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To be served than to serve

Senator Grace Poe couldn’t have said it better when she labeled the decision and actions of the LTFRB Technical Working Group as nothing less than “Ganti-Gantihan” or vengeful spite......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJan 21st, 2020

Manila’s iconic clock tower’s lights shut off as city mourns passing of former mayor Lim

The Manila City Hall complex went dark on Saturday night (Aug. 8) as the lights of the building’s iconic clock tower were switched off to mourn the passing of former Manila mayor Alfredo “Fred” Lim. (Isko Moreno FB page/ MANILA BULLETIN) It was a tribute of the Manila city government to the former mayor “in its own little way” while the country still battles the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, current Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso said. Domagoso, who served as Lim’s vice mayor during the latter’s mayoral term from 2007 to 2013, announced the death of his former partner via Facebook Live. “Nais ko pong ipabatid sa inyo ang isang malungkot na balita sa atin bilang taga-lungsod, bilang batang Maynila. Si dating Mayor Alfredo Lim ay sumakabilang buhay na po, dala nang pagkaka-infection nya sa COVID-19 (I’d like to inform you of some sad news, as residents of Manila, that former mayor Alredo Lim has passed away due to COVID-19 infection),” he said. “Ilang araw na po ang nakakaraan ngunit di na po kinaya ng kanyang katawan (He had been ill for some days but could not longer continue fighting),” he added. Lim was 90. Moreno said there “are a lot of things” to give and words to say to Lim. But the city can only show its respect to him for now by turning the lights off of the clock tower as “the proper time is yet to come.” “Kanina po, bilang tanda ng ating pakikiramay sa maliit nating kaparaanan ay…pinapatay po natin ang ilaw ng clock tower, na sagisag ng pag-asa ng Maynila (Earlier, as a sign of our sympathies in our own little way, we turned off the lights of the clock tower, which symbolizes the hope of Manila),” Domagoso said. The iconic clock tower, which was completed in the 1930s, is the largest clock tower in the Philippines, reaching close to 100 feet in height. It is illuminated every evening. “Ngunit di naman ibig sabihin na wala na tayong pag-asa. Ito ay isa lamang tanda ng ating paggalang sa maliit nating kaparaanan, habang kinakaharap natin ang pandemyang ito, ang isang taong naglingkod, mabigyan man lang nating ng kaunting pagpapahalaga (But this doesn’t mean that we don’t have hope. This is just a sign, in our own little way while we face this pandemic, of our respect for a person who served, that we give him a simple acknowledgement),” he added. The current local chief executive cited Lim’s contributions in the city of Manila, including his hospital projects that still benefit residents. “Hindi natin makakalimutan ang paglilingkod niya sa ating lungsod, sapagkat hanggang sa ngayon ay patuloy na pinakikibangan ng mga batang Maynila ang mga programa at proyekto ng minamahal nating mayor. Ilan diyan ay patuloy na nakikita ninyo — Sta. Ana Hospital, Gat Andres Bonifacio, Sampaloc (We will not forget his service to our city, because up to now the people of Manila stil benefit from the programs and projects of our beloved mayor. Some of those you still see — Sta. Ana, Gat Andres Bonifacio, and Sampaloc [hospitals]),” Domagoso said. “Ang isa sa pinakamalaki na di makakalimutan na program ng ating dating mayor ay ang Unibersidad de Manila, na ito’y nagbibigay ng libreng tertiary education na hanggang ngayon ay nagagamit ng mahihirap nating kababayan na nagnanais na magkamit ng edukasyon (One of the biggest and most unforgettable programs of our former mayor was the Unibersidad de Manila, that gives free tertiary education that up to now may be availed of by our poor countrymen who wish to obtain an education),” he added.  Domagoso also said Lim “had been an effective” public servant as he gave the public safety and security whenever they went to Manila. Aside from being mayor from 1992 to 1998 and from 2007 to 2013, he said, Lim also became the city’s chief of police and the head of the National Bureau of Investigation, dedicating 50 years of his life to serving the public. “Noong ako po’y manalong mayor, siya po ay aking pinuntahan agad para po humingi ng mga payo kung paano susugpuin ang kriminalidad sa ating lipunan at paano patitinuin ang mga bahagi ng gobyerno sa ating pamahalaang lungsod (When I won as mayor, I immediately went to him to ask for advice on how to crack down on criminality in our society and how to reform some areas of our city government),” he said. Domagoso encouraged the public to emulate Lim, noting that like the latter, Filipinos can also serve the country well and with honesty. The current mayor called on his constituents to include Lim in their prayers......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 8th, 2020

