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Things you shouldn’t feel sorry for

  CEBU CITY, Philippines–Here’s what you should start doing today: Start living life unapologetically. Yes, start living your life by not feeling bad about how you choose to live your life. Let these simple reminders walk you through: Working at your own pace Everything takes time, and others may have it faster than you but, […] The post Things you shouldn’t feel sorry for appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerNov 18th, 2020

Column: A quiet, measured response from golf on civil unrest

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer Golf has never been known to move quickly. Harold Varner III illustrated as much with thoughtful observations he posted on social media after civil unrest in America over the weekend reached levels not seen in more than 50 years. “I’ve received more messages than ever before, mostly from people who wanted me to speak up immediately because of who I am. I AM BLACK,” his post began. “But it’s not helpful to anyone when impulsive, passionate reaction takes precedence over clear-minded thought.” What followed from Varner, one of three PGA Tour members of black heritage, was just that. He referred to the “senseless killing” of George Floyd, the handcuffed black man who died last week when a white police officer in Minneapolis put a knee to the back of his neck until he stopped breathing. “To me, it was evil incarnate,” Varner said. “There are objective truths in life. I think that’s one of them,” he wrote in his Monday post. Varner also cautioned against single-minded thoughts, that one can be against police killing a man while saying that burning businesses and police stations is wrong. “We can go beyond the trap of one-dimensional thinking. Once we do, our eyes will see the righteous, our hearts will feel the love, and we’ll have done more to honor all those subjected to evil and its vile nature,” he concluded. The more prominent voice is Tiger Woods, whose profile worldwide is so great that he chose early in his career not to get too opinionated on social issues. One example was two years ago at Riviera, during Black History Month, when he was asked during a news conference what concerned him about the plight of black Americans. Woods was smart in his delivery, short on substance, when he said African Americans have had their share of struggles, it has gotten better and there’s room for improvement. Accurate and safe. His tweet Monday night arrived shortly before 10 p.m. in Florida. It began with his heart going out to Floyd, his loved ones and “all of us who are hurting right now.” And while he said he has “the utmost respect” for law enforcement and the training involved to know how, when and where to use force, “This shocking tragedy clearly crossed that line.” Woods referenced the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles in 1992 — he was a teenager growing up in neighboring Orange County — and said “education is the best path forward.” “We can make our points without burning the very neighborhoods we live in,” he said. “I hope that through constructive, honest conversations we can build a safer, unified society.” Whether he said a little or a lot, Woods said something. That was important. Voices need to be heard, especially relevant ones. Golf doesn’t have many of those. It has a shabby history of inclusion, particularly when it comes to blacks, starting with the PGA of America taking until 1961 to drop its “Caucasian-only clause.” The PGA Tour now attracts the best from every corner of the globe. It can be an expensive game, yet not even the privileged are assured of making it. Woods said in a 2009 interview on being the only black on tour, "It’s only going to become more difficult for African Americans now, because golf has opened up around the world.” And so where does golf fit in the discussion of equality and justice? The PGA Tour is the only major sports league that did not issue a public statement or reference the views of its players on the homepage of its website. Would anyone have taken it seriously given the composition and color of the tour's membership? Did it need to carve out a spot on the dais that already was crowded with voices from other sports that are far more germane to the issues? Commissioner Jay Monahan was searching for answers over the weekend and ultimately chose to keep his thoughts within the tour, sending a letter Monday to his staff and then sharing it with the players. “The hardships and injustices that have and continue to impact the African-American community are painful to watch and difficult to comprehend,” Monahan wrote. “And as a citizen of this country and a leader of this organization, I must admit that I’m struggling with what my role should be. But I am determined to help and make a difference.” Monahan said he had several “meaningful and emotional” conversations with colleagues and friends in the black community, “who — once again — showed me that sometimes listening and making a commitment to understand are the only things you can offer, and that’s OK.” “What I was left with was this,” he wrote. “Make no mistake about it — someone you know and care about is hurting right now, even if they haven’t told you that directly. ... And if anyone at the tour is hurting, we should all hurt.” He also included a link from the Refinery29 website on the unseen pain blacks endure. “Too often we just move on when we are not directly influenced by the news of the day," he wrote. “Yes, we have all been impacted by the global pandemic, but we should also be painfully aware and impacted by the dividing lines in our country. “We might not know exactly what to do right now, but we shouldn’t be deterred.” The PGA Tour resumes next week at Colonial, back to its familiar world with little controversy and ample privilege. No other sport does charity as well as golf. This issue requires more than that. If the best it can do is listen and commit to understand, that's OK......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 2nd, 2020

