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Universal Health Care Law” reorients health care system

What could be the most salient point of the newly passed Universal Health Care Law (UHCL) which President Rodrigo Duterte signed not too long ago? Asked this question, Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) Visayas Vice President Lourdes Diocsonhinted the reorientation of the old health care system. From the generally post confinement assistance, much of the […].....»»

Category: newsSource: boholnewsdaily boholnewsdailyApr 28th, 2019

Gov’t sets inspection of cold storage facilities

For COVID-19 vaccines The government will conduct an inspection starting next week of existing cold storage facilities as it prepares for another tripartite logistics suppliers agreement for an integrated shipment, storage and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in the country. National Task Force Against COVID-19 Chief Implementer and Vaccine Czar Secretary Carlito Galvez Jr. said this as he assured that inputs from the private logistics providers will be considered in organizing an end-to-end service for the vaccines’ rollout. Presidential Peace Adviser Carlito Galvez Jr., chief implementer of the National Task Force (NTF) on COVID-19 (NTF AGAINST COVID-19 / MANILA BULLETIN) “Next week we will inspect all available cold chain storage. We are coordinating with a consortium so that they will make sure that all vaccines from 2-8-degree celcius to negative 70 will be taken care of,” he said. This developed as the Cold Chain Association of the Philippines (CCAP), told Manila Bulletin that the industry is still awaiting for the government to accept the industry’s offer to play a role in the distribution of COVID-19 vaccine. CCAP is a multi-sectoral group of companies involved in the handling, storage, and distribution of chilled and frozen food, among other products.                Galvez assured that the logistics system for the vaccines will be in coordination with the vaccine suppliers, the cold storage provider and the government. Galvez explained the government has to establish an integrated logistics system for the vaccines to ensure there is no wastage of the new vaccines, which have different storage temperature requirement. “We have seen some reports that we have 30 percent wastage in some areas in Europe. With acute shortage of vaccines we cannot afford wastage,” he stressed. He further said that the cold storage facilities are part of their agreement with vaccine suppliers for an end-to-end service solution. The after sales service is part of this long commitment with the vaccine suppliers and as a requirement under the government’s universal health system. “We will make sure that the vaccine that will be coming here has an integrated coordination with vaccine maker, the local government units and the private sector so that includes after sales service,” he said. Meantime, the Go Negosyo which spearheaded the private sector donation drive “A Dose of Hope” said there are ongoing consultations to help Galvez in coming up with an integrated shipment, storage and distribution system for the vaccines. Presidential Adviser on Entrepreneurship Joey Concepcion said the private sector donors would rather live the logistics aspect to the vaccine supplier Astra-Zeneca Pharmaceuticals and the national government to ensure smooth implementation. Concepcion has secured 17 million doses from the private sector that are expected to inoculate 8 million Filipinos in June-July this year. Meantime, Royal Cargo Inc., one of the country’s leading logistics providers, has expanded its cold storage facility at its Paranaque head office so it can accommodate the different temperature requirements of the various COVID-19 vaccines. Earlier, CCAP President Anthony Dizon said the Philippine government is yet to formally tap the country’s cold chain industry for the handling and distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine in the country.            According to Dizon, the industry, “individually and collectively”, has more than enough capacity to participate in the country’s COVID-19 vaccine distribution program.Right now, he said the cold chain industry’s total cumulative capacity stood at 500,000 pallet containers, while the initial 20 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine will consume only less than 200 pallets.            “Our initial estimate is that even if we are called upon to play a role in the storage of the vaccine, it will constitute a small portion of our capacity,” Dizon said.“The industry is just waiting for the government to approach us,” he added.   In a previous report,. said the government is now in discussion with the private sector regarding the state-led distribution of COVID-19 vaccine.             “I’m thankful to the private sector for throwing their support to us, like what they did when we ramped up our testing capacity,” said Galvez.  On the part of CCAP, however, Dizon said no official dialogue has so far taken place between the organization and the government regarding this matter......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsJan 17th, 2021