AP Was There: Seles tops Graf in riveting French Open final

By The Associated Press EDITOR’S NOTE -- Every French Open features matches that are memorable for one reason or another. There are upsets. Comebacks. Dramatic moments. Historic accomplishments. The AP is republishing stories about a handful of such matches while the postponed Grand Slam tournament was supposed to be played. One match memorable for the drama and competition between two all-time greats was the 1992 final at Roland Garros between Steffi Graf and Monica Seles. Less than a year later, Seles was stabbed by a spectator at a match in Germany. The following story was sent June 6, 1992. ___ By STEPHEN WILSON AP Sports Writer PARIS (AP) — This was a match no one deserved to lose. Monica Seles and Steffi Graf dueled for two hours and 43 minutes Saturday, matching each other shot for shot, fighting for the lead game after game. Finally, after an epic third set lasting 18 games and 91 minutes, Seles emerged with a 6-2, 3-6, 10-8 victory for her third straight French Open title. “It’s the most emotional match I’ve ever played,” said Seles, who is now halfway to winning the Grand Slam. “This one’s always going to stay in my memory.” “It really couldn’t have been a better final,” she said. “It shows women’s tennis is getting more and more exciting. It’s just too bad for whoever lost. Both deserved to win.” Even in defeat, Graf agreed it was a memorable match. “If you play 10-8 in the final set, it definitely is special,” she said. “Those are very special matches, even if you lose.” Seles became the first woman to capture three consecutive French Opens since Germany’s Hilde Sterling accomplished the feat from 1935 to 1937. Seles, strengthening her hold on the No. 1 ranking, has now won six Grand Slams in her career, including the last five in which she has appeared. She missed Wimbledon last year, but will be competing there in two weeks to try to win the third leg of the Grand Slam. Saturday’s third set provided some of the greatest drama in tennis — men’s or women’s — in recent years. “I’ve never played a set like that in my life,” Seles said. There were furious rallies, fantastic gets, lunging winners, frequent shifts in momentum. Despite fatigue, both players were so pumped up they showed their emotions after nearly every point. Graf would yell “Yes!” clench her fist and slap her hip after a winner. When Seles lost a point, she would shriek “Noooo,” close her eyes and grimace in agony. The lead swung back and forth. Seles was up 5-3. Graf saved four match points in the next game and moved ahead 6-5 and 7-6. Seles broke and went up 8-7. Graf broke back for 8-8. Seles broke again and then finally held serve to close out the match. “I never thought it would last so long,” she said. “I was getting getting a little bit tired. But I could have stayed out there if I had to.” The 18 games in the final set was the most in a women’s final here since 1956, when Althea Gibson beat Angela Mortimer 6-0, 12-10. The 35 total games was one short of the record for a French final since the Open era began in 1968. The 36-game mark was set in 1973 when Margaret Court beat Chris Evert 6-7, 7-6, 6-4. Graf paid tribute to Seles’ refusal to give up. “You have seen it in other matches,” she said. “She is definitely a tough one. Even if it’s close, if she’s tired, she is always going for it. That is definitely a big, big quality.” Graf found no satisfaction in her own gutsy performance. “I mean it’s great the way I came back, the way I fought every time,” she said. “I think it was a very good effort, especially being down 5-3 in the third set. But I’m disappointed the way I played when I was leading.” “Every time I gave her those games,” she said. “I didn’t play those points good enough. I didn’t really try like the games before to run everything down and to go for every shot. But it’s difficult if you have to do that all the time.” The crowd was overwhelmingly in Graf’s favor, repeatedly breaking into rhythmic clapping and chants of “Steffi! Steffi!” “I really can’t say that I have had that support ever before,” Graf said. “It was just amazing.” Seles controlled the first set, winning 12 out the first 14 points. Graf started to raise the level of her play at the end of the first set, even breaking Seles at love in one game. The German seemed to get a psychological boost early in the second set when she saved a break point to prevent Seles from taking a 2-0 lead. Graf gained the edge when she broke for 4-3. She saved three break points to hold for 5-3, then broke Seles at love to win the set. Seles didn’t even bother to chase Graf’s forehand winner on set point. Seles was up a service break at 3-1, 4-2 and 5-3 in the final set. Then came the four match points on Graf’s serve. She erased the first with a deep forehand, the second with a forehand putaway, the third with a forehand into the corner, and the fourth with a skidding slice backhand approach shot. “I said to myself, ‘Just go for it,’” Graf said. “On those points I really didn’t give her a lot of chances. I was trying to be the one who is aggressive.” “Steffi played some great shots under pressure and I played too safe,” Seles said. Seles served for the match in the next game, but Graf kept dictating the points with her big forehand and broke at 15 to even the set at 5-5. The two continued on serve until Seles broke for an 8-7 lead as Graf missed on a short forehand. But Graf broke right back, hitting a perfect backhand drop shot on one point. In the next game, Seles crushed a short crosscourt backhand after a long rally to break for a 9-8 lead. Serving for the match for the third time, Seles went up 40-15. On match point No. 5, Graf responded by ripping a clean forehand winner. But on the sixth, she pounded a forehand into the net. “It was totally up and down,” Seles said. “One or two points really decided it.” Seles won $372,896, putting her over the $5 million mark in career earnings. Graf won $186,457......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 7th, 2020

Strawberry Cheesecake, bagong flavor ng soft-served ice cream, tikman na!

Manila, Philippines – Ramdam mo na ba ang summer? Init na init na, at sawa na sa mga flavors ng ice cream? Mayroon nang Strawberry Milk Cheesecake flavor mga bes. Inihahandog ng am.pm, isang dessert joint mula Hong Kong ang soft-served ice cream,  Strawberry Milk Cheesecake Soft-Serve sa halagang P 110 kada cone, mai-enjoy mo […] The post Strawberry Cheesecake, bagong flavor ng soft-served ice cream, tikman na! appeared first on REMATE ONLINE......»»

Category: newsSource:  remateRelated NewsMar 8th, 2020

To be served than to serve

Senator Grace Poe couldn’t have said it better when she labeled the decision and actions of the LTFRB Technical Working Group as nothing less than “Ganti-Gantihan” or vengeful spite......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 21st, 2020

Enes Kanter seeks to open school in Oklahoma City

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Former Oklahoma City Thunder player Enes Kanter plans to open a charter school in the metro area that focuses on serving low-income minority students and those from immigrant families with limited English-speaking abilities. Kanter, who currently plays for the Boston Celtics, notified Oklahoma City Public Schools of his intention to open the Enes Kanter School for Exceptional Learning, according to a letter first obtained by The Frontier. He and a group of “civic-minded individuals” from the city will submit a charter school application to the school district on Tuesday, The Oklahoman reported. The Oklahoma City School Board will then consider the application in a vote. Kanter and his associates have not selected a location for the school, but noted that they want to pick a site where “the need is high,” according to the letter. The school would be designed mostly for under-served minority and immigrant students from fourth through 12th grade. Kanter played for the Thunder from 2014 to 2017 before he was traded to the New York Knicks. “Despite playing for other teams, I continue to return to Oklahoma City to host my annual basketball summer camps and to support programs that serve the OKC children,” Kanter wrote. “Through my foundation, my philanthropic activities extend to all of the cities where I have played for: Utah, Portland, New York, and Boston.” The school would offer a syllabus that highlights reading, writing, math and science skills with an emphasis on physical, emotional and mental health education. It would embed “rich sports and arts activities in students’ daily schedule.” Kanter would not be the first NBA player to open a school. Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James gained recognition for opening the I Promise School in his hometown of Akron, Ohio. James’ school opened in 2018 as an elementary school to serve at-risk children. He has also faced challenges beyond the court. As a native of Turkey, Kanter missed a game last year in Toronto shortly after joining the Portland Trailblazers because he felt like his life might be in danger if he left the United States. As a result of his criticism of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Kanter had been labeled a terrorist by his native country. His passport was revoked and Turkey reportedly issued a warrant for his arrest with Interpol......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 10th, 2020

