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UP Master of Laws application open

The Master of Laws (LL.M.) Program of the University of the Philippines is now accepting applications for Academic Year 2021-2022. The program aims to prepare and familiarize students with internationalized legal practice with its two specialization tracks: Cross-Border and Regional Practice, as well as Government, Public Advocacy and Judging. Individuals with the following qualifications are […] The post UP Master of Laws application open appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource: tribune tribuneFeb 22nd, 2021

Parc Central Residences is now being open for E-Application

Introduction of Parc Central Residences Parc Central Residences is a forthcoming executive condo that is located at Tampines Opportunity 10, East Area of the island......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJan 14th, 2021

Application forms for PBA draft available starting Dec. 7

The Philippine Basketball Association opens the door for prospective rookie hopefuls in its Season 46 Draft as applications will be open starting Dec. 7......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 4th, 2020

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Quizon leads cast in chess qualifiers

International Master Daniel Quizon and Woman Grandmaster candidate Kylen Joy Mordido shoot for nothing less than slots to the premier 18-under open and girls’ divisions of the FIDE Online World Cadets and Youth Rapid Chess Championships when the National Chess Federation of the Philippines holds its qualifiers tomorrow......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 5th, 2020

Addressing mental health amid a pandemic

BETTER DAYS Senator Sonny Angara Mental health has historically been a difficult subject to talk about in Philippine society. Many of us, no doubt, have our own stories, personal or otherwise, of how difficult it is to seek help. In fact, in the journal Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, an August, 2020, analysis of many studies on the matter confirmed that the low utilization of mental health services among Filipinos could be attributed in part to the stigma associated with mental health issues, with resilience and self-reliance becoming possible alternate coping strategies. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has made mental health an even bigger issue. The quarantine, the economic effects of the pandemic, and the anxieties brought about by the virus’ unpredictability have had a negative effect on the mental health of many Filipinos. Although we as a country are consistently rated to be in the Top 5 of a global optimism index, according to the DOH, the calls for help have been increasing. According to the National Center for Mental Health (NCMH), their helpline received about 400 calls monthly from May, 2019, to February, 2020. That’s an average of 13 to 15 calls daily. By March, 672 calls were serviced, and this grew steadily in the following months, until there were 1,034 calls in July – and 440 for the half of August. These double the monthly average from March to August to 876 calls, or 32 to 37 calls daily. Many government and private mental health services are available for people who are seeking help or just someone to talk to. Aside from the NCMH crisis hotline, the Natasha Goulbourn Foundation has confidential crisis lines and a referral system to partnered psychologists. The foundation is also a hub for prevention, recognition, and treatment of depression. The Philippine Mental Health Association also offers similar services, and universities like UST, UP Diliman, and Ateneo de Manila have their own mental health service organizations. Some, like Ateneo’s Center for Family Ministries have affordable or negotiable fees. Online resources like the Silakbo.Ph website have listings for many other mental health service providers outside of the NCR. In fact, many organizations have already partnered with the Department of Health (DOH); perhaps more of them should be invited to the table to plan new policies, projects, and initiatives that will address the growing number of mental health cases. The DOH is also encouraging people to learn more about general mental health through free e-learning courses translated into Filipino.  The source material is from the World Health Organization’s (WHO) QualityRights initiative, which is a global project that aims to help participants improve their own mental health, learn how to support their loved ones and communities, and gain knowledge and skills to tackle mental health issues. Clearly, we need to reassess and adapt to the fact that more Filipinos are now looking for mental health services and treatments. This is why I am seeking to amend Republic Act 11036, the Mental Health Act, particularly its existing chapter on “Rights of Service Users and Other Stakeholders.” Our proposed amendment seek to give health service users the right to immediately receive compensation benefits and special financial assistance they are entitled to under law, should they sustain temporary or permanent mental disability in the line of duty or by reason of a person’s office or position. This is an important amendment, as the Mental Health Act requires that PhilHealth provide insurance packages to patients with mental health conditions, and that access to medicines is ensured. With the observation of World Mental Health Day last October 10, it is important to remember the DOH’s theme for this year, “Mental Health for All: Unifying Voices for Greater Investment and Access.”  This theme encourages that we open conversations on the various challenges that our mental health care system faces every day, such as social stigma and limited funding. In fact, the simple act of marking the day itself is important. It shows those who are suffering that we see them, and care for them. It tells others who are hiding their issues that it is perfectly normal to seek help. And most of all, it encourages the whole world to stand in solidarity in recognition of the need for all of society to help those with mental health issues. E-mail: sensonnyangara@yahoo.com| Facebook, Twitter & Instagram: @sonnyangara Senator Sonny Angara has been in public service for 16 years—9 years as Representative of the Lone District of Aurora, and 7 as Senator. He has authored and sponsored more than 200 laws.  He is currently serving his second term in the Senate. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Bong Go backs construction of Bulacan airport