Opportunity to reform market economy

The crisis brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic provides a singular opportunity to significantly reform the so-called free market economy that has been embraced by countries of different political shades and persuasions, from socialist China to capitalist America.  Although it cannot be denied that the experiment with market-oriented economic policies by China has resulted in the liberation from dehumanizing poverty of hundreds of millions of people over the last 20  to 30 years, there continues to be scandalous disparity of income and wealth among those who have benefited from these reforms and those who have been left behind.  The massive unemployment that has been caused by the lockdowns of  economies all over the world has worsened the inequity in the distribution of income even in the most developed countries of Europe and elsewhere. The human sufferings that we are witnessing during the worst global economic crisis in 150 year  should bring world leaders to finally come to their senses and listen to what Pope Francis has been saying about   the limitations of the free market economy in respecting the dignity of each human person and in pursuing the common good of society. In The Joy of the Gospel, Pope Francis clearly states that “the dignity of each human person and the pursuit of the common good are concerns which ought to shape all economic policies. At times, however, they seem to be a mere addendum imported from without in order to fill out a political discourse lacking in perspectives or plans for true and integral development.”  The Holy Father points out that  growth in social justice “requires more than economic growth, while presupposing such growth.”  it requires decisions, programs, mechanisms, and processes especially geared to a better distribution of income, the creation of sources of employment, and an integral promotion of the poor which goes beyond a simple welfare mentality.”  In the publication “This Economy Kills,” authors Andrea Tornielli and Giacomo Galeazzi, inspired by the teachings of Pope Francis, enumerate the types of leaders who are needed for authentic human development in both developed and emerging markets.  According to them, we need “men and women who look to the future, who are committed to pursue the common  good and whose goal is not just the next election campaign.  It requires men and women who not only look at the spread and stock market indices as indicators of the health of a country but inquire whether the younger generations have a job, a future, and hope; whether children have kindergartens and schools that can educate them by introducing them to reality; whether couples have the opportunity to buy a house; whether there are effective welfare programs available for the elderly; and whether those who still bet on the future by putting children into the world are justly taxed, rather than penalized.  It requires men and women who are engaged in politics and work in institutions without corrupting themselves or letting others corrupt them, even managing perhaps to revive a minimum of esteem (which has never been so in decline) for that ‘highest form of charity’—that is, politics—in as much as it is exclusively committed to the common good and to the real lives of people, with special attention   and dedication to those in difficulty, those left behind, those  who are excluded and should be included.” We have in the above quote a program that should permeate the so-called new normal post-pandemic.  What I have read so far about prognostications concerning the “new normal” are mostly about means, not ends. There is a lot of talk about the digital transformation that all economic sectors shall have undergone as a response to the changes in consumer lifestyle and business practices brought about by COVID-19. It asserted that digitalization will be a universal practice. Online purchases of practically all types of consumer goods and services; modes of payments; delivery of formal education and all types  of skills training; banking practices; religious services; sports events; forms of entertainment; etc.  These transformations, however,  could occur without addressing the fundamental problem of great disparities in the distribution of income and wealth and may even exacerbate the problem of the poor if, for example, their children are further left behind because they lack the resources to participate in online learning.  Although the means are also important, there should be greater emphasis in the transformation of the ends or objectives of the economic system.  Our leaders should ask themselves how to make the structural changes necessary to reduce mass poverty (which has worsened during the many lockdowns made necessary by the pandemic).  In more concrete terms, the economic system should be geared to providing more nutritious food to the poorest of the poor; better quality education and health care to the bottom 20 percent of the population; free health services to those who cannot afford them;  socialized housing for the homeless; and well paying jobs for the unemployed and underemployed. The new normal should give the highest priority to providing the small farmers with what they need to eke out a decent living by providing them with the necessary infrastructures such as farm-to-market roads, irrigation systems, post-harvest facilities, access to credit and other farm support services that have long been denied the Filipino farmers.  I have always maintained that the first cause of dehumanizing poverty in the Philippines is the long-term neglect of rural and agricultural development.  It is not a coincidence that 75 percent of those who fall below the poverty line are in the rural areas. Many of them are the beneficiaries of agrarian reform who, after being provided with one or two hectares of land, were completely abandoned to their own resources.  They are the landless farm workers, the “kaingeros” (slush-and-burn farmers), and the subsistence fisherfolk. Hopefully, the shortage of food during  the pandemic has made it crystal clear that food security should be on top of our economic objectives.  Food security now and in the future can be made possible only by a significant increase in the productivity with which we use our agricultural resources.  To be continued For comments, my email address is bernardo.villegas@uap.asia.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2020

Cebu to Pilot Health Program

The Province of Cebu was one of the pilot provinces chosen for the initial implementation of the Universal Health Care. By the time that the Universal Health Care will be fully implemented, it will rebuild the country’s healthcare system. Dr. Rene Catan, chief of the Cebu Provincial Health Office (PHO) pointed out that good performance […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsMay 4th, 2019