Pats to play in wild-card game, Chiefs get AFC s No. 2 seed

By Dennis Waszak Jr., Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Tom Brady and the New England Patriots will be playing in the postseason a week earlier than usual this year. The defending Super Bowl champs open the playoffs during wild-card weekend for the first time since 2009 after they lost 27-24 to Miami on Sunday and Patrick Mahomes and the Kansas City Chiefs beat the Los Angeles Chargers 31-21 to earn a first-round bye. “We didn’t play the way we’re capable of playing and it ended up costing us," Brady said. “Just too many bad mistakes." The Patriots (12-4) are the No. 3 overall seed in the AFC and will have to fix things in a hurry as they host Tennessee (9-7) next weekend. “We've got a game next week, we've got to get ready to go," Patriots safety Devin McCourty said. “Nobody should feel sorry for us, we shouldn't feel sorry for ourselves. Our goal is to play in the playoffs. We got a shot next week at all of that." The Titans clinched their spot by beating Houston 35-14, eliminating both Pittsburgh and Oakland in the process. All three teams had a chance at the playoffs, but Tennessee had the easiest path by needing to win — and got it against a Texans squad that rested several starters, including quarterback Deshaun Watson. “I think it’s great when you can determine whether you get to continue to play football," Titans coach Mike Vrabel said. “There was some great effort, but we’re going to have to improve and play better. Everything gets harder from here on out." The last time New England played on wild-card weekend, it lost at home to the Ravens. The Patriots have never made it to the Super Bowl with Brady and coach Bill Belichick while playing in the opening round. “We've got to move forward and get ready to go or the end of our season will be next week if we don't turn the page and play good football, way better than today,” McCourty said. “Nobody feels sorry for the Patriots not getting a first-round bye in the playoffs." Meanwhile, the Chiefs (12-4) are the No. 2 seed and will be able to watch the opening round, along with the top-seeded Baltimore Ravens (14-2). “We'll step back, the guys will come in tomorrow, we'll have a team meeting, I'll give them a schedule for what's going on the next week here during the bye week," Chiefs coach Andy Reid said. “The main thing is we get work done, but we rest up and get ready for whoever we might play.” Kansas City's victory also locked Houston into the No. 4 seed, and the Texans (10-6) will host the Buffalo Bills (10-6) next weekend. Despite resting several starters, including quarterback Lamar Jackson, running back Mark Ingram, guard Marshal Yanda and safety Earl Thomas, Baltimore cruised past Pittsburgh 28-10 to ride into the playoffs on a 12-game winning streak. “It's the best team in football in the regular season this year, but that doesn't count for anything in the next season," coach John Harbaugh said. “In the next season, we have to obviously go to work this week and become a better football team." In the NFC, Green Bay earned at least a first-round bye with a 23-20 victory at Detroit. Now, Aaron Rodgers and the Packers (13-3) will wait on the result on the San Francisco-Seattle matchup Sunday night to see if they'll have the No. 1 overall seed — and home-field advantage —- in the conference. "The NFC is wide open," Rodgers said. “I think home-field advantage can be very important.” If the 49ers win, they get it. Otherwise, it will be the Packers in the top spot. "We’re hot," Rodgers said after helping his team rally to its fifth straight win. "But you've got to start all over in the playoffs and it’s all great football teams now, so the margin of error is even smaller." New Orleans routed Carolina 42-10 to finish 13-3 in the regular season, but Drew Brees and Co. will also have to wait to see what their playoff path will be. The NFC South champions can't get home-field advantage because of Green Bay's win, but can earn a first-round bye if Seattle beats San Francisco. A win by the 49ers would push the Saints to the No. 3 seed and a home game against Minnesota (10-6) in the wild-card round next weekend. Injury-ravaged Philadelphia (9-7) won the NFC East with a 34-17 win over the New York Giants, eliminating Dallas with the victory. The Eagles, with their second division title in three years, will host the loser of the 49ers-Seahawks showdown. “This team, when it’s crunch time this time of year, we get it done,” Eagles defensive tackle Tim Jernigan said after his team finished the schedule with a four-game inni. ___ AP Pro Football Writer Rob Maaddi, and AP Sports Writers Dave Ginsburg, Kyle Hightower, Larry Lage, Kristie Rieken and Dave Skretta contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 30th, 2019