SEA Games 2019 chef vows to serve athletes best and safest food

MANILA, Philippines – Bruce Lim, the chef in charge of food preparation for the 2019 Southeast Asian Games , assured athletes from the Philippines and rival countries will be served with "the best and safest food."  That includes catering to the dietary and faith restrictions of the athletes.  Lim said the SEA Games ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 27th, 2019

BARMM Cabinet reshuffled: Ebrahim to serve as Finance Minister

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 13 November) – Chief Minister Ahod “Al Haj Murad” Ebrahim announced changes in the Cabinet of the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (BARMM) effective November 11, among them his serving in a concurrent capacity as Finance Minister. The BARMM Bureau of Public Information on Tuesday said Ebrahim, who served in […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsNov 13th, 2019

Sinner beats De Minaur to scoop 1st ATP title

By Daniella Matar, Associated Press MILAN (AP) — Italian teenager Jannik Sinner beat top-seeded Alex de Minaur in straight sets at the Next Gen Finals on Saturday to claim his first ATP title — and a big payday. Wild card Sinner triumphed 4-2, 4-1, 4-2 in the final, serving out to love and clinching victory when De Minaur hit a return into the net, much to the delight of a boisterous crowd in Milan. It was a second successive runner-up finish for De Minaur at the season-ending tournament for top under-21 players. "He's an unbelievable player," Sinner said. "I just tried to play my game and not make any errors. I didn't make many so I'm very happy with my performance." The title caps a fantastic season for the 18-year-old Sinner who opened the year at No. 551 but is now the youngest player inside the Top 300, having risen to No. 95. He only recorded his first ATP Tour main-draw win in April. Sinner picked up $372,000 from this week's tournament, surpassing his career total before arriving in Milan. But he doesn't plan on splashing out to celebrate. "No," Sinner said with a smile when asked if he was going to buy himself something special. But he admitted even he didn't expect to do so well in Milan. "I'm surprised because it's been an unbelievable week. All the players are unbelievable players. If not, they are not here." "Sinner-Mania" is sure to grow. His run in Milan has stirred the crowds this week to near-hysteria and fans have packed the stands just to watch him practice. De Minaur has only lost two of his 10 matches in two editions of the tournament in Milan, but unfortunately for the Australian they were both finals. "It's a pretty simple match to evaluate," said the 20-year-old De Minaur, who is ranked No. 18. "I had nine break points and I wasn't able to convert any of them. "Jannick played a really impressive match. He was putting me under pressure. In the end he just played too good." Sinner dominated from the start and, after the opening games had gone with serve, broke to love to take the first set. Roared on by his home crowd, Sinner never looked back and again broke De Minaur's serve at his first opportunity in the second set. De Minaur managed to save a set point on his serve but that was simply delaying the inevitable as an imperious Sinner served it out to go 2-0 up. The noise grew to fever pitch when Sinner broke again in the third game of the final set and he went on to wrap up the match in just over an hour......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 10th, 2019

Djokovic and Nadal on course to meet in Paris Masters final

PARIS (AP) — Top-ranked Novak Djokovic and No. 2 Rafael Nadal remain on course to face off in the Paris Masters final, a 55th match in their intense rivalry, after winning their quarterfinals in straight sets on Friday. Djokovic demolished seventh-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas 6-1, 6-2 after losing to the Greek three weeks ago in the Shanghai quarterfinals. It could have been even quicker since he led the first set 5-0, 40-0, but Tsitsipas saved three set points and held serve. Nadal had a more demanding contest against 2008 champion Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, with the first set tiebreak reaching 3-3 after Nadal double faulted. But when the veteran Spaniard broke the unseeded Frenchman at the start of the second he took control in a 7-6 (4), 6-1 win. "It was a tough first set where I had to play at a very high level," Nadal said after beating Tsonga for the 10th time in 14 meetings. Nadal and Djokovic are vying for the year-end No. 1 ranking. Nadal will guarantee it for the fifth time if he wins the Paris Masters for the first time, while Djokovic is chasing a fifth title at Bercy Arena and a sixth year-end finish as No. 1. Iin Saturday's semifinals, he takes on Grigor Dimitrov while Nadal plays Denis Shapovalov. Nadal is 1-1 in career meetings with the Canadian, while Djokovic has an 8-1 lead over the U.S. Open semifinalist Dimitrov. Djokovic, chasing a 77th career title, even impressed himself with the level of his performance. "I played one of the best matches of the season. I prepared myself very well for this match. I lost to Stefanos in Shanghai and obviously I went through the videos, understanding what I did well, what I didn't do so well," Djokovic said. "I served well. I read his serve very well, as well. Put him under pressure constantly." He broke Tsitsipas in the third game of the second set, then held and broke to love for 4-1. Tsitsipas, who dropped his serve four times, appeared to hurt his left ankle when retrieving a shot near the baseline in the second set. Serving for the match, Djokovic clinched it on his first match point when Tsitsipas whipped a forehand long following a short rally. Djokovic, last year's runner-up, is wary of Dimitrov, who beat Roger Federer in the U.S. Open quarterfinals. Although Dimitrov has won only eight career titles — and none since the ATP Finals in 2017 for his biggest prize — Djokovic talked him up. "He has been one of the best talents we had in the sport in the last decade for sure. There's been a lot of comparison with his game and Federer's game," Djokovic said. "Since the U.S. Open he's playing at a different level, a high level. He always had the game; it's just sometimes it's a matter of things coming together, really, mentally and at the right time." Djokovic also noted that Dimitrov, who is set to break back into the top 20 rankings next week after plummeting to No. 78 in August, has found a way to overcome a weakness on backhand. "The backhand was always his kind of weaker shot ... so most of the players (tried) to attack that vulnerable side of his game," Djokovic said. "But he mixes it up really well with the slice. He blocks a lot of returns and gets back into play and he moves extremely well. He's one of the fittest guys on the tour. So that helps him, always being in the right position." Dimitrov reached his second semifinal this season by beating Cristian Garin 6-2, 7-5. Shapovalov crushed Gael Monfils 6-2, 6-2, ending the Frenchman's hopes of reaching the season-ending ATP Finals in London and sending U.S. Open semifinalist Matteo Berrettini there instead......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2019