New bills filed to amend Universal Health Care Act

MANILA, Philippines — Lawmakers from the Senate and the House of Representatives have called for the deferment of the increase in premium payments to Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth). A group of senators on Tuesday filed bills that seek to amend Republic Act No. 11223 or the Universal Health Care (UHC) Act to avert an […] The post New bills filed to amend Universal Health Care Act appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 6th, 2021

PhilHealth rate increase pushing through in 2021

The Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth) is implementing the scheduled increase in premium contribution rates and adjustment in income ceiling for 2021 to ensure sufficient funding for the health care benefits of its 110 million members, as mandated by Republic Act No. 11223 or the Universal Health Care (UHC) Law......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 30th, 2020

Pru Life UK continues health dialogue series on telemedicine with partners from the government and health sector

Pru Life UK reaffirmed its commitment to digital health with the webinar Telemedicine: Accelerating Access of Filipinos to Quality Universal Health Care......»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 27th, 2020

Guidelines sa pondo ng PAGCOR para sa UHC program isinasapinal pa – Sec. Roque

Manila, Philippines – Sinabi ng Malakanyang na isinasapinal pa ang guidelines para sa paggamit ng pondo mula sa Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (PAGCOR) para sa Universal Health Care program. Ayon kay presidential spokesperson Harry Roque pirma na lamang ang kulang para maipatupad ang   guidelines na inihanda ng Department of Health at Philippine Health Insurance […] The post Guidelines sa pondo ng PAGCOR para sa UHC program isinasapinal pa – Sec. Roque appeared first on REMATE ONLINE......»»

Category: newsSource:  remateRelated NewsNov 19th, 2020

Ilocos Norte to operate oxygen generator plant

LAOAG CITY (PNA) – The Governor Roque B. Ablan Sr. Memorial Hospital (GRBASMH) here is set to operate a P20-million oxygen generator plant this month, Dr. Rogelio R. Balbag, executive officer of the Ilocos Norte Hospital Management Council (INHMC), said Friday. Balbag said almost 90 percent of the warehouse for the medical oxygen generator has been constructed, while the machine, its accessories, and the trained personnel are also set to be installed. As part of improving the health care system, the Ilocos Norte government is eyeing the upgrade of its health facilities to address the shortage of oxygen supply often encountered by district hospitals. “With our oxygen generator, we will no longer import. Instead, we will be able to produce our own. Also, Ilocos Norte can save a budget and even supply other private hospitals,” he added. Meanwhile, a Malasakit Center will soon open at the GRBASMH. The center is a one-stop shop where patients could access medical and financial assistance offered by various government agencies. “This is a pet project of our governor. We are just waiting for the launch date from the Office of the President and we will be ready to open,” Balbag said, noting that the center would be replicated in all district hospitals to serve more Ilocanos. When Governor Matthew Marcos Manotoc assumed office, he pledged to invest in the health of Ilocanos, whom he recognized as the province’s “greatest assets”. As such, the provincial government has been expanding its health care infrastructure to increase the capacity of all government-managed hospitals in the province. This year, more than P118 million has been allocated for the improvement, rehabilitation, and renovation of the provincial and district hospitals. Among the completed infrastructure projects at the provincial hospital are the computerized tomography (CT) scan building, renovation of the intensive care unit room, and the rehabilitation of comfort rooms. The operating and delivery rooms of the Dingras District Hospital were also rehabilitated, while several fixtures at the Vintar District Hospital were repaired. Other ongoing projects are the construction of a placenta pit, a sewerage system, the medical oxygen generator warehouse, and the improvement of the dialysis center and operating room complex of GRBASMH. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsNov 8th, 2020

Mga Pinoy na kayang bumili ng COVID vaccine, ‘di haharangin – gov’t

Manila, Philippines – Hindi pipigilan ng pamahalaan ang mga Pilipino na  kayang bumili ng  COVID-19 vaccine sa kabila ng  Universal Health Care (UHC) Law na ang mandato ay bigyan ng bakuna ang lahat ng mga Pilipino. Ang pahayag na ito ni Presidential spokesman Harry Roque ay matapos na sabihin ni Pangulong Rodrigo Roa Duterte na […] The post Mga Pinoy na kayang bumili ng COVID vaccine, ‘di haharangin – gov’t appeared first on REMATE ONLINE......»»