Bucks making case as favorites to win title

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com MILWAUKEE -- In the wake of a wire-to-wire, 125-103 victory in Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals, a question for the group: Shouldn't the Milwaukee Bucks be the favorites to win this thing? No, not the conference finals. At this point, they're obviously the heavy favorite to win the East. Prior to this year, 72 teams had a 2-0 lead in the conference finals, and 67 of them went on to win. But why aren't the Bucks the favorites to win the NBA championship? Is there a case to be made against 1) what was the best team in the regular season and 2) what has been an even better team in the playoffs? [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] Maybe this is a we'll-believe-it-when-we-see-it league. How can you pick a team to win a championship when its best player had never won a playoff series prior to this year? Until they lost in five, it was easier to imagine the Celtics, with their talent and with their recent history of playoff success (back-to-back trips to the conference finals), being the team to represent the East in The Finals in the first year A.L. (after LeBron). And then the Bucks outscored the Celtics by a total of 65 points over the last four games of the conference semis. It's similarly difficult to pick against the Golden State Warriors until they actually lose. The two-time defending champs have Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green. Presumably, they'll have Kevin Durant back for The Finals should they finish off the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference finals. And even without Durant, the Warriors boast the same 2-0 conference finals lead the Bucks currently possess. But the Warriors haven't been as sharp as they were in each of the previous two postseasons. Five of their 10 playoff wins have been within five points in the last five minutes. Last year, only four of their 16 wins were within five in the last five. In 2017, it was four of 16 as well. With the postseason's 10th-ranked defense, Golden State has outscored its opponents by 6.4 points per 100 possessions over its 14 games. The Bucks have outscored their opponents by more than double that: 15.1 per 100. That feels like the mark of an eventual champion. Through 10 playoff wins last year, the Warriors had outscored their opponents by 9.6 points per 100 possessions. Through 10 playoff wins in 2015, they had outscored their opponents by just 7.7 points per 100. It was only in 2017, when they won their first 15 playoff games in Durant's first season in Golden State, that the Warriors were as dominant as the Bucks have been thus far. At 10-0 two years ago, Golden State had outscored its playoff opponents by 16.5 points per 100 possessions. At that point, the Warriors had the No. 2 offense and the No. 1 defense in the postseason. That's exactly where the Bucks stand after Game 2 on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). Milwaukee is a complete team in more ways than one. The defense has been there almost every night. The Bucks have held their opponents under a point per possession (the measure of elite defense) in six of their 11 games and only once (their Game 1 loss to Boston) have they allowed them to score more than what was the league average (109.7 points scored per 100 possessions) in the regular season. Even with the rise in three-point shooting over the last few years, the most important shots on the floor remain those at the basket, and no team has been better at both preventing and defending those shots than the Bucks. After allowing a league-low 29.6 points per game in the restricted area in the regular season, the Bucks have allowed just 22.0 per game in the playoffs. In this series, Raptors drives have been met with a swarm of Milwaukee defenders, making it difficult to either score in the paint or get off a clean pass to an open shooter. After shooting 57 percent in the paint through the first two rounds (in which they faced two very good defenses), the Raptors have shot just 49 percent (36-for-73) in the paint through the first two games of the conference finals. On Toronto's first possession of Game 2, Marc Gasol posted up Khris Middleton after a switch and spun around Middleton for a layup, only to be rejected by Giannis Antetokounmpo. The Raptors went scoreless on their first five possessions, had just 39 points on 49 possessions at halftime, and were too far behind for a 39-point third quarter to matter much. "I think the way we played on both ends of the court in the first half," Budenholzer said afterward, "is what we're trying to get to." After a bit of an offensive struggle in Game 1, the Bucks broke out on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). The elite defense led to 28 fast-break points, a size advantage inside led to 17 second-chance points, and six of their nine rotation players scored in double-figures. Three of those six came off the bench. While Toronto coach Nick Nurse has had to both shorten and alter his rotation in these playoffs, Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer has seemingly found contributors wherever he has turned. George Hill and Pat Connaughton were huge in the Boston series, Malcolm Brogdon didn't need long to find his rhythm after missing the first eight postseason games, and on Friday (Saturday, PHL time), Ersan Ilyasova had what Budenholzer called "clearly his best game of the year," scoring 17 points, drawing three charges, and registering a plus-22 in just over 21 minutes off the bench. The Bucks have the presumed Kia MVP, but their biggest strength in these playoffs has been their depth. Through 11 games, they've outscored their opponents by 12.0 points per 100 possessions with Antetokounmpo off the floor. Unlike his fellow Eastern Conference coaches, Budenholzer has never had to rush his best player back onto the floor. And this team is now 10-1 with Antetokounmpo ranking 40th in postseason minutes per game at 32.3. While the Raptors' offense has struggled to take advantage of the attention paid to Kawhi Leonard, every Bucks rotation player has played with confidence and freedom. "They're not going to let me play one-on-one," Antetokounmpo said after registering 30 points, 17 rebounds and five assists in Game 2. "So this series is not going to be about me; it's going to be about my teammates being ready to shoot, being ready to make the right play." "We try and empower them," Budenholzer said of his team's role players. "We try to play a way where they all feel like they can contribute and do things. Hopefully that's paying off for us." There's no argument to the contrary. But is there an argument against this team being the favorite to win the championship? While it remains difficult to pick against the team that won last year and remains intact, new champions come along all the time, and it's easier to see them in hindsight than in the moment. Of course, as good as they've been playing and as special as this run has felt, Bucks players refuse to get ahead of themselves. "You can't," Eric Bledsoe said. "That's how you lose focus. The biggest thing with this group is just taking a game at a time, and not looking forward to The Finals. Anything can happen. So we're focused on Game 3." "It's a great opportunity that we have," George Hill added, "but it means nothing until we get there." The players have to keep their minds on Toronto. But the rest of us can feel free to envision the future, one that includes an NBA championship. John Schuhmann is a senior stats analyst for NBA.com. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 18th, 2019