Kansas City Royals being sold in deal expected to fetch $1B

By Dave Skretta, Associated Press KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — David Glass and his family had a very specific set of qualities they were searching for in a potential owner when they decided to put the Kansas City Royals on the market. They wanted an astute and successful businessman, someone with local ties who, perhaps most importantly, had a deep love for baseball. John Sherman fit that description perfectly. So on Friday, the Glass family announced the sale of the two-time World Series champions to an ownership group led by Sherman in a deal expected to be worth about $1 billion. Sherman and his local co-investors will become only the third owners since Ewing Kauffman founded the club in 1969. "The decision to sell the Royals was difficult for our family," said Glass, whose son Dan has served as the Royals' president. "Our goal, which I firmly believe we've achieved, was to have someone local, who truly loved the game of baseball and who would be a great steward for this franchise going forward. In John Sherman we have found everything we were looking for in taking ownership. The 64-year-old Sherman has lived in Kansas City for more than four decades, even after he bought an interest in the Cleveland Indians. He founded, built and then sold a series of energy companies, and he has remained an influential local businessman, dabbling in agriculture and biosciences. Sherman, who played quarterback at nearby Ottawa University, is also a well-respected civic leader, even though he keeps a low profile. He has given time and money to the Truman Presidential Library in nearby Independence, the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City, and several local schools. He and his wife, Marny, also work with Teach for America and other programs serving underprivileged youth. "I am enormously grateful to David and the Glass family for this extraordinary opportunity," Sherman said in a statement, "and am humbled by the chance to team up with a distinguished group of local investors to carry forward and build on this rich Kansas City Royals legacy. "Our goal will be threefold: to compete for a championship on behalf of our fans; to honor their passion, their experience and their unwavering commitment; and to carry their hopes and dreams forward in this great Kansas City region we all love for decades to come." Sherman will need to divest his interest in the Cleveland Indians, believed to be about 30 percent of the franchise, and the deal is subject to the approval of Major League Baseball. Those hurdles should be cleared before owners vote on the sale at their meeting Nov. 21. "There's no way that Mr. Glass and the Glass family would entertain selling this team unless they could find what they believe to be the perfect owner who represents everything they stand for, and would go on and represent what baseball means to Kansas City," Royals general manager Dayton Moore said. Sherman was introduced to Dolan by Steve Greenberg, the son of Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg. His financial involvement allowed the Indians to push their payroll over the years, including in 2016, when they acquired All-Star reliever Andrew Miller from the Yankees before the trading deadline. The Indians proceeded to reach the World Series for the first time since 1997. "We're very supportive of John and his group reaching an agreement to acquire ownership of his hometown Kansas City Royals," Indians president Paul Dolan said. "His acquisition of the Royals is good for the game of baseball and I wish him nothing but the best." Before the Indians broke through, the Royals had represented the American League in the previous two Fall Classics, winning their second World Series title when they defeated the New York Mets in 2015. But the back-to-back pennants, and the accompanying rise boom in fan interest, came after a long period of dismal performances that left Glass with a mixed legacy in Kansas City. On one hand, the 83-year-old longtime Wal-Mart executive and his family kept the club in town following Kauffman's death in 1993. Glass helped serve as caretaker of the organization until April 2000, when he purchased sole ownership for $96 million — considered a strong bid at the time. On the other hand, Glass was derided during the Royals' many 100-loss seasons for being unwilling to spend money on payroll, something he rectified in more recent years. Many fans also viewed him as an absentee owner whose family was more committed to northwest Arkansas than Kansas City. "He's one of the most unique people I've ever met," countered Royals manager Ned Yost. "Probably starting in 2012, my whole focus was to win a world championship for him. I didn't have any understanding or inkling what it would mean to win a championship for the city. I found that out later. But I wanted to win a championship for him. Every waking moment was meant with him in mind." Yost said watching Glass raise the World Series trophy at Citi Field in 2015 was "one of the top three highlights of my baseball career, because we had accomplished it for him." Glass has reportedly been in declining health, increasing the urgency to find a new owner. The goal all along was to identify someone with ties to Kansas City who would keep the club in town. "I will never forget the thrill of seeing over 800,000 people of this community come together on one sunny November day to salute the newly crowned world champions. It's been a fantastic ride," Glass said, "and I want to thank our great fans for supporting us through the years. But now it's time for someone else to oversee this franchise into its next championship." The sale comes at an opportune time for other reasons, too. Their local television contract expires after this season, and the Royals are expected to sign a new deal that would double annual rights fees to about $50 million. They also have just 12 years left on their lease at Kauffman Stadium, meaning the push for more renovations or a new ballpark — potentially one in the revitalized downtown area — is expected to begin in the next few years. On the field, the club is in the midst of a massive rebuilding effort while barreling toward another 100-loss season. But the Royals have a bevy of young prospects rapidly rising through the minors, and the front office is hopeful the Royals will contend within the next two years. "I heard he's a former season-ticket holder, so that's nice to have someone who's had some love for this city and wants to do what's best," said outfielder Alex Gordon, the Royals' longest-tenured player and a part of both AL championship teams. "This is a great town with great fans. We haven't been giving them a lot the last few years. Hopefully this is just the start of turning things around." ___ AP Sports Writer Tom Withers and AP freelance writer David Smale contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 31st, 2019