Category: newsSource:  remateRelated NewsNov 7th, 2020

Millions more face English virus restrictions as cases spiral

Millions more people in northern England face stricter coronavirus rules next week, officials said Friday, as reports suggested the government is considering a nationwide lockdown. A digital display shows NHS health advice on the coronavirus in Leeds on October 30, 2020. – West Yorkshire is to be placed under tier three Covid restrictions from November 2, 2020, the strictest level of rules. (Photo by Lindsey Parnaby / AFP) From Monday, nearly 2.4 million residents in five districts of West Yorkshire, including in the city of Leeds, will be barred from socialising with other households indoors. Pubs and bars not serving “substantial meals” must close, alongside casinos and betting shops, while people have also been told to avoid unnecessary travel. The Department of Health said the measures were needed as infection rates in West Yorkshire were among the highest in the country and rising rapidly. The Times reported Friday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson was considering a return to a national lockdown to battle the surge. Johnson was expected to hold a press conference on Monday to announce new restrictions, which would close everything except “essential shops”, schools and universities, the paper said, quoting a government source. In its weekly study of Covid-19 prevalence, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said the number of people with the virus had increased to around one in 100 nationwide. “There has been growth in all age groups over the past two weeks; older teenagers and young adults continue to have the highest current rates while rates appear to be steeply increasing among secondary school children,” it said. The country’s official science advisory panel warned in a report published Friday that the virus was spreading “significantly” faster and that hospitalisations were rising at a higher rate through England than its predicted “worst-case” scenario drawn up in July. The report said that in mid-October, shortly before new local rules were introduced, around four times as many people were catching Covid than anticipated in the July report. That study warned that 85,000 more people could die during the winter wave. West Yorkshire’s imminent restrictions are the latest step in the UK government’s localised response to the surging transmission, which has come under increasing scrutiny in recent weeks. More than 11 million people — about a fifth of England’s population — will be under the tightest measures from next week. Most of the areas in the “very high” category of the government’s three-tier Covid alert system are in northern and central parts of the country. Nottingham became the latest city to enter the highest tier Friday. On Thursday night, young people took to the streets in fancy dress and drank in large groups before a ban on alcohol sales in shops came into force at 2100 GMT. – ‘Targeted’ – The pandemic has hit Britain harder than any other country in Europe, with more than 45,000 people having died within 28 days of testing positive. Case rates are spiralling again after a lull, tracking the situation elsewhere on the continent. England is seeing nearly 52,000 new cases daily, a 47 percent weekly rise, according to the ONS, which conducts its analysis of households with the help of several universities and health bodies, and excludes people in hospitals and care homes.  Britain’s European neighbours and the devolved governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have reimposed partial lockdowns to try to cut infection rates. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Friday the government would continue its “targeted and focused” strategy of local restrictions in virus hotspots. “The arbitrariness of a blanket approach would be far worse than the effects of trying to be as targeted as possible,” he said. Meanwhile, a new study reported Friday that a Covid-19 variant originating in Spanish farm workers has spread rapidly throughout Europe in recent months and now accounts for most cases in Britain. The variant — called 20A.EU1 — is thought to have been spread from northeastern Spain by people returning from holidays there, according to the study, which is awaiting peer review in a medical journal. There is currently no evidence that the strain spreads faster or impacts illness severity and immunity......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 31st, 2020