To bye or not to bye in NFL playoffs? Let's take a look

BARRY WILNER, AP Pro Football Writer NFL teams pursue byes like they are precious jewels. Are they really? Or does the road to the Super Bowl not particularly come with a rest stop? History tells us that reaching the Super Bowl, let alone winning it, after playing in a wild-card game is anything but ideal. Not impossible but just ask, in recent years, the 2005 Pittsburgh Steelers, 2007 New York Giants and 2010 Green Bay Packers. But it's certainly the most difficult way of doing things, particularly how those three teams managed it, as sixth seeds with no home games. All of them are in this postseason. Not one of them goes into this weekend wishing they didn't own a bye. Yet there are advantages — yes, really — to being active in the wild-card round. For one, the opponent shouldn't be as formidable as either of the top two seeds in each conference who are enjoying a mini-vacation. Secondly, the momentum gathered from an opening win can carry teams a long way. Again, look up what those Pittsburgh, New York, and Green Bay teams above did. 'We're battle tested,' Giants receiver Victor Cruz says, speaking not only of an early season loss at Lambeau Field, but of the team's general psyche. 'We've been through some things after that game that really set the standard and the focus for this team. That's one of the biggest things for us going into the game: Understanding that we've been through some wars and now we're ready to go.' So the Giants go to Green Bay, where in 2008 they won the NFC Championship. And, four years later, they beat a 15-1 Packers squad in the divisional round. Both times, they went on to win a Super Bowl. Eli Manning was the quarterback and offensive fulcrum of those title runs, while the pressure-first defense was masterful in negating big-time passers. The Giants entered those postseasons pretty much as afterthoughts, then got their acts together immediately in wild-card outings. Sure, they might have won it all in those seasons anyway. Yet there's no question those opening victories against Tampa Bay in 2008 and Atlanta in 2012 helped in a big way. 'You like to prove people wrong,' Manning says, knowing the Giants again are long shots to win it all. 'That is always kind of an exciting thing to do.' Under the eight-division format with 12 playoff teams that began in 2002, teams playing in wild-card games have made the Super Bowl eight times: Carolina in 2004, Pittsburgh in '06, Indianapolis in '07, the Giants in '08 and '12, Arizona in 2009, Green Bay in 2011, and Baltimore in 2013. Six of them won the title, with only the Panthers and Cardinals failing, both with last-minute losses. From 1990-92, there were six divisions, with 12 teams still advancing to the playoffs. Yes, three wild cards per conference, meaning one NFC and one AFC division winner didn't receive a bye. In that span, only four teams came out of the wild-card round to make the Super Bowl, all from the AFC. Buffalo (1993) and Tennessee (2000) both lost to the NFC champion. Denver (1998) and Baltimore (2001) won. Indeed, the Titans beat the Bills in January 2000 in the Music City Miracle, and Buffalo hasn't been back to the postseason since. One franchise that has made a habit of earning byes, of course, is New England. This is the sixth straight year the Patriots are idle for the opening weekend. Even Tom Brady gets antsy during the bye, though. 'You always want to feel great on Sunday,' Brady says. 'You'd always like to practice every day, too. Some weeks it's about prioritization. I'd like to do everything all the time, but sometimes that's not possible just based on ... practice is pretty demanding. Sometimes if you practice it might set you back a little more than you would want. 'After 17 years, I've got a pretty good balance for those things. I'm the type of person who likes to practice a lot. I've also been around long enough to know you've got to be smart, too, so it's just trying to find that right balance.' Brady can kick back this weekend while seeking that balance. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 6th, 2017

LATE BLOOMS: Rock-Bottom Sad

Things just seem so bad at times, so bad we can’t help but feel sad rock-bottom sad as everything we hold dear fall apart and we trudge on mindless closer to the precipice of a bottomless abyss. But then in our heart there is that small flame that refuses to go out and we think […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated News14 hr. 52 min. ago

Word to the artistic

From national artists to award-winning actors and drag queens, inspirational words of advice from our local creatives Last year brought us to our knees, yet here we are standing tall with courage, facing 2021 with hope and a positive perspective. To give us more inspiration to create and explore new things this year, the Manila Bulletin has compiled some quotes from creative individuals, from national artists to award-winning actress. May their words of wisdom bring out the creative urges in all of us, as we make this world a better, more colorful, more meaningful place to live in. Kidlat Tahimik, national artist for film We are all adjusting to the new normal—new rules and new protocols. I’m sure that most artists are taking this time to take art deeper into their hearts. After all, you have nothing to do but just to be productive. *** Ian Inoy, biromantic pansexual artist Every move I made with my art before had this follow up question in my head, asking if it would look gay or not. Now that I’ve fully accepted myself, nothing like that matters anymore. I no longer have the fear of hearing people perceiving my art as “too gay or girly.” *** Heart Evangelista/Love Marie Ongpauco Escudero, actor, painter Express yourself in art. See how art can move you or distract you from distress or how art can bring the best out of you. I notice that my paintings have been a bit muted these days. I feel it’s a bit because of the drama that’s going on around us. In a weird way, I find beauty in sorrow and the way my colors have been coming out, I like what’s happening. I’ve always been like this anyway. I find something beautiful about my emotions, no matter how dark they are, and I translate all that into art. *** Whatsoever you do, if you do it joyfully, if you do it lovingly, if your act of doing is not purely economic, then it is creative.—Osho, Creativity unleashing the forces within *** Kate Adajar, blogger artist The uncertainty Covid-19 brings has triggered confusion, anxiety, and mixed emotions in me. But the lockdown has also given me time to focus on and practice my art. Being in quarantine has allowed me to look at my craft not only as a creative outlet but also as a form of stress release. It has suddenly become therapeutic and meditative. *** F. Sionil Jose, national artist for literature Photo by Noel Pabalate Artistry is something that is created not just by intellect but by passion. And you stop being a craftsman. That is when you become an artist. You cannot be an artist without being a craftsman first. *** Miz Kiki Krunch, drag queen I am more creative as a gay person. My drag persona brings out the best and most authentic part of me. I can express myself better, I can perform better when I channel my weirdness, my “freak,” my truth. *** Cherie Gil, actor Everything can be learned as long as one sets one’s mind and heart to it. There is also no age limit to learning anything. Acting—what is it really but reliving lives and telling their stories. But this requires a lot of work to excavate the instrument to be able to truthfully do just that. It’s not easy. It takes a lot of balls to share one’s personal inner sanctum. *** Iana Cris Forbes, owner of art shop Quiversmiths Pursue what you want. At first, it was hard for me because I wanted to be a painter, I wanted to be a sculptor, I wanted to be a graphic artist, I wanted to be a wedding colorist, I wanted to stitch, I wanted to make bags and shoes and jewelry. But I haven’t seen a person doing all of those!. Before, I could not see any future in them but here they are now. I’m doing everything all at once and I’m fine. I’m happy living multiple lives. It’s like connecting the dots. My hobbies are now my sources of living and I couldn’t be more thankful. *** BenCab, national artist for visual arts This pandemic gives artists more time for their art. It’s usually better for an artist to be locked-in because you work on your own. *** Natasha Aliño, jewelry artist It’s been said many times and my mother always says this whenever I feel frustrated, which most people would feel when they’re starting something new—“trust the process.” This is more of a reminder when you’re in that headspace. Another thing is when you are learning a certain skill, do it so with purpose and authenticity. Then you can confidently say after some time that you can indeed trust the process. Never stop learning and inspiring others on your journey. Photos from the artists’ respective social media accounts and websites.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsJan 17th, 2021