Senator Christopher “Bong” Go has expressed his support for the construction of the New Manila International Airport project in Bulacan while reminding its proponents to ensure compliance with labor, environmental and other applicable laws, rules and regulations. “I just want to very briefly state that I fully support the move to open a new airport […] The post Bong Go backs construction of Bulacan airport appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsSep 24th, 2020

& lsquo;Your Honor please, I move& hellip;& rsquo;

It is a common phrase uttered by a lawyer in open court before making a request or application for relief. In legal parlance this is known as a “motion.” A motion shall be made in writing except those made by the lawyer in open court. For a young lawyer like myself 28 years ago, appearing in court for a motion hearing is the rite of passage into litigation practice......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 10th, 2020

QC remains City of Stars

  BY RONALD CONSTANTINO     Despite COVID-19 (pandemic, lockdown, quarantine), Quezon City remains the City of Stars, as envisioned by the Master Showman, German “Kuya Germs” Moreno. For one, GMA dominates the airlanes. ABS-CBN has been shutdown, but the Kapamilya Channel remains open via cable, app, iWant, YouTube, Facebook. There is Star Cinema and […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsAug 18th, 2020

WeTrace to open registration by Aug. 8

CEBU CITY, Philippines – Residents in areas under general community quarantine (GCQ) of Cebu province will have to wait for a while before they can register to a contact tracing application needed for their future travel passes. Developers of WeTrace, in an advisory, announced that their Work Pass System portal will be open for registration […] The post WeTrace to open registration by Aug. 8 appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 7th, 2020

An open letter to the Immigration Commissioner

Justice Francisco Acosta, Chairperson/Secretary of the Commission on Filipinos Overseas, sent a correspondence to your office about my request for the issuance by the Bureau of Immigration of a Certification that Johnson Qui Ong, Yu Sam Ong, Johnson Qui Ong Yu Sam, and Johnson Q, Ong Yu Sam with the listed date of birth do not have pending or approved application for naturalization. Said letter was dated February 14, 2020 and was received by your office on February 20, 2020......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 7th, 2020

Fortinet Secure SD-WAN delivers optimal user experience

One of the most critical strategies for businesses undergoing digital transformation is to ensure that growth and expansion is built on a distributed infrastructure. This not only enables them to quickly adapt to today’s dynamic business environments. It also more effectively supports their BCDR (business continuity and disaster recovery) strategy so they can stay open and productive even in the face of a crisis—whether it’s a natural crisis, like the current pandemic, a technological issue, such as the breakdown of critical infrastructures, or even a financial crisis. The key is to build flexibility into the infrastructure that allows for rapidly shifting the workforce to a remote teleworker model. Without proper strategies and solutions in place, organizations are faced with addressing significant technological challenges to enterprises—such as application access, optimal performance, and uninterrupted connectivity to critical assets/resources—in a highly compressed timeframe. And that can lead to serious issues, especially with regards to security......»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 20th, 2020

Online loan application now open for GSIS members, pensioners

State pension fund President and General Manager Rolando Ledesma Macasaet announced that the Government Service Insurance System (GSIS) is now accepting online loan applications via the GSIS website.  .....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 29th, 2020