Roque to Congress: Consult Palace on increasing budget for vaccines

Any congressional move to raise the proposed 2021 budget for the coronavirus vaccine should at least be done in consultation with the Executive branch, according to a Palace official.  Presidential Spokesperson Harry Roque (RESIDENTIAL PHOTO / MANILA BULLETIN) Presidential spokesman Harry Roque said while they respect Congress’ wisdom to hike the vaccine budget for the next year, the issue on its funding source must also be addressed. “The power of purse is vested in Congress. We will bow to the wisdom of Congress should they deem it fit to increase the budget for the vaccine, and of course, may pagkukuhanan po iyan (there will be a funding source for that),” he said during a Palace press briefing Thursday. “So we hope that Congress will at least confer with the Executive kung saan nila kukunin iyong pondo para itaas ang budget for the vaccine (on where the funds will be obtained to raise the budget for the vaccine),” he added. Nonetheless, Roque affirmed the administration’s resolve to ensure the country has adequate funds for the vaccine procurement once the life-saving drug becomes available.“We join Congress in our desire that we should have sufficient funds to pay for the vaccine, which according po to (Philippine) Ambassador (to China) Chito (Sta. Romana) is really forthcoming in the near future,” he said.The House of Representatives has reportedly introduced several amendments to its approved 2021 national budget, including a higher budget for the purchase of COVID vaccines to P8 billion.  In the original Palace-backed P4.5 trillion national budget proposal, at least P2.5 billion has been allocated for the COVID-19 vaccination program under the Department of Health’s budget. House Majority Leader Martin Romualdez, who leads a small group in charge of amendments to the budget bill, said the additional P5.5 billion to augment the vaccine budget aims to ensure safe and effective vaccine will be available to Filipinos. “This is to support President Rodrigo Duterte’s program to strengthen the country’s health care system. We believe that vaccines play a very crucial role in keeping the population safe and healthy from the pandemic,” the Leyte lawmaker said.  On the part of the Senate, Senator Panfilo Lacson disclosed plans to increase funding for the coronavirus vaccine under the proposed 2021 national budget. Last week, the President said the government has the funds to buy the coronavirus vaccine once it is available but would need more money to vaccinate all Filipinos. Duterte earlier vowed to give priority to the poor, the police and military personnel in the distribution of free vaccines.  He said the country will buy the most affordable vaccine to be sold in the market given the government’s limited resources. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2020

Babies have rights

 #ASKGOYO Atty. Gregorio Larrazabal Quoted below is the statement of the Integrated Bar of the Philippines: “The tragic death of 3-month-old Baby River highlights the need to do MORE, BETTER, FASTER in the justice sector quoted below is the statement of the Integrated Bar of the Philippines: “Baby River was born at the Fabella Medical Center on July 1, 2020.  Her mother, urban poor organizer Reina Mae Nasino, 23 years old, is a detainee at the Manila City Jail Female Dormitory who was arrested on November 5, 2019 at the Tondo office of Bagong Alyansang Makabayan.  The police raids that resulted in the arrests of over 60 activists in Metro Manila and Bacolod were by virtue of various warrants issued by the RTC Branch 89 in Quezon City.  Reina Mae and two others were charged with illegal possession of firearms and explosives, a non-bailable offense. “Despite questions raised against the validity of the raids and arrests as well as petitions for the release of Reina Mae on health and humanitarian grounds or for continued breast-feeding, the frail and underweight Baby River was separated from her mother barely a month after birth. “The case went through RTC Manila Branch 20, the Supreme Court, back to RTC Branch 20, then RTC branch 42 and RTC Branch 37, and the Court of Appeals, until Baby River died on Oct. 12, 2020. “Manila RTC Branch 47 finally allowed Reina Mae furlough – this time to visit her dead daughter.  Despite many fully armed BJMP escorts, police and military personnel monitoring and accompanying Reina Mae, she remained hand-cuffed while at the wake. “The heartbreaking and brief life-story of Baby River compel us to raise these questions: “1. Why can’t our justice system safeguard the needs and rights of an innocent child to breastfeeding and a better chance to survive? “2. Why don’t our jails have adequate facilities to address the needs and rights of children and women detainees duly recognized by domestic and international law? “3. Why does it take so long to respect, protect, and fulfill human rights? “4. Isn’t there double standard when “bigger” detainees are allowed similar or even greater privileges? “5. Can we not have justice with compassion? “Let our concern, dismay, or rage and the tears that we may shed for Baby River Nasino fuel our collective determination and action to improve our justice system.  Let not our innocent children fall under the cracks.  Babies have rights and we have duties to nurture them.  Let our humanity rise above our personal comforts or the privileges of power.” DOMINGO EGON CAYOSA National President & Chairman of the Board of Governors *** We can talk about the law legal processes, and I’m sure many will.  But at the crux of all this should be:“What is it to be human?” Have we sunk so low that we’ve lost our humanity?  Have we forgotten what it is that separates us from animals?  Have we been numb to peoples’ suffering and death? Have we been stripped of our sense of morality and compassion that we have lost our appreciation of what is right and wrong?  People have discussed the trampled rights of the mother of the infant.  But what about the rights of the baby?  Stripping the legalese of the tragedy, we have to ask: What about the basic needs of the baby, as emphasized by the statement of the IBP?  There is no justification to being deprived of the love and care his mother, and the warmth of her embrace. The soothing voice to say she’s going to get better, and she’s loved…  Have we regressed to a point that we’ve been stripped of our empathy? More than the legality of this.  After the furor will have died down, and it surely will, I think we have to ask ourselves, “Where are we now?”  How low have we sunk and how to we get back up and regain some sense of decency? My heart broke when I saw pictures of Reina Mae Nasino covered in PPE, in handcuffs, unable to even hug her dead baby one last time.  I still cannot understand the inhumanity towards not only the mother, but the baby, who had done no one wrong, yet was treated with so much hate, disrespect, contempt, and derision for her to be born in this world, yet stripped and deprived of human love and affection.  I can never hate anyone that much to treat him or her so badly. I think we need to dig deep within ourselves and search our soul.  To find the humanity which has clearly been missing.  We need to find our moral compass, before we all lose our soul and drown in the abyss. Stay Safe.  Pray for Baby River.  Pray for OUR country......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Addressing mental health amid a pandemic