Don’t rush these things

CEBU CITY, Philippines— Rushing will lead you to no good. To rush things just because you feel the pressure around you will not always better your life. Sometimes, it makes it worse. So if this year, you are eager to do so much, remember, that you are set at a certain pace for a reason. […] The post Don’t rush these things appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 10th, 2021

Things to do after getting ignored

  CEBU CITY, Philippines— Getting ignored makes one feel small. Yes, it does. Especially when it is someone you used to hang out with, say, for example, your fling. Who you thought would be the “one” for you. Ouch. But when the going gets rough and he or she starts ignoring you, read this as […] The post Things to do after getting ignored appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 13th, 2020

The Huawei MateBook 14 wants to be your new work buddy

Huawei leaps to the stage with this year’s MateBook 14 Notebook, fired up with AMD’s 4600-H processor. With a 307.5mm width and a height of 15.9mm, the MateBook 14 is one of the thinnest laptops you can get your hands on. It’s sleek and stands out with a premium look and feel. At only 1.49kg, the MateBook 14 is lightweight and easy to tag along where you can work comfortably. The trackpad is big and spacious, making it easier to navigate around. The 14-inch screen is incredible. It features 2160×1440 resolution, bright, and excellent viewing angles. The bezels are also razor-thin, giving more screen space. It also happens to be a touch screen, armed with buttery response of today’s smartphones. No need to navigate the trackpad or mouse for simple tasks, like scrolling pages up or down. The hinges are solid and sturdy. You’d need two hands to pry open this laptop and for me, that’s good. You can punch the keys at a rapid pace without experiencing any wobbling. One of the most important things I personally look into for choosing laptops, is the keyboard. Besides having sufficient and comfortable travel between keystrokes, it’s a personal preference to have that “snappy” feel to it. I’m sure I’m not alone in the world with that keyboard preference. And it’s a delight to report the MateBook 14 has that “snappy” feel in its keyboards, making typing an enjoyable experience. When working at night with the lights off, the MateBook 14 features a backlit keyboard. The MateBook 14 is only a new component in Huawei’s entire ecosystem. To bridge mobility and workflow, the Huawei Share allows you to transfer files between the laptop and Huawei smartphone seamlessly. So, if you need to hurry off, just tap your Huawei phone into the MateBook 14 and you can keep on working while outside. The MateBook 14 is a strong addition to Huawei’s laptop lineup. If you’re looking to get a solid laptop for work or for online learning, the MateBook 14 is worth checking out......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 9th, 2020

Five ways to feel good inside and out while at home

Just in case you needed to hear this today: it’s absolutely okay to admit you’re not doing fine. With the many things going on right now in the world, this year indeed did not go as planned. Living through this pandemic is not only challenging in many ways but also exhausting, emotionally and mentally. Giving […] The post Five ways to feel good inside and out while at home appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 30th, 2020

Robredo: Gov t not receptive to criticism, suggestions on COVID-19 response

"It feels like the government is comfortable with how things are going right now, even if the numbers say that they aren't. We aren't improving. It's a crisis and it's affecting people's lives. Our response should be proactive, and we shouldn't be content.".....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 30th, 2020

