuka Saso got subdued this time, fumbling with a six-over 77 Saturday to all but bow out of the chase for the US Women’s Open diadem that is up for grabs for at least eight bidders in Houston, Texas......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 14th, 2020

Saso fades with 73; Hara storms ahead

The young Fil-Japanese, who got back into the thick of things with a birdie-eagle feat for a 70 Friday, birdied the opening par-5 No. 1, sparking hopes for the NEC Karuizawa and NItori Ladies winner’s big third round charge in the Japan Women’s Open after finishing tied for 13th in the JLPGA Championship Minolta Cup in Okayama last month......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 3rd, 2020

Saso fights back with 70, lays eight adrift

In danger of missing the weekend play of the Japan Women’s Open, Yuka Saso did what she does best, coming through with an explosive windup to shoot a 70 and safely advance in the LPGA of Japan Tour’s second major championship in Miyakawa City in Fukuoka Prefecture yesterday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2020

Refreshed Saso eager to launch 2nd major drive

Back to what she loves doing best, Yuka Saso sets out for the rich Japan Women’s Open......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 29th, 2020

Morikawa quickly goes from college grad to major champion

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Collin Morikawa couldn't help but break into a smile, and not just because the shiny Wanamaker Trophy he won at Harding Park was positioned on a stand next to him. Just over 14 months ago, Morikawa went through commencement after his All-American career — on the golf course and in the classroom — across the Bay Bridge and up the road at Cal-Berkeley. Since then, he has played 28 tournaments around the world and already has three victories on the PGA Tour, one of them a major championship. In the last 50 years, only four other players won their first major before age 23 or younger — Jordan Spieth, Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods and Seve Ballesteros. He already is No. 5 in the world. That alone puts him among the elite, except that Morikawa didn't need to win the PGA Championship to feel that way. “When I woke up today, I was like, ‘This is meant to be.’ This is where I feel very comfortable,” Morikawa said. “This is where I want to be, and I'm not scared from it. I think if I was scared from it, the last few holes would have been a little different. But you want to be in this position.” Harding Park was not a place for the meek. Rare is Sunday at a major with so many possibilities at the beginning, at the turn and down the stretch. The drama was relentless. Nine players at one point could claim a share of the lead. There was Dustin Johnson, who started with a one-shot lead. The power of Tony Finau, Bryson DeChambeau and Cameron Champ was on full display. Jason Day brought the experience of winning majors and being No. 1 in the world. Morikawa embraced the moment and delivered the signature shot that allowed him to win a thriller. Actually, there were two moments. After catching a good break — even the most tested major champions need those — with a tee shot off a tree and into play on the 14th, he was short of the green and chipped in for birdie to take the lead. Two holes later, Paul Casey tied him with a nifty up-and-down for birdie on the 16th, where the tees were moved forward to 294 yards to entice players to go for the green. Morikawa thought back to the 14th hole at Muirfield Village during the Workday Charity Open, where he fearlessly hit driver in a similar situation — big trouble left, water right — and drilled it to 12 feet. His shot was the signature moment of this major, a driver that bounced just right and onto the green and rolled up to 7 feet below the cup. He made the eagle putt and was on his way to a two-shot victory with a 6-under 64, matching the lowest final round by a PGA champion. There were no spectators because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Casey must have felt like one. He was still on the 17th tee when he looked back and saw Morikawa's shot. “Nothing you can do but tip your cap to that,” Casey said. “Collin has taken on that challenge and pulled it off. That's what champions do.” He won at Muirfield Village last month not from that bold play on the 14th hole, but after Justin Thomas made a 50-foot birdie putt in the playoff. Morikawa answered with a 25-foot birdie of his own and won two holes later. He is comfortable in the most uncomfortable situations. It was Thomas who gave Morikawa more confidence than he needed. They got together for dinner at the Canadian Open last summer, Morikawa's first start since graduating from Cal. Thomas told him he was good enough, he would make it. Thomas knew from experience. He spent a year in the minor leagues before getting his PGA Tour card, went through a year of learning without winning and now has 13 wins, a major and twice has been No. 1 in the world. Morikawa didn't wait that long. He won the Barracuda Championship to earn a PGA Tour card. He won against a strong field for validation. Now he's a major champion. Young stars are emerging every year, and it was easy to overlook Morikawa. He was a runner-up two years in a row for the Hogan Award, given to the nation's best college player. Doug Ghim won in 2018, Matthew Wolff a year later. And it was Wolff who denied Morikawa a victory last year in Minnesota by making a long eagle putt on the last hole. Players know best. “There’s always a bunch of guys that rock up on the scene, and he didn’t necessarily get the most publicity out of the group he was in,” Casey said. “I know talent when I see it. I don't like the term ‘talent,’ but you know when somebody is good. And Collin was good. We could just tell. ... And we weren't wrong.” Morikawa grew up in Southern California with Wolff. He considers the Bay Area a second home from his time at Cal and the dozen times the Golden Bears played or had qualifiers at Harding Park, a public course that never was this tough. In just over a year — it feels less than that because of the three months golf was shut down because of the pandemic — he has emerged as a star without ever being surprised. He thought back to his debut 14 months ago and recalled being comfortable then. He tied for 14th. “There's a different sense of comfort now,” Morikawa said. Another big smile. A bright future......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2020