BETTER DAYS Senator Sonny Angara Mental health has historically been a difficult subject to talk about in Philippine society. Many of us, no doubt, have our own stories, personal or otherwise, of how difficult it is to seek help. In fact, in the journal Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, an August, 2020, analysis of many studies on the matter confirmed that the low utilization of mental health services among Filipinos could be attributed in part to the stigma associated with mental health issues, with resilience and self-reliance becoming possible alternate coping strategies. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has made mental health an even bigger issue. The quarantine, the economic effects of the pandemic, and the anxieties brought about by the virus’ unpredictability have had a negative effect on the mental health of many Filipinos. Although we as a country are consistently rated to be in the Top 5 of a global optimism index, according to the DOH, the calls for help have been increasing. According to the National Center for Mental Health (NCMH), their helpline received about 400 calls monthly from May, 2019, to February, 2020. That’s an average of 13 to 15 calls daily. By March, 672 calls were serviced, and this grew steadily in the following months, until there were 1,034 calls in July – and 440 for the half of August. These double the monthly average from March to August to 876 calls, or 32 to 37 calls daily. Many government and private mental health services are available for people who are seeking help or just someone to talk to. Aside from the NCMH crisis hotline, the Natasha Goulbourn Foundation has confidential crisis lines and a referral system to partnered psychologists. The foundation is also a hub for prevention, recognition, and treatment of depression. The Philippine Mental Health Association also offers similar services, and universities like UST, UP Diliman, and Ateneo de Manila have their own mental health service organizations. Some, like Ateneo’s Center for Family Ministries have affordable or negotiable fees. Online resources like the Silakbo.Ph website have listings for many other mental health service providers outside of the NCR. In fact, many organizations have already partnered with the Department of Health (DOH); perhaps more of them should be invited to the table to plan new policies, projects, and initiatives that will address the growing number of mental health cases. The DOH is also encouraging people to learn more about general mental health through free e-learning courses translated into Filipino.  The source material is from the World Health Organization’s (WHO) QualityRights initiative, which is a global project that aims to help participants improve their own mental health, learn how to support their loved ones and communities, and gain knowledge and skills to tackle mental health issues. Clearly, we need to reassess and adapt to the fact that more Filipinos are now looking for mental health services and treatments. This is why I am seeking to amend Republic Act 11036, the Mental Health Act, particularly its existing chapter on “Rights of Service Users and Other Stakeholders.” Our proposed amendment seek to give health service users the right to immediately receive compensation benefits and special financial assistance they are entitled to under law, should they sustain temporary or permanent mental disability in the line of duty or by reason of a person’s office or position. This is an important amendment, as the Mental Health Act requires that PhilHealth provide insurance packages to patients with mental health conditions, and that access to medicines is ensured. With the observation of World Mental Health Day last October 10, it is important to remember the DOH’s theme for this year, “Mental Health for All: Unifying Voices for Greater Investment and Access.”  This theme encourages that we open conversations on the various challenges that our mental health care system faces every day, such as social stigma and limited funding. In fact, the simple act of marking the day itself is important. It shows those who are suffering that we see them, and care for them. It tells others who are hiding their issues that it is perfectly normal to seek help. And most of all, it encourages the whole world to stand in solidarity in recognition of the need for all of society to help those with mental health issues. E-mail: sensonnyangara@yahoo.com| Facebook, Twitter & Instagram: @sonnyangara Senator Sonny Angara has been in public service for 16 years—9 years as Representative of the Lone District of Aurora, and 7 as Senator. He has authored and sponsored more than 200 laws.  He is currently serving his second term in the Senate. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