Column: Woods gets to see and hear how the other half lives

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. (AP) — Tiger Woods arrived at Olympia Fields for the first time in 17 years, this time with no one around to chase after his every move from the moment he stepped out of the car until he walked off the course. That's not a bad thing. He'll be in a red shirt on Sunday with about the same number of people. That's not good, at least not for him. Woods is learning after three tournaments what others have begun to realize over the last three months. Some players thrive on energy from the crowd as a pick-me-up. Now the reaction, the volume, is the same for a birdie as a double bogey. Woods is one of those players who feeds off noise. “Always have,” he said. “I've played in front of thousands of people ever since I turned pro 24 years ago. It's always been odd when I haven't played in front of people. In one way, it's been nice between tees not getting tapped or getting a glove pulled out of my pocket. Those are things I've had to deal with for a very long time. “But you hit good shots and you get on nice little runs ... we don't have the same energy, the same fan energy.” This is not his issue alone, nor is it the reason he has yet to finish in the top 35 in the three tournaments he has played since golf returned from the coronavirus-caused shutdown. Hitting good shots and making putts goes a long way in any environment. Graeme McDowell was walking along the ninth fairway in the middle of his second round last week at the TPC Boston when he said he felt like a “golf zombie.” “It's like I have no soul,” he said. The courses are different and look the same. They're empty. McDowell spoke of needing the adrenaline he gets from the crowd around the first tee at a U.S. Open or Ryder Cup. Maybe some players do better with no one watching, especially if they're on edge and need something to calm them down. McDowell isn't one of them. Neither is Rory McIlroy. He played the final two rounds with Woods, as big a draw as there is in golf, with hardly anyone watching. Woods began the final round with four straight birdies and the only buzz came from Twitter. McIlroy knows about ebbs and flows in his game. He once missed four out of five cuts and won three out of four tournaments, all in a span of four months in 2012. But his play since returning to an empty stage in June is worth noting. He had had seven consecutive top 5s, including a victory at a World Golf Championship, and reached No. 1 in the world. Since the return, he has seven straight tournaments out of the top 10 and has yet to reach the back nine with a chance to win. Coincidence? Maybe. Three months off surely cost him some momentum. “This is going to sound really bad,” McIlroy said, “but I feel like the last few weeks, I've just been going through the motions. ... And look, that's partly to do with the atmosphere and partly to do with how I'm playing. I'm not inspiring myself, and I'm trying to get inspiration from outside sources to get something going. I can definitely see where Graeme is coming from." That might allow McIlroy to reconsider what he once said about Woods. He played with Woods and Justin Thomas in the opening two rounds at Riviera a few years ago and was amazed by all the commotion around Woods. “I swear, playing in front of all that, he gives up half a shot a day on the field. Like, it's two shots a tournament he has to give to the field because of all that goes on around,” McIlroy said that day. “Whoever is teeing off at 8:30 in the morning doesn't get that and can just go about his business. He has to deal with that every single time.” McIlroy missed the point. If all that commotion costs Woods two shots to the field, what does it cost the players with him? Right now, nothing. Without spectators, has Woods lost an advantage he once had? “Absolutely,” Woods replied. "Anyone who has played in front of thousands of people, it is very different. That's always been one of the things I've become accustomed to. The guys who played with me, who haven't become accustomed to it, they have only experienced one round here and there. That's been every round I've played for over two decades. “That advantage — for me, and some of the other top players — trying to deal with all that noise and the movement, that experience is no longer there.” Nick Faldo touched on this when he was discussing the 10-year anniversary of Woods winning the 1997 Masters, a watershed moment in golf. Faldo said that when he slipped the green jacket on Woods that Sunday, he thought the Masters would be the only major he could win. Sure, Augusta National suited his game. “But also because the Masters was the only major that the media was kept outside the ropes,” Faldo said. "And I thought that was going to be his biggest challenge. Now it’s his greatest asset. Everyone joining him now on the weekend at a major goes into his world. That’s Tiger’s arena. Other guys will step into that arena one week and go back out. He’s there all the time. And good luck coming into his world.” It's a new world for everyone now. It's especially different for Woods, not so much for some of the players paired with him. For the less accomplished players who always wondered what it was like to be in his shoes, the absence of spectators has allowed Woods to see what it's like to be in theirs......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 26th, 2020

James, Davis power Lakers past Trail Blazers for 2-1 lead

By BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. (AP) — LeBron James had 38 points, 12 rebounds and eight assists, Anthony Davis scored 12 of his 29 points in the fourth quarter, and the Los Angeles Lakers beat the Portland Trail Blazers 116-108 on Saturday night (Sunday morning in the Philippines) for a 2-1 lead in the Western Conference first-round series. The Lakers shut down the high-scoring Blazers for the second straight game after the No. 1 seed was knocked off in Game 1. This was Portland's highest-scoring performance in the series and it wasn't close to good enough. Damian Lillard scored 34 points despite a dislocated left index finger and CJ McCollum added 28 for the Trail Blazers. They will try to even the series in Game 4 on Monday. Portland was down only three with about 9 1/2 minutes left. But Davis then re-entered and started scoring from everywhere, turning lob passes into dunks or stepping outside for jumpers. The Lakers' defense handled the rest, limiting the Blazers to just three field goals over more than seven minutes as they pushed the lead to 109-98 with a little more than 2 minutes to go. Carmelo Anthony added 20 points in his first good game of the series. He was 4 for 17 in the first two games and he started Game 3 with seven straight misses before making his eighth — by tipping in his own miss. The Blazers made a lineup change, inserting Hassan Whiteside to play alongside Jusuf Nurkic in a big starting five. The unit got Portland off to a good start and the Blazers nursed the early lead all the way through the second quarter without ever really stopping James, who was 5 for 6 for 15 points in eight minutes in the period. But McCollum capped his 13-point period with a 3-pointer from the corner at the buzzer, making it 57-53. James and Kentavious Caldwell-Pope combined for 12 straight points to send the Lakers from six down to a 70-64 lead. The Blazers came right back behind Anthony, who made three straight jumpers before a dunk on the break tied it at 72. The Lakers surged back ahead with a 10-0 burst that made it 89-78 and they led by seven entering the fourth. TIP-INS Lakers: Caldwell-Pope had 13 points. ... Davis missed four of his five free throw attempts in the opening minutes and finished 7 for 14. Trail Blazers: Nurkic scored 10 points. ... The Blazers were outrebounded 55-38. MISSING COLLINS Portland coach Terry Stotts said Zach Collins (left ankle stress reaction) was still in the bubble but didn't know for how long. The forward separated his left shoulder in October but returned to play in the seeding and play-in games before having to be shut down because of the ankle. “As much as we miss him, I just feel bad for him because he had put so much work into being ready for this,” Stotts said. “And because of the hiatus it gave him the opportunity to play this season, which we weren’t sure he was going to be able to have if there was no hiatus. So it looked like things were lining up well for him so it’s really disappointing for him.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