Rising tennis star Eala leads PSA honor roll of young athletes

Rising tennis star Alex Eala leads a compact list of young, promising athletes who will have their share of center stage in the coming SMC-PSA (Philippine Sportswriters Association) Annual Awards Night. The 14-year-old Eala, along with nine others, are the recipients of the 2019 Tony Siddayao awards during the March 6 gala night at the Centennial Hall of the Manila Hotel. The award, named after the late former Manila Standard sports editor Antonio ‘Tony’ Siddayao - who considered as the Dean of Philippine sportswriting - is given to young, emerging athletes 17-year-old and below, who excelled in their respective fields. Eala exactly embodies that, especially in a year that saw her finish in the top 10 of the world junior rankings by the end of 2019. Following her maiden grand slam title after winning the Australian Open girls doubles tournament along with partner Priska Madelyn Nugroho, the Filipina wonder is now ranked no. 4 in the world. Bemedalled age-group swimmers Micaela Jasmine Mojdeh and Marc Bryant Dula share the honor with Eala in the special yearly event by the country’s oldest media organization headed by Tito S. Talao, sports editor of the Manila Bulletin, and presented by the Philippine Sports Commission, MILO, Philippine Basketball Association, AirAsia, and Rain or Shine. Completing the Siddayao awardees are the bowling pair of Dale Lazo and Jordan Dinham, karatedo’s Juan Miguel Sebastian, golfer Celine Abalos, Woman FIDE master Antonella Racasa, powerlifter Jessa Mae Tabuan, and Eala’s older brother Michael Eala. Prominent recipients of the award for young athletes were Grandmaster Wesley So, Kiefer Ravena, Eumir Felix Marcial, Jeron Teng, Markie Alcala, Pauline Del Rosario, Aby Arevalo, Maurice Sacho Ilustre, among others.  On top of the close than 200 awardees to be honored by the country’s sportswriting fraternity is 30th Southeast Asian Games overall champion Team Philippines, which is the consensus choice as the 2019 Athlete of the Year......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 29th, 2020

Pasig City opens Government Internship Program

PASIG CITY, Jan. 27 (PIA) -- The City Government of Pasig is opening its doors for interns via its Government Internship Program (GIP).Application is now open. Interested applicants must be:.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJan 27th, 2020

Federer roars into record 15th Australian Open quarterfinal

MELBOURNE, Australia – Roger Federer flicked a switch after losing the opening set to crush Marton Fucsovics and book a record 15th Australian Open quarterfinal on Sunday, January 26. The Swiss master took time to work out the Hungarian, but when he did, it was one-way traffic en route to a ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 26th, 2020

Federer survives five-set epic at Australian Open

MELBOURNE, Australia – Six-time champion Roger Federer survived an epic five-set marathon to seal his 100th Australian Open win Friday, January 24, fending off a huge challenge from John Millman. The Swiss master was rattled by the all-guns-blazing Australian, but finally scraped past him, 4-6, 7-6 (7/2), 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (10/8), ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 25th, 2020

An array of MPBL stars have been drafted in the PBA. Who will shine?

A passel of Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League ballers have been drafted into the PBA. These gifted young Pinoys prove that the MPBL is a worthy proving ground for the pro league. We asked a few observers of the league to give their two cents on who they think will fly in the pros, namely commentators Migs Gomez and Martin Antonio as well as league head of ops, Emmer Oreta. Both Gomez and Oreta think that Manila Frontrow Star Aris Dionisio will make the biggest splash in the pros. “Aris Dionisio is the best MPBL player in the (PBA) draft,” says Gomez. “I think his length and athleticism can translate his defensive abilities to the PBA easily. Offensively, he is also capable of running the floor and shooting threes, so converting him from center to small forward will not be a problem.” The 6 foot 5 Dionisio was nabbed by Magnolia with the 9th choice in the first round. “Aris Dionisio is a versatile player who can play a lot of positions, and can also can play off the ball,” notes Oreta. “And the most important thing is he can play defense, for sure.” “Dionisio is next in line to Marc Pingris,” adds Martin Antonio. Oreta and Gomez also agree that Mike Ayonayon will be an impact player immediately in the PBA. The 6-foot San Juan Knight is “a baller, a lengthy swingman who is very athletic and likes the open floor,” says Gomez. The former PCU Dolphin was selected third by NLEX and is etched in league lore because of his Reggie Miller-esque 12-point, two-minute outburst for San Juan that enabled the Knights to a close comeback win versus Bataan earlier in the season. Antonio believes that Ayonayon will thrive and develop under Road Warriors mentor Yeng Guiao. “Ayanayon + Guiao = Killer,” says Coach Hammer. “Yeng Guiao loves players like Mike,” adds Antonio. Gomez even gives the high-flying Antipoleno the ultimate compliment. “I came up with my signature line “Magic in the Air” because of him.” When it comes to sleeper picks and project players, the experts are split. Oreta and believes that Chris Bitoon, Dionisio's teammate in Manila, could be a surprise package. “A late pick, but for sure coach Nash Racela knows this guy well, and he can really play.” The former Manuel L. Quezon University Stallion had his number called in the third round by Blackwater Elite. Also getting drafted by Elite was Richard Escoto, who played for the Iloilo Royals, where Racela was an assistant before getting the Blackwater head coaching job. Gomez believes that Aaron Black is a worthy project for Meralco. The Zamboanga combo guard who also played for QC early in the season was corralled by the Bolts, who are coached by his father, Norman. “The pressure has always been there for Aaron to live up to his last name, but he has embraced it and blossomed in the MPBL,” explains Gomez. “He has a good relationship with his father, and with the skillset and body that he has now, I can only see him improving more and more. Aaron can play point guard and get triple-doubles.” Gomez also throws another name into the ring when it comes to project players: Yankie Haruna. The former CSB Blazer, currently with the Bacolod Master Sardines club, was drafted 9th in the second round by Magnolia. The 6 foot 2 New Jersey-native is an enticing prospect. “He’s tall enough, very athletic, and likes to penetrate with full authority. I think his body can translate into an explosive scorer in the PBA,” explains Gomez. Oreta on the other hand thinks Cris Dumapig can rise up from obscurity to become a PBA player. “He is a workhorse of a big man, for sure this kind of a player Coach Pido Jarencio really wants. I'm hoping he can sign with the team.” Dumapig was taken by NorthPort in the middle of the third round. The rebounding machine is a vital cog for a Basilan Steel Jumbo Plastic side that is third in the South Division as of the writing of this piece. Oreta also thinks another big man can make waves: Cebu Sharks – Casino Ethyl Alcohol's Will McAloney. “Coach Yeng really loves players from the south, playing physical and all-out every time,” said Oreta. The burly homegrown Cebuano was the first of NLEX's two second round selections. There are so many MPBL stalwarts who are testing the waters in the PBA, like Allyn Bulanadi, the stylish scorer taken by Alaska, and Rey Publico, the Iloilo big man also absorbed by the same PBA team. Rey Suerte of Batangas will don the colors of Blackwater after his early selection (Editor's note: Bulanadi and Suerte were selected as part of the special Gilas Draft and will focus on national team duties before suiting up in the PBA). Big names like Prince Rivero and Arvin Tolentino will also attempt to show their wares at the country's highest stage. Most if not all of these players will remain with their MPBL teams until April. Whether it's in the Liga ng Bawat Pilipino or at the PBA, we can expect tons of fireworks from this bumper crop of young Pinoy hoops talent......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 24th, 2020