No stopping health care law& mdash;DOH

The implementation of the Universal Health Care law will still push through regardless of the fate of the state insurer Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth), Health Undersecretary Maria Rosario Vergeire said Friday......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 10th, 2020

Italy ‘second wave’ fears grow as virus cases top 5,000

Italy was grappling Friday with fears of a second coronavirus wave similar to the ones seen in Britain, France and Spain, as it registered over 5,000 new infections in 24 hours. “We’re under extreme pressure,” the World Health Organization’s Italian government adviser Walter Ricciardi said, warning that spaces in Covid-19 hospitals were running out in the worst-hit regions. Italy registered 5,372 new cases Friday, the health ministry said, nearly 1,000 more than on Thursday. The country has not seen such high numbers of recorded new infections since mid-April. New infections are still well behind Britain, France and Spain, which are registering between 12,000 and 19,000 cases in 24 hours. But Ricciardi said the rise in cases could reach those levels in Italy just as winter begins and common influenza strikes. “When the flu comes, we risk having 16 thousand cases in a day,” he said in an interview with broadcaster Sky TG24. “I am very worried… (about) sub-intensive units because there are infectious patients who need to be treated in a certain way and beds are already running out. And that’s before the flu hits,” he said. The government moved to tackle the sharp rise in case numbers earlier this week, making wearing face masks compulsory in outdoor spaces across the country, on top of all indoor spaces apart from homes. – ‘Dramatic decisions’ – Lazio, the region which houses capital Rome, has been performing particularly badly, along with Campania in the south and Lombardy in the north, where the pandemic broke out in Italy back in February. According to official figures, more than 36,000 people have died of the virus in Italy, where a nationwide lockdown — the first in any European country — lasted over two months. Drained by years of budget cuts, southern Italy’s overstretched health care system escaped the brunt of the virus after movement between regions was banned, preventing cases from travelling down the country. But there are fears it would not escape a second wave. The Italian Association of Hospital Anaesthesiologists said Friday that hospitals in the south, where infrastructure is weaker, were not ready for an escalating crisis, despite efforts made to boost beds and staff numbers. Campania’s regional president Vincenzo De Luca said on Facebook he thought “we’ve reached the point where dramatic decisions need to be taken”. He said he could not rule out a new lockdown of the region. Regional Affairs Minister Francesco Boccia said Friday that if the upward trend continued, movement of people between regions may be temporarily banned. “A rise in the number of contagions was predictable. Intensive care units have been reinforced,” he said. “However, I cannot rule out limits on movements. Nothing can be ruled out at the moment,” he told Radio Capitale......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 9th, 2020

China at 71

The facts speak for themselves. After more than six months into the COVID-19 pandemic which originated in Wuhan, China is now turning out to be the model on how the whole world can and should live with the disease. It has opened up its economy, has largely controlled the transmission of the disease, enhanced its health care system and is on track to be the first among the ten countries working to produce a vaccine......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 1st, 2020

Who s in charge?

Six months after various stages of lockdowns that drove the national economy into recession in the second quarter, the COVID-19 pandemic shows no sign of easing up in this country. We have yet to achieve what scientists refer to as the "flattening of the curve," or the phase where the existing health care system can very well cope with new cases and not turn them away, as what's still happening now......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 17th, 2020

Tragic abandonment

In Wednesday’s Pre-Budget Briefing on the Department of Health’s (DOH) proposed 2021 budget conducted by the House of Representatives Committee on Health, Chairperson Rep. Angelina ‘Helen’ Tan exercised the committee’s oversight function and probed into the implementation and funding of the Universal Health Care Act, the National Integrated Cancer Control Act (NICCA) and other health legislation......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 14th, 2020

Stench at PhilHealth

PhilHealth, the blogger Heneral Lunacy pointed out, is a criminal enterprise posing as universal health care. Duh! Many government agencies are criminal enterprises posing as regulators......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 11th, 2020

UHC ‘wag damay sa PhilHealth scam-Lacson

Dapat suportahan ng Kongreso ang 2021 budget para sa implementasyon ng Universal Health Care (UHC) law sa kabila ng alegasyon ng talamak na korapsyon sa Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth), ayon kay Senador Panfilo Lacson. The post UHC 'wag damay sa PhilHealth scam-Lacson first appeared on Abante......»»

Category: newsSource:  abanteRelated NewsSep 7th, 2020