2020 NBA Champion doesn t deserve dreaded 'asterisk'

Take your asterisk and file it somewhere else. For former NBA champion Glen Rice, the winner of the 2020 NBA title will be a deserving one. It certainly shouldn't be subject to to any asterisks even as the NBA season was postponed for months due to the COVID-19 pandemic. If anything, the season delay and the fact that NBA teams had to be subjected inside the bubble for the duration of the playoffs plus an additional eight seeding games makes this year's champion all the more celebrated. "When you have what's going on around everyone, trying to maintain a safe lifestyle in the bubble, at the same time staying aware of what's going on outside the bubble and the nuances that can go as far as COVID creeping in there, if you can get champion out everything that's going on that's really easy to distract you from basketball, I think that's a huge plus for these guys," Rice said in an interview set up by NBA Philippines. "That just goes to show you how determined and focused they were," he added. The 2020 NBA Champion will be one of the few crowned during a season where teams played less than then 82 regular season games. The 2012 Miami Heat and 1999 San Antonio Spurs won their respective titles during lockout-shortened seasons. Still, those teams don't deserve asterisks shouldn't they? Do the 2019 Raptors deserve an asterisk because Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson were injured in the last two games of the Finals? Do the mid-1990s Houston Rockets deserve an asterisk because Michael Jordan chose to play baseball? Each NBA champion will be unique in their own way, Rice says there should be no reason why the 2020 NBA winner should be looked at any differently just because of the current world circumstances. "I think you will see a lot of people saying something different, perhaps having that asterisk. But I think more importantly, people need to realize is that this is different and I'm talking about in a positive way," he said. "This is something that we've never seen in sports. To crown a champion in this environment right now, I think that says a lot about the players and coaches who go out there and do what they gotta do," Rice added. The 2020 NBA playoffs tip off Monday (Tuesday in Manila) with the Milwaukee Bucks and the Los Angeles Lakers leading the East and West, respectively. The Bucks open round 1 against the Orlando Magic while the Lakers battle the Portland Trail Blazers. Defending champion Toronto Raptors take on the Brooklyn Nets while the Boston Celtics meet the Philadelphia 76ers. The Indiana Pacers and the Miami Heat complete the East bracket. In the Western Conference, the no. 2 Los Angeles Clippers open things up against the Dallas Mavericks. The Denver Nuggets take on division rival Utah Jazz while the Houston Rockets and the Oklahoma City Thunder duke it out in a best-of-7.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 17th, 2020

Jason Day continues recent improvement with early PGA lead

By JIMMY GOLEN AP Sports Writer Jason Day is on a pretty good run for a guy who hasn’t won a tournament in two years. The 32-year-old Australian has finished in the top 10 in three straight tournaments heading into this week’s PGA Championship in San Francisco. Day, who won the PGA in 2015 for his only major victory, was the leader in the clubhouse midway through Thursday’s opening round after shooting a 5-under-par 65 at the 7,251-yard TPC Harding Park. “I feel like the momentum that I’ve had over the last three starts has kind of seeped into this week,” Day said. ”The funny thing is that every day I’m excited to go back to the golf course and play. Whereas before I was struggling to get up, and going, ’Oh, do I want to kind of put myself through this again?' “To be honest, I’m excited to get out and play every week now.” Day won the 2015 PGA at Whistling Straits and was runner up the next year at Baltusrol during a two-year period in which he claimed eight tour victories and spent 51 weeks as the No. 1 player in the world. But he hasn't seriously contended in a major since and has won just two tour events — the last in 2018. Struggling with a back injury that forced him to skip the Presidents Cup in Australia in December, Day fell out of the top 50 for the first time in 10 years after missing the cut at the Colonial in June, the first tournament back after the coronavirus shutdown. To shake things up, he parted ways last month with longtime coach Colin Swatton, who had been guiding his game — and his life — since taking Day in as a rambunctious 12-year-old whose father had died. Something clicked for Day in Ohio last month, when he finished tied for seventh and fourth in back-to-back weekends at Muirfield Village. Next was a six-place finish in Memphis. “I finally had enough of feeling sorry for myself, and it’s easy to do that in this game because it is so mentally tough. You can start blaming everything else but yourself,” Day said. “Sometimes you’ve just got to pull your pants up and just move on, you know.” A handful of golfers flirted with 5 under on Thursday, but Day was the only one who made it stick. He played bogey-free golf, and moved into the lead with a 6-foot birdie putt on his last hole, the 515-yard, par-4 ninth, which had been the second-hardest hole on the course over the morning round. “I feel like the game is slowly coming around,” he said. “The confidence is coming around because I’m starting to see the results.” ___ More AP golf: apnews.com/tag/apf-Golf.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 7th, 2020

There are things that are beyond our control… and it’s totally okay

CEBU CITY, Philippines— Growing up, you come to realize that you can’t really control most of the things that are happening around you. We think we got it all planned out. But then all of a sudden, it gets out of our control. Can you feel the frustration there? Read: The beauty of living in […] The post There are things that are beyond our control… and it’s totally okay appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 4th, 2020