Tennis champ, trailblazer Althea Gibson honored at US Open

By Melissa Murphy, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Althea Gibson basked in a ticker-tape parade in New York a decade before Arthur Ashe won the 1968 U.S. Open. Gibson won 11 majors in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open singles titles. She integrated two sports — tennis and golf — during an era of racial segregation in the United States. "She's our Jackie Robinson of tennis," said Billie Jean King, who at 13 watched Gibson play. "I saw what it meant to be the best." One Love Tennis is an athletic and educational program for youth in Wilmington, North Carolina. During a rainy day in 2017, the girls watched the documentary "Althea and Arthur." They learned Ashe has a stadium named for him at the U.S. Open on the grounds of the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York. The mood in the room grew somber afterward, according to program director Lenny Simpson. The girls realized there wasn't even a "dag-gone hot dog stand" named for Gibson. Why wasn't there a monument to the first African American to win a major title (1956 French Open) before winning both the U.S. Nationals (precursor to the U.S. Open) and Wimbledon in 1957-58? Simpson suggested the girls be part of the solution by writing letters to his friend and then-U.S. Tennis Association President Katrina Adams. King and Adams had been working on the Gibson project for years. King's advocacy before the USTA board resulted in a unanimous vote. Adams later read letters to the board from the girls, including Xerra Robinson, to reinforce the importance of a tribute. "I know she would be proud to see the progress that's been made with so many women of color leading the pack in professional tennis," Adams said of Gibson, who died in 2003 at 76. "Her bravery, perseverance and determination paved the way." On Monday, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. The girls and boys of One Love Tennis will attend the ceremony, along with Gibson's 85-year-old doubles partner, Angela Buxton of Britain. "It's about bloody time," said Buxton, who won the 1956 French and Wimbledon titles with her friend. More things to know about Gibson, who made the covers of Time and Sports Illustrated and was voted AP Female Athlete of the Year in 1957-58: EARLY YEARS Gibson traveled the hard road from Harlem to Wimbledon, but she had a community of support. The oldest of five children, Gibson was born in Silver, South Carolina, before her sharecropper parents relocated to Harlem. At 18, Gibson moved to Wilmington, North Carolina, to live with Dr. Hubert and Celeste Eaton. She honed her tennis and social skills on Dr. Eaton's court at his home, called "the black country club" because African Americans couldn't play at public courts or white country clubs. "Culturally, it was a tough adjustment," said Simpson, who met his coach and mentor on that court at age 5 when Gibson gave him a racket and called him "champ." ''(In Harlem), she didn't see the signs of white and colored water fountains and white and colored bathrooms. The prejudice and discrimination certainly was there, but nothing like the Jim Crow days of the South." She spent summers in Lynchburg, Virginia, training on the court of Dr. Robert Walter Johnson, who later nurtured Ashe, a winner of five Grand Slam titles. Both were forced to play in segregated tournaments early in their careers. Barred by the precursor of the USTA, Gibson won 10 straight American Tennis Association women's titles starting in 1947. After lobbying by the ATA and a withering editorial from four-time champion Alice Marble, Gibson became the first African American to compete in the 1950 U.S. Nationals at Forest Hills on her 23rd birthday. A graduate of Florida A&M, Gibson taught physical education and considered quitting tennis because she couldn't make a living in the low-paying amateur days. But in 1955, she was tapped by the State Department for a goodwill tennis tour of Asia. That's how she met Buxton in India. ALTHEA YEARS Both were looking for a doubles partner in 1956. Buxton was denied membership at the club in London where she practiced after she listed Jewish for religion on the application. She grew up in England and South Africa and understood Gibson's struggle. "No one spoke to her, let alone played with her," Buxton said by phone from London. "(Her playing style) was like a young man. She wore little shorts, a vest and hit the ball hard, even her second serve. She came charging up to the net. She bamboozled people with her attitude." They won at Roland Garros and Wimbledon, but the "powers that be" were not thrilled and "you needed a spy glass to see the headline 'Minorities Win,'" Buxton said. Both were denied membership at the All England Club despite being Wimbledon champions. (Buxton is still waiting). Nonetheless, Gibson got the royal treatment with a ticker-tape parade in July in New York after receiving the 1957 Wimbledon trophy from Queen Elizabeth II. Two months later, she won the U.S. Nationals at Forest Hills. "That was an incredible joy for her," Simpson said. She duplicated those feats and retired from tennis at No. 1 in 1958 — a winner of more than 50 singles and doubles titles — because there was no significant prize money until the professional era began in 1968. The men's and women's 2019 U.S. Open winner will each receive a check for $3.8 million. No other African American woman won the U.S. Open until Serena Williams in 1999 or Wimbledon until Venus Williams in 2000. AFTER TENNIS Gibson played exhibition tennis before Harlem Globetrotters games, signing a $100,000 contract, and joined the LPGA full-time in 1964. In 1975, she became state commissioner of athletics in New Jersey. She served on the state athletics control board, and the governor's council on physical fitness until 1992. The twice-divorced Gibson's health failed in her late 60s after a stroke and she struggled to make ends meet. Buxton said Gibson reached out to a handful of tennis friends without much success. Gibson was on the verge of suicide in 1995 when the tennis great called her, she said. Buxton provided financial support and visited her friend in East Orange, New Jersey. "Angela Buxton saved her life, literally," Simpson said. Buxton also wrote a letter to Tennis Week magazine, and donations flooded in from all over the world. The WTA currently has a hardship fund to help former players. Frances Gray, a longtime friend and co-founder of the Althea Gibson Foundation, has kept her legacy alive. A self-described "born athlete," Gibson said she wanted to be remembered as "strong and tough and quick." "If not for Althea Gibson, there would be no Arthur Ashe, no Serena and Venus, Madison Keys, Sloane Stephens and the list goes on," Simpson said. "She opened it up for all of us.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 25th, 2019

Technical issues cause Comelec Cebu City to serve fewer 1st day voter’s registrants

CEBU CITY, Philippines — Only 400 of the usual 1,000 Cebu City residents were served by the Commission on Elections in Cebu City (Comelec Cebu City) on the first day of voter’s registrations this year for the city’s two districts. Lawyer Marchel Sarno, Cebu City north district election officer, that they only were able to […] The post Technical issues cause Comelec Cebu City to serve fewer 1st day voter’s registrants appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 1st, 2019

Ferdinand Gaite, from union to lawmaking

“As lawmakers, we should not be served. We, as public servants, must serve the people.” The post Ferdinand Gaite, from union to lawmaking appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2019