Li at his best and builds early lead at PGA Championship

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Still young, often inconsistent, forever fearless, Li Haotong is capable of just about anything on a big stage in golf. He was at his best Friday in the PGA Championship. Three years after his 63 in the final round of the British Open, Li hit only four fairways at Harding Park and still managed a 5-under 65 that gave him the early lead and set the target for Jason Day, Brooks Koepka and Tiger Woods to chase. The 25-year-old from China capped a bogey-free round with his eighth straight par and was at 8-under 132, two shots ahead of Tommy Fleetwood of England among the early starters. Surprised? Depends on the day. “The last couple days, I've been pretty much all hit in the right spot,” Li said. Getting as much attention was the logo on his hat — WeChat, the Chinese social media company and one of his biggest sponsors. Li was in the spotlight at Harding Park one day after President Donald Trump signed executive orders on a vague ban of WeChat and TikTok in 45 days. Just as unclear was whether Li was aware of the development. “I don't know,” he said. “Who knows?” Li is a two-time winner on the European Tour, most recently in 2018 at the Dubai Desert Classic when he rallied down the stretch to beat Rory McIlroy by one shot. He was sensational at Royal Birkdale in 2017 — only five other players have 63 in the final round of a major. But he had a terrible week in his Presidents Cup debut at Royal Melbourne in December. When he first came to America, he made fast friends on the developmental tours with his constant laughter, engaging personality and aggressive play. “He's got the arsenal to take it low,” said Adam Scott, his teammate at Royal Melbourne. “But we don’t see that kind of consistency out of him, and that probably matches his personality a little bit. He’s young, though, and that’s the kind of golf he plays. He plays pretty much all guns blazing, and when it comes off, it’s really good.” And when it doesn't? He beat Koepka in the Match Play last year and reached the round of 16. But that was his last top 10 in America. And then there was the Presidents Cup. Li brought his trainer to be his caddie, and the caddie got lost on the course during a practice round, gave up and headed for the clubhouse. Instead of finding him, Li played the rest of the round out of another player's bag. International captain Ernie Els wound up benching him for two days, playing Li only when he had to. Li lost both matches he played. “It's been very tough on me, the Presidents Cup, because I didn't play until Saturday,” Li said. “So not quite in the Presidents that way, actually. But anyways, good experience.” Fleetwood had one of those final-round 63s in the majors two years ago at Shinnecock Hills in the U.S. Open. He had a 64 on Friday and was two shots behind at 134. Much like Li — maybe the only thing they have in common — it's been a slow start back. Fleetwood stayed in England during the pandemic, not returning to competition until Minnesota two weeks ago (he missed the cut). He also played a World Golf Championship last week with middling results, but he found his form in San Francisco. “It’s funny really, like when you’ve played poorly, you feel a long way off, and then you have a day like today and you obviously feel a lot better about it,” Fleetwood said. “I feel like I’ve prepared well last week and this week and felt way more in the groove of tournament golf.” Cameron Champ, who grew up in Sacramento, had a 64. He was three shots behind Li, along with Paul Casey (67). Brendon Todd, who shared the 18-hole lead with Day, settled for a 70 and joined them at 135. Li, who primarily plays the European Tour, went back to China in March when the COVID-19 pandemic shut down golf. He returned at the Memorial and missed the cut, and then tied for 75th in a 78-man field last week in Tennessee. “I didn't even (think) I could play like this ... got no confidence,” Li said. “Probably it helped me clear my mind a little bit.” He's wise enough to realize the tournament is not even at the halfway point. If the lead holds, Li would be the first player from China to hold the lead after any round of a major......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 8th, 2020