Family kept Trina Guytingco going during COVID-19 scare

First, the bad news. Last Wednesday, Trina Guytingco's COVID-19 test from two weeks ago came back positive. The Ateneo de Manila University playmaker said so herself in the latest episode of So She Did. "About three weeks ago, I attended a basketball (camp) in Vegas. I spent three days with a whole bunch of women, just playing basketball," she shared. She then continued, "A couple of days later, I started feeling sick. Then I received news that one of my teammates (from the camp) tested positive." Not long after, Guytingco was feeling the effects of the virus herself. "I started to have fever, a really bad headache, a sore throat, loss of appetite, and just a lot of body aches," she said. The 22-year-old never thought she was going to be at the wrong end of the continuing COVID-19 crisis. After all, she never failed to look out for their health. "Prior to that, I was very cautious with everything I was doing - wearing a mask, washing my hands, practicing social distancing," she said. Even so, she was far from safe and secure for when lady luck didn't smile upon her. Guytingco does not know for sure when, where, and how exactly she contracted COVID-19. What's certain is that after the basketball camp, she was not well and good. As she put it, "For me, it felt like I worked out the whole day even if I was literally in bed the whole day. I was exhausted and my body was just hurting and aching everywhere." Even worse, the 5-foot-7 guard's mind was in the same state as the body. "It was just very nerve-racking. I didn't know what was about to happen so it just messes with your head," she said. She then continued, "It was a very rough week for me. There were days when you think you're going to be fine, but there were days you think why did this happen to me?" Now, the good news. Guytingco is with her family in their home in Pleasant Hill, California. And of course, they are doing their best to make her feel better - just as she's doing her best not to make them feel worse. "Even before the test results, I treated myself like I was positive and my family treated me like I was positive. I was just in my room for a whole two weeks," she said. While she was waging war with the virus, her family wore masks and disinfected anywhere and everywhere she was - even inside their home. Her mom was also on top of things - making sure she took medicine and vitamins as well as ginger tea with cinnamon for her sore throat. And the even better news? Trina Guytingco is doing much, much better now. "I've been feeling amazing," she said, while also sharing that her latest rapid test result came last Thursday and it was negative. Still, she says she will keep staying safe. "We still don't know how much (worse) this virus can get. I don't know when I'm 'safe' already so we're just hoping I keep getting better," she said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2020

Lessons we learn from being left behind

    CEBU CITY, Philippines— How does it feel to get left behind? Painful, right? But even with this painful reality, we have to admit that, one way or another, we learned a thing or two about people leaving us. Reliving this kind of heartbreak will make us realize the things we never did before. […] The post Lessons we learn from being left behind appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 21st, 2020

Once upon a time, Big Ben Mbala wasn t that big

Ben Mbala's first choice was Ateneo de Manila University rather than De La Salle University. Long before the UAAP archrivals, however, San Beda University apparently had its sights set on the Cameroonian powerhouse. "The funny thing is, I also talked to San Beda," he said in the inaugural episode of The Prospects Pod. According to Mbala, aside from Southwestern University, where he eventually ended up, the Red Lions also showed interest in him. Back then, though, he felt that he was far from prepared for the big time. "I wasn't that tall yet. I wasn't that big yet. I was still growing from like 6-4 or 6-5. It didn't feel right," he recalled. And so, Mbala decided to first grow into his body and then toughen it up in CESAFI. "I was really skinny back in SWU and I'm not going to say it was easy in Cebu. People might think that I just went there and did my thing, but no," he shared. He then continued, "I was just the backup to Justin Aboude and he competed with [June Mar] Fajardo so I still had to prove myself." Not long after, Aboude, a 6-foot-6 Cameroonian, got sidelined - and the player to be known as "Big Ben" had to fill in his shoes. "That was the time I had to step up. I had more playing time and got to do more stuff. Just like that, things were able to happen for me," he said. Indeed, from that point, "Big Ben" became "Big Ben" and actually only became bigger and bigger. Through it all, he made sure that he was being as good a student as he was an athlete. "In the beginning of all this, of course, I didn't know about (the Philippines) and I didn't even know if my family will just let me fly out and be away from home. Finally, I convinced my mom when I told her I wasn't going to stop studying," he narrated. He then continued, "Her main concern was me focusing on my studies. She was like, 'You can go anywhere you want as long as you continue studying.'" Mbala did just that and did nothing but make his mama proud. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 17th, 2020

PBA: Ginebra s solution to no Slaughter? More of Stanley Pringle

Without Greg Slaughter, Barangay Ginebra's campaign in the PBA was dealt with a huge blow. Slaughter's sudden sabbatical back in February came as a shock for the Gin Kings and it will surely be a different dynamic for Ginebra the next time the team takes the court in the PBA, whenever that is. Regardless, the Gin Kings will have to figure things out and part of the adjustment is to unleash Stanley Pringle and pair him with Japeth Aguilar. "We still have a lot of weapons," Ginebra coach Tim Cone said on Coaches Unfiltered. "We have Stanley. Stanley is somebody who is still very much exploring how to best use his talent and where he fits. There's a lot to still find out about him," coach Tim added. While Pringle ended up winning his first PBA title with Ginebra last season, he's only been with the Gin Kings for less than two full conferences. Stanley was acquired in a trade with Northport in the middle of last year's Commissioner's Cup where the team lost in the semifinals to TNT. By the Governors' Cup, Ginebra was back as champions after taking down Meralco in the Finals. [Related: PBA: Pringle relishes "special" PBA title with Ginebra] Aside from Pringle, Cone says Ginebra will cope up without Slaughter by giving larger roles for their crew of younger players. "We feel very good about our young guys, some of our younger veterans in Aljon Mariano, of course Art Dela Cruz," Cone said. "Then our young rookies, we have a lot of fate in Arvin Tolentino, I like Arvin's game. It's just a matter of whether we could get him to our culture and get him turned on playing how we want him to play," coach Tim added. [Related: Greg Slaughter signs with same agent as Nikola Jokic] Slaughter, who recently signed with the same agent as that of Nikola Jokic of the Denver Nuggets, is a huge loss for the Barangay. But the Gin Kings will be alright. "We'll make up for Greg in other ways. It's gonna be tough because he can be a force at times and it's real tough having something ripped away from you like that without having being given anything in return," Cone said. "But we'll find ways to replace him, maybe a little more Japeth, a little bit more of Stanley," coach Tim added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 15th, 2020