Federer comes so close to 9th Wimbledon title before losing

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press WIMBLEDON, England (AP) — Roger Federer won more points than Novak Djokovic in the Wimbledon final. Federer was the first of the pair to come within a point of taking the championship Sunday, too. Had two such chances in the fifth set, even. Indeed, Federer dominated the historic match in nearly every statistical way. More than twice as many aces. More than twice as many breaks of serve. Nearly twice as many total winners. And yet, in the only category that matters, the final score, Federer barely came up on the short end, losing 7-6 (5), 1-6, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 13-12 (3) to defending champion Djokovic. By ceding all three sets that went to a tiebreaker, including — for the first time at Wimbledon — the fifth, Federer was denied a ninth title at the All England Club and 21st Grand Slam trophy overall, which both would have extended men's records he already holds. "For now it hurts, and it should, like every loss does here at Wimbledon," said Federer, who is now 8-4 in finals at the grass-court major, with three of those losses against Djokovic, including in 2014 and 2015. As for how he will go about bouncing back from this sort of a heartbreaking defeat, Federer replied: "I think it's a mindset. I'm very strong at being able to move on, because I don't want to be depressed about actually an amazing tennis match." That is was. They played for nearly five hours, making it the longest final at Wimbledon, where they've been holding this tournament since the 1870s. It surpassed the old mark established by the 2008 final, which Federer also lost in a fifth set, that one against Rafael Nadal. One key difference with this one: The All England Club changed its rules to adopt deciding-set tiebreakers for the first time at 12-all. "I'm the loser both times," Federer said, "so that's the only similarity I see." He wound up with 218 points to Djokovic's 204. Federer also led in aces, 25-10; service breaks, 7-3; total winners, 94-54. Did a lot of damage at the net, too, winning 13 of 15 serve-and-volley points and 51 of 65 when he moved forward at all. "Most of the match, I was on the back foot, actually. I was defending. He was dictating the play," Djokovic said. "I just tried to fight and find a way when it mattered the most, which is what happened." After Federer went up a break at 8-7 in the last set, he served for the victory. He held two championship points at 40-15 and didn't convert either one. The match would go on for another 45 minutes and Federer would never get that close to winning again. "Definitely tough," Federer said, "to have those chances." On top of everything else, Federer also was stopped from becoming, less than a month away from his 38th birthday, the oldest man to win a major championship in the professional era. "I hope I give some other people a chance to believe that, at 37, it's not over yet," Federer said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 15th, 2019

Nishikori wins 2-day five-setter, Djokovic easily advances

By Samuel Petrequin, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — When it comes to the deciding set, count on Kei Nishikori. The Japanese player won his eighth consecutive five-set match on Monday to defeat Benoit Paire 6-2, 6-7 (8), 6-2, 6-7 (8), 7-5 over two days and set up a quarterfinal match against defending champion Rafael Nadal at the French Open. In a match ridden with unforced errors that featured 15 breaks of serve but also some beautiful shots, Nishikori prevailed after a nearly four-hour battle. Their fourth-round match had been suspended by darkness on Sunday, with Nishikori leading two sets to one. Nishikori extended his impressive record in five-set matches to 23-6, including a 6-1 mark at the clay-court Grand Slam. He also holds the best percentage of wins in deciding sets (132-45) — either in best-of-five or best-of-three matches — since the Open Era began in 1968. In damp conditions, Paire's all-risk tennis was working when they came back on court. The Frenchman saved two match points in the fourth-set tiebreaker and served for the match at 5-3, but he was finally made to rue his awful mistakes. "He was serving for the match, and I just tried to play one point at a time," Nishikori said. Paire hit 15 double-faults and 79 unforced errors. "Never easy to finish a match," Paire said. "It was tough emotionally. I'm very sad to lose this match but glad for what I did this week." Nishikori will play in a third quarterfinal match in Paris but faces a tall order in the next round. Nadal has won 10 of their 12 previous matches, including all three matches on clay. Top-ranked Novak Djokovic had an easier time against 45th-ranked Jan-Lennard Struff of Germany, becoming the first man to reach the French Open quarterfinals 10 years in a row with a 6-3, 6-2, 6-2 victory. His quarterfinal opponent will be No. 5 Alexander Zverev or No. 9 Fabio Fognini. In the women's draw, Sofia Kenin and Katerina Siniakova could not follow up their upsets of Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka. Kenin lost to eighth-seeded Ash Barty 6-3, 3-6, 6-0, while 14th-seeded Madison Keys advanced to last eight for the second straight year with a 6-2, 6-4 victory over Siniakova. Keys and Barty will face off in the quarterfinals. "It's going to be a tough one," said Keys, a semifinalist in Paris last year. "I feel like clay actually suits her game really well with her kick serve and slice.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2019