Rahm s wild day ends with Memorial win and No. 1 ranking

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) — The drama was more than Jon Rahm wanted. The result was what he always imagined. Rahm became the No. 1 player in the world Sunday with a victory in the Memorial in which he watched an eight-shot lead at the turn shrink to three shots with three holes to play, and then hit what he called the greatest shot of his life that turned into a bogey because of a penalty. All that mattered was that fist-bump — not a handshake — with Jack Nicklaus, and taking his place along his idol Seve Ballesteros as the only Spaniards to reach No. 1 in the world. With a two-shot penalty for his ball moving the length of a dimple on his chip-in behind the 16th green, Rahm closed with 3-over 75 for a three-shot victory over Ryan Palmer. Rahm got up-and-down on the final four greens, which made it feel even sweeter. “One of the best performances of my life,” Rahm said. “Yesterday was probably one of the best rounds of my life, and finished today with some clutch up-and-downs. As a Spaniard, I'm kind of glad it happened that way.” The fiery emotion is his hallmark. He showed it with a tee shot that sailed left into a creek on the 11th hole, Rahm slamming his club into the ground in a pique of anger. And it was evident with that ferocious fist-pump when his flop shot from deep rough behind the 16th green rolled into the cup. Birdie or bogey, it was a winner, a shot that would have made Ballesteros proud. “I still can't believe it, I'm not going to lie,” he told Nicklaus off the 18th green. With the penalty — Rahm had no idea it was an issue after his round, but accepted the penalty when he saw a video that zoomed in close on the ball — he finished at 9-under 279 for his 10th career victory, fourth on the PGA Tour. Muirfield Village played its toughest in 42 years, with only five players under par, the fewest for the final round since this tournament began in 1976. Rahm's 75 was the highest finish by a winner since Roger Maltbie shot 76 the inaugural year. The rough wasn't cut all week. The greens were allowed to go to the edge because they are being replaced. Crews already had stripped the entire fifth green as the leaders were on the back nine. Rahm looked to be playing a different course. He played bogey-free on the front nine with birdies on the two par 5s. That put him eight shots clear on his way to No. 1. And then he made bogey on the 10th. Not a problem. He yanked his tee shot into a creek on the par-5 11th, and that was a bigger problem based on how hard he slammed the club into the ground in a pique of anger. He made double bogey. Palmer made birdie on the 12th, and then Rahm made another bogey from the bunker on the 14th. Just like that, the lead was three shots. Only a week ago at Muirfield Village for the Workday Charity Open, Justin Thomas had a three-shot lead with three holes to play and wound up losing in a playoff to Collin Morikawa. Rahm was worried his tee shot might find the back bunker, though the rough was not a great option with how fast the greens were running. Rahm was thinking anything inside 10 feet would be good. This was perfect, the ball landing on the fringe and sliding down the slope into the cup. As for the penalty? “It doesn’t change the outcome of the tournament,” he said. “It just puts a little bit of an asterisk in it in the sense of I wish I could just keep that birdie because it was one of the greatest shots of my life, right?” The chip was similar — but from a different angle — to Tiger Woods chipping in from behind the 16th green when he won the Memorial for the fifth time in 2012. Woods, in his first competition since Feb. 16 because of the COVID-19 pandemic, shot 76 and tied for 40th. “Tough, tough conditions to start out my first week back, Thursday and Sunday,” Woods said. “But it was good to get the feel and the flow of competing again.” Matthew Fitzpatrick had a 68 for the low score of the final day to finish third. The consolation prize went to Palmer (74) and Mackenzie Hughes (72), who earned spots in the U.S. Open at Winged Foot in September as the leading two players from the top 10 who were not already eligible. Henrik Norlander could have taken the final spot with a par on the 18th, but he missed the fairway well to the right, couldn't reach the green and made bogey. Norlander and Hughes tied at 3-under 285, but the spot went to Hughes because he had the better world ranking. That ranking now starts with Rahm, who only four years ago was at the Memorial to receive the Jack Nicklaus Award as the nation's best college player. Now he's the best in the world, a ranking that McIlroy had since Feb. 9. “He deserves it,” McIlroy said after his tie for 32nd. “He's been playing great for a long time. Even the display this week, it's pretty impressive.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 20th, 2020

Saso drops to 27th spot after a two-over 74

Yuka Saso carded a two-over par 74 in challenging, wet conditions in Saturday’s third round as she slipped to joint 27th in the AIG Women’s Open in Carnoustie, Scotland......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2021

Saso remains in Top 5 at halfway mark of British Open

Fil-Japanese golfer Yuka Saso remains firmly in contention for her second LPGA major title at the Women's British Open after two rounds of competition......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 21st, 2021

Saso fires 68 in AIG Open solid start

Filipina ace Yuka Saso opened with an eagle-spiked four-under-par 68 to stand just one shot off the pace in the opening round of the $5.8-million AIG Women’s Open Thursday in Carnoustie, Scotland......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 20th, 2021

Korda shares Women s British Open lead with Sagstrom, Kim; Saso one behind

Nelly Korda lived up to her tag of world number one by taking a share of the first-round lead in the Women's British Open alongside South Korea's Kim Sei-young and Swede Madelene Sagstrom at Carnoustie on Thursday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 20th, 2021

Eyes on Saso, young guns at Women& rsquo;s British Open

Carnoustie, United Kingdom—A women’s major golf season dominated by youngsters and newcomers culminates with the Women’s British Open at Carnoustie starting on Thursday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 19th, 2021