Enes Kanter seeks to open school in Oklahoma City

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Former Oklahoma City Thunder player Enes Kanter plans to open a charter school in the metro area that focuses on serving low-income minority students and those from immigrant families with limited English-speaking abilities. Kanter, who currently plays for the Boston Celtics, notified Oklahoma City Public Schools of his intention to open the Enes Kanter School for Exceptional Learning, according to a letter first obtained by The Frontier. He and a group of “civic-minded individuals” from the city will submit a charter school application to the school district on Tuesday, The Oklahoman reported. The Oklahoma City School Board will then consider the application in a vote. Kanter and his associates have not selected a location for the school, but noted that they want to pick a site where “the need is high,” according to the letter. The school would be designed mostly for under-served minority and immigrant students from fourth through 12th grade. Kanter played for the Thunder from 2014 to 2017 before he was traded to the New York Knicks. “Despite playing for other teams, I continue to return to Oklahoma City to host my annual basketball summer camps and to support programs that serve the OKC children,” Kanter wrote. “Through my foundation, my philanthropic activities extend to all of the cities where I have played for: Utah, Portland, New York, and Boston.” The school would offer a syllabus that highlights reading, writing, math and science skills with an emphasis on physical, emotional and mental health education. It would embed “rich sports and arts activities in students’ daily schedule.” Kanter would not be the first NBA player to open a school. Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James gained recognition for opening the I Promise School in his hometown of Akron, Ohio. James’ school opened in 2018 as an elementary school to serve at-risk children. He has also faced challenges beyond the court. As a native of Turkey, Kanter missed a game last year in Toronto shortly after joining the Portland Trailblazers because he felt like his life might be in danger if he left the United States. As a result of his criticism of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Kanter had been labeled a terrorist by his native country. His passport was revoked and Turkey reportedly issued a warrant for his arrest with Interpol......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 10th, 2020

Top seed NM Emperado rules Metropolitan chessfest

Top seed National Master Emmanuel Emperado lived up to expectations as he ruled the Metropolitan Chess Club Grand Reunion Standard Open Chess Tournament recently at the Starmall Edsa Shaw in Mandaluyong City.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 3rd, 2020

Emperado paces MCC standard open

Top seed National Master Emmanuel Emperado took the early lead after four rounds of play in the MCC Grand Reunion Standard Open Chess Tournament at the Starmall Edsa Shaw in Mandaluyong City......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 29th, 2019