Federer loses to Thiem in Madrid Open quarterfinals

By Tales Azzoni, Associated Press MADRID (AP) — Roger Federer's return to clay lasted only three matches. A day after saving two match points at the Madrid Open, Federer squandered two match points himself in the quarterfinals against Dominic Thiem on Friday, losing 3-6, 7-6 (11), 6-4. It may have ended his first appearance at a clay-court tournament in three years, but Federer wasn't leaving the Spanish capital too disappointed with the outcome of his return. "I feel very good about my game. I thought I had some good matches here," Federer said. "I feel good on the clay right now. It's been a good week. Frustrating, clearly. Losing with match points is the worst, so that's how I feel. But nevertheless, if I take a step back, it's all good." Federer skipped the clay swing the past two years to remain fit for the rest of the season. He decided to return this year in preparation for his first French Open appearance since 2015. The fifth-seeded Thiem, runner-up in Madrid the last two seasons, will next face top-ranked Novak Djokovic, who didn't have to play his quarterfinal after Marin Cilic withdrew because of food poisoning. Thiem has a chance to win his third title of the year after victories in Barcelona and Indian Wells, where he defeated Federer in a three-set final. "Facing him, it always requires my absolute best game and also a little bit luck, which I both had in Indian Wells and also here, and that's why I won these two matches," Thiem said. The other semifinal will be between Stefanos Tsitsipas and five-time Madrid champion Rafael Nadal. Tsitsipas defeated defending champion Alexander Zverev 7-5, 3-6, 6-2, while Nadal cruised past Stan Wawrinka 6-1, 6-2. Nadal lost only seven points on his service games, conceding no break opportunities against the 34th-ranked Wawrinka. The Swiss lost the 2013 Madrid final to Nadal. "It was one of my best matches in a long time, my best match on clay this year," the second-ranked Spaniard said. "It means a lot to have this feeling in this crucial moment of the clay season." On the women's side, Simona Halep made it back to the Madrid final for the first time since 2017 with a 6-2, 6-7 (2), 6-0 win over unseeded Belinda Bencic. The French Open champion can surpass Naomi Osaka for the No. 1 ranking if she wins Saturday's final. "I don't want to think about that. For me, it is more important to win the trophy here than being No. 1," the third-ranked Halep said. "I prefer titles than numbers and rankings. So this is my goal, to play finals and to win trophies." She will face last year's runner-up Kiki Bertens, who defeated Sloane Stephens 6-2, 7-5. The 37-year-old Federer was trying to win his third Madrid title, and first since 2012. He has already won hard-court titles this season in Dubai and Miami. Federer got off to a great start against Thiem at the Magic Box center court, breaking the Austrian's serve early and cruising to a first-set win. He squandered five break points in the second, and then had match points at 8-7 and 10-9 in the tiebreaker before Thiem forced the deciding set by converting his sixth set point. Federer had saved two match points in his difficult three-set win over Gael Monfils on Thursday. Thiem broke Federer for the first time in the third game of the third set, converting his ninth break opportunity of the match. Federer got back on serve at 4-4, but started his next game 0-40 and couldn't recover. Thiem then served out for the victory, converting on his second match point. Thiem has won the last two matches he played against Djokovic, who got the day off because of Cilic's withdrawal. "It was supposed to be definitely a good match," said Djokovic, who has played only four sets this week. "I went back on the court, trained for another hour and got a good sweat in. Happy that I'm going to be fresh for my semifinal." The top-seeded Serb is seeking a third Madrid Open title, and his second of the season after winning the Australian Open. Thiem lost the Madrid final to Nadal in 2017 and to Alexander Zverev in 2018. "I was playing Novak last year and two years ago and he was not at his best I guess, and now he is again," Thiem said. "He's won the last three Slams and he is at the top of the ranking again. So the challenge couldn't be bigger.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 11th, 2019

WEEKLY REFLECTIONS | Understanding Jesus’ death

“For even the Son of Man did not come to be served; he came to serve and to give his life to redeem many people." - Mark 10:45.....»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsApr 28th, 2019

Valdez assures LVPI she will attend national team tryouts

Former Ateneo de Manila Queen Eagle Alyssa Valdez promised to join the tryouts set by the Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc, for the national women’s team that will see action in the 29th Kuala Lumpur Southeast Asian Games on August 19 to 31. LVPI vice president Peter Cayco said that Valdez told him Saturday that the three-time UAAP Most Valuable Player will undergo the selection process just like other national squad aspirants. The Manila tryout is on January 28, 29 and 31 with legs in Cebu and Davao set next month. Each aspirant must complete the three-day tryout. The names of the players that will make the 20-woman pool will be announced on the last week of February. Valdez, a two-time UAAP champion who bannered the PHI team in the 2015 Singapore SEA Games, assured LVPI in a meeting with Cayco in the sports association’s office at Arellano-Taft before she flew to Thailand Sunday to join 3BB Nakornnont in the Thai League, that she will return home during the break to join any of the three tryouts. “Nakapag-usap kami noong Saturday ang sabi niya sa akin uuwi siya para sa tryouts,” Cayco said Tuesday during the Philippine Sportswriters Association Forum at the Rizal Memorial Complex Media Center. Valdez will debut in the Thai League on January 29 making her unavailable for the Manila leg. She is expected to show up either in the Cebu or Davao leg.       National team head coach Francis Vicente, who discovered and molded Valdez into a star during her high school days as a University of Sto. Tomas player, pointed out that though Valdez is a cut above the rest with her volleyball skills, leadership and fan base she will still go under the scrutiny of the selection committee. “Alam naman natin na Alyssa Valdez is angat, sikat and sa akin din galing yan pero ayaw ko na kukunin ko na siya na, ‘O halika na rito wag ka na mag-tryout.’ Unfair naman ‘yun sa iba,” said Vicente. “Unfair naman yun kina Myla Pablo kina Grethcel Soltones e magaling din naman sila. Ayokong mabansagan na may kinikilingan. If she really wants to play in the national team kailangan niyang pumunta sa tryouts, no special treatment.”                             LVPI president Joey Romasanta commended the gesture of Valdez, who served as the country’s flag-bearer during the last SEA Games, saying that her willingness to join the tryouts during her break in the Thai League.          “’Yung sinabi ni Alyssa na uuwi siya rito to join the tryout for the national team is very commendable and a manifestation of her being a true athlete and her sincerest desire to serve the country via the national team,” said Roamsanta. “Ako, we are very hopeful that during the breaks in her (Thai League) schedule she will be able to join any of those tryouts.”       --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles             .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2017

Pursuing a record 23rd major title, Williams opens with win

JOHN PYE, AP Sports Writer   MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — For the first five games in the second set, Serena Williams played almost flawless tennis in her first-round match at the Australian Open. Then came the rustiness that tends to follow a lengthy layoff, giving Belinda Bencic a glimmer of hope, before Williams regained her composure to win 6-4, 6-3 on Tuesday. The six-time Australian Open champion improved her impressive record in the first round of Grand Slam tournaments to 65-1. The No. 2-ranked Williams' priority here is an Open era record 23rd major title. She's one win down — beating a player who was seeded 12th here last year and reached a career-high No. 7 ranking last February — and is targeting six more at Melbourne Park. 'She was just recently in the top 10. I knew it would be one of the toughest first-round matches I've ever played,' the newly engaged Williams said. In round two she'll meet Lucie Safarova, who beat Yanina Wickmayer 3-6, 7-6 (7), 6-1. Bencic got one service break in the first set, but only took two points in the first three games on Williams' serve in the second. Serving for the match at 6-4, 5-1, things changed. Williams finished her 2016 after the U.S. Open, resting injuries. And started 2017 with an error-prone loss in Auckland, New Zealand. Williams served only her second double-fault of the match to give Bencic a break-point chance, and Bencic converted it with a crosscourt winning forehand. The Swiss teenager held at love and then faced a match point, when Williams double-faulted again. The 35-year-old Williams made no mistake on her second match point and pumped her first in celebration. She finished with 30 winners and 30 unforced errors, eight errors and four double-faults. Karolina Pliskova and Johanna Konta both had their Grand Slam breakthroughs last year, both prepared for the season's first major with title runs in Australia and both advanced with straight sets wins. U.S. Open finalist Pliskova following her title win at the Brisbane International with a 6-2, 6-0 victory over Sara Sorribes Tormo. The fifth-seeded Pliskova, who beat Serena Williams in the U.S. Open semifinals before losing the final to Angelique Kerber, has never advanced past the third round at Melbourne Park — losing at that stage in the last two years to Ekaterina Makarova. Pliskova is feeling more confident this time. 'I feel good on the court, especially when I win my first title in the first week of the year,' Pliskova said. 'So I'm ready for the tournament.' Konta, who won the Sydney International title last week, had a tougher time in beating Kirsten Flipkens 7-5, 6-2 on Margaret Court Arena. 'I definitely love playing here. It's a dream. A lot has happened in the last year, but I'm just enjoying playing and getting better each day.' Ninth-seeded Konta was a surprise semifinalist in her debut at the Australian Open last year, starting with a first-round win over Venus Williams and sparking a strong 2016 season which ended with her in the top 10. In other early results, No. 21 Caroline Garcia beat Kateryna Bondarenko 7-6 (4), 6-4 and No. 30 Makarova had a 6-0, 4-6, 6-1 win over Ekaterina Alexandrova. On the men's side, No. 25 Gilles Simon beat U.S. wild-card entry Michael Mmoh 6-1, 6-3, 6-3. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2017

Federer returns with a win, joins Murray in 2nd round

JOHN PYE, AP Sports Writer br /> MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Roger Federer shanked a few shots and was unsettled by how nervous he felt after six months on the sidelines, despite the familiar surroundings at the Australian Open. No other man on tour knows the way around a Grand Slam tournament better than Federer, who is playing in his 69th major and has won a record 17. He served 19 aces and had only one double-fault in a 7-5, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2 win Monday over fellow 35-year-old Jurgen Melzer, but dropped serve three times and experienced frustrating moments. 'I was feeling nervous once the match actually started,' said Federer, who hadn't played at tour level since Wimbledon after taking time off to let his injured left knee heal. 'In the warmup ... I felt fine. Then I hit four frames in a row. It was like, 'Whew, it's not as easy as I thought it was going to be.' 'I struggled for a while to find that groove, that rhythm.' Federer had surgery on the knee after a semifinal exit at the last Australian Open and missed the French Open, ending his streak of 65 consecutive Grand Slam tournaments. He returned for Wimbledon, reached the semifinals, then didn't play again in 2016. In November, he fell out of the top 10 for the first time in 734 weeks. The 17th-seeded Federer wasn't the only highly-ranked player to find the going tough Monday. Stan Wawrinka, the U.S. Open champion, was pushed to five sets. So was No. 5-seeded Kei Nishikori. Angelique Kerber, defending champion and ranked No. 1 at a major for the first time, had some nervous moments in her 6-2, 5-7, 6-2 win over Lesia Tsurenko. Kerber won her first Grand Slam title in Melbourne last year, beating Serena Williams in the final after saving a match point in the first round. After wasting a match point before her serve was broken as Tsurenko rallied to win the second set, Kerber said her mind raced back 12 months. 'When I lost the second set, and I had match point, I was thinking about my match last year in the first round,' she said. 'First rounds are always tough.' In his first Grand Slam match with the elevated status of having a knighthood and the No. 1 ranking, Andy Murray berated himself when he made mistakes and frequently yelled during a 7-5, 7-6 (5), 6-2 win over Illya Marchenko. In other words, nothing much has changed. The five-time finalist comfortably navigated what he hoped was the first step to a drought-breaking Australian Open title. Murray has lost four of the last six finals in Melbourne to six-time champion Novak Djokovic. Gaining the top ranking and receiving the civic honors doesn't change anything for Murray, who said he faces 'the same pressure, same expectations. I've never won here — I'm going to try to change that this year.' Wawrinka, who made his Grand Slam breakthrough in Australia in 2014, narrowly scraped past 35th-ranked Martin Klizan 4-6, 6-4, 7-5, 4-6, 6-4. In the ninth game of the fifth set, Wawrinka smashed a soft half-volley from Klizan straight back into the Slovakian's body, clipping the frame and just missing his midsection. He stepped over the net and ensured Klizan was OK, then held serve in that game and broke in the next game to finish it off. Nishikori beat Andrey Kuznetsov 7-5, 1-6, 6-4, 7-6 (6), 6-2. Joining him in the second round are 2014 U.S. Open champion Marin Cilic, 2008 Australian Open finalist Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, No. 19 John Isner, No. 23 Jack Sock, No. 27 Bernard Tomic, No. 29 Viktor Troicki and No. 31 Sam Querrey. Also, No. 14 Nick Kyrgios returned from his suspension for underperforming in Shanghai last year and raced through a 6-1, 6-2, 6-2 win over Gastao Elias. No. 16 Lucas Pouille was the highest-ranked of the three men's seeded players to lose. Five of the women's seeded players went out, including No. 4 Simona Halep, who lost 6-3, 6-1 to Shelby Rogers in the first match on Rod Laver Arena, and No. 15 Roberta Vinci, who lost to CoCo Vandeweghe. Seven-time major winner Venus Williams beat Kateryna Kozlova 7-6 (5), 7-5, and 2014 Wimbledon finalist Eugenie Bouchard continued her recent resurgence by routing Louisa Chirico 6-0, 6-4. Joining them in the next round will be French Open champion Garbine Muguruza, Olympic gold medalist Monica Puig, No. 8 Svetlana Kuznetsova, No. 10 Carla Suarez, No. 11 Elina Svitolina and No. 20 Zhang Shuai. Sixteen-year-old Destanee Aiava became the first player born in this millennium to play in the main draw of a major, but the milestone match ended in a 6-3, 7-6 (4) loss to Mona Barthel